ECS2 anglais rentrée 2015 ( PDF

Commentaires

Transcription

ECS2 anglais rentrée 2015 ( PDF
Devoirs de Vacances ECS 2
Hello,
Tout d’abord, voici mon adresse email :
[email protected]
Essayez de prendre contact avec moi si vous avez des questions sur n’importe quoi. Je vais
certainement vous envoyer des documents à lire ou à visionner dès le mois d’août, donc j’aurai
besoin de votre adresse email. Sinon, suivez les instructions ci-dessous !
1. Lire autant que possible en anglais. Ce qui veut dire, des nouvelles, des articles de journaux
et, si certains se sentent courageux, des livres. Pour ce qui est des journaux, privilégier
http://www.guardian.co.uk
http://www.independent.co.uk/
http://www.frontpagestoday.co.uk/
http://www.nytimes.com/
http://www.washingtonpost.com/
2. Regarder des films en anglais. N’importe quoi, pourvu que ce soit en anglais. De préférence
sans sous-titres. Si vous ne savez pas quoi regarder,
http://www.film4.com/features/article/50-films-to-see-before-you-die
3. Apprendre par cœur les listes de vocabulaire. Vous aurez à répondre à des questions dès la
rentrée.
4. Faire les sujets ci-dessous. A rendre dès le premier cours de septembre !
5. Vous reposer. Un peu tout de même.
6. Revenir nous voir en septembre. Souriant. Et prêt à démarrer- pied au plancher !
ECONOMY Vocabulary
a free-market economy
increase, rise
share
supply and demand
boom / boost
bond
a state-run economy
slump
quotation
a subsidy
decrease
a shareholder
the domestic/ home market
recovery
broker
bring under state control
be in the doldrums
stockbroker
subsidize
exchange rates
golden boy
state-owned
steady
portfolio
growth
unsteady
a rising market
junk bonds
clinch a deal
supplier
insider trading
make sth profitable
wholesaler
to float / go to the market
/be quoted
go bankrupt
retailer
businesslike
a supply chain
thriving
warehouse
slack
Invoice
profit-making
takings
profitable
overheads
a merger
assets
subsidiary
liabilities
head office
slash prices
department
competition
the board
challenger
shareholders
market share
chairman
bid / tender
managing director
gain, grab a market share
manager
corner the market
head of department
storm
staff
trade barrier
accountant
(customs) tariffs
a favourable trade balance
cost-conscious
commercial traveller / sales
representative
miserly
downsizing
a tycoon
corporate identity
a medium-sized business
run, manage
turnover
merge
profit
hire/ take on / recruit
lose business
shopkeeper
soar/ rocket
peak
plummet
a safe
gold bullion / an ingot
deposit
withdrawal
overdraft
rubber cheque
loan
mortgage
repayment
default
save up
borrow money
loan/lend money
extravagant
an adverse trade balance
trade surplus / deficit
blockade
protect, shelter
survey
sample
market gap
brand image
retail price
a launch
available
price range
loyalty
disposable
price list
consumer goods
throwaway
price tag
loss-maker
ecological / green /ecofriendly
good value for money
domestic appliances
white goods
brown goods
staple goods,
commodities
packaging
faulty
up-market
down-market
trendy
second-hand
high street prices
bargain
a coupon / a voucher
a trial – offer
build consumer loyalty
ETHICS Vocabulary
a feat
uphold a principle
a widow / a widower
a breakthrough
the elderly
sympathy
achieve sthg
a pensioner
the undertaker
chance upon
an old people’s home
a shroud
devise
bedridden
a coffin
active euthanasia
life expectancy
the burial
mercy-killing
life span
cremation
long for death
a hearing aid
ashes
carry out euthanasia
dentures
to pass away
switch off a machine
to retire
breathe one’s last
death panels
to take early retirement
bury
brain dead
to postpone retirement
offer one’s sympathy
artificial insemination
ramble
make a will
a test-tube baby
lapse into 2nd childhood
the cult of youth
stem cell research
to dote
an anti-wrinkle cream
a guinea pig
able-bodied
plastic surgery
cloning
greying
hair transplant
tamper with
the deceased
everlasting
the Hippocratic oath
the late
timeless
a code of ethics
a corpse
the after-life
a ban on
bereavement / mourning
to sell one’s soul to the devil
legislate
the bereaved / the mourner
clone
citizen
mutual understanding
fellow-feeling
tactfulness
open-mindedness
a friendly society
altruism / selflessness
well-meaning
push for change
self-denial
gallant / gentlemanly
press for a demand
good breeding
freedom of worship
lawful
a socialite
freedom of assembly
peacemaker
banter, small talk
legitimacy
goodwill mission
break the ice
abide by the law
foster a relationship with
behave well
enforce the law
entertain people
defend the weak
HUMAN RIGHTS Vocabulary
a dictator
arbitrary
dictatorship
summary
crackdown
mass killing
a death squad
ethnic cleansing
to fear
internment
suffering
an uprooted person
to abuse/violate
bondage
to silence/gag
enslavement
interrogate
a slave trader
to maim/mutilate
to enslave
to cripple
to reduce to slavery
frightened
be in shackles/in fetters
submissive
Sujet Anglais BCE 2011 LV2 Traductions
Le mardi 17 mai 2011.
Sujet Anglais BCE 2011 LV2 Traductions
TRADUCTION DU FRANÇAIS EN ANGLAIS
À mon réveil, ma mère et le docteur Cousin, notre médecin de famille, se trouvaient à mon
chevet. Comme par miracle, la fièvre était tombée, et le docteur, se voulant rassurant,
diagnostiqua une simple indigestion. Malgré tout, ma mère demeurait sceptique, et
commença alors entre eux la rituelle discussion qu’ils aimaient avoir à chacune de ses visites.
« Vous êtes trop angoissée, chère madame Crémer, votre fils a dû faire quelques excès, il a
peut-être pris froid le long de la Seine, peut-être aussi est-il un peu fatigué, les jeunes
artistes ont les nerfs fragiles, et puis... Dieu sait tout ce qu’il ne vous raconte pas... Demain il
sera en pleine forme.
– J’espère que vous ne vous trompez pas, docteur, mais je peux vous assurer que je n’ai
jamais vu cet enfant dans l’état d’hier soir... J’ai bien failli vous appeler dans la nuit.
– Votre fils n’est plus un enfant, chère madame Crémer. »
Bruno Crémer, Un certain jeune homme
TRADUCTION DE L’ANGLAIS EN FRANÇAIS
Mr. Jones lived in the room next to mine. My room was the smallest in the house, his the
largest, a nice big sunshiny room, which was just as well, for Mr. Jones never left it : ail his
needs, meals, shopping, laundry, were attended to by the middle-aged landladies. Also, he
was not without visitors; on the average, a half-dozen various persons, men and women,
young, old, in-between, visited his room each day, from early morning until late in the
evening. He was not a drug dealer or a fortune-teller; no, they came just to talk to him and
apparently they made him small gifts of money for his conversation and advice. If not, he
had no obvious means of support.
I never had a conversation with Mr. Jones myself, a circumstance I’ve often since regretted.
He was a handsome man, about forty. Slender, black-haired, and with a distinctive face; a
pale, lean face, high cheekbones, and with a birthmark on his left cheek, a small scarlet
defect shaped like a star. He wore gold-rimmed glasses with pitch-black lenses: he was blind,
and crippled too according to the sisters, the use of his legs had been denied him by a
childhood accident, and he could not move without crutches.
Truman Capote, Music for Chameleons
Sujet Anglais LV2 IENA 2011
Le mardi 17 mai 2011.
Sujet Anglais LV2 IENA 2011
Cutting out the middlemen
When the workers in the City of London head home each evening, a hidden legion of
homeless people shuffles out of the shadows to reclaim their territory. The Square Mile has
more rough sleepers than any other London borough except Westminster: 338 were
identified by Broadway, a charity, over the past year, most of whom had spent more than a
year on the streets. Policymakers have long struggled to find ways to shift such people, some
of whom take deluded pride in their chaotic circumstances, resist offers to come in from the
cold and suffer from severe drug, drink or mental-health problems (sometimes all three).
Broadway tried a brave and novel approach: giving each homeless person hundreds of
pounds to be spent as they wished.
According to a new report on the project by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, a think-tank,
it worked - a success that might offer broader lessons for public-service reform and
efficiency. The charity targeted the longest-term rough sleepers in the City, who had been
on the streets for between four and 45 years (no mean achievement when average life
expectancy for the long-term homeless is 42). Instead of the usual offers of hostel places,
they were simply asked what they needed to change their lives.
One asked for a new pair of trainers and a television; another for a caravan on a travellers’
site in Suffolk, which was duly bought for him. Of the 13 people who engaged with the
scheme, 11 have moved off the streets. The outlay averaged £794 per person. [...] None
wanted their money spent on drink, drugs or bets. Several said they co-operated because
they were offered control over their lives rather than being “bullied” into hostels. Howard
Sinclair of Broadway explains: “We just said, ‘It’s your life and up to you to do what you want
with it, but we are here to help if you want.”
This was only a small-scale pilot project -though its results have been echoed by others
elsewhere in Britain- but it underlines the importance of risk-taking in the provision of public
services. In this case, although finance directors (and many voters) might balk at buying the
homeless caravans, the savings should outweigh the costs. Some estimates suggest the state
spends £26,000 annually on each homeless person in health, police and prison bills.
The scheme also reinforces the view that handing control to the users of public services,
even in unlikely circumstances, can yield better results. It is perhaps the most radical
application yet of “personalised budgets", increasingly used in Britain for the disabled and
chronically ill. [. . .]
The Economist Nov 4th 2010
I. VERSION (sur 20 points)
Traduire le titre et à partir de “When the workers ...” jusqu’à “...as they wished”. (De la ligne
1 jusqu’à la ligne 8)
II. QUESTIONS (sur 40 points)
1. Question de compréhension du texte.
What recent experiment has been carried out in England to deal with homelessness?
(150 mots + ou - 10%* ; sur 20 points)
2. Question d’expression personnelle.
Public help, individual generosity or both? Which approach would you support to help those
in need?
(250 mots + ou - 10% * ; sur 20 points)
* Le non-respect de ces normes sera sanctionné. Indiquer le nombre de mots utilisés.
III. THÈME (sur 20 points)
1. Les cinq meilleurs chercheurs du pays ont été convoqués par le premier ministre.
2. Les résultats économiques de l’année écoulée sont bien meilleurs que prévu.
3. La plupart des gens prétendent faire preuve d’honnêteté.
4. Le Prince de Galles donne de moins en moins de conférences.
5. Quoi qu’on en dise, les frais de scolarité doivent être augmentés.
6. ll y a encore cinq meubles à descendre, puis nous pourrons aller chercher les bagages.
7. Cela faisait quinze ans qu’on n’avait pas vu de telles inondations.
8. Il faudrait qu’il fasse réparer son lave-vaisselle dès que possible.
9. On dit de cette voiture qu’elle est la plus économique jamais produite.
10. En dépit des difficultés que connaît la croissance, l’économie du pays demeure stable.
Exercices de grammaire. Les temps verbaux
Mettre ces phrases à la forme interrogative :
1. It took them a lot of time
2. They went to the cinema
3. They taught him to play golf
Construire des phrases selon le modèle suivant: I was eating my dinner when he called round.
4. She (to watch TV) when the telephone (to ring)
5. I (to dream) about my holidays when the alarm (to ring)
6. They (to travel) in Ireland when the earthquake (to occur)
Transformer les phrases selon le modèle suivant: They are talking (+over an hour)
talking for over an hour
7.
8.
9.
10.
They have been
He knows my sister (+ ten years)
We are learning English (+ eight years)
He is handsome (+always)
They are married (+ fifteen years)
Mettre le verbe au preterite ou au present perfect
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Look ! I ….. a new dress ( to buy)
Ireland ….. a republic since 1922 (to be)
The police ….. the man last night (to catch)
The police ….. the murderer ( to arrest + not yet)
He ….. three accidents since the beginning of the year, he ….. one yesterday (to have)
Traduire
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
Je me demandais quelle heure il était quand les cloches de l’église sonnèrent 5 heures
Est-ce quelqu’un a vu le dernier Tarantino ?
Je suis allé en Irlande la semaine dernière. Quand je suis arrivé il pleuvait.
Nous nous connaissons depuis 20 ans. Nous nous sommes rencontrés à l’université
Avez-vous déjà mangé des escargots ? Oui, j’en ai mangé en Bretagne
Il est en prison depuis un mois. Je suis allé le voir hier
Polly est ravie, elle vient de réussir son permis de conduire
Il vient de téléphoner
Elle venait de frapper à la porte quand William est apparu derrière elle
Aviez-vous déjà traduit des phrases de ce type avant de venir ici ?
J’ai perdu mon portefeuille
C’est la quatrième fois qu’il échoue
Il se plaint depuis qu’il est rentré à l’école
Elle rêvasse depuis qu’il lui a téléphoné
Je me suis souvent demandé d’où elle tirait son argent
Traduire en anglais
1. Quel temps fait-il ? Il pleut, comme toujours en Irlande
2. Sois prudent, ne tombe pas dans la piscine. Elle est profonde de 3 mètres
3. Quel est la longueur de ta voiture ? Elle est 4m 50 de long
4. Combien de salles de cinéma y a-t-il à Marseille ?
5. Il n’y aura pas assez de jus d’orange pour tout le monde
6. Que font les petits français le jour de Pâques ?
7. Presque personne en Irlande n’a vu l’éclipse. Il y avait beaucoup trop de nuages
8. Je n’ai pas sommeil, mais j’ai vraiment très faim
9. Nous avions 10 minutes de retard, et eux aussi
10. Je n’arrive pas à ouvrir la fenêtre. Peux-tu m’aider ?
11. Il se peut qu’il y ait une grève des professeurs la semaine prochaine
12. Vous deviez vous demander pourquoi je n’avais pas répondu à votre mél
13. Le concert a été une grande réussite. Il devait y avoir au moins 500 personnes
14. Il se peut qu’il ait été retardé par la manifestation en ville
15. Le problème était très difficile. Personne n’a pu le résoudre
16. Tu es très fatigué. Il faut que tu ailles te coucher tout de suite
17. Il y a eu trois cambriolages dans ce village depuis le début du mois
18. Avez-vous pu traduire toutes les phrases ?
19. Quel âge avais tu quand tes parents sont partis en Australie ? Je n’avais que 8 ans
20. Elle ne boit presque jamais de l’alcool
21. Vous pouvez vous asseoir. Vous n’avez pas besoin de rester debout
22. Il ne nous a pas entendus. Il doit toujours être en train de dormir
23. J’aurais dû acheter un billet de la loterie. J’aurais pu gagner un dictionnaire d’anglais
24. Il n’utilise pas souvent son vélo. Tu pourrais lui demander de te le prêter
25. Ils auraient pu au moins nous inviter à leur mariage

Documents pareils

Devoirs de Vacances ECS 2 ECONOMY Vocabulary

Devoirs de Vacances ECS 2 ECONOMY Vocabulary One asked for a new pair of trainers and a television; another for a caravan on a travellers’ site in Suffolk, which was duly bought for him. Of the 13 people who engaged with the scheme, 11 have m...

Plus en détail