What Is the Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients After

Commentaires

Transcription

What Is the Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients After
What Is the Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients After Acute
Coronary Syndromes?
Relationship of Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in the Pravastatin
or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy–Thrombolysis in
Myocardial Infarction (PROVE IT-TIMI) 22 Trial
Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA; Jie Qin, MS; Sarah Sloan, MS; Sabina A. Murphy, MPH;
Christopher P. Cannon, MD; for the PROVE IT-TIMI 22 Trial Investigators
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Background—Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been advocated in patients with acute coronary syndrome, but
few data exist in this population relative to cardiovascular outcomes.
Methods and Results—We evaluated 4162 patients enrolled in the PRavastatin Or atorVastatin Evaluation and Infection
Therapy–Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (PROVE IT-TIMI) 22 trial (acute coronary syndrome patients
randomized to pravastatin 40 mg versus atorvastatin 80 mg). The average follow-up BP (systolic and diastolic) was
categorized into 10-mm Hg increments. The primary outcome was a composite of death due to any cause, myocardial
infarction, unstable angina requiring rehospitalization, revascularization after 30 days, and stroke. The secondary
outcome was a composite of death due to coronary heart disease, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or revascularization.
The relationship between BP (systolic or diastolic) followed a J- or U-shaped curve association with primary, secondary,
and individual outcomes, with increased events rates at both low and high BP values, both unadjusted and after
adjustment for baseline variables, baseline C-reactive protein, and on-treatment average levels of low-density
lipoprotein cholesterol. A nonlinear Cox proportional hazards model showed a nadir of 136/85 mm Hg (range 130 to
140 mm Hg systolic and 80 to 90 mm Hg diastolic) at which the incidence of primary outcome was lowest. The curve
was relatively flat for systolic pressures of 110 to 130 mm Hg and diastolic pressures of 70 to 90 mm Hg.
Conclusions—After acute coronary syndrome, a J- or U-shaped curve association existed between BP and the risk of future
cardiovascular events, with lowest event rates in the BP range of approximately 130 to 140 mm Hg systolic and 80 to
90 mm Hg diastolic and a relatively flat curve for systolic pressures of 110 to 130 mm Hg and diastolic pressures of 70
to 90 mm Hg, which suggests that too low of a pressure (especially ⬍110/70 mm Hg) may be dangerous.
Clinical Trial Registration—URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00382460.
(Circulation. 2010;122:2142-2151.)
Key Words: blood pressure 䡲 hypertension 䡲 prognosis 䡲 acute coronary syndrome
Subsequently, a BP of ⬍120/80 mm Hg has been considered
“optimal”4 or “normal.”3
D
ata from observational studies involving more than 1
million individuals without preexisting vascular disease
have indicated that deaths due to both ischemic heart disease
and stroke increase progressively and linearly with blood pressure (BP).1 Consequently, the notion that “lower is better”2 has
been popular for management of hypertension. The Seventh
Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure states,
“The relationship between BP and risk of cardiovascular events
is continuous, consistent, and independent of other risk factors.”3
Clinical Perspective on p 2151
However, this linear theory has been challenged for nearly
3 decades, especially for diastolic pressure.5– 8 Physiologically, a J- or U-shaped curve phenomenon would be expected to
exist in vital components such as BP and other biological
systems, with an increased mortality exhibited at both ends of
the spectrum. The linear relationship might hold true for the
Received September 1, 2009; accepted September 2, 2010.
From the New York University School of Medicine (S.B.), New York, NY, and TIMI Study Group (J.Q., S.S., S.A.M., C.P.C.), Brigham and Women’s
Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
Guest Editor for this article was Bernard R. Chaitman, MD.
Presented in part at the Annual Scientific Session of the American College of Cardiology, Orlando, Fla, March 30, 2009.
Reprint requests to Dr Christopher P. Cannon, TIMI Study Group, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 350
Longwood Ave, First Floor, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail [email protected]
© 2010 American Heart Association, Inc.
Circulation is available at http://circ.ahajournals.org
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.905687
2142
Bangalore et al
J- or U-Shaped Curve for Blood Pressure After ACS
general population, but in patients with stable coronary artery
disease, the relationship between BP and cardiovascular
outcomes has been shown in some studies to follow a J- or a
U-shaped curve, with higher event rates at very low and very
high BP.5,7,9 –14 However, this is controversial. The Seventh
Report of the Joint National Committee states, “There is no
definitive evidence of an increase in risk of aggressive
treatment (a J-curve) unless the diastolic BP is lowered to
⬍55 or 60 mm Hg by treatment.”3 In the American Heart
Association scientific statement on “Treatment of Hypertension in the Prevention and Management of Ischemic Heart
Disease,” a target of ⬍130/80 mm Hg has been recommended in patients at high risk of coronary artery disease and
acute coronary syndromes (ACS), but it was acknowledged
that there were limited data to support this recommendation.15
We aimed to analyze what data exist for the target range of
BP in patients after ACS.
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Methods
Patient Population and Study Design
We analyzed patients enrolled in the PRavastatin Or atorVastatin
Evaluation and Infection Therapy–Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (PROVE IT-TIMI) 22 trial16,17 which was an international,
multicenter, randomized, double-blind, 2⫻2 factorial design trial of
men or women at least 18 years old hospitalized with ACS (either
myocardial infarction [MI], with or without ST-segment elevation, or
high-risk unstable angina) in the preceding 10 days who were
randomly assigned to receive pravastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80
mg once daily and to receive gatifloxacin or placebo. The protocol
required that the baseline total cholesterol level be ⬍240 mg/dL in
statin-naive patients or ⬍200 mg/dL in patients previously given a
statin. Patients were managed with standard medical and interventional treatment for ACS.
Follow-Up
Patients were followed up for 18 to 36 months (average 24 months),
with visits at 30 days, 4 months, and every 4 months thereafter. At
each visit, vital signs and information on clinical end points, adverse
events, and concurrent medication use were collected. During each
visit, BP was recorded, and blood samples were collected and
analyzed at a central laboratory. BP management was at the
discretion of the treating physician.
For the present analysis, average follow-up systolic and diastolic
pressures were calculated for each patient by use of all postbaseline
results up to the last visit before the date of primary outcome or the
end of follow-up in those patients without events. The baseline value
was substituted for patients with no postbaseline data. The risk of
cardiovascular outcomes was then evaluated as a function of BP.
Study Outcomes
Primary and secondary outcomes measures in the present analysis
were the same as for the main PROVE IT-TIMI 22 trial.16,17 The
primary outcome was the time from randomization to the first
occurrence of death due to any cause, MI, documented unstable
angina requiring hospitalization, revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft performed more than 30 days after randomization, and stroke. The
secondary outcome was a composite of death due to coronary heart
disease, nonfatal MI, or revascularization after 30 days. Tertiary
outcomes consisted of all-cause mortality, death due to coronary
heart disease, and nonfatal MI considered as separate outcomes.
Statistical Analyses
BP values were categorized in 10-mm Hg increments for association
with clinical outcomes. Patient groups were compared by 1-way
2143
analysis of variance (ANOVA) or Kruskal-Wallis rank test for
continuous variables and ␹2 test for categorical variables.
The decision to use the average on-treatment follow-up BP category
was based on the following: We created separate models (unadjusted
and adjusted) using baseline pressure, follow-up pressure, and average
on-treatment follow-up pressures and calculated the predictive value of
the models using the concordance index (C statistic). The end of
follow-up (adjusted C statistic of 0.62 for systolic BP and 0.63 for
diastolic BP) and average follow-up pressure variables (adjusted C
statistic of 0.62 for systolic and 0.63 for diastolic BP) were higher than
those for the baseline BP variables (adjusted C statistic of 0.60 for
systolic and 0.60 for diastolic pressure), which suggests a higher
predictive value than with the baseline BP variables. Because the
average follow-up BP variable represents the effect of pressure over a
period of time rather than at 1 point in time, we considered this to be
more important for prediction of long-term events and used this for the
rest of the analyses. However, we performed similar modeling (for
events) with baseline pressure variables. We hypothesized that if a J- or
U-shaped relationship was found with both baseline and average
follow-up BP variables and outcomes, it was likely due to reverse
causality (with low BP being a mere marker of ill health). If, however,
a J- or U-shaped relationship was found with average follow-up BP but
not at baseline, the BP itself was more likely to contribute to increased
events at follow-up.
Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to
assess the risk of outcomes for each 10-mm Hg increment in BP.
Multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed that
included BP category as the major factor, with adjustment for age,
sex, smoking, baseline body mass index, history of hypertension,
diabetes mellitus, history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery,
coronary angioplasty, angina pectoris, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, heart failure, arrhythmia, baseline
C-reactive protein level, average follow-up low-density lipoprotein
levels, and treatment effect. This was done for the whole cohort and
for the 2 treatment groups separately in accordance with the
intention-to-treat principle. The adjusted hazard ratio for each
category of systolic or diastolic BP was calculated in reference to the
systolic BP group in which the event rate was lowest (nadir BP
calculated by the delta method as outlined below), for which the
hazard ratio was considered as 1.
In addition, nonlinear Cox proportional hazards models were
estimated with mean BP as a continuous variable and with the square
of BP. Unadjusted hazard ratios were calculated on the basis of
univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis that included BP and
BP squared only. Adjusted hazard ratios were calculated on the basis
of multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis that included the
major predictors BP and BP squared adjusted for the confounding
variables listed previously. Overall BP effects were examined on the
basis of a likelihood ratio test that compared a full model that
included both linear and quadratic mean BP terms plus other
covariates (in adjusted analysis only) and a reduced model without
the linear and quadratic mean BP terms. Nadir BP was calculated on
the basis of the delta method, which is equal to the coefficient of the
linear term divided by ⫺2 times the coefficient of the quadratic term.
Furthermore, interactions between treatments by mean BP and BP
squared were examined on the basis of the likelihood ratio test by
comparison of a full model that included both linear and quadratic
mean BP terms plus treatment plus other covariates (in adjusted
analysis) versus a reduced model without the 2 interaction terms.
A P value of ⬍0.05 was considered statistically significant for all
tests. All analyses were performed with Stata software version 9.2
(College Station, Tex).
Results
Patients
A total of 4162 patients who had been hospitalized for an
ACS within the preceding 10 days were randomized to
pravastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg per day. The main
results of the trial have been discussed elsewhere.17
2144
Circulation
November 23, 2010
Table 1.
Demographic and Baseline Characteristics by Mean Systolic BP Categories
Mean Systolic BP During Follow-Up, mm Hg
Parameter
⬍100
(n⫽65)
⬎100
to ⱕ110
(n⫽370)
⬎110
to ⱕ120
(n⫽985)
⬎120
to ⱕ130
(n⫽1182)
⬎130
to ⱕ140
(n⫽878)
⬎140
to ⱕ150
(n⫽399)
⬎150
to ⱕ160
(n⫽158)
⬎160
(n⫽63)
P*
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Age, mean (SD), y
56.5 (11.7) 54.5 (9.9)
54.4 (10.4) 57.8 (11.0) 61.0 (10.8)
63.2 (10.8) 62.5 (11.0) 67.2 (11.0)
0.0001
Men, n (%)
51 (68.9)
323 (85.2)
820 (82.2)
951 (79.4)
657 (74.6)
297 (73.5)
113 (70.2)
38 (57.6) ⬍0.0001
White, n (%)
69 (93.2)
347 (91.6)
924 (92.7) 1098 (91.6)
786 (89.2)
361 (89.6)
132 (82.0)
57 (86.4)
0.001
BMI, mean (SD), kg/m2
26.8 (6.1)
28.2 (4.9)
29.1 (5.6)
29.5 (5.6)
30.3 (5.7)
29.8 (5.8)
31.7 (7.5)
29.2 (6.1)
0.0001
Never smoked, n (%)
20 (27.0)
93 (24.5)
226 (22.7)
299 (25.0)
252 (28.6)
121 (29.9)
48 (29.8)
26 (39.4)
0.003
Hypertension, n (%)
20 (27.0)
84 (22.2)
323 (32.4)
588 (49.1)
562 (63.8)
315 (78.0)
137 (85.1)
61 (92.4) ⬍0.0001
Diabetes mellitus, n (%)
9 (12.2)
36 (9.5)
115 (11.5)
206 (17.2)
191 (21.7)
102 (25.2)
53 (32.9)
21 (31.8) ⬍0.0001
FH of CAD, n (%)
43 (59.7)
173 (47.4)
503 (52.7)
618 (54.3)
436 (53.6)
200 (52.5)
69 (46.9)
30 (51.7)
0.251
MI, n (%)
7 (9.5)
54 (14.2)
159 (15.9)
231 (19.3)
164 (18.6)
101 (25.0)
38 (23.6)
14 (21.2) ⬍0.0001
CABG, n (%)
6 (8.1)
34 (9.0)
69 (6.9)
134 (11.2)
119 (13.5)
60 (14.8)
20 (12.4)
11 (16.7) ⬍0.0001
Angioplasty, n (%)
13 (17.8)
75 (19.8)
215 (21.6)
329 (27.5)
262 (30.0)
140 (35.0)
54 (34.0)
23 (34.8) ⬍0.0001
Angina pectoris, n (%)
13 (18.3)
73 (19.4)
198 (20.1)
258 (21.9)
188 (21.8)
101 (25.5)
55 (34.4)
19 (28.8)
0.002
Peripheral vascular disease, n (%)
5 (6.8)
16 (4.2)
39 (3.9)
53 (4.4)
62 (7.0)
37 (9.2)
18 (11.2)
10 (15.1) ⬍0.0001
CHF, n (%)
1 (1.3)
15 (4.0)
20 (2.0)
31 (2.6)
32 (3.6)
23 (5.7)
11 (6.9)
3 (4.5)
0.002
Arrhythmia, n (%)
0 (0.0)
21 (5.6)
45 (4.5)
83 (7.0)
69 (7.9)
43 (10.7)
7 (4.4)
6 (9.1) ⬍0.0001
Prior stroke/TIA, n (%)
3 (4.0)
5 (1.3)
37 (3.7)
63 (5.3)
55 (6.2)
31 (7.7)
20 (12.4)
9 (13.6) ⬍0.0001
Chronic renal failure, n (%)
0 (0.0)
24 (6.4)
80 (8.1)
93 (7.8)
82 (9.3)
69 (17.1)
18 (11.3)
6 (9.1) ⬍0.0001
Baseline heart rate, mean
71.6 (13.5) 69.2 (11.9)
68.9 (11.1) 69.5 (12.1) 69.3 (12.1)
69.3 (12.6) 70.2 (12.8) 68.2 (12.6)
0.8096
(SD), bpm
Baseline LDL-C, mean (SD), mg/dL 105.2 (30.4) 111.9 (31.3) 110.5 (29.9) 108.4 (29.7) 106.4 (29.8) 105.6 (30.8) 107.8 (29.0) 106.2 (29.9)
0.0172
Baseline TG, mean (SD), mg/dL
155.9 (67.2) 172.6 (173.2) 177.8 (84.1) 179.8 (99.9) 180.8 (101.2) 176.2 (92.1) 165.1 (79.1) 163.1 (83.7)
0.0111
Baseline HDL-C, mean (SD), mg/dL 38.6 (10.4) 39.0 (10.1)
38.8 (10.3) 40.0 (11.0) 40.8 (11.1)
40.9 (10.3) 41.9 (12.9) 44.5 (14.2)
0.0001
Baseline CRP, mean (SD), mg/dL
3.01 (4.35) 2.65 (3.22)
2.15 (2.79) 2.19 (2.92) 2.45 (3.13)
2.61 (3.33) 2.64 (3.08) 2.74 (3.69)
0.0037
Aspirin, n (%)†
20 (27.0)
86 (22.7)
298 (30.0)
431 (36.0)
338 (38.4)
178 (44.1)
71 (44.1)
28 (42.4) ⬍0.0001
ACEi/ARB, n (%)†
11 (14.9)
50 (13.2)
139 (14.0)
276 (23.0)
245 (27.8)
165 (40.8)
69 (42.9)
41 (62.1) ⬍0.0001
CCB, n (%)†
6 (8.1)
24 (6.3)
103 (10.3)
184 (15.4)
182 (20.7)
120 (30.1)
52 (32.3)
23 (34.8) ⬍0.0001
␤-blocker, n (%)†
10 (13.5)
52 (13.7)
182 (18.3)
284 (23.7)
259 (29.4)
134 (33.2)
57 (35.4)
26 (39.4) ⬍0.0001
BMI indicates body mass index; FH, family history; CAD, coronary artery disease; MI, myocardial infarction; CABG, coronary artery bypass graft surgery; CHF,
congestive heart failure; TIA, transient ischemic attack; LDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; TG, triglycerides; HDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; CRP,
C-reactive protein; ACEi, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor; ARB, angiotensin receptor blocker; and CCB, calcium channel blocker.
*P values are based on 1-way analysis of variance for continuous variables (ie, age, BMI, and LDL-C) and Pearson’s ␹2 test for the remaining categorical variables.
†Baseline medication usage 2 weeks before qualifying event before randomization.
Baseline Characteristics
Tables 1 and 2 show baseline characteristics by systolic and
diastolic pressure categories, respectively. Patients with low
systolic pressure were a lower-risk cohort who were more likely
to be younger, male, leaner, and to have never smoked; they
were less likely to have risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, prior
MI, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, angioplasty, peripheral
arterial disease, heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack,
or chronic renal failure); and they had lower levels of baseline
low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol/triglycerides but higher levels of baseline C-reactive
protein than patients with high systolic pressure (Table 1). In
contrast, patients with low diastolic pressure were older and
more likely to be female and hypertensive and to have prior
coronary artery bypass graft surgery, heart failure, and peripheral
arterial disease than patients with high diastolic pressure.
BP and Primary Outcome
Among the 4162 patients, 1000 (24%) reached the primary
outcome. The relationship between systolic pressure and the
incidence of primary outcome followed a J- or U-shaped
shaped curve, with an increased event rate at low and high
systolic pressures (Figure 1A). After adjustment for baseline
covariates, treatment effect, baseline C-reactive protein, and
average on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, compared with the reference group (BP ⬎130 to
140 mm Hg), the risk of primary outcome increased 4.9-fold
in the group with systolic BP ⱕ100 mm Hg and by 1.2-fold
in the group with systolic BP ⬎160 mm Hg (Figure 1A). A
nonlinear Cox proportional hazards model with systolic
pressure on a continuous scale (␹2⫽49, P⬍0.0001) identified
a nadir of 136 mm Hg at which the event rate was the lowest.
This was true for the overall cohort (Figure 1A) and separately for the 2 treatment cohorts (data not shown). The J- or
U-shaped relationship was more pronounced with average
follow-up BP than with baseline BP variables (Figure 1B).
The relationship between diastolic pressure and the incidence
of primary outcome also followed a J- or U-shaped curve, with
increased event rates at low and high diastolic pressures (Figure
1C). After adjustment for baseline covariates and for treatment
Bangalore et al
Table 2.
J- or U-Shaped Curve for Blood Pressure After ACS
2145
Demographic and Baseline Characteristics by Mean Diastolic BP Categories
Mean Diastolic BP, mm Hg
ⱕ60
(n⫽123)
⬎60 to ⱕ70
(n⫽907)
⬎70 to ⱕ80
(n⫽2049)
⬎80 to ⱕ90
(n⫽947)
⬎90 to ⱕ100
(n⫽115)
⬎100
(n⫽18)
P*
61.7 (11.8)
76 (61.8)
114 (92.7)
28.0 (6.1)
24 (19.5)
57 (46.3)
30 (24.4)
62 (53.0)
35 (28.5)
20 (16.3)
44 (36.1)
30 (25.0)
15 (12.2)
11 (9.0)
4 (3.2)
9 (7.3)
9 (7.3)
70 (12)
107.3 (33.7)
153.5 (59.7)
42.5 (12.9)
2.99 (4.29)
44 (35.8)
38 (30.9)
17 (13.8)
33 (26.8)
60.3 (11.9)
690 (76.1)
834 (91.9)
28.4 (5.4)
231 (25.5)
352 (38.8)
156 (17.2)
441 (51.6)
174 (19.2)
122 (13.4)
237 (26.2)
223 (24.9)
75 (8.3)
46 (5.1)
74 (8.2)
49 (5.4)
84 (9.3)
69 (12)
107.0 (30.6)
172.3 (129.2)
40.4 (11.3)
2.44 (3.12)
319 (35.2)
171 (18.8)
156 (17.2)
209 (23.0)
58.0 (11.2)
1602 (78.2)
1873 (91.4)
29.4 (5.5)
512 (25.0)
975 (47.6)
364 (17.8)
1014 (52.4)
359 (17.5)
221 (10.8)
535 (26.2)
424 (21.0)
108 (5.3)
57 (2.8)
131 (6.4)
106 (5.2)
171 (8.4)
69 (12)
108.4 (29.1)
178.0 (95.1)
39.8 (10.6)
2.32 (2.95)
717 (34.5)
463 (22.6)
313 (15.3)
458 (22.4)
56.7 (10.1)
770 (81.3)
851 (89.9)
30.7 (5.9)
276 (29.1)
591 (62.4)
157 (16.6)
491 (54.6)
171 (18.1)
79 (8.3)
257 (27.3)
196 (21.0)
34 (3.6)
19 (2.0)
60 (6.4)
49 (5.2)
93 (9.9)
70 (12)
109.6 (31.3)
183.1 (98.4)
39.8 (10.8)
2.28 (3.06)
331 (34.9)
271 (28.6)
180 (19.0)
269 (28.4)
54.4 (10.4)
97 (84.3)
87 (76.3)
32.1 (7.3)
33 (28.7)
98 (85.2)
23 (20.0)
56 (52.3)
26 (22.6)
10 (8.7)
33 (29.2)
27 (23.9)
8 (7.0)
2 (1.7)
4 (3.5)
7 (6.1)
11 (9.6)
72 (11)
113.2 (30.2)
175.2 (81.5)
40.3 (11.1)
2.50 (3.10)
44 (38.3)
42 (36.5)
22 (19.1)
28 (24.3)
54.9 (11.5)
15 (83.3)
14 (77.8)
30.3 (5.4)
8 (44.4)
17 (94.4)
3 (16.7)
7 (50.0)
3 (16.7)
1 (5.6)
5 (27.8)
5 (27.8)
0 (0.0)
1 (5.6)
1 (5.6)
2 (11.1)
4 (22.2)
73 (15)
103.4 (27.7)
228.9 (188.1)
38.2 (9.7)
1.46 (1.78)
4 (22.2)
11 (61.1)
6 (33.3)
7 (38.9)
0.0001
⬍0.0001
⬍0.0001
0.0001
0.030
⬍0.0001
0.393
0.812
0.049
0.004
0.282
0.207
⬍0.0001
⬍0.0001
0.157
0.786
0.280
0.022
0.198
0.010
0.274
0.180
0.842
⬍0.0001
0.041
0.006
Parameter
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Age, mean (SD), y
Men, n (%)
White, n (%)
BMI, mean (SD), kg/m2
Never smoked, n (%)
Hypertension, n (%)
Diabetes mellitus, n (%)
FH of CAD, n (%)
MI, n (%)
CABG, n (%)
Angioplasty, n (%)
Angina pectoris, n (%)
Peripheral vascular disease, n (%)
CHF, n (%)
Arrhythmia, n (%)
Prior stroke/TIA, n (%)
Chronic renal insufficiency, n (%)
Baseline heart rate, mean (SD), bpm
Baseline LDL-C, mean (SD), mg/dL
Baseline TG, mean (SD), mg/dL
Baseline HDL-C, mean (SD), mg/dL
Baseline CRP, mean (SD), mg/dL
Aspirin, n (%)†
ACEi/ARB, n (%)†
CCB, n (%)†
␤-blocker, n (%)†
Abbreviations as in Table 1.
*P values are based on 1-way analysis of variance for continuous variables (ie, age, BMI, and LDL-C) and Pearson’s ␹2 test for the remaining categorical variables.
†Baseline medication usage 2 weeks before qualifying event before randomization.
effect, compared with the reference group (BP ⬎80 to
90 mm Hg), the risk of primary outcome increased 3.7-fold in
the group with diastolic BP ⱕ60 mm Hg and 2.1-fold in the
group with diastolic BP ⬎100 mm Hg (Figure 1C). A nonlinear
Cox proportional hazards model with diastolic BP on a continuous scale (␹2⫽52, P⬍0.0001) identified a nadir of 85 mm Hg
at which the event rate was the lowest (Figure 1C). This was true
for the overall cohort (Figure 1C) and separately for the 2
treatment cohorts (data not shown). The J- or U-shaped relationship was more pronounced with average follow-up BP than with
baseline BP variables (Figure 1D).
BP and Secondary Outcome
Among the 4162 patients, 856 (21%) patients reached the
secondary outcome. A similar J- or U-shaped relationship
with secondary outcome was found for both systolic (␹2⫽37,
P⬍0.0001; Figure 2A) and diastolic (␹2⫽47, P⬍0.0001;
Figure 2C) pressure in both the unadjusted and adjusted
models, with a nadir at 137/84 mm Hg. However, as with the
primary outcome, the J- or U-shaped relationship was more
pronounced with average follow-up BP variables than with
baseline BP variables (Figure 2B and 2D).
BP and Tertiary Outcomes
Among the 4162 patients, 119 (2.9%) died; 53 (1.3%) of
these were cardiovascular deaths, 260 (6.2%) had a nonfatal
MI, and 40 (0.96%) had a stroke. A J- or U-shaped relationship was found for both systolic (␹2⫽10, P⫽0.007; Figure
3A) and diastolic (␹2⫽11, P⫽0.0007; Figure 3C) pressure
with all-cause mortality in both the unadjusted and adjusted
models. The J- or U-shaped relationship was found with
average follow-up BP variables but not with baseline BP
variables (Figure 3B and 3D). A J- or U-shaped relationship
with cardiovascular mortality was also found for both systolic
(␹2⫽6, P⫽0.041; Figure 4A) and diastolic (␹2⫽14,
P⫽0.0007; Figure 4C) pressure in both the unadjusted and
adjusted models. The J- or U-shaped relationship was found
with average follow-up BP variables but not with baseline BP
variables (Figure 4B and 4D). Similarly, a J- or U-shaped
relationship with nonfatal MI was found for both systolic
(␹2⫽26, P⬍0.0001; Figure 5A) and diastolic (␹2⫽24,
P⬍0.0001; Figure 5C) pressure in both the unadjusted and
adjusted models, with a nadir at 134/84 mm Hg. The J- or
U-shaped relationship was found with average follow-up BP
variables but not with baseline BP variables (Figure 5B and 5D).
2146
Circulation
November 23, 2010
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Figure 1. BP and primary outcome. A, Incidence and adjusted risk of primary outcome as a function of average follow-up systolic BP
categories. B, Adjusted risk of primary outcome as a function of baseline or average follow-up systolic BP categories. C, Incidence and
adjusted risk of primary outcome as a function of average follow-up diastolic BP categories. D, Adjusted risk of primary outcome as a
function of baseline or average follow-up diastolic BP categories. DBP indicates diastolic BP; SBP, systolic BP; and HR, hazard ratio.
All of the above relationships were true for the overall cohort
and separately for the 2 treatment cohorts (data not shown).
The event rate for stroke (0.96%) was too small to derive
any meaningful relationship between BP and stroke. The
incidence ratio of nonfatal MI to stroke remained constant for
a wide range of BPs; however, at lower diastolic pressures,
the incidence of nonfatal MI was much higher than the
incidence of stroke, which implies that a compromised
coronary circulation resulting from low diastolic pressures
could be a more important factor for MI than for stroke.
Sensitivity Analysis
To evaluate the effect of pulse pressure, we performed a
sensitivity analysis that controlled for it. The results were
unchanged when the analysis was repeated after controlling
for pulse pressure (data not shown). We also evaluated the
joint distribution of systolic and diastolic pressures in a
number of ways. There was only a modest correlation
between the 2 variables (r⫽0.58, 95% CI⫽0.56 to 0.60). The
mean diastolic pressures for each systolic pressure category
(Figure 1A) showed no distribution of higher diastolic pres-
sures for low systolic categories and vice versa; the same was
true for diastolic BP categories (Figure 1C). In a model
designed to predict whether the risk of events was higher in
those with low systolic pressure or diastolic pressure or in
those with both low systolic and diastolic pressures, the test
for interaction was not significant, and the risk of events was
comparable for all 3 categories.
Discussion
The present analysis of a high-risk post-ACS population enrolled
in the PROVE IT-TIMI 22 trial showed that a J- or U-shaped
relationship existed between BP and the risk of cardiovascular
outcomes such that there was an exponential increase in event
rates at high and low BP values. The relationship was true for
both systolic and diastolic BP. The analyses identified a BP nadir
of 136/85 mm Hg at which the event rate was the lowest;
however, the curve was relatively flat for systolic pressures of
110 to 130 mm Hg and diastolic pressures of 70 to 90 mm Hg.
A BP ⬍110/70 mm Hg was associated with an increased risk of
cardiovascular events, which suggests that a BP that is too low
indentifies a subset of patients with poor prognosis.
Bangalore et al
J- or U-Shaped Curve for Blood Pressure After ACS
2147
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Figure 2. BP and secondary outcome. A, Incidence and adjusted risk of secondary outcome as a function of average follow-up systolic BP
categories. B, Adjusted risk of secondary outcome as a function of baseline or average follow-up systolic BP categories. C, Incidence and
adjusted risk of secondary outcome as a function of average follow-up diastolic BP categories. D, Adjusted risk of secondary outcome as a
function of baseline or average follow-up diastolic BP categories. SBP indicates systolic BP; HR, hazard ratio; and DBP, diastolic BP.
Shifting Paradigm of Intensive BP Management
BP and the J-Curve Phenomenon
In patients treated for hypertension, guidelines recommend a
target of ⱕ140/90 mm Hg, with lower targets (ⱕ130/
80 mm Hg) for special populations such as those with diabetes,
renal impairment, or coronary artery disease.3,18,19 However, the
evidence to support a lower BP target is not robust. In the Action
to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes BP trial,20 there was
no reduction in the rate of fatal and nonfatal major cardiovascular outcomes with intensive management (target systolic
pressure ⬍120 mm Hg) compared with a standard target of
⬍140 mm Hg among high-risk persons with type 2 diabetes
mellitus. Similarly, in a Cochrane meta-analysis of 7 randomized
trials, Arguedas et al21 showed no difference in cardiovascular
morbidity and mortality with intensive BP management (target
ⱕ135/85 mm Hg) compared with standard targets (ⱕ140 to
160/ⱕ90 to 100 mm Hg).
The results of the present analyses extend the above observation to the highest-risk cohort, those with established coronary
artery disease after ACS, and suggests not only a flat curve for
BP 110 to 130/70 to 90 mm Hg but also a higher risk of
cardiovascular events at lower pressures. This suggests that the
paradigm of “lower is better” in cardiovascular medicine is not
applicable to BP control beyond a certain target.
The J- or U-shaped curve phenomenon with BP has been
explored for more than 3 decades. Most of the prior studies
were retrospective analyses or post hoc analyses of randomized trials of hypertensive cohorts. In patients without known
coronary artery disease, the existence of a J- or U-shaped
curve has not been shown consistently. Stewart8 showed a Jor U-shaped relationship for MI and cardiovascular death
with a nadir at a diastolic pressure of 100 to 109 mm Hg. The
Australian National BP Trial22 echoed these findings, with a
nadir at 85 to 89 mm Hg of diastolic pressure. Conversely, an
analysis of the International Prospective Primary Prevention
Study in Hypertension trial failed to show a J- or U-shaped
curve.23 More recently, an analysis of the Hypertension
Optimal Treatment trial showed a J-shaped curve for both
systolic and diastolic pressure for cardiovascular death, with
a nadir at 139/86 mm Hg,24 similar to the nadir of 137/
84 mm Hg shown in the present study. A meta-analysis of
individual patient data from 7 randomized trials showed a Jor U-shaped curve for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality,
with a nadir at 156/84 mm Hg. However, in a recent randomized trial of nondiabetic hypertensive subjects, tight control of
BP (mean 132/77 mm Hg) was associated with a significant
2148
Circulation
November 23, 2010
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Figure 3. BP and all-cause mortality. A, Incidence and adjusted risk of all-cause mortality as a function of average follow-up systolic BP categories. B, Adjusted risk of all-cause mortality as a function of baseline or average follow-up systolic BP categories. C, Incidence and
adjusted risk of all-cause mortality as a function of average follow-up diastolic BP categories. D, Adjusted risk of all-cause mortality as a
function of baseline or average follow-up diastolic BP categories. SBP indicates systolic BP; HR, hazard ratio; and DBP, diastolic BP.
reduction in cardiovascular events compared with usual
control (mean 136/79 mm Hg).25 Of note, the above studies
enrolled very few or no patients with known coronary artery
disease.
The optimal BP for patients with coronary artery disease,
especially post-ACS patients, is not well defined. A recent
American Heart Association statement suggests a target of
⬍130/80 mm Hg in this cohort.15 Insights from the Comparison of Amlodipine versus Enalapril to Limit Occurrences of
Thrombosis study (CAMELOT), which enrolled patients with
“normal” BP (baseline 129/78 mm Hg), appear to suggest
that further BP reduction might be beneficial26; however, the
optimal target is less well defined. Few studies have evaluated the J- or U-shaped curve phenomenon in patients with
hypertension and coronary artery disease. Cruickshank et al5
showed a J-shaped relationship between cardiovascular death
and diastolic BP, but only in patients with known coronary
artery disease, with a nadir at 85 to 90 mm Hg. Similarly, data
from the Framingham Heart Study also showed a J- or U-shaped
relationship for cardiovascular mortality, but only in patients
with prior MI.27 In the International Verapamil-SR Trandolapril
study of 22 576 patients with hypertension and coronary artery
disease, a J- or U-shaped relationship was shown between BP
and cardiovascular outcomes,7 and the relationship was stronger
in patients without prior angioplasty, which suggests that patients with prior angioplasty tolerated low diastolic pressures
better than those without. In the recently published Ongoing
Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global
End-Point Trial (ONTARGET) of patients with atherosclerotic
disease or diabetes with organ damage, a J- or U-shaped
relationship with cardiovascular mortality and MI was shown for
both systolic and diastolic pressure.28
The present data are concordant with prior studies showing
a J- or U-shaped relationship; however, the present study
differs from prior studies in many respects. Unlike the prior
studies in hypertensive cohorts, the present study is a post hoc
analysis of patients after ACS. Unlike other hypertension
studies, the treatment of hypertension and the choice of
medications were left to the discretion of the managing
physician. The present study also showed that the degree of
statin therapy did not mitigate the J- or U-shaped curve
phenomenon. The J- or U-shaped relationship persisted after
we controlled for baseline C-reactive protein and average
on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.
Pathophysiological Mechanisms for
J-Curve Phenomenon
Several “pathophysiological” mechanisms have been proposed to explain the existence of a J- or U-shaped curve. The
Bangalore et al
J- or U-Shaped Curve for Blood Pressure After ACS
2149
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Figure 4. BP and cardiovascular mortality. A, Incidence and adjusted risk of cardiovascular mortality as a function of average follow-up
systolic BP categories. B, Adjusted risk of cardiovascular mortality as a function of baseline or average follow-up systolic BP categories. C, Incidence and adjusted risk of cardiovascular mortality as a function of average follow-up diastolic BP categories. D, Adjusted
risk of cardiovascular mortality as a function of baseline or average follow-up diastolic BP categories. SBP indicates systolic BP; HR,
hazard ratio; CV, cardiovascular; and DBP, diastolic BP.
results of the present analyses can be explained by any these
mechanisms either singly or in combination. It has been
hypothesized that the J- or U-shaped curve may be an
epiphenomenon of more severe underlying chronic illness
(including cancer) or underlying severe cardiac illness (like
heart failure), thereby increasing mortality. However, only
1% to 5% of patients in the present study had a history of
heart failure at baseline, with a lower percentage in those with
lower systolic BP. In addition, the J- or U-shaped relationship
between BP (both systolic and diastolic) and outcomes persisted
even after we controlled for baseline covariates. Moreover, the
results are from data derived from a randomized trial in which
patients with debilitating illness (for example, advanced cancer
with a survival of ⬍2 years) are excluded. In addition, if the Jor U-shaped curve were due to reverse causality (low BP
variables being a mere marker of ill health), the relationship
should have been seen with both baseline and average follow-up
BP variables. In our analyses, the J- or U-shaped relationship
was found with average on-treatment BP variables but not at
baseline, which suggests that decreased BP per se might be a
contributor to the increased events. However, other unmeasured
indicators of poor health were not taken into consideration in the
present analysis.
The J- or U-shaped curve may represent an epiphenomenon of
increased arterial stiffness, and thus, a low diastolic BP might be
a marker for high pulse pressure and an increase in mortality.29
In our analyses, we noticed a J- or U-shaped curve phenomenon
not just for diastolic but also for systolic BP, for which the pulse
pressure theory would not be applicable.
A low diastolic BP may compromise coronary perfusion
in subjects with coronary heart disease, because coronary
perfusion occurs in diastole. In the present analysis, all
patients were post-ACS patients, and the incidence ratio of
nonfatal MI to stroke increased at low diastolic pressures,
which emphasizes that at low BP, MI is more likely than
stroke. This can be explained by impaired coronary perfusion and is a more likely explanation given that we
observed a more pronounced J- or U-shaped curve effect
with follow-up BP variables than with baseline BP variables. However, the present study does not prove a causal
relationship between low pressure (either systolic or diastolic) and an increased risk of events, although the
differential effect on outcomes between baseline and
follow-up BP values appears to suggest that a low BP
might be causally related to outcomes.
2150
Circulation
November 23, 2010
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
Figure 5. BP and nonfatal myocardial infarction. A, Incidence and adjusted risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction as a function of average follow-up systolic BP categories. B, Adjusted risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction as a function of baseline or average follow-up
systolic BP categories. C, Incidence and adjusted risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction as a function of average follow-up diastolic BP
categories. D, Adjusted risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction as a function of baseline or average follow-up diastolic BP categories. MI
indicates myocardial infarction; SBP, systolic BP; HR, hazard ratio; and DBP, diastolic BP.
Study Limitations
The present study was a post hoc analysis that evaluated the
relationship between BP and cardiovascular events in a coronary
artery disease population with tight control of cholesterol levels,
and hence, the results cannot be extrapolated to other populations. We did not adjust our analyses for all possible confounders, especially those that are predictors of poor health, such as
socioeconomic status, job stress, and mental health. We also did
not adjust our analyses for dosage of antihypertensive agents
received. Finally, therapies that reduce systolic BP usually
reduce diastolic pressure as well, which makes it difficult to
determine precisely whether differences in event rates observed
at the lower range were caused by reduced systolic or diastolic
BP or their combination.
Conclusions
In post-ACS patients, a J- or U-shaped curve association
existed between BP and the risk of future cardiovascular
events, with the lowest event rates in the BP range of
approximately 130 to 140/80 to 90 mm Hg and a relatively
flat curve for pressures of 110 to 130/70 to 90 mm Hg, which
suggests that too low of a pressure (especially ⬍110/
70 mm Hg) may be dangerous. Thus, although our data
generally support the “lower is better” approach, this only
goes so far. The present findings provide support for the
Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee’s guideline
recognition of a possible increased risk when diastolic pressures are lowered to ⬍60 mm Hg. Our findings are consistent
with a recent randomized trial20 and a large observational
study30 in stable patients that showed no benefit of more
intensive BP management (beyond standard lowering of
systolic BP to ⬍140 mg/dL) but also extend the observation
to a high-risk group of post-ACS patients.
Sources of Funding
PROVE IT-TIMI 22 was supported by a research grant from
Bristol-Myers-Squibb and Sankyo.
Disclosures
Dr Cannon has received research grants/support from Accumetrics,
AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Intekrin Therapeutics, Merck, and
Takeda; has served on advisory boards (but donated the funds
therefrom to charity) for Alnylam, Bristol-Myers Squibb/Sanofi
Partnership, and Novartis; and has received honoraria for independent educational conferences from Pfizer and AstraZeneca; he also
Bangalore et al
J- or U-Shaped Curve for Blood Pressure After ACS
holds an equity interest in Automedics Medical Systems. The
remaining authors report no conflicts.
References
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
1. Lewington S, Clarke R, Qizilbash N, Peto R, Collins R. Age-specific
relevance of usual blood pressure to vascular mortality: a meta-analysis of
individual data for one million adults in 61 prospective studies.
Lancet. 2002;360:1903–1913.
2. Anderson TW. Re-examination of some of the Framingham bloodpressure data. Lancet. 1978;2:1139 –1141.
3. Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, Cushman WC, Green LA, Izzo JL
Jr, Jones DW, Materson BJ, Oparil S, Wright JT Jr, Roccella EJ. The
Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention,
Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC 7
report. JAMA. 2003;289:2560 –2572.
4. The sixth report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention,
Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Arch
Intern Med. 1997;157:2413–2446.
5. Cruickshank JM, Thorp JM, Zacharias FJ. Benefits and potential harm of
lowering high blood pressure. Lancet. 1987;1:581–584.
6. Lindholm L, Lanke J, Bengtsson B, Ejlertsson G, Thulin T, Schersten B.
Both high and low blood pressures risk indicators of death in middle-aged
males: isotonic regression of blood pressure on age applied to data from
a 13-year prospective study. Acta Med Scand. 1985;218:473– 480.
7. Messerli FH, Mancia G, Conti CR, Hewkin AC, Kupfer S, Champion A,
Kolloch R, Benetos A, Pepine CJ. Dogma disputed: can aggressively
lowering blood pressure in hypertensive patients with coronary artery
disease be dangerous? Ann Intern Med. 2006;144:884 – 893.
8. Stewart IM. Relation of reduction in pressure to first myocardial
infarction in patients receiving treatment for severe hypertension. Lancet.
1979;1:861– 865.
9. Protogerou AD, Safar ME, Iaria P, Safar H, Le Dudal K, Filipovsky J,
Henry O, Ducimetiere P, Blacher J. Diastolic blood pressure and mortality in the elderly with cardiovascular disease. Hypertension. 2007;50:
172–180.
10. Kaplan N. J-curve not burned off by HOT study: Hypertension Optimal
Treatment. Lancet. 1998;351:1748 –1749.
11. Weinberger MH. Do no harm: antihypertensive therapy and the “J” curve.
Arch Intern Med. 1992;152:473– 476.
12. Staessen JA. Potential adverse effects of blood pressure lowering: J-curve
revisited. Lancet. 1996;348:696 – 697.
13. Farnett L, Mulrow CD, Linn WD, Lucey CR, Tuley MR. The J-curve
phenomenon and the treatment of hypertension: is there a point beyond
which pressure reduction is dangerous? JAMA. 1991;265:489 – 495.
14. Waller PC, Isles CG, Lever AF, Murray GD, McInnes GT. Does therapeutic reduction of diastolic blood pressure cause death from coronary
heart disease? J Hum Hypertens. 1988;2:7–10.
15. Rosendorff C, Black HR, Cannon CP, Gersh BJ, Gore J, Izzo JL Jr,
Kaplan NM, O’Connor CM, O’Gara PT, Oparil S. Treatment of hypertension in the prevention and management of ischemic heart disease: a
scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council for
High Blood Pressure Research and the Councils on Clinical Cardiology
and Epidemiology and Prevention. Circulation. 2007;115:2761–2788.
2151
16. Cannon CP, McCabe CH, Belder R, Breen J, Braunwald E. Design of the
Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy (PROVE
IT)-TIMI 22 trial. Am J Cardiol. 2002;89:860 – 861.
17. Cannon CP, Braunwald E, McCabe CH, Rader DJ, Rouleau JL, Belder R,
Joyal SV, Hill KA, Pfeffer MA, Skene AM. Intensive versus moderate
lipid lowering with statins after acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med.
2004;350:1495–1504.
18. Williams B, Poulter NR, Brown MJ, Davis M, McInnes GT, Potter JF,
Sever PS, Thom SM. British Hypertension Society guidelines for hypertension management 2004 (BHS-IV): summary. BMJ. 2004;328:
634 – 640.
19. Whitworth JA. 2003 World Health Organization (WHO)/International
Society of Hypertension (ISH) statement on management of hypertension.
J Hypertens. 2003;21:1983–1992.
20. The ACCORD Study Group. Effects of intensive blood-pressure control
in type 2 diabetes mellitus. N Engl J Med. 2010;362:1575– 85.
21. Arguedas JA, Perez MI, Wright JM. Treatment blood pressure targets for
hypertension. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD004349.
22. Untreated mild hypertension: a report by the Management Committee of
the Australian Therapeutic Trial in Mild Hypertension. Lancet. 1982;1:
185–191.
23. The IPPPSH Collaborative Group. Cardiovascular risk and risk factors in
a randomized trial of treatment based on the beta-blocker oxprenolol: the
International Prospective Primary Prevention Study in Hypertension
(IPPPSH). J Hypertens. 1985;3:379 –392.
24. Hansson L, Zanchetti A, Carruthers SG, Dahlof B, Elmfeldt D, Julius S,
Menard J, Rahn KH, Wedel H, Westerling S; HOT Study Group. Effects
of intensive blood-pressure lowering and low-dose aspirin in patients with
hypertension: principal results of the Hypertension Optimal Treatment
(HOT) randomised trial. Lancet. 1998;351:1755–1762.
25. Verdecchia P, Staessen JA, Angeli F, de Simone G, Achilli A, Ganau A,
Mureddu G, Pede S, Maggioni AP, Lucci D, Reboldi G. Usual versus
tight control of systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic patients with
hypertension (Cardio-Sis): an open-label randomised trial. Lancet. 2009;
374:525–533.
26. Nissen SE, Tuzcu EM, Libby P, Thompson PD, Ghali M, Garza D,
Berman L, Shi H, Buebendorf E, Topol EJ. Effect of antihypertensive
agents on cardiovascular events in patients with coronary disease and
normal blood pressure: the CAMELOT study: a randomized controlled
trial. JAMA. 2004;292:2217–2225.
27. D’Agostino RB, Belanger AJ, Kannel WB, Cruickshank JM. Relation of
low diastolic blood pressure to coronary heart disease death in presence
of myocardial infarction: the Framingham Study. BMJ. 1991;303:
385–389.
28. Sleight P, Redon J, Verdecchia P, Mancia G, Gao P, Fagard R, Schumacher H, Weber M, Bohm M, Williams B, Pogue J, Koon T, Yusuf S.
Prognostic value of blood pressure in patients with high vascular risk in
the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global
Endpoint Trial study. J Hypertens. 2009;27:1360 –1369.
29. Kannel WB, Wilson PW, Nam BH, D’Agostino RB, Li J. A likely
explanation for the J-curve of blood pressure cardiovascular risk. Am J
Cardiol. 2004;94:380 –384.
30. Cooper-DeHoff RM, Gong Y, Handberg EM, Bavry AA, Denardo SJ,
Bakris GL, Pepine CJ. Tight blood pressure control and cardiovascular
outcomes among hypertensive patients with diabetes and coronary artery
disease. JAMA. 2010;304:61– 8.
CLINICAL PERSPECTIVE
Although aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been advocated in patients with diabetes and more recently in those
with acute coronary syndromes, recent trials and observational studies in stable diabetic patients have challenged this
concept by finding that more intensive BP lowering was not superior to standard BP lowering. We found in a population
of 4162 post–acute coronary syndrome patients that a J- or U-shaped curve existed between BP and the risk of future
cardiovascular events, with the lowest event rates in the BP range of approximately 130 to 140/80 to 90 mm Hg. Thus, our
findings are consistent with recent studies in stable patients but extend the observation to high-risk post–acute coronary
syndrome patients. As such, this study helps provide evidence that clinicians treating hypertension should aim for a systolic
BP ⬍140 mm Hg but not ⬍110 mm Hg.
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 29, 2016
What Is the Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients After Acute Coronary Syndromes?:
Relationship of Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in the Pravastatin or
Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy−Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction
(PROVE IT-TIMI) 22 Trial
Sripal Bangalore, Jie Qin, Sarah Sloan, Sabina A. Murphy, Christopher P. Cannon and for the
PROVE IT-TIMI 22 Trial Investigators
Circulation. 2010;122:2142-2151; originally published online November 8, 2010;
doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.905687
Circulation is published by the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231
Copyright © 2010 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.
Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539
The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on the
World Wide Web at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/122/21/2142
Data Supplement (unedited) at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2011/12/22/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.905687.DC1.html
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2013/10/17/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.905687.DC2.html
Permissions: Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published
in Circulation can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial
Office. Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located,
click Request Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about
this process is available in the Permissions and Rights Question and Answer document.
Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at:
http://www.lww.com/reprints
Subscriptions: Information about subscribing to Circulation is online at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/
Page 326
Coronaropathies
Quelle est la pression artérielle optimale chez les patients
ayant présenté un syndrome coronaire aigu ?
Relation entre la pression artérielle et le risque d’événement cardiovasculaire
dans l’essai PROVE IT-TIMI 22 (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation
and Infection Therapy-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction )
Sripal Bangalore, MD, MHA ; Jie Qin, MS ; Sarah Sloan, MS ; Sabina A. Murphy, MPH ;
Christopher P. Cannon, MD ; pour les investigateurs de l’essai PROVE IT-TIMI 22
Contexte—Un contrôle agressif de la pression artérielle (PA) est préconisé chez les patients ayant présenté un syndrome
coronaire aigu, mais on ne possède que peu de données sur le pronostic cardiovasculaire de ces sujets.
Méthodes et résultats—Nous avons évalué 4 162 patients inclus dans l’essai PROVE IT-TIMI 22 (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin
Evaluation and Infection Therapy-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction) (patients atteints de syndromes coronaires
aigus randomisés en vue de recevoir quotidiennement 40 mg de pravastatine ou 80 mg d’atorvastatine). Les PA moyennes
(systolique et diastolique) mesurées au cours du suivi ont été stratifiées par paliers successifs de 10 mmHg. L’événement
cible principal regroupait le décès lié à une quelconque cause, l’infarctus du myocarde, l’angor instable ayant imposé la
réhospitalisation du patient, la réalisation d’une intervention de revascularisation au-delà de 30 jours et l’accident
vasculaire cérébral. L’événement cible secondaire combinait le décès secondaire à une pathologie coronaire, l’infarctus
du myocarde non fatal et la réalisation d’une revascularisation. Les liens unissant la PA (systolique ou diastolique) aux
événements cibles primaire et secondaire ainsi qu’à leurs différentes composantes ont décrit une courbe en J ou en U, les
taux d’événements ayant été plus élevés à chacune des extrémités de la fourchette de chiffres tensionnels et ce, aussi bien
en l’absence d’ajustement qu’après avoir ajusté les données en fonction des caractéristiques initiales, du taux de C-réactive
protéine relevé à l’entrée dans l’étude et de la concentration moyenne en cholestérol lié aux lipoprotéines de faible densité
mesurée sous traitement. Un modèle non linéaire de risques proportionnels de Cox a montré que l’incidence de
l’événement cible principal avait été la plus faible lorsque la PA se situait à un nadir de 136/85 mmHg (extrêmes : 130 à
140 mmHg pour la systolique et 80 à 90 mmHg pour la diastolique). La courbe était relativement plate pour les pressions
systoliques comprises entre 110 et 130 mmHg et pour les valeurs diastoliques s’étendant de 70 à 90 mmHg.
Conclusions—Après un syndrome coronaire aigu, la relation entre la PA et le risque d’événement cardiovasculaire suit une
courbe en J ou en U, les plus faibles taux d’événements étant observés pour des chiffres de PA grossièrement compris
entre 130 et 140 mmHg pour la systolique et entre 80 et 90 mmHg pour la diastolique, alors que la courbe est apparue
relativement plate pour les valeurs systoliques comprises entre 110 et 130 mmHg et pour les diastoliques comprises entre
70 et 90 mmHg ; cela tend à indiquer qu’une PA trop basse peut être dangereuse (surtout si elle est inférieure à
110/70 mmHg).
Registre américain des essais cliniques–URL : http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Identifiant unique : NCT00382460.
(Traduit de l’anglais : What Is the Optimal Blood Pressure in Patients After Acute Coronary Syndromes?: Relationship of
Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in the Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection TherapyThrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (PROVE IT-TIMI) 22 Trial. Circulation. 2010;122:2142–2151.)
Mots clés : pression artérielle 䊏 hypertension artérielle 䊏 pronostic 䊏 syndrome coronaire aigu
es données d’études observationnelles ayant porté sur
plus d’un million d’individus sans antécédent d’affection
vasculaire ont montré que les taux de décès par cardiopathie
ischémique et par accident vasculaire cérébral augmentent
de façon linéaire avec l’élévation de la pression artérielle
(PA).1 C’est pourquoi, en matière de prise en charge de
L
Reçu le 1er septembre 2009 ; accepté le 2 septembre 2010.
Faculté de Médecine de l’Université de New York (S.B.), New York, Etats-Unis, et Groupe d’Etude de TIMI (J.Q., S.S., S.A.M., C.P.C.), Brigham and
Women’s Hospital, Faculté de Médecine d’Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts, Etats-Unis.
Le rédacteur en chef invité pour cet article était le Dr Bernard R. Chaitman.
Présenté en partie à l’occasion de la réunion scientifique annuelle de l’American College of Cardiology qui s’est tenue à Orlando (Floride, Etats-Unis)
le 30 mars 2009.
Correspondance : Dr Christopher P. Cannon, TIMI Study Group, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,
350 Longwood Ave, First Floor, Boston, MA 02115, Etats-Unis. E-mail : [email protected]
© 2011 Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Circulation est disponible sur http://circ.ahajournals.org
326
10:01:27:07:11
Page 326
Page 327
Bangalore et al
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
l’hypertension artérielle, l’opinion qui prévaut aujourd’hui
est que « plus la PA est basse et mieux c’est ».2 Le septième
rapport du Joint National Committee on Prevention,
Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure
(commission paritaire américaine pour la prévention, le
dépistage, l’évaluation et le traitement de l’hypertension
artérielle) stipule notamment que « le lien entre la PA et le
risque d’événement cardiovasculaire est continu, constant et
indépendant des autres facteurs de risque ».3 En foi de quoi,
des chiffres tensionnels inférieurs à 120/80 mmHg sont
désormais considérés comme « optimaux » ou « normaux ».3
Toutefois, cela fait près de trente ans que cette vision
linéaire est battue en brèche, en particulier en ce qui concerne
la pression diastolique.5–8 Physiologiquement, on s’attendrait
à ce que les paramètres vitaux tels que la PA et certaines autres
composantes biologiques déterminent une courbe en J ou en
U, la mortalité étant plus élevée à chacune des deux extrémités
du spectre de valeurs. La relation linéaire pourrait demeurer
vraie pour la population générale, mais certaines études ont
montré que, chez les patients atteints d’une maladie coronaire
stable, le lien unissant la PA au risque d’événement cardiovasculaire suit une courbe en J ou en U, les taux d’événements
étant supérieurs lorsque la PA est très basse ou, au contraire,
très élevée.5,7,9–14 Cette notion est toutefois controversée. Dans
le septième rapport du Joint National Committee, il est écrit
qu’« il n’existe aucune preuve formelle qu’un traitement
agressif augmente le risque (cela se traduisant par une courbe
en J) hormis lorsqu’il a pour effet d’abaisser la PA diastolique
en dessous de 55 à 60 mmHg ».3 Dans le rapport scientifique
de l’American Heart Association intitulé « Treatment of
Hypertension in the Prevention and Management of Ischemic
Heart Disease » (traitement de l’hypertension artérielle
dans la prévention et la prise en charge des cardiopathies
ischémiques), il est préconisé d’abaisser les chiffres tensionnels
en-dessous de 130/80 mmHg chez les patients exposés à un
risque élevé de maladie coronaire et de syndrome coronaire
aigu (SCA), mais les auteurs du rapport reconnaissent
néanmoins que cette recommandation ne s’appuie que sur des
données limitées.15 Nous avons donc entrepris de rechercher
les éléments sur lesquels il y avait lieu de s’appuyer pour fixer
l’objectif de PA chez les patients ayant présenté un SCA.
Méthodes
Population et plan d’organisation de l’étude
Nous avons analysé les données des patients ayant participé à l’essai
PROVE IT-TIMI 22 (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and
Infection Therapy-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction [étude
comparative de la pravastatine et de l’atorvastatine et traitement antiinfectieux-Thrombolyse dans l’infarctus du myocarde]),16,17 qui était
une étude multicentrique internationale, randomisée, en double
aveugle et menée sur un mode doublement bifactoriel chez des sujets
des deux sexes âgés d’au moins 18 ans ayant été hospitalisés pour un
SCA (consistant en un infarctus du myocarde [IDM] avec ou sans
sus-décalage du segment ST ou en un angor instable à haut risque)
dans les dix jours ayant précédé leur inclusion et auxquels il avait
été assigné par randomisation un traitement fondé sur la prise
quotidienne de 40 mg de pravastatine ou de 80 mg d’atorvastatine
80 mg et sur l’administration de gatifloxacine ou d’un placebo. Aux
termes du protocole, la cholestérolémie totale à l’entrée dans l’étude
devait être inférieure à 240 mg/dl chez les patients qui n’avaient encore
jamais reçu de statine et à 200 mg/dl chez ceux auxquels un tel
10:01:27:07:11
Page 327
327
médicament avait précédemment été prescrit. Les SCA des patients
ont été pris en charge par les moyens médicaux et interventionnels
classiques.
Suivi
Les patients ont été suivis sur une période de 18 à 36 mois (durée
moyenne : 24 mois), des consultations ayant été programmées au 30ème
jour, au 4ème mois puis tous les 4 mois. Lors de chaque consultation,
les signes vitaux ont été contrôlés et des informations ont été
recueillies sur les événements cibles cliniques, les manifestations
indésirables et la prise de médicaments autres que ceux de l’étude.
Chacune des consultations a également donné lieu à une mesure de la
PA et au recueil d’échantillons sanguins en vue de leur analyse dans
un laboratoire central. La prise en charge de la PA a été laissée à
l’initiative du médecin traitant.
Pour les besoins de la présente analyse, les valeurs moyennes des
pressions systolique et diastolique de suivi ont été calculées pour
chaque patient à partir de la totalité des mesures effectuées depuis la
première consultation ayant suivi l’inclusion jusqu’à celle qui avait
précédé la survenue de l’événement cible principal ou jusqu’au terme
du suivi lorsqu’aucun événement ne s’était produit. Chez les patients
pour lesquels les données postérieures à l’inclusion faisaient défaut, la
valeur retenue a été celle mesurée à l’entrée dans l’étude. Nous avons
ainsi pu évaluer le risque d’événement cardiovasculaire en fonction du
niveau de la PA.
Evénements cibles de l’étude
Les événements cibles principal et secondaire utilisés dans la présente
analyse ont été les mêmes que ceux prédéfinis dans l’étude mère
PROVE IT-TIMI 22.16,17 Le critère de jugement principal a été le délai
écoulé depuis la randomisation jusqu’à la survenue d’un décès lié à
une quelconque cause, d’un IDM, d’un angor instable documenté
imposant l’hospitalisation ou d’un accident vasculaire cérébral ou
jusqu’à la réalisation d’une revascularisation à type d’intervention
coronaire percutanée ou de pontage aorto-coronaire au-delà de
30 jours après la randomisation. L’événement cible secondaire
combinait le décès secondaire à une pathologie coronaire, l’IDM non
fatal et la réalisation d’une revascularisation après 30 jours. Les
événements cibles tertiaires ont été le décès lié à toute cause, le décès
secondaire à une pathologie coronaire et l’IDM non fatal.
Analyses statistiques
Les valeurs de PA ont été stratifiées par paliers successifs de 10 mmHg
afin d’évaluer leur lien avec les événements cliniques. Les groupes de
patients ont été comparés en ayant recours à une analyse de variance
unidirectionnelle (ANOVA) ou à un test des rangs logarithmiques de
Kruskal-Wallis pour les variables continues et à un test du χ 2 pour les
variables qualitatives.
La décision d’utiliser les chiffres tensionnels moyens mesurés sous
traitement au cours du suivi a été prise au vu des éléments suivants :
nous avons conçu des modèles distincts (non ajustés et avec
ajustement) prenant en compte les chiffres de PA respectivement
mesurés à l’entrée dans l’étude et au terme du suivi ainsi que les
valeurs moyennes sous traitement pendant le suivi, puis nous avons
calculé la valeur prédictive de ces modèles en nous fondant sur l’indice
de concordance (statistique c). Les indices de concordance des chiffres
tensionnels de fin de suivi (statistique c après ajustement : 0,62 pour la
PA systolique et 0,63 pour la diastolique) et des valeurs moyennes
relevées au cours de celui-ci (statistique C après ajustement : 0,62 pour
la PA systolique et 0,63 pour la diastolique) ont été supérieurs à celui
obtenu pour la PA initiale (statistique C après ajustement : 0,60 pour
la PA systolique et 0,60 pour la diastolique), ce qui suggérait que les
valeurs prédictives de ces deux mesures étaient supérieures à celle de
la PA enregistrée à l’entrée dans l’étude. Comme la valeur moyenne de
la PA relevée au cours du suivi traduit l’effet exercé par cette dernière
non pas à un moment donné, mais sur toute une période, nous avons
jugé que cette variable était plus fortement prédictive de la survenue
d’événements à long terme et nous l’avons donc utilisée pour la suite
des analyses. Nous avons toutefois élaboré le même type de modèle
Page 328
328
Circulation
Septembre 2011
(relatif au risque d’événement) en nous fondant sur les valeurs de PA
mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude. Nous avons, en effet, considéré que si
une relation à type de courbe en J ou en U était objectivée entre
le risque d’événement et aussi bien les chiffres tensionnels initiaux
que la PA moyenne mesurée au cours du suivi, cela traduirait
vraisemblablement un simple lien de causalité inverse (une PA basse
n’étant que le témoin d’un état de santé médiocre). Si, en revanche,
une relation en J ou en U n’était mise en évidence que pour la seule
PA moyenne de suivi et non pour celle mesurée à l’inclusion,
cela serait davantage en faveur d’une influence directe de la PA sur
l’augmentation d’incidence des événements au cours du suivi.
Une analyse univariée fondée sur la méthode des risques
proportionnels de Cox a été effectuée pour évaluer le risque
d’événement pour chaque augmentation de 10 mmHg de la PA. Une
analyse multivariée utilisant la même approche a également été
réalisée en prenant le niveau de PA comme terme principal et en
pratiquant des ajustements en fonction de l’âge, du sexe, de la
consommation de tabac, de l’indice de masse corporelle à l’entrée
dans l’étude, des antécédents d’hypertension artérielle, de diabète,
de pontage aorto-coronaire, d’angioplastie coronaire, d’angor,
d’affection vasculaire cérébrale, d’artériopathie périphérique,
d’insuffisance cardiaque et de trouble du rythme cardiaque, du taux
initial de C-réactive protéine, de la concentration moyenne en lipoprotéines de faible densité mesurée au cours du suivi et de l’effet
du traitement. Ces analyses ont été pratiquées sur la cohorte totale
et sur chacun des deux groupes de traitement selon le principe
de l’intention de traiter. Pour chaque niveau de PA systolique ou
diastolique, le rapport de risques ajusté a été calculé en prenant
pour référence la tranche de PA systolique dans laquelle le taux
d’événements était le plus faible (nadir de PA calculé par la méthode
du Delta décrite ci-après) et qui a donc été affectée d’un rapport de
risques égal à 1.
Des modèles de risques proportionnels de Cox ont, en outre, été
construits, qui incorporaient la PA moyenne en tant que variable
continue ainsi que le carré de la PA. Les rapports de risques non
ajustés ont été calculés en effectuant une analyse univariée selon
la méthode des risques proportionnels de Cox, laquelle prenait
uniquement en compte la PA et son carré. Les rapports de risques
ajustés ont été estimés à partir d’une analyse multivariée menée selon
la même approche et qui portait sur les principaux facteurs prédictifs,
à savoir la PA et son carré, ajustés en fonction des variables
confondantes mentionnées plus haut. Les effets globaux exercés par
les chiffres tensionnels ont été évalués en effectuant un test du rapport
de vraisemblance dans lequel un modèle exhaustif prenant en compte
à la fois les valeurs linéaires et quadratiques de PA moyenne ainsi
que les autres covariables (uniquement pour l’analyse ajustée) a été
comparé à un modèle de taille réduite dont les valeurs linéaires et
quadratiques de PA moyenne étaient exclues. Le nadir de PA a été
calculé par la méthode du Delta comme étant égal au coefficient du
terme linéaire divisé par –2 fois le coefficient du terme quadratique.
De plus, les interactions entre les traitements et la PA moyenne
et son carré ont été analysées au moyen d’un test du rapport de
vraisemblance en comparant un modèle exhaustif prenant en compte
les valeurs linéaires et quadratiques de PA moyenne, le traitement et
les autres covariables (dans l’analyse ajustée) à un modèle dont les
deux termes d’interaction étaient exclus.
Les valeurs de p inférieures à 0,05 ont été considérés comme
statistiquement significatives pour tous les tests. Les analyses ont
toutes été effectuées avec un logiciel Stata version 9.2 (College
Station, Texas, Etats-Unis).
Résultats
Patients
Au total, 4 162 patients hospitalisés pour un SCA survenu au
cours des 10 jours précédents ont été randomisés en vue de
recevoir quotidiennement 40 mg de pravastatine ou 80 mg
d’atorvastatine. Les principaux résultats de l’étude ont déjà
fait l’objet d’une publication.17
10:01:27:07:11
Page 328
Caractéristiques initiales
Les Tableaux 1 et 2 résument les caractéristiques initiales des
patients en fonction des chiffres de pressions systolique et
diastolique. Les patients dont la pression systolique était
basse formaient une cohorte à faible risque et, comparativement aux sujets qui avaient une pression systolique élevée,
tendaient à être plus jeunes, plutôt de sexe masculin, plus
minces et à n’avoir jamais fumé ; ces patients étaient
également moins enclins à présenter des facteurs de risque
(hypertension artérielle, diabète, antécédents d’IDM, de
pontage aorto-coronaire, d’angioplastie, d’artériopathie
périphérique, d’insuffisance cardiaque, d’accident vasculaire
cérébral ou d’accident ischémique transitoire, insuffisance
rénale chronique) et, à leur entrée dans l’étude, avaient des
taux inférieurs de cholestérol lié aux lipoprotéines de faible
densité, de cholestérol lié aux lipoprotéines de haute densité et
de triglycérides, mais des taux de C-réactive protéine plus
élevés (Tableau 1). A l’inverse, le sous-groupe des patients
qui avaient une faible pression diastolique était plus âgé et
comptait davantage de femmes que celui des sujets ayant une
pression diastolique élevée ; les pourcentages de patients
hypertendus et ayant des antécédents de pontage aortocoronaire, d’insuffisance cardiaque et d’artériopathie
périphérique étaient également plus importants.
Relation entre la PA et l’événement cible principal
Parmi les 4 162 patients, 1 000 (24 %) ont présenté l’événement
cible principal. La relation entre la pression systolique et
l’incidence de ce dernier a décrit une courbe en J ou en U, les
taux d’événements ayant été plus élevés à chacune des
extrémités de la fourchette de valeurs (Figure 1A). Après
ajustement pour tenir compte des covariables initiales, de
l’effet du traitement, du taux de C-réactive protéine à l’entrée
dans l’étude et de la concentration moyenne en cholestérol
lié aux lipoprotéines de faible densité sous traitement,
comparativement au groupe de référence (PA systolique
excédant 130 à 140 mmHg), le risque de survenue de
l’événement cible principal est apparu 4,9 fois plus élevé dans
le sous-groupe dont la PA systolique était égale ou inférieure
à 100 mmHg et 1,2 fois supérieur dans celui dont la PA
systolique dépassait 160 mmHg (Figure 1A). L’application
d’un modèle de risques proportionnels de Cox non linéaire
dans lequel la pression systolique a été analysée selon une
échelle continue (χ 2 = 49 : p <0,0001) a permis de rattacher le
taux d’événements le plus faible à un nadir de 136 mmHg.
Cette observation valait aussi bien pour la cohorte totale
(Figure 1A) que pour chacun des deux groupes de traitement
(données non présentées). La pente de la courbe en J ou en U
s’est, par ailleurs, révélée plus prononcée pour le lien avec la
PA moyenne mesurée au cours du suivi que pour celui avec les
chiffres tensionnels initiaux (Figure 1B).
La relation entre la PA diastolique et l’incidence de
l’événement cible principal a également suivi une courbe en J
ou en U, les taux d’événements s’étant révélés plus élevés à la
fois pour les valeurs les plus faibles et pour les plus hautes
(Figure 1C). Après ajustement en fonction des covariables initiales et de l’effet du traitement, comparativement au groupe
de référence (PA diastolique excédant 80 à 90 mmHg), le risque de survenue de l’événement cible principal est apparu 3,7
Page 329
Bangalore et al
Tableau 1.
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
Caractéristiques démographiques et initiales des patients en fonction de leur PA systolique moyenne
fois plus élevé dans le sous-groupe dont la PA diastolique était
égale ou inférieure à 60 mmHg et 2,1 fois plus élevé dans celui
dont la PA systolique dépassait 100 mmHg (Figure 1C).
L’exécution d’un modèle de risques proportionnels de Cox
non linéaire dans lequel la pression diastolique a été analysée
selon une échelle continue (χ 2 = 52 : p <0,0001) a permis
d’établir que le taux d’événements le plus faible correspondait
à un nadir de 85 mmHg. Cette observation s’est montrée
valide aussi bien pour la cohorte totale (Figure 1C) que pour
chacun des deux groupes de traitement (données non
présentées). Là encore, la pente de la courbe en J ou en U a été
plus accentuée pour le lien avec la PA moyenne mesurée
au cours du suivi que pour celui avec les chiffres tensionnels
initiaux (Figure 1D).
Relation entre la PA et l’événement cible secondaire
Sur les 4 162 patients, 856 patients (21 %) ont présenté
l’événement cible secondaire. Dans les modèles avant et après
ajustement, la relation entre les chiffres tensionnels et
l’événement cible secondaire a décrit les mêmes courbes en
10:01:27:07:11
329
Page 329
J ou en U que précédemment, aussi bien pour la pression
systolique (χ 2 = 37 : p <0,0001 ; Figure 2A) que pour la
diastolique (χ 2 = 47 : p <0,0001 ; Figure 2C), le nadir ayant été
établi à 137/84 mmHg. Toutefois, comme pour l’événement
cible principal, la pente de la courbe en J ou en U a été plus
prononcée pour la PA moyenne mesurée au cours du suivi que
pour les chiffres tensionnels initiaux (Figure 2B et 2D).
Relation entre la PA et l’événement cible tertiaire
Parmi les 4 162 patients, 119 (2,9 %) sont décédés, dont 53
(1,3 %) de causes cardiovasculaires ; 260 (6,2 %) ont présenté
un IDM non fatal et 40 (0,96 %) un accident vasculaire
cérébral. Les modèles avant et après ajustement ont mis en
évidence une relation à type de courbe en J ou en U entre le
risque de décès lié à une quelconque cause et les chiffres de
pressions aussi bien systoliques (χ 2 = 10 ; p = 0,007 ; Figure 3A)
que diastoliques (χ 2 = 11 ; p = 0,0007 ; Figure 3C). Cette
relation n’a cependant été objectivée qu’avec la PA moyenne
mesurée au cours du suivi et non avec celle relevée à l’entrée
dans l’étude (Figures 3B et 3D). Dans les modèles aussi bien
Page 330
330
Circulation
Tableau 2.
Septembre 2011
Caractéristiques démographiques et initiales des patients en fonction de leur PA diastolique moyenne
non ajustés qu’ajustés, une courbe en J ou en U a également
été observée s’agissant de la relation entre la mortalité de
cause cardiovasculaire et les pressions systoliques (χ 2 = 6 ;
p = 0,041 ; Figure 4A) et diastoliques (χ 2 = 14 ; p = 0,0007 ;
Figure 4C). Cette relation à type de courbe en J ou en U a
toutefois été relevée avec la PA moyenne mesurée au cours du
suivi, mais ne l’a pas été avec la PA initiale (Figure 4B et 4D).
De même, dans les modèles non ajustés et ajustés, une relation
en J ou en U a été mise en évidence entre le risque d’IDM non
fatal et les chiffres de pressions aussi bien systoliques (χ 2 = 26 ;
p <0,0001 ; Figure 5A) que diastoliques (χ 2 = 24 ; p <0,0001 ;
Figure 5C), avec présence d’un nadir à 134/84 mmHg. Là
encore, la relation a été objectivée avec la PA moyenne
mesurée au cours du suivi, mais non avec la PA initiale (Figure
5B et 5D). Les différents liens mis en évidence s’appliquaient
aussi bien à la cohorte totale qu’à chacun des deux groupes de
traitement (données non présentées).
Le taux d’accidents vasculaires cérébraux (0,96 %) a été
trop faible pour pouvoir dégager une relation pertinente entre
la PA et le risque de survenue d’un tel événement. Le rapport
de l’incidence des IDM non fatals sur celle des accidents
10:01:27:07:11
Page 330
vasculaires cérébraux est demeuré constant pour une large
fourchette de chiffres tensionnels ; toutefois, pour les pressions
diastoliques les plus basses, le taux d’IDM non fatals a été
beaucoup plus élevé que celui d’accidents vasculaires
cérébraux, ce qui tendrait à indiquer que la diminution du flux
sanguin coronaire provoquée par l’existence d’une faible
pression diastolique pourrait contribuer plus fortement au
risque d’IDM qu’à celui d’accident vasculaire cérébral.
Analyse de sensibilité
Pour juger de l’effet de la pression pulsée, nous avons effectué
une analyse de sensibilité qui prenait celle-ci en compte. Les
résultats sont demeurés inchangés après avoir refait l’analyse
en fonction de ce paramètre (données non présentées). Par
différentes techniques, nous avons également évalué la
distribution des pressions systolique et diastolique l’une par
rapport à l’autre. La corrélation entre ces deux variables s’est
révélée peu marquée (r = 0,58 ; IC à 95 % : 0,56 à 0,60). En
rapportant les pressions diastoliques moyennes aux différents
niveaux de pression systolique (Figure 1A), nous n’avons pas
constaté de tendance à l’existence de pressions diastoliques
Page 331
Bangalore et al
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
331
Figure 1. Relation entre la PA et l’événement cible principal. A, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue de l’événement cible principal en
fonction de la PA systolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. B, risques ajustés de survenue de l’événement cible principal en fonction des
valeurs moyennes de PA systolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. C, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue de
l’événement cible principal en fonction de la PA diastolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. D, risques ajustés de survenue de l’événement
cible principal en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA diastolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. PAD : PA diastolique ;
PAS : PA systolique ; RR : rapport de risques.
plus élevées chez les patients dont la systolique était basse et
réciproquement ; l’observation valait également pour les
niveaux de PA diastolique (Figure 1C). Dans un modèle
élaboré afin de déterminer si le risque d’événement était plus
élevé chez les sujets dont uniquement l’une des composantes,
systolique ou diastolique, de la PA était basse ou chez ceux
dont la systolique et la diastolique étaient toutes deux faibles,
le test d’évaluation de l’interaction s’est révélé dépourvu de
significativité et le risque d’événement a été comparable pour
chacune des trois catégories de patients.
aussi bien pour la PA systolique que pour la diastolique.
Les analyses ont également révélé que le plus faible taux
d’événements correspondait à un nadir de PA estimé à
136/85 mmHg ; toutefois, la courbe était relativement plate
pour les pressions systoliques comprises entre 110 et
130 mmHg et pour les valeurs diastoliques comprises entre 70
et 90 mmHg. La présence de chiffres tensionnels inférieurs
à 110/70 mmHg est allée de pair avec une augmentation du
risque d’événement cardiovasculaire, ce qui porte à penser
qu’une PA trop basse définit un sous-groupe de patients chez
lesquels le pronostic est mauvais.
Discussion
Cette analyse réalisée sur une population de patients à haut
risque ayant présenté un SCA et qui avaient pris part à l’étude
PROVE IT-TIMI 22 a objectivé l’existence d’une relation
à type de courbe en J ou en U entre la PA et le risque
d’événement cardiovasculaire, cela s’étant traduit par une
augmentation exponentielle du taux d’événements aux deux
extrémités de la fourchette des valeurs de PA. Le lien valait
10:01:27:07:11
Page 331
Le dogme de la correction intensive des chiffres
tensionnels remis en question
Chez les patients traités pour une hypertension artérielle, les
actuelles recommandations préconisent d’abaisser les chiffres
tensionnels à 140/90 mmHg ou en deçà, les valeurs cibles
étant encore plus faibles (130/80 mmHg ou moins) pour
certaines populations particulières telles que celles des sujets
Page 332
332
Circulation
Septembre 2011
Figure 2. Relation entre la PA et l’événement cible secondaire. A, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue de l’événement cible secondaire en
fonction de la PA systolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. B, risques ajustés de survenue de l’événement cible secondaire en fonction
des valeurs moyennes de PA systolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. C, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue de
l’événement cible secondaire en fonction de la PA diastolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. D, risques ajustés de survenue de
l’événement cible secondaire en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA diastolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi.
PAS : PA systolique ; RR : rapport de risques ; PAD : PA diastolique.
diabétiques, insuffisants rénaux ou coronariens.3,18,19 Les
données en faveur de valeurs cibles aussi basses sont toutefois
peu concluantes. Dans l’essai Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes BP (action visant à contrôler le
risque cardiovasculaire chez le diabétique hypertendu),20 la
réduction agressive de la PA (pression systolique cible
inférieure à 120 mmHg) chez des patients à haut risque
atteints de diabète de type 2 n’a pas diminué le taux
d’événements cardiovasculaires majeurs, fatals ou non,
comparativement à l’approche conventionnelle fondée sur
une valeur cible inférieure à 140 mmHg. De même, dans une
méta-analyse Cochrane ayant porté sur sept études
randomisées, Arguedas et al21 n’ont relevé aucune différence
de morbidité et de mortalité cardiovasculaires après
abaissement intensif de la PA (valeur cible égale ou inférieure
à 135/85 mmHg) comparativement à la prise en charge
reposant sur les objectifs classiques (systolique n’excédant pas
140 à 160 mmHg et diastolique ne dépassant pas 90 à
100 mmHg).
Les résultats de notre étude étendent ces observations aux
patients exposés à un risque maximal, à savoir ceux atteints
d’une maladie coronaire documentée et ayant déjà présenté
10:01:27:07:11
Page 332
un SCA ; en effet, ils montrent non seulement que la courbe
de risque est plate lorsque les chiffres tensionnels sont compris
entre 110/70 et 130/90 mmHg, mais aussi que le risque
d’événement cardiovasculaire augmente lorsque la PA est trop
faible. Cela tend à indiquer que le paradigme de la médecine
cardiovasculaire selon lequel « plus la PA est basse et mieux
c’est » n’est plus valable lorsque celle-ci est abaissée au-delà
d’une certaine valeur cible.
Influence de la PA et phénomène de courbe en J
Cela fait plus de trente ans que l’on s’intéresse au phénomène
de courbe en J ou en U en relation avec la PA. Toutefois,
la plupart des travaux précédemment menés étaient des
études rétrospectives ou des analyses a posteriori d’essais
randomisées portant sur des cohortes de patients hypertendus.
Chez les patients ne présentant pas de maladie coronaire
connue, l’existence d’une courbe en J ou en U n’a pas toujours
été objectivée. Stewart8 a fait état d’une relation en J ou en U
entre le risque d’IDM ou de décès de cause cardiovasculaire,
avec un nadir de pression diastolique compris entre 100
et 109 mmHg. Cette observation a été confirmée par
Page 333
Bangalore et al
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
333
Figure 3. Relation entre la PA et la mortalité de toute cause. A, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue d’un décès de toute cause en fonction
de la PA systolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. B, risques ajustés de survenue d’un décès de toute cause en fonction des valeurs
moyennes de PA systolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. C, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue d’un décès de
toute cause en fonction de la PA diastolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. D, risques ajustés de survenue d’un décès de toute cause en
fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA diastolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. PAS : PA systolique ; RR : rapport de
risques ; PAD : PA diastolique.
l’Australian National BP Trial (essai australien sur la PA),22
qui a identifié un nadir de pression diastolique de l’ordre de
85 à 89 mmHg. En revanche, une analyse des données de
l’International Prospective Primary Prevention Study in
Hypertension (étude internationale prospective de prévention
primaire dans l’hypertension artérielle) n’a pas mis en
évidence de courbe en J ou en U.23 Plus récemment, une analyse de l’étude Hypertension Optimal Treatment (traitement
optimal de l’hypertension artérielle) a objectivé une relation
à type de courbe en J entre les pressions systolique et
diastolique et le risque de décès de cause cardiovasculaire, le
nadir de PA ayant été estimé à 139/86 mmHg,24 ce qui est
superposable à celui de 137/84 mmHg observé dans la
présente étude. Une méta-analyse des données recueillies
chez les patients de sept essais randomisés a montré que la
mortalité de toute cause et le risque de décès d’origine cardiovasculaire suivaient une courbe en J ou en U, avec un nadir
de PA de 156/84 mmHg. Cela étant, dans un récent essai
randomisé mené chez des sujets hypertendus non diabétiques,
l’abaissement énergique des chiffres tensionnels (valeurs
moyennes : 132/77 mmHg) a eu pour effet de réduire significativement l’incidence des événements cardiovasculaires
10:01:27:07:11
Page 333
comparativement à la prise en charge classique (valeurs
moyennes : 136/79 mmHg).25 Il importe toutefois de noter
que, dans les études qui viennent d’être mentionnées, le
nombre de patients coronariens connus était très faible, voire
nul pour certaines.
On ne sait pas exactement quelle est la PA optimale chez
les patients coronariens, notamment ceux ayant présenté
un SCA. Selon un récent rapport de l’American Heart
Association, chez de tels individus, les chiffres tensionnels
devraient être ramenés en dessous de 130/80 mmHg.15 Les
données de l’étude CAMELOT (Comparison of Amlodipine
versus Enalapril to Limit Occurrences of Thrombosis
[comparaison entre l’amlodipine et l’énalapril dans la
prévention des événements thrombotiques]), qui a inclus
des patients dont la PA était « normale » (129/78 mmHg à
l’entrée dans l’étude), semblent indiquer qu’un abaissement
plus important des chiffres tensionnels pourrait être
bénéfique26 ; le degré optimal de réduction est toutefois
moins bien défini. Peu d’études ont exploré le phénomène
de courbe en J ou en U chez les patients à la fois hypertendus et coronariens. Cruickshank et al5 ont observé une
relation à type de courbe en J entre la mortalité de cause
Page 334
334
Circulation
Septembre 2011
Figure 4. Relation entre la PA et la mortalité de cause cardiovasculaire. A, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue d’un décès de cause
cardiovasculaire en fonction de la PA systolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. B, risques ajustés de survenue d’un décès de cause
cardiovasculaire en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA systolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. C, incidence et
risque ajusté de survenue d’un décès de cause cardiovasculaire en fonction de la PA diastolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. D,
risques ajustés de survenue d’un décès de cause cardiovasculaire en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA diastolique mesurées à l’entrée
dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. PAS : PA systolique ; RR : rapport de risques ; PAD : PA diastolique.
cardiovasculaire et la PA diastolique, avec un nadir de l’ordre
de 85 à 90 mmHg, mais cela uniquement chez des patients
qui présentaient une maladie coronaire connue. Certaines
données émanant de l’étude cardiologique de Framingham
font également apparaître une relation en J ou en U pour
la mortalité cardiovasculaire, mais seulement chez les
patients ayant des antécédents d’IDM.27 Dans l’International
Verapamil-SR Trandolapril Study (étude internationale
comparative entre le vérapamil à libération prolongée et le
trandolapril) menée chez 22 576 patients cumulant une
hypertension artérielle et une maladie coronaire, une relation
à type de courbe en J ou en U a été mise en évidence entre la
PA et l’incidence des événements cardiovasculaires7 ; le lien a
toutefois été plus marqué chez les patients qui n’avaient pas
d’antécédent d’angioplastie coronaire, ce qui porte à penser
que les individus ayant fait l’objet d’une angioplastie tolèrent
mieux une pression diastolique basse que ceux qui n’en ont
pas bénéficié. Dans le récent essai ONTARGET (Ongoing
Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril
Global End-Point Trial [incidence globale des événements
cibles sous traitement continu par le telmisartan seul et couplé
10:01:27:07:11
Page 334
au ramipril]) mené chez des patients atteints d’athérosclérose
ou de lésions organiques d’origine diabétique, une relation
en J ou en U a été mise en évidence entre la pression tant
systolique que diastolique et les risques de décès de cause
cardiovasculaire et d’IDM.28
Nos données sont en accord avec celles de précédentes
études ayant objectivé une relation à type de courbe en J ou en
U ; notre étude se démarque toutefois de celles antérieurement
menées par plusieurs aspects. A la différence des travaux ayant
porté sur des cohortes de patients hypertendus, il s’agit ici
d’une analyse a posteriori de patients ayant présenté un SCA.
Contrairement à ce qui a été fait dans les autres études sur
l’hypertension artérielle, le traitement de cette dernière et le
choix des médicaments ont été laissés à l’appréciation du
médecin traitant. La présente étude a également montré que
la posologie de statine administrée n’avait pas eu d’incidence
sur la relation à type de courbe en J ou en U. Celle-ci a, en
outre, persisté après ajustement des données en fonction du
taux initial de C-réactive protéine et de la concentration
moyenne en cholestérol lié aux lipoprotéines de faible densité
mesurée sous traitement.
Page 335
Bangalore et al
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
335
Figure 5. Relation entre la PA et le risque d’infarctus du myocarde non fatal. A, incidence et risque ajusté de survenue d’un infarctus du
myocarde non fatal en fonction de la PA systolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi. B, risques ajustés de survenue d’un infarctus du
myocarde non fatal en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA systolique mesurées à l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. C, incidence
et risque ajusté de survenue d’un infarctus du myocarde non fatal en fonction de la PA diastolique moyenne mesurée pendant le suivi.
D, risques ajustés de survenue d’un infarctus du myocarde non fatal en fonction des valeurs moyennes de PA diastolique mesurées à
l’entrée dans l’étude et au cours du suivi. PAS : PA systolique ; RR : rapport de risques ; PAD : PA diastolique.
Mécanismes physiopathologiques sous-tendant le
phénomène de courbe en J
Plusieurs mécanismes « physiopathologiques » ont été proposés pour justifier l’existence d’une courbe en J ou en U. Les
résultats de notre étude peuvent s’expliquer par chacun de
ces mécanismes pris séparément ou par leur combinaison.
Certains ont émis l’hypothèse selon laquelle la courbe en J ou
en U constituerait un épiphénomène témoignant de la
présence sous-jacente d’une maladie chronique plus grave
(telle qu’un cancer) ou d’une affection cardiaque sévère
(une insuffisance cardiaque, par exemple) qui contribuerait à
augmenter le risque de décès. Toutefois, seulement 1 à 5 % des
patients de notre étude avaient des antécédents d’insuffisance
cardiaque à leur inclusion, le pourcentage ayant été encore
plus faible parmi ceux dont la PA systolique était basse. De
plus, la relation à type de courbe en J ou en U relevée entre les
chiffres tensionnels (aussi bien systoliques que diastoliques) et
l’incidence des événements cliniques a persisté même après
l’ajustement pratiqué pour tenir compte des covariables
initiales. Surtout, nos observations reposent sur les données
d’un essai randomisé dont avaient été exclus les patients
10:01:27:07:11
Page 335
atteints d’une maladie grave (notamment, d’un cancer évolué
limitant l’espérance de vie à moins de 2 ans). En outre, si la
courbe en J ou en U n’était que le reflet d’un lien de causalité
inverse (dans lequel le faible niveau de la PA ne serait que le
simple témoin de l’état critique du sujet), nous aurions dû
observer ce lien tant avec la PA d’entrée dans l’étude qu’avec
la valeur moyenne mesurée au cours du suivi. Or, dans nos
analyses, nous n’avons objectivé la relation à type de courbe
en J ou en U qu’avec la PA moyenne sous traitement, ce
qui tend à démontrer que c’est bien l’abaissement des
chiffres tensionnels qui contribue à l’augmentation du risque
d’événement. Il convient cependant de remarquer que, dans
notre étude, nous n’avons pas pris en compte les autres
marqueurs potentiels d’une santé compromise.
La courbe en J ou en U pourrait, par ailleurs, être un
épiphénomène en relation avec l’augmentation de la rigidité
artérielle, de sorte qu’une faible PA diastolique serait alors
le témoin de l’élévation de la pression pulsée et de l’augmentation du risque de décès.29 Cependant, nos analyses ont
mis en évidence le phénomène de courbe en J ou en U non
seulement avec la PA diastolique mais aussi avec la systolique,
Page 336
336
Circulation
Septembre 2011
ce qui semble infirmer la théorie faisant intervenir la pression
pulsée.
Chez les patients coronariens, une PA diastolique basse
peut réduire la perfusion coronaire, car celle-ci se produit
pendant la diastole. Dans notre étude, les patients avaient
tous été victimes d’un SCA et le rapport de l’incidence des
IDM non fatals sur celle des accidents vasculaires cérébraux
était plus élevé chez les sujets qui avaient une faible pression
diastolique, ce qui suggère que, dans un tel contexte, le risque
d’IDM l’emporte sur celui d’accident vasculaire cérébral. Cela
peut précisément s’expliquer par l’altération de la perfusion
coronaire, cette explication étant d’autant plus probable que
l’effet à type de courbe en J ou en U que nous avons observé a
été plus marqué pour les chiffres tensionnels mesurés au cours
du suivi que pour la PA d’entrée dans l’étude. Néanmoins,
notre étude n’apporte pas la preuve formelle d’un lien de
causalité entre l’existence d’une faible PA (systolique ou
diastolique) et l’augmentation du risque d’événement, bien
que cela soit suggéré par la différence observée entre
l’influence exercée sur ce dernier par les chiffres tensionnels
initiaux et ceux mesurés au cours du suivi.
Limites de l’étude
Cette étude a consisté en une analyse a posteriori qui visait
à rechercher le lien unissant la PA aux événements cardiovasculaires au sein d’une population de patients coronariens
dont la cholestérolémie était étroitement régulée ; les résultats
ne peuvent donc être extrapolés à d’autres populations. Nous
n’avons pas ajusté nos analyses en fonction de la totalité des
facteurs de confusion potentiels, notamment de ceux qui, tels
le faible statut socio-économique, le stress professionnel
et l’altération psychique, contribuent à un état de santé
médiocre. Nous n’avons pas non plus ajusté nos résultats en
fonction des posologies d’antihypertenseurs prescrites aux
patients. Enfin, en règle générale, les traitements qui abaissent
la PA systolique diminuent également la diastolique, de sorte
qu’il nous a été difficile de déterminer avec précision si les
différences de taux d’événements observées dans les catégories
inférieures de chiffres tensionnels étaient imputables à la
diminution de la PA systolique, à celle de la diastolique ou à la
combinaison des deux.
Conclusions
Chez des patients suivis après un SCA, une relation à type de
courbe en J ou en U a été mise en évidence entre la PA et le
risque d’événement cardiovasculaire ultérieur ; le plus faible
taux d’événements a été enregistré chez les sujets dont les
chiffres tensionnels étaient approximativement compris entre
130/80 et 140/90 mmHg, alors que, pour les valeurs s’étendant
de 110/70 à 130/90 mmHg, la courbe était relativement plate,
ce qui porte à penser qu’une PA trop faible pourrait être
dangereuse (surtout lorsqu’elle est inférieure à 110/70 mmHg).
Ainsi, bien que nos données corroborent globalement la
notion selon laquelle « plus la PA est basse et mieux c’est »,
cette approche a des limites. Les présentes observations
confortent, en fait, la mise en garde publiée dans le septième
rapport du Joint National Committee concernant la possible
augmentation du risque cardiovasculaire lorsque la pression
10:01:27:07:11
Page 336
diastolique est abaissée en dessous de 60 mmHg. Nos résultats
sont, par ailleurs, en accord avec ceux enregistrés chez des
patients stables dans un récent essai randomisé20 et dans une
vaste étude observationnelle,30 lesquels avaient montré qu’une
prise en charge plus agressive des chiffres tensionnels (au-delà
de la réduction conventionnelle de la PA systolique en
dessous de 140 mmHg) n’induisait aucun effet bénéfique
supplémentaire ; cela étant, nous étendons également ces
observations à la population des patients à haut risque ayant
présenté un SCA.
Sources de financement
L’essai PROVE IT-TIMI 22 a été financé par des bourses de recherche
émanant de Bristol-Myers-Squibb et de Sankyo.
Déclarations
Le Dr Cannon a bénéficié de bourses de recherches ou des soutiens
financiers d’Accumetrics, d’AstraZeneca, de GlaxoSmithKline,
d’Intekrin Therapeutics, de Merck et de Takeda ; il a également été
membre des comités consultatifs d’Alnylam, du partenariat BristolMyers Squibb/Sanofi et de Novartis (mais a reversé ses émoluments à
des œuvres caritatives) ; il a, par ailleurs, été rémunéré pour des
conférences de formation médicale organisées avec le soutien de Pfizer
et d’AstraZeneca ; enfin, il détient des parts de la société Automedics
Medical Systems. Les autres auteurs n’ont aucun conflit d’intérêts
à signaler.
Références
1. Lewington S, Clarke R, Qizilbash N, Peto R, Collins R. Age-specific
relevance of usual blood pressure to vascular mortality: a meta-analysis
of individual data for one million adults in 61 prospective studies.
Lancet. 2002;360:1903–1913.
2. Anderson TW. Re-examination of some of the Framingham bloodpressure data. Lancet. 1978;2:1139–1141.
3. Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, Cushman WC, Green LA,
Izzo JL Jr, Jones DW, Materson BJ, Oparil S, Wright JT Jr, Roccella EJ.
The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention,
Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure: the JNC
7 report. JAMA. 2003;289:2560–2572.
4. The sixth report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention,
Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Arch
Intern Med. 1997;157:2413–2446.
5. Cruickshank JM, Thorp JM, Zacharias FJ. Benefits and potential harm
of lowering high blood pressure. Lancet. 1987;1:581–584.
6. Lindholm L, Lanke J, Bengtsson B, Ejlertsson G, Thulin T, Schersten
B. Both high and low blood pressures risk indicators of death in middleaged males: isotonic regression of blood pressure on age applied to data
from a 13-year prospective study. Acta Med Scand. 1985;218:473–480.
7. Messerli FH, Mancia G, Conti CR, Hewkin AC, Kupfer S, Champion
A, Kolloch R, Benetos A, Pepine CJ. Dogma disputed: can aggressively
lowering blood pressure in hypertensive patients with coronary artery
disease be dangerous? Ann Intern Med. 2006;144:884–893.
8. Stewart IM. Relation of reduction in pressure to first myocardial
infarction in patients receiving treatment for severe hypertension.
Lancet. 1979;1:861–865.
9. Protogerou AD, Safar ME, Iaria P, Safar H, Le Dudal K, Filipovsky J,
Henry O, Ducimetiere P, Blacher J. Diastolic blood pressure and
mortality in the elderly with cardiovascular disease. Hypertension.
2007;50:172–180.
10. Kaplan N. J-curve not burned off by HOT study: Hypertension Optimal
Treatment. Lancet. 1998;351:1748–1749.
11. Weinberger MH. Do no harm: antihypertensive therapy and the “J”
curve. Arch Intern Med. 1992;152:473–476.
12. Staessen JA. Potential adverse effects of blood pressure lowering: J-curve
revisited. Lancet. 1996;348:696–697.
13. Farnett L, Mulrow CD, Linn WD, Lucey CR, Tuley MR. The J-curve
phenomenon and the treatment of hypertension: is there a point beyond
which pressure reduction is dangerous? JAMA. 1991;265:489–495.
Page 337
Bangalore et al
Courbe de pression artérielle en J ou en U après un SCA
14. Waller PC, Isles CG, Lever AF, Murray GD, McInnes GT. Does therapeutic reduction of diastolic blood pressure cause death from coronary
heart disease? J Hum Hypertens. 1988;2:7–10.
15. Rosendorff C, Black HR, Cannon CP, Gersh BJ, Gore J, Izzo JL Jr,
Kaplan NM, O’Connor CM, O’Gara PT, Oparil S. Treatment of
hypertension in the prevention and management of ischemic heart
disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association
Council for High Blood Pressure Research and the Councils on Clinical
Cardiology and Epidemiology and Prevention. Circulation. 2007;115:
2761–2788.
16. Cannon CP, McCabe CH, Belder R, Breen J, Braunwald E. Design of
the Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy
(PROVE IT)-TIMI 22 trial. Am J Cardiol. 2002;89:860–861.
17. Cannon CP, Braunwald E, McCabe CH, Rader DJ, Rouleau JL, Belder
R, Joyal SV, Hill KA, Pfeffer MA, Skene AM. Intensive versus moderate
lipid lowering with statins after acute coronary syndromes. N Engl
J Med. 2004;350:1495–1504.
18. Williams B, Poulter NR, Brown MJ, Davis M, McInnes GT, Potter JF,
Sever PS, Thom SM. British Hypertension Society guidelines for
hypertension management 2004 (BHS-IV): summary. BMJ. 2004;328:
634–640.
19. Whitworth JA. 2003 World Health Organization (WHO)/International
Society of Hypertension (ISH) statement on management of hypertension. J Hypertens. 2003;21:1983–1992.
20. The ACCORD Study Group. Effects of intensive blood-pressure control
in type 2 diabetes mellitus. N Engl J Med. 2010;362:1575–85.
21. Arguedas JA, Perez MI, Wright JM. Treatment blood pressure targets
for hypertension. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD004349.
22. Untreated mild hypertension: a report by the Management Committee
of the Australian Therapeutic Trial in Mild Hypertension. Lancet.
1982;1:185–191.
23. The IPPPSH Collaborative Group. Cardiovascular risk and risk factors
in a randomized trial of treatment based on the beta-blocker oxprenolol:
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
337
the International Prospective Primary Prevention Study in Hypertension
(IPPPSH). J Hypertens. 1985;3:379–392.
Hansson L, Zanchetti A, Carruthers SG, Dahlof B, Elmfeldt D, Julius S,
Menard J, Rahn KH, Wedel H, Westerling S; HOT Study Group. Effects
of intensive blood-pressure lowering and low-dose aspirin in patients
with hypertension: principal results of the Hypertension Optimal
Treatment (HOT) randomised trial. Lancet. 1998;351:1755–1762.
Verdecchia P, Staessen JA, Angeli F, de Simone G, Achilli A, Ganau A,
Mureddu G, Pede S, Maggioni AP, Lucci D, Reboldi G. Usual versus
tight control of systolic blood pressure in non-diabetic patients with
hypertension (Cardio-Sis): an open-label randomised trial. Lancet.
2009;374:525–533.
Nissen SE, Tuzcu EM, Libby P, Thompson PD, Ghali M, Garza D,
Berman L, Shi H, Buebendorf E, Topol EJ. Effect of antihypertensive
agents on cardiovascular events in patients with coronary disease and
normal blood pressure: the CAMELOT study: a randomized controlled
trial. JAMA. 2004;292:2217–2225.
D’Agostino RB, Belanger AJ, Kannel WB, Cruickshank JM. Relation of
low diastolic blood pressure to coronary heart disease death in presence
of myocardial infarction: the Framingham Study. BMJ. 1991;303:
385–389.
Sleight P, Redon J, Verdecchia P, Mancia G, Gao P, Fagard R,
Schumacher H, Weber M, Bohm M, Williams B, Pogue J, Koon T,
Yusuf S. Prognostic value of blood pressure in patients with high vascular
risk in the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with
Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial study. J Hypertens. 2009;27:1360–1369.
Kannel WB, Wilson PW, Nam BH, D’Agostino RB, Li J. A likely
explanation for the J-curve of blood pressure cardiovascular risk. Am J
Cardiol. 2004;94:380–384.
Cooper-DeHoff RM, Gong Y, Handberg EM, Bavry AA, Denardo SJ,
Bakris GL, Pepine CJ. Tight blood pressure control and cardiovascular
outcomes among hypertensive patients with diabetes and coronary
artery disease. JAMA. 2010;304:61–68.
PERSPECTIVE CLINIQUE
Bien qu’un contrôle agressif de la pression artérielle (PA) ait été préconisé chez les patients atteints de diabète et, plus récemment, chez ceux ayant présenté
un syndrome coronaire aigu, les essais et les études observationnelles dernièrement menées chez des patients diabétiques stables ont remis ce concept en
question en montrant que, comparativement à l’objectif conventionnel d’abaissement des chiffres tensionnels, une réduction plus importante n’apporte pas
de bénéfice supplémentaire. Dans une population de 4 162 patients suivis après un syndrome coronaire aigu, nous avons mis en évidence une relation à type
de courbe en J ou en U entre la PA et le risque d’événement cardiovasculaire ultérieur, les taux d’événements les plus faibles ayant été enregistrés chez les
sujets dont les chiffres tensionnels étaient grossièrement compris entre 130/80 et 140/90 mmHg. Nos résultats sont donc en accord avec ceux des récentes
études menées chez des patients stables, mais étendent ces observations aux patients à haut risque ayant présenté un syndrome coronaire aigu. Par là-même,
ce travail tend à montrer que, lorsqu’ils traitent un patient hypertendu, les médecins doivent avoir pour objectif d’abaisser la PA systolique en dessous de
140 mmHg sans aller en-deçà de 110 mmHg.
10:01:27:07:11
Page 337

Documents pareils

Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine

Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine epicardial coronary arteries. In the past 30 years, however, several studies have shown that abnormalities in coronary microcirculation may also cause or contribute to myocardial ischemia in severa...

Plus en détail