Canadian Version - Amalgamated Transit Union

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Canadian Version - Amalgamated Transit Union
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JA N / F E B
www.atu.org
Struggle
Against
Austerity
NYC Mayor Bloomberg’s attacks
on school bus drivers and
Canadian PM Harper’s
Right-to-Work push highlight
the continued assaults on the
livelihood of working families.
O F F I C I A L J O U R N A L O F T H E A M A LG A M AT E D T R A N S I T U N I O N | A F L- C I O/C LC
INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS
LAWRENCE J. HANLEY
International President
ROBERT H. BAKER
International Executive Vice President
OSCAR OWENS
International Secretary-Treasurer
INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENTS
LARRY R. KINNEAR
Ashburn, ON – [email protected]
JAVIER M. PEREZ, JR.
Kansas City, MO – [email protected]
RICHARD M. MURPHY
Newburyport, MA – [email protected]
NEWSBRIEFS
Moncton buses rolling at full service
again: Seven months after being locked
out Codiac Transpo bus drivers, members
of Local 1290, are back driving at full service. Many
drivers are glad they are back to work and have
put the lockout behind them. The two sides were
embroiled in a nasty contact dispute before reaching
an agreement, which included a pay increase and
other improvements.
BOB M. HYKAWAY
Calgary, AB – [email protected]
WILLIAM G. McLEAN
Reno, NV – [email protected]
JANIS M. BORCHARDT
Madison, WI – [email protected]
PAUL BOWEN
Canton, MI – [email protected]
KENNETH R. KIRK
Lancaster, TX – [email protected]
GARY RAUEN
Clayton, NC – [email protected]
MARCELLUS BARNES
Flossmore, IL – [email protected]
RAY RIVERA
More mass transit for Lethbridge? The
local newspaper says transit ridership
could be increased by making the
system more accessible through improvements and
investment in the city’s bus system. The city’s new
transportation master plan makes recommendations
that could increase the use of the Lethbridge Transit
system. The plan proposes reducing transfers, adding
more direct routes and the building more terminals in
outer areas of Lethbridge to improve ridership.
Lilburn, GA – [email protected]
YVETTE SALAZAR
Thornton, CO – [email protected]
GARY JOHNSON, SR.
Cleveland, OH – [email protected]
ROBIN WEST
Halifax, NS – [email protected]
JOHN COSTA
Kenilworth, NJ – [email protected]
CHUCK WATSON
Syracuse, NY – [email protected]
Ottawa and Gatineau transit ridership
up: More and more people are using public
transportation to get around Ottawa and
Gatineau according to a recent survey conducted by
the cities. Mass transit ridership shot up 9 percent
from 2005 to 2011. The trend is expected to continue
as work progresses on transit projects such as the
city’s $2.1-billion light-rail system.
INTERNATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
ANTHONY WITHINGTON
Sebastopol, CA – [email protected]
DENNIS ANTONELLIS
Spokane, WA – [email protected]
CLAUDIA HUDSON
Oakland, CA – [email protected]
INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS EMERITUS
STEPHAN MACDOUGALL
International President Jim La Sala, ret.
International President Warren George, ret.
ANTHONY GARLAND
International Executive Vice President Ellis Franklin, ret.
International Executive Vice President Mike Siano, ret.
Boston, MA – [email protected]
Washington, DC – [email protected]
CANADIAN DIRECTOR
MICHAEL MAHAR
Rexdale, ON - [email protected]
Subscription: USA and Canada, $5 a year. Single copy: 50 cents. All others: $10 a year. Published bimonthly by the Amalgamated
Transit Union, Editor: Shawn Perry, Designer: Paul A. Fitzgerald. Editorial Office: 5025 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC
20016-4139. Tel: 1-202-537-1645. Please send all requests for address changes to the ATU Registry Dept. ISSN: 0019-3291.
PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40033361. RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO: APC Postal
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JAN/FEB
www.atu.org
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International Officers & General Executive Board
NEWS Briefs
Index Page
Active & Retired Members Step Up for ATU Victims of Sandy
International President’s Message:
ATU Fighting Battle for All Members, All Unions
International Executive Vice President’s Message:
It’s Up to Us
International Secretary-Treasurer’s Message:
Spring Is Coming
How Many More Must Die?
The Struggle Against Austerity
New APTA Voter Survey Shows Strong Support
for Investment in Transit
Congress Rights A Wrong - Restores Commuter Tax Benefit
Twin Cities Transit Workers Get Strong New Contract
Cincinnati Bus Drivers Protest New Sick Leave Policy
Drivers and Riders Stand Stronger Together in Pittsburgh
US DOT Funds Detroit Streetcar Project and Bus Rapid
Transit Network
New Detroit Plan Would Shrink City, Create Green Space
in Abandoned Areas
Streetcars Still Popular in Cities Across America
46 New Biodiesel Buses to Replace Most of Peoria’s
CityLink Fleet
Filibuster Reform Founders on ‘Compromise’
2012 ‘Most Valuable’ US Nantional Union? ATU, Of Course
Drivers, Riders Warned to Take Extra Precautions
During Flu Season
Suspect in NJ Transit Assault Case Arrested in North Carolina
DC Driver Shields Don’t (Retro-) Fit Some Buses
Fiscal Cliff Deal Hits Middle Class Americans As
Much As Wealthy
Boston MBTA Crackdown Nabs 40% More Fare Evaders
Driver in Virginia Bus Crash to Serve 6 Years,
Discount Operator Continues in New Company
Local President Issues Warning After Double-Decker
Flips in Ottawa
Halifax Drivers, Passengers Concerned About Safety
of Articulated Buses
New Ontario Premiere Expected to be Strong Supporter
of Public Transit
Metrolinx Asks Toronto “How Would You Like to Pay for That?”
Translations (Spanish)
In Memoriam
The 57th International Convention Notice
Please Give to ATU Members Still Suffering from
Hurricane Sandy
2013
Vol. 122, No. 1
RIGHT TO WORK, MR. HUDAK AND UNIONS
8
THE STRUGGLE AGAINST AUSTERITY
10
VIRGINIA GOV WANTS TO SCRAP GAS TAX,
MARYLAND WEIGHING ALTERNATIVES
14
TRANSIT RIDERSHIP SOARS, MORE INVESTMENT NEEDED
19
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
3
Active & retired members step up for
ATU victims of Sandy ATU helps New York members devastated by Hurricane Sandy, and now on strike
Local 1181-New York, NY, members Maria Gentile
and Richard Krohley have had a tough couple of
months to say the least. On October 29, Hurricane
Sandy completely destroyed the first level of the
couple’s Howard Beach, NY, house along with their
two cars. They went over two weeks without power,
hot water, lights or heat. They’re still fighting with
their insurance company over claims and have received
very little assistance.
Now the two veteran New York City school bus
drivers are going without paychecks because Mayor
Michael Bloomberg has forced them to go on strike
to protect their jobs (see story on strike).
And both Both Gentile and Krohley, who applied
for and received money from the ATU Disaster
Relief Fund, say that without the Union they would
have never been able to make it through these
difficult times.
Joined picket line despite hardship
“It shows my union brothers and sisters are behind
me in good times and bad,” says Gentile, who despite
her hardships has been on picket lines with Richard
since the strike began. “We were both deeply touched,
especially with this strike, that our Union could help us
get our feet back on the ground after our home and cars
were destroyed by the hurricane. I’ve been a member for
34 years and have never been prouder to be a member
of ATU.”
Gentile and Krohley’s story is similar to many of
our east coast members, who are still recovering from
the devastating impact of Sandy. Some, who are also
on strike in New York, have received money from
the Disaster Relief Fund, others are waiting, and
more are still expected to apply for the financial
assistance.
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January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
Local 618 President Paul Harrington and IVP Richard Murphy joined
ATU Lime Rock Firefighter members who raised $3,500.
Over $110,000 raised, so far
ATU members, retirees and friends have stepped up to
the plate, contributing more than $110,000, so far, to
the Relief Fund to help fellow members like Gentile
and Krohley.
The Lincoln, RI, Lime Rock fire fighters, new members
of Local 618 -Providence, RI, raised $3,500 for the fund
with a “fill-the-boots” collection on their own time.
Local 127-Los Angeles, CA, made a $10,000 donation
to the fund that was matched by the California
Conference Board. But the majority of donations have
come from individual members and retirees like Steve
Morrison, a retiree of Local 689-Washington, DC.
“When I heard the homes of ATU members were
damaged by the storm, I wanted to help because that’s
what I do,” said Morrison, who lives in Clinton, MD.
“The ATU served me well during my years working at
WMATA and when my fellow brothers and sisters are
in need the least I could do was contribute to the fund.”
So, no matter how big or small, donations of any
amount to the Disaster Relief Fund can help your
fellow members and their families affected by the storm.
Credit card donations can now be made on the ATU
website (www.atu.org).
LARRY HANLEY, INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT
atu fighting battle
for all members,
all unions
I
’m writing to you today from the picket lines of our
school bus drivers and matrons in New York City,
where the latest battle in the war on unions has taken
center stage (see story on page 10).
No one should doubt that this is, indeed, a war; a war in
which Billionaire Mayor Michael Bloomberg is trying to
rob the wages and take away the jobs of our Local 1181
members in order to keep taxes as low as possible for
those of his rich, privileged class.
This is no different from what Governor Scott Walker,
R, did to public workers in Wisconsin, essentially
repealing their collective bargaining rights.
The same thing is happening in Atlanta, where a
“reorganization” of MARTA has been initiated as a tool
to privatize their transit system and lower the wages of
their workers now represented by Local 732.
It’s also happening in Canada, where Conservative
politicians are looking for the right time to table rightto-work laws in the Ontario legislature.
The particular strategy used against ATU in Canada has
been for provinces and localities to declare our work an
“essential service” revoking our right to strike.
‘Transit theatre of war’
This is the “transit theatre of war” in an overall campaign
against working people, driven by the money of the Koch
brothers and their millionaire friends, and orchestrated
by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).
Corporate interests in both countries are the profiteers.
The struggles of our members in New York, Atlanta, and
Ontario can appear to be local problems that don’t affect
other transit workers. But that’s because the enemies of
Labor Unions made a strategic decision to deploy their forces
at the state and provincial, rather than the federal levels.
Make no mistake this is an international war of
attrition. The enemies of transit workers are blaming
workers for rising costs and budget shortfalls. In city
after city they claim ATU workers are paid too much
and their benefits are too costly.
Slowly, but surely, they plan to de-unionize all public
service work including public transit, and eventually
outlaw all collective bargaining or render it useless.
Passengers and school kids victims too
ATU members are not the only victims in this war.
Our passengers, who have come to rely on dependable
professional public transit, usually end up paying more
for substandard service.
School children and their safe and reliable transportation
are being used as pawns.
The poor, who depend on mass transit more than others,
are most affected. Not only is their physical mobility
restricted but also their social mobility is limited by the
service cuts that prevent them from getting to jobs that
would help them move out of poverty.
This war helps the rich avoid paying their fare share of
taxes, while complaining that those in poverty need to
get off the government’s dime.
If nothing is done we can expect to see this battle plan
continually played out in one city after another for the
foreseeable future. No one will be immune.
Our mission is clear. We must fight with all we’ve got to
stop this process now in New York, Atlanta, and Ontario,
not only for our members and passengers there, but for
those who will be hurt by the anti-union battles that lie
ahead if we don’t.
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
5
BOB BAKER, INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
IT’S UP TO US
A
very clear message is being sent to labor unions
in the United States and Canada by the corporate
interests who would turn the clock on labor law back a
hundred years or more:
And by the time you receive this magazine, you will
be reading about how the Republicans in Congress are
again daring to push the nation over another fiscal cliff
in order to extract another pound of flesh from workers.
It doesn’t matter if you win a national election.
Sisters and brothers, there is no depth to which the
corporate interests of Canada and the U.S. will not go
in pursuit of lower costs and greater profits.
We will fight you in the states. We will fight you in
the provinces. We will fight you in the courts.
We will use our corporate war chest to buy our way
into state and provincial courts and legislatures. We
will turn public opinion against you. We will make
you fight each other.
We will use the public’s ignorance about what we’re
up to, and what unions do, to pass laws that will
render Labor powerless against us.
We will eliminate paid health care, paid sick days,
paid vacations, and pensions.
We will eliminate Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid,
and any kind of public assistance so that we can pay
even lower taxes.
We will push workers back into the ranks of the
working poor, just like they were in the late 1800s.
That is the road to (our) prosperity.
Ample evidence
We have ample evidence that the campaign to destroy
labor unions is continuing unabated despite the victory of
the Democratic Party in the recent election.
Later in this issue you will read about how they are
trying to rob the collective bargaining rights and labor
protections of our largest local – Local 1181 – in New
York City. You will read about how they are scheming
to take collective bargaining rights away from public
service workers in Canada.
6
January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
Fodder
And we workers are simply the expendable fuel they use
to enrich themselves – easily replaceable fodder for the
corporate machine.
There are those who would say this is an exaggeration;
that the scenario above could never happen again.
I would ask everyone to pay a visit to the non-union
operations run by the transit providers in our countries
and see what employment is like at those properties.
Realize that that’s where they want all of us, and that if
we don’t get active now, that’s where we’ll all be.
Know, however, that they may have money, but we’ve
got members and a lot more voices than they have. And,
if we all stand together and refuse to let this happen,
they can’t deny us.
In the coming months the executive officers and the
General Executive Board will be outlining a course of
action to fight those who would force us back to the
nineteenth century.
Electing leaders who won’t purposely hurt us was the
first step. The rest is up to us.
In Solidarity,
Bob Baker
OSCAR OWENS, INTERNATIONAL SECRETARY-TREASURER
SPRING IS COMING
T
his is a very difficult time for some people. It’s
stays dark outside longer than any other time
of year. It’s cold. The traffic is bad. It can be very
depressing.
All of this is as predictable as the change of seasons.
But that’s no reason to be down or depressed, because
we’re making our plans also.
Winter can seem like a gloomy time we just have to
endure between the holidays and spring. Nothing
much seems to be happening.
Dignity
Yet we know that’s not true. There’s a lot going on.
We plan on fighting to protect and improve transit
funding in any national legislation that will be
considered in the coming year.
The angle of the sun changes as the light loiters just a
little longer each day. The earth, plants and trees are
changing; getting ready to bloom. The snow falling in
the mountains will melt swelling the streams that rush
to the rivers.
Lots of things are happening that we don’t notice.
Winter is far from a “dead” time of year.
We plan to fight to protect transit workers from violent
assault, and to provide drivers with adequate bathroom
breaks.
We plan to fight to improve the wages, benefits and
working conditions of all workers.
And we plan to fight to assure that employers accord all
workers the God-given dignity they deserve.
Plans are being laid
It’s like that in our political world too. Those who
oppose public transit are laying their plans now.
We know that there are those in Congress and in our
provincial legislatures who plan to use the “austerity
budgets” our nations face as an excuse to reduce or even
eliminate transit funding.
For, just as surely as spring will come, workers will fight
to improve their lives and the lives of their families.
And that process can no more be stopped than the sun
can be prevented from warming the earth.
You can participate in that fight by making your
voluntary donation to ATU-COPE today.
We know that more local governments will say they can
no longer afford to operate their own transit systems
and try to contract them out to private, non-union
providers.
We know that courts will be asked to strike down our
Section 13(c) collective bargaining rights in several cities
in the United States, and declare transit in Canadian
cities to be “essential services,” barring our members
working there from striking.
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
7
Canadian Agenda
Right to work,
Mr. Hudak and unions
W
ith the passage of legislation to make Michigan
a so-called “right to work” state, Progressive
Conservative (PC) leader Tim Hudak and several
of his caucus have jumped on the idea of doing the
same here.
PC deputy leader Christine Elliott says “right to work”
legislation will mean more jobs in Ontario, and higher
paying ones to boot. If that were the case, “right to
work” would make perfect sense. But let’s look at the
facts.
Actually, “right to work” is an American idea, affirmed
in the 1947 Taft-Hartley Act that amended the National
Labor Relations Act. It allows employees in a unionized
workplace to choose to forego paying union dues, yet
still get the wages and the benefits derived from the
collective bargaining agreements bargained by the union. In the U.S., 24 states now have “right to work” legislation
on their books. According to the Economic Policy
Institute: “The effect on the average worker—unionized
or not—of working in a right-to-work state is to earn
approximately $1,500 less per year than a similar worker
in a state without such a law.”
In other words, they can get the benefits even though
they are not paying the costs. Unions call them “free
riders.”
Even the Wall Street Journal says “States that bar
mandatory union dues tend towards more jobs but
lower wages.” That may be a choice that Ontarians are
willing to make. But they need to be told the true facts.
The right believes, correctly, that if union dues are
voluntary, many people will stop paying them (why pay
for what you can get for free?) thus cutting off union
resources so they cannot bargain or organize effectively.
Union membership will drop, further weakening
unions. And in fact, in the U.S., all of this is exactly
what has happened.
Rand Formula
Mr. Hudak has a problem here in Canada, however: the
so-called “Rand Formula” in Ontario, a compromise
ruling by Justice Ivan Rand in 1946. Contrary to what
some uninformed PCs have been telling people, the
Rand Formula does not force anyone to belong to a
union.
It does however say that if someone benefits from wage
increases and benefits derived from a union, such as
collective bargaining, they must pay union dues - the
opposite of the Taft-Hartley Act. In other words, Justice
Rand said there should be no “free riders.” This is what
Mr. Hudak wants changed.
8
January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
Tired, old songbook
“Right to work” is just the latest salvo against unions
by the PC leader and his campaign team, made up
of some of the most prominent members of Mike
Harris’ Whiz Kids. But this group always has always
tended to use a whipping boy that they say has it
better than everyone else, and shouldn’t. The aim is to
stir resentment and translate that into a vote for
Mr. Hudak.
Looked at from this perspective, Mr. Hudak’s crusade
against unions has nothing to do with “modernizing,”
but rather is part of a tired old songbook. By Susanna Kelley, ontarionewswatch.com, December
17, 2012, excerpted with permission.
You can find Susanna here: @susannakelley View all of
Susanna Kelley’s columns.
Local president issues warning after doubledecker flips in Ottawa
conditions. The warning comes in response to a recent
incident in which one of the new buses flipped over on
its side into a ditch.
Fortunately, the driver who was the only person on the
bus, managed to crawl out through a window unhurt.
L
ocal President Craig Watson, 279-Ottawa, ON, is
warning his members to take care when operating
one of OC Transpo’s new double-decker buses in windy
Watson described the accident saying, “The wind blew
him over... [to] where the plow had left its residue and
so on, and then the bus started to hydroplane.” Watson
said the driver then described losing control of the bus
and toppling into the ditch “in slow motion.” The
local is working with the transit agency to address the
problem.
Halifax drivers, passengers concerned about
safety of articulated buses
C
oncerns are being expressed about the safety of
articulated buses after one got stuck trying to turn
a corner in Halifax, NS. Traffic came to a halt for most
of the afternoon, as Metro Transit crews struggled to free
the jackknifed “accordion” vehicle.
Articulated buses can carry almost twice as many
passengers than regular buses – a real advantage during
rush hour on heavily used routes. But the coaches do
have a bad reputation for getting into more accidents
than other types of buses.
Drivers complain that the buses have trouble on steep,
slippery winter streets.
“In snow or ice it is a problem,” agrees Local 508
Shop Steward Paul MacDonald, who says the twopart construction of the buses makes them difficult
to maneuver.
“Climate is one thing, but also terrain. In Winnipeg
where it is all flat, you don’t have a problem, but
in Halifax where it is all hills we have an issue,”
he adds.
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
25
New Ontario premiere expected to
be strong supporter of public transit
O
ntario’s Grits convened
January 25-27, and
elected former transportation
minister Kathleen Wynne
as the first woman and the
first openly gay premiere of
Ontario. If she follows through
on the statements she made,
public transit and ATU will
have a strong advocate at the
head of Ontario’s government.
Wynne said she would ask Toronto MPPs to sit down
with federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty to work on
public transit funding issues.
“What other jurisdiction does not have the input
and support of federal government in an incremental
way?,” she asked. “The big thing I learned as minister
of transportation is you can’t take breaks of 30 years.
You can’t dig holes and fill them in, as we saw under the
previous government, and still expect to get ahead.”
Long-range transit plan needed
supported the idea of developing a long-range transit
plan for the province, and said that Liberals need to
work more cohesively with Tory Leader Tim Hudak
and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath.
Proposals to improve Ontario
public transit
Referring to the GTA, one of the two leading contenders,
Sandra Pupatello, said that she believed that the federal
government should do more. “Every modern economy
out there has their federal government helping their
biggest city on transit. Everywhere but Canada. We
need to change this,” she said.
Former education minister Gerard Kennedy called the
small amount the federal government contributes to
Ottawa’s transit needs “criminal,” adding that Ottawa
contributes only 15 cents of every dollar being spent on
Toronto’s new subways lines.
“It doesn’t matter whether you live in Durham or
whether you live in a small rural village,” he said, “You
have transit and transportation needs.”
Actually, all of the candidates vying for the premiership
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Details to Follow
26
January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
Metrolinx asks Toronto ‘How would you like
to pay for that?’
M
etrolinx, the umbrella organization for transit
in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is about to
ask residents the same question a salesman asks you
after you agree to make a big purchase: “…and, how
would you like to pay for that?”
Metrolinx is asking citizens to join a “Big Conversation”
about the “Big Move” – a poorly publicized
transportation plan for the region.
Ontario has already committed $16 billion toward
various parts of the $50 billion, 25-year plan. But,
obviously more is needed.
Online tool
Metrolinx has even created an online tool to get people
involved at bigmove.ca that allows people to design
their own transit system – and figure out how to pay
for it.
“What we’re striving for,” Graser said, “is a really lively,
provocative conversation that gets people thinking
about what it means.”
Taxes, tolls, and fares, Oh my!
The agency is anxious to engage the public in the
plan because it’s about to do something no one
wants to do – ask for a toll, a fare hike, or an increase
in taxes.
So, Metrolinx is inviting citizens to 12 regional
roundtables to promote public investment in the plan
and discuss how it should be paid for.
In announcing the roundtables, though, Metrolinx
made no mention of fares, tolls, or taxes.
That’s because the public still doesn’t understand
it, says Dina Graser, director of community and
stakeholder relations.
“Of course (the roundtables) will talk about the
need for transportation investment, but they’re also
really about getting people to understand not just
who Metrolinx is, but what is The Big Move… People
need to understand what they’re paying for before
you get into the conversation of how you’re paying for
it,” she explains.
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
27
L’ATU se bat pour tous les
membres et toutes les unions
guerre. Nos passagers, qui en sont venus à dépendre d’un
transport public professionnel et fiable, finissent habituellement
par payer plus cher pour un service de piètre qualité.
Je vous écris aujourd’hui depuis les lignes de piquetage des
chauffeurs d’autobus scolaires et des matrones de New York,
où la plus récente bataille dans la guerre sur les unions a pris le
devant de la scène (voir l’article à la page 10).
Les enfants d’âge scolaire et leurs transports sûrs et fiables sont
utilisés comme des pions.
Personne ne devrait douter qu’il s’agit, en effet, d’une guerre;
une guerre dans laquelle le maire milliardaire Michael
Bloomberg tente de voler les salaires et de ravir les emplois de
nos membres du Local 1181 dans le but de maintenir le plus
bas possible les impôts de ceux de sa classe riche et privilégiée.
Ceci ne diffère pas de ce que le gouverneur Scott Walker, R,
a fait subir aux travailleurs du secteur public au Wisconsin;
essentiellement en abrogeant leurs droits de négociation
collective.
La même chose se produit à Atlanta, où une « réorganisation
» de MARTA a été entreprise comme outil servant à privatiser
leur système de transport et à baisser les salaires de leurs
travailleurs maintenant représentés par le Local 732.
C’est également le cas au Canada, où les politiciens
conservateurs cherchent le bon moment pour présenter les lois
du droit au travail à l’Assemblée législative de l’Ontario.
La stratégie particulière utilisée contre l’ATU au Canada a été
de faire que les provinces et les localités déclarent notre travail
un « service essentiel » révoquant notre droit de grève.
Les pauvres, qui dépendent plus que tout autre du transport
collectif, sont ceux les plus touchés. Non seulement sont-ils
restreints par leur mobilité physique, mais aussi sont-ils limités
dans leur mobilité sociale due aux réductions de services qui les
empêchent de se rendre vers des emplois qui les aideraient à se
sortir de la pauvreté.
Cette guerre contribue à éviter aux riches de payer leur juste
part d’impôts, tout en se plaignant que les gens vivant dans la
pauvreté doivent se décoller de l’argent du gouvernement.
Si rien n’est fait, nous pouvons nous attendre à voir ce plan de
bataille se jouer de chaque ville à chaque village et ce dans un
avenir prévisible. Personne ne sera épargné.
Notre mission est clairement définie. Nous devons nous battre
d’arrache-pied afin de mettre un terme à ce processus maintenant
en place à New York, Atlanta et en Ontario, non seulement pour
nos membres et passagers qui y sont, mais aussi pour ceux et
celles qui seront touchés par les combats antisyndicaux qui se
dessinent à l’horizon si nous n’agissons pas.
Il n’en tient qu’à nous.
« Le théâtre de guerre du transport »
Il s›agit du « théâtre de guerre du transport » au milieu d›une
campagne générale contre les travailleurs – celle-ci alimentée
par les frères Koch et leurs copains millionnaires – et orchestrée
par l’American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). Les
intérêts des entreprises sont les profiteurs dans les deux pays.
Les difficultés de nos membres se trouvant à New York, à Atlanta et
en Ontario peuvent apparaître comme étant des problèmes locaux
qui n›affectent pas d›autres employés du transport. Mais ceci est
parce que les ennemis des syndicats ont pris la décision stratégique
de déployer leurs forces aux niveaux nationaux et provinciaux
plutôt qu›au niveau fédéral.
Et ne vous y trompez pas : nous sommes en présence d’une
guerre d’usure internationale. Les ennemies des employés du
transport blâment ceux-ci pour l›augmentation des coûts et
l›insuffisance budgétaire. D›une ville à l›autre ils prétendent
que les travailleurs de l›ATU sont trop payés et que leurs
avantages coûtent trop chers.
Les grandes sociétés envoient un message très clair aux
syndicats qui se trouvent aux États-Unis et au Canada et qui
veulent revenir des centaines d’années en arrière par rapport à
la loi du travail.
• Peu importe si vous gagnez une élection nationale.
• Nous vous combattrons dans les états. Nous vous
combattrons dans les provinces. Nous vous combattrons
dans les tribunaux.
• Nous utiliserons notre réserve monétaire pour ouvrir les
portes des tribunaux et des législatures des états et des
provinces. Nous retournerons l’opinion publique contre
vous. Nous ferons en sorte que vous vous combattiez les
uns contre les autres.
• Nous utiliserons l’ignorance du public quant à ce que nous
voulons faire et ce que font les syndicats, pour passer des
lois qui rendront les travailleurs impuissants contre nous.
Lentement, mais sûrement, ils planifient la désyndicalisation
de tout le secteur public – incluant le transport public –, et
éventuellement de proscrire toute négociation collective ou de
rendre celle-ci inutilisable.
• Nous éliminerons les soins de santé rémunérés, les congés
de maladie payés, les vacances payées et les pensions.
Les passagers et les enfants d’âge
scolaire sont aussi des victimes;
• Nous repousserons les salariés dans les rangs des travailleurs
pauvres, comme ils étaient à la fin des années 1800.
Les membres de l’ATU ne sont pas les seules victimes de cette
• Ceci est la route vers la (notre) prospérité.
28
January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
• Nous éliminerons Obamacare, le régime d’assurancemaladie Medicare, Medicaid et toute forme d’aide
publique afin de payer moins d’impôts.
Amplement de preuves
Nous savons pourtant que c’est faux. Il se passe beaucoup de choses.
Nous détenons amplement de preuves que la campagne pour
détruire les syndicats se poursuit sans répit malgré la victoire du
parti Démocratique aux dernières élections.
L’angle du soleil change alors que la lumière lambine un peu
plus longtemps à chaque jour. La terre, les plantes et les arbres
changent; ils se préparent à fleurir. La neige tombant sur les
montagnes va fondre et gonfler les ruisseaux qui se précipitent
vers les rivières.
Plus loin dans cette édition vous pourrez lire de quelle façon
ils tentent de voler les droits de négociation collective et les
protections du travail de notre section locale la plus importante
– Local 1181 – à New York. Vous lirez de quelle façon ils
complotent pour subtiliser les droits de négociation collective
des travailleurs de la fonction publique au Canada.
Et au moment où vous recevrez ce magazine, vous pourrez
lire comment les républicains au Congrès tentent de pousser
encore une fois la nation vers un autre gouffre fiscal dans le but
d›extraire une autre livre de chair des travailleurs.
Sœurs et frères, il n›y a pas de limites pour les grandes sociétés
du Canada et des États-Unis, elles sont prêtes à tout pour
baisser des coûts et obtenir des profits plus élevés.
Chair à canon
Et nous les travailleurs ne sommes qu’un carburant
interchangeable qu’ils utilisent pour s’enrichir - de la chair à
canon facilement remplaçable pour la machine corporative.
Il y a ceux qui vous diraient qu’il s’agit là d’une exagération;
que le scénario ci-dessus ne pourrait jamais se reproduire. Je
demande à tout le monde de rendre une visite aux opérations
non syndiquées qui sont dirigées par les sociétés de transport
dans nos pays et de voir à quoi ressemblent les emplois chez eux.
Il se passe beaucoup de choses. L’hiver est loin d’être une période « morte » de l›année.
Des plans se développent.
C’est aussi comme ça dans le monde de la politique. Ceux qui
s’opposent au transport public développent leurs plans maintenant.
Nous savons qu’il se trouve au Congrès et parmi nos législateurs provinciaux ceux qui planifient d’utiliser nos ������
« ����
budgets d›austérité » auxquels nos pays sont confrontés comme
prétexte pour réduire ou même éliminer le financement des
services de transport.
Nous savons que davantage autorités locales diront qu›elles n›ont
plus les moyens d›opérer leurs propres systèmes de transport et essaieront de sous-traiter à des fournisseurs privés et non syndiqués.
Nous savons qu›il sera demandé aux tribunaux de rejeter les droits
de négociation collective de la Section 13 (c) que nous avons dans
plusieurs villes aux États-Unis, et de déclarer que le transport dans
les villes canadiennes est un « service essentiel » empêchant ainsi à
nos membres qui y travaillent de faire la grève.
Tout cela est aussi prévisible que le changement de saisons.
Comprenez que c’est là qu’ils veuillent que nous soyons, et que
si nous ne prenons pas de mesures concrètes maintenant, c’est
là que nous nous retrouverons tous.
Ce n›est cependant pas une raison d›être déprimé ou abattu,
parce nous sommes également en train de faire nos plans.
Sachez cependant qu’ils ont peut-être l’argent. Mais nous
avons des membres et un plus grand nombre de voix qu’ils
en ont. De plus, si nous faisons front commun et refusons de
laisser cela se produire, ils ne peuvent s’opposer à nous.
Dignité
Dans les mois à venir les hauts dirigeants et le Conseil exécutif
général décriront un plan d’action pour combattre ceux qui
nous forceraient à retourner au dix-neuvième siècle.
Élire des dirigeants qui ne nous nuirons pas était la première
étape. Le reste est entre nos mains.
En solidarité, Bob Baker
Le printemps arrive
Cette période est très difficile pour certaines personnes. C’est
la période de l’année ou les journées restent sombres plus longtemps. Il fait froid. La circulation est dense. Ce qui peut s’avérer très déprimant.
L’hiver peut sembler comme un temps triste et sombre que
nous avons à endurer entre les fêtes et le printemps. Il semble
qu’il ne se passe pas grand-chose.
Nous prévoyons lutter pour protéger et améliorer le financement des services de transport dans toutes les législations nationales qui seront considérées dans l’année à venir.
Nous prévoyons lutter pour protéger les travailleurs du secteur
de transport contre des agressions violentes et de fournir des
pauses toilettes adéquates pour les conducteurs.
Nous prévoyons lutter pour améliorer les salaires, les avantages
et les conditions de travail de tous les travailleurs.
Et nous prévoyons lutter pour s’assurer que les employeurs
accordent aux travailleurs la dignité que Dieu leur a donnée.
Parce que, tout comme l’arrivée imminente du printemps, les
travailleurs lutteront pour améliorer la qualité de leur vie et
celles de leurs familles.
Et ce processus ne peut être arrêté. Tout comme on ne peut
empêcher le soleil de réchauffer la terre.
Vous pouvez participer à cette lutte en faisant un don volontaire aujourd’hui à ATU-COPE.
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
29
In Memoriam
Death Benefits Awarded November 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012
1- MEMBERS AT LARGE
WILMER BRUNDAGE
PHILIP F CAVANAUGH
JIP L DYCUS JR
ROBERT P HILLER
MAX L HUGHES
CURTIS W MC GLONE
TOMMY B THREET
JACK CORBITT WARREN
DORSEY L WEDDINGTON
22- WORCESTER, MA
ERNEST H THORPE
26- DETROIT, MI
PHILLIP L GRASTY
85- PITTSBURGH, PA
RICHARD DABECCO
GERALDINE S DEELEY
AMOS W DUNMORE
107- HAMILTON, ON
STERLING R LINTOTT
JAMES D RAMSAY
ARNOLD STEWART
113- TORONTO, ON
KENNETH ALLEN
GINO BERTOLA
DIAN BOLEN
JOHN BOLES
PATRICK BRIANT
CLIFFORD THOMAS BROWN
NEVILLE CAMPBELL
ROLANDS DULMANIS
JAMES CLAUDE FALLS
GEORGE GABOR
ROBERT H GOWANS
HAROLD K HORTON
VERNON X HUGH
SADRUDIN H KANJI
RICHARD KAYE
ANGEL KEYES
PHILIP LEGGIO
GORDON MACKIE
RODGER MC TAGGART
DANNY MILLER
GIUSEPPE PANZINI
ELWOOD S PEARSON
GERALD A POLLARD
DAVID WINSLOW PORTER
DOMENICO SALVAGGIO
JAMES HOLMES SHAW
EDWARD A SOKOLOWSKI
ALEXANDER STEVENSON
ALVIN J SYMAK
GINO VECELLIO
192- OAKLAND, CA
FAY SEIDELL ENGELAGE
GLORIA E PATTERSON
JOE E REED
DONNELL L SAFFORD
HAROLD G WHARTON JR
241- CHICAGO, IL
FITZ J BARIFFE
RODOLFO S GARCIA
LARRY JOHNSON
FRANK E JONES
ARE N MC MILLION
NYDIA REYES
LESLIE B ROSS
ERICH W SICHERT
ALPHA J THOMAS
EMILIO G TORRES
256- SACRAMENTO, CA
ROGER M SCHAD
30
272- YOUNGSTOWN, OH
WILLIAM J MASON
279- OTTAWA, ON
LUCIEN BOUDRIA
J L MARCEL RIENDEAU
KARL STROHMAIER
308- CHICAGO, IL
DAVID L ALEXANDER
CLEMENTINE BROWN
JOSE A GREEN
MCKINLEY HOLMES
JEFFERY KWIATKOWSKI
BOBBY L REEVES
ERIC L SMITH
MARY A TAYLOR
EUGENE TRIPP
ARNOLD H WHITE
THEODORE WILLIAMS
313- ROCK ISLAND, IL
FRED J KOONTZ
448- SPRINGFIELD, MA
JEFFREY D BLACK
MARIO ROSA
568- ERIE, PA
JOSEPH E KONETSKY
569- EDMONTON, AB
ROMEO ALFRED BOURQUE
HEINZ K DEUTSCHER
MIKE DYRDA
HYOUNGSUG Y KIM
KING MAH
580- SYRACUSE, NY
WILLIAM R GUMMER
RICHARD W WILLIAMS
583- CALGARY, AB
KENNETH F GAMMIE
STEVEN SHIH
587- SEATTLE, WA
VAN G HARKER
ROBERT E LEACH
588- REGINA, SK
CYRIL JAMES REYNARD
589- BOSTON, MA
KEVIN H EDGINTON
FRANCIS J GALLAGHER
JOHN J O’LEARY
JAMES M QUINN
PETER L WOOD
591- HULL, QC
ADELARD BAKER
615- SASKATOON, SK
LAWRENCE EDWARD BACON
618- PROVIDENCE, RI
ROBERT B BARKER
FRANK J FORTE
PATRICIA A VAN PETTEN
627- CINCINNATI, OH
ERIKA HOWARD
FRANCIS HUFF
HARRIS H NGUYEN
GREGORY SMALLWOOD
JAMES HENRY SONNABEND
JOSEPH STARENCHAK JR
1179- NEW YORK, NY
JOHN C HAANRAADTS
PIERRE E JACOB
MICHAEL J RENNA
694- SAN ANTONIO, TX
MARTIN VAN BURE DIKES
FILIBERTO G GALVAN
ROBERT YBARRA
1181- NEW YORK, NY
MINDELSON ALRICHE
DORITA BROWN
MAJOR W HARTRIDGE
LESLIE W HILL JR
JEAN JACOTIN
FRITZ LAURENT
SHANA MAZYCK
MATTHEW M MC HALE
GRACE PERRINO
JOSEPH HENRY SESSA
RALPH SESSA
FRED STAITI
713- MEMPHIS, TN
SILAS PARHAM JR
TOMMIE SMITH
725- BIRMINGHAM, AL
ORVALLE G QUATTLEBAUM
726- STATEN ISLAND, NY
LOUIS PIACENTINO
732- ATLANTA, GA
MARCUS F CLEMENTS
JOHN E ISAACS
CHARLIE R KENDRICK
RICHARD MARTIN
WILLIAM SHIPP JR
STANLEY SMALLS
757- PORTLAND, OR
DAVID E CAHILL
JORGE L CAO
758- TACOMA, WA
MARCIA LINVILLE
788- ST. LOUIS, MO
RONALD L BLANKS
CLARENCE H HAENEL
MARCIA A MITCHELL
VIRGIE R VAUGHN
CLARENCE J WASSER
820- UNION CITY, NJ
LUIS A DELEON
ALBERT MENKEN
PATRICK S OLAH
RAYMOND THORPE
823- ELIZABETH, NJ
NAPOLEON HOLLEY
824- NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ
FRANCIS KUMINIEWICZ
825- ORADELL, NJ
JAGNANAN PRAGOAT
880- CAMDEN, NJ
SANTO R DE LUCA
JAMES EASTERWOOD
LOUIS GOLDSTEIN
EDWARD J MATUSIAK
DAVID G MONAHAN
JOHN PILIERE
1235- NASHVILLE, TN
JOSEPH JACKSON
1267- FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
LOUISE MARIE CRAMER
CHARLIE HAYNES
1277- LOS ANGELES, CA
PATRICIA A ANDERSON
VITRUVIUS H BROOKS
GREGORY R FRANTZ
1309- SAN DIEGO, CA
RUTH D MERSHON
1321- ALBANY & TROY, NY
DELORES B BROWN
WILLIAM J KLEIN
1324- SAVANNAH, GA
DARNELL CRAWFORD
1336- BRIDGEPORT, CT
MANUEL VAZQUEZ
1342- BUFFALO, NY
FREDERICK C GRIESE
DANIEL R LESINSKI
EARL A TONG
ROOSEVELT R WILLIAMS
1385- DAYTON, OH
NATHANIEL L ROBERTSON
1433- PHOENIX, AZ
REX E GLASCO
1447- LOUISVILLE, KY
RICHARD COOPER
WILLIAM H HATFIELD
JOHN SIMMONS
998- MILWAUKEE, WI
DAVID E RILEY
1498- JOPLIN, MO
DONALD WINN
1001- DENVER, CO
DENNIS M CAGIANESE
GERALD HENRY SEADER
ERIC S WAUGH
1548- PLYMOUTH, MA
SAMUEL J MARTINEZ
682- FORT WAYNE, IN
CLEODIS BOYD
ROBERT HILL JR
1005- MINNEAPOLIS & ST. PAUL, MN
DANIEL P DREXLER
JIM DUNCAN
MICHAEL A KRAKOWSKI
EDWIN M LYSENG
689- WASHINGTON, DC
CARL C GREEN JR
1037- NEW BEDFORD, MA
MAURICE A COTE
January/February 2013 | IN TRANSIT
1220- RICHMOND, VA
CHRISTOPHER ARTIS
1582- NIAGARA FALLS, ON
DONALD J CANHAM
1700- CHICAGO, IL
JAMES ADAMS
VERNON RICHARD GRIMES
1729- PITTSBURGH, PA
JOHN H MICHAELS
ROBERT G MORGAN
Amalgamated Transit Union
Convention Delegates & Guests:
THE 57TH
INTERNATIONAL
CONVENTION
will be held at
Hilton San Diego Bayfront
San Diego, CA
August 25-30, 2013
Please be patient.
No reservations available
until the Convention Call
is published in 2013
IN TRANSIT
| January/February 2013
31
Amalgamated Transit Union
AFL-CIO/CLC
c/o Canadian Mail Exchange
2950 Stanley Ave
Niagara Falls, ON L2E 6S8
Canada
www.atu.org
STAY CONNECTED
PRINTED IN U.S.A.
PLEASE GIVE.
Help needed for members still suffering effects of Hurricane Sandy
The ATU Disaster Relief Fund
Mother Nature recently unleashed her wrath with
devastating floods and high winds, and ATU members’
homes and property have been destroyed and damaged
in the process.
When a crisis hits, ATU members do what they do
every day on the job, in their communities, in their places
of worship. They don’t ask questions about when and
where and how. They just help out.
To help out our brothers and sisters along the east coast,
please contribute to the ATU Disaster Relief Fund.
Donations can be made online by visiting www.atu.org
or by mailing a check to:
Amalgamated Transit Union
Disaster Relief Fund
5025 Wisconsin, Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC 20016
Attn: Lawrence J. Hanley
U.S. Contributors: Your contribution is tax deductible
to the extent provided by law.

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