Télécharger le catalogue

Commentaires

Transcription

Télécharger le catalogue
Bagu
Matter and Spirit in Rainforest Country / L’esprit de la forêt tropicale
Queensland, Australia / Australie
Éditions Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris
Bagu
Matter and Spirit in Rainforest Country
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Queensland, Australia / Australie
Bagu
2
préface
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco
S.A.S. le Prince Albert II de Monaco
During my travels I have discovered Aboriginal and Oceanic art; genuine
sacred pathways through myths and dreams and the harsh reality of humanity’s
tenuous link with nature.
The Oceanographic Museum wanted to celebrate this imaginative and
colourful art with an exhibition entitled ‘Taba
Naba’, the title of a traditional Torres Strait Islander
children’s song recounting the relationship
between a child and the sea.
The Museum is thus inviting us on a voyage of
discovery. I am pleased to be able to lend several
works from my private collection to highlight my
admiration for these artists who have been able
to express, in such a unique way, the urgent need
to protect the environment and the oceans. The
Oceanographic Museum was created by my greatgrandfather, Prince Albert I, as a temple dedicated
to the sea and a meeting point for Science
and Art, the ‘two driving forces of civilisation’.
Contemporary art is a great vehicle for drawing
attention to the dangers that threaten us. The
artworks are true advocates for the preservation
of marine ecosystems and are particularly powerful
when viewed in the rooms of the Oceanographic
Museum; creating a living dialogue across our
collections. Using a wide variety of media (painting,
sculpture, photography, video, masks, headdresses,
etc.) and materials (wood, metal, plastic, fishing nets,
etc.), these works alert us to the importance of nature; the risks of climate change
and the devastation we inflict on our environment through overfishing, pollution and
plastic waste. They are an invitation to change our habits.
This exhibition has created real momentum with important support from
the Australian Government and the Queensland Government, major Australian
galleries and major museums such as the Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht and the
Musée des Confluences in Lyon. I hope that this event is welcomed with great
enthusiasm by the public, both in its encounter with the artworks as well as with the
many related events and workshops the Oceanographic Museum will be running.
It is by preserving endangered oceans that we will be able to usher in a new era of
sustainable development, shared by all peoples. I want to offer my sincere thanks to
the organisers for having devised and produced this unique and majestic exhibition
that demonstrates a world in balance that we aIl wish for.
Lors de mes voyages, j'ai pu découvrir l’art aborigène et océanien, véritables
itinéraires sacrés entre mythes, rêves et la dure réalité des liens distendus entre l’homme
et la nature.
Le Musée océanographique a souhaité célébrer cet art si imaginatif et
coloré avec une exposition dont le titre Taba Naba évoque une chanson enfantine
traditionnelle des peuples du détroit de Torres racontant la relation entre un enfant
et la mer. Le musée nous adresse une véritable invitation au voyage. Je suis heureux
de prêter plusieurs œuvres de ma collection privée pour souligner mon admiration
pour ces artistes qui ont su exprimer, de manière si singulière, l’impérieuse nécessité de
protéger l’environnement et les océans.
Le Musée océanographique a été créé par mon trisaïeul, le Prince Albert Ier,
comme un temple dédié à la mer et un carrefour des intelligences et des sensibilités
autour des « deux forces directrices de la civilisation », la Science et l’Art. L’art
contemporain est un formidable vecteur de sensibilisation sur les périls qui nous
3
menacent et un plaidoyer pour préserver les écosystèmes marins.
Les œuvres d’art prennent toute leur place sur le parvis et au sein des salles et
des collections du Musée océanographique, créant ainsi un dialogue plus vivant.
Ces œuvres, utilisant tous les supports (peintures, sculptures, photographies, vidéos,
masques, coiffes…) et de nombreux matériaux (bois, métal, plastiques, filets de pêche…), nous
alertent sur les risques et les vulnérabilités liés à l’impact du changement climatique et sur
les ravages que nous infligeons à notre environnement avec la surpêche, la pollution par les
déchets plastiques… et nous invitent à changer nos habitudes.
Cette exposition a su créer une véritable dynamique avec les soutiens
importants apportés par le gouvernement fédéral d’Australie et de l’État du Queensland,
par de grandes galeries australiennes ainsi que de grands musées tels que le Musée d’art
aborigène contemporain d’Utrecht ou le musée des Confluences de Lyon.
Je souhaite que cet événement soit accueilli avec un grand enthousiasme de la part du
public car au-delà de la rencontre avec cet art, le Musée océanographique proposera de
nombreuses animations et ateliers.
C’est en préservant les océans menacés que nous pourrons inaugurer une
nouvelle ère, celle du développement durable et partagé, pour tous les peuples. Je tiens
sincèrement à remercier tous les organisateurs pour avoir imaginé et réussi à mettre en
place cette exposition unique et majestueuse qui dessine un monde d’équilibre que nous
appelons de nos vœux.
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
preface
avant-propos
His Excellency Mr Stephen Brady AO CVO,
Australian Ambassador to France and to the Principality of Monaco
Son Excellence Monsieur Stephen Brady,
Ambassadeur d’Australie en France et à Monaco
The Government of Australia is proud to support ‘Taba
Naba’ at the Oceanographic Institute in Monaco, a series of three
major exhibitions which explore the unique relationship between
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia, and
their country.
The cornerstone of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
beliefs is their interconnectedness to country – the natural
environment that nurtures them, and must in turn be nurtured
by them. This connection, seen by many Indigenous Australians
as central to their identity, spirituality and cultural well-being, has
influenced millennia of unique cultural practices and produced a
tradition of sustainable land and water management. It is therefore
entirely appropriate that these exhibitions take place at the
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, whose mission, as stated by its
founder H.S.H. Prince Albert I, is ‘knowing, loving and protecting the
oceans’.
The exhibition ‘Australia : Defending the Oceans at
the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands Art’ presents six
monumental installations by contemporary artists from the coastal
regions of northern Australia. Commissioned by curators
Stéphane Jacob and Suzanne O’Connell, over fifty artists including
Ken Thaiday Snr., Alick Tipoti and Brian Robinson and art centres
including Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre whose Bagu sculptures
will welcome visitors to the forecourt of the museum. Erub Arts,
Pormpuraaw Art and Culture Centre and Tjutjuna Art and Culture
Centre have all worked on the dramatic installations of giant sea
creatures featured in the hall of honour of the museum. These
works are a vibrant illustration of living Indigenous culture and the
unique relationship Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
have with the ocean environment.
For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the
process of artistic creation is intrinsic to the practice of their cultural
heritage and the transmission of knowledge from generation to
generation.
‘Oceania islanders: past masters in navigation and artistic
expression’ curated by Didier Zanette brings together objects and
artefacts from the Pacific Islands to demonstrate the similarities
between the different cultural traditions, with a focus on the sea and
its navigation. This exhibition echoes the collections assembled by
Prince Albert I during his scientific expeditions which are at the core
of the collection of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.
The exhibition ‘Living Waters’ explores how these
traditions influence the traditional and contemporary art of
Australia’s first peoples. The exhibition celebrates the world’s oldest
continuing living culture and demonstrates the extraordinary
capacity of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists
to adapt and engage with other cultures, across different media.
Mr Marc Sordello and Mr Francis Missana, whose major collection
lies at the heart of ‘Living Waters’, are to be commended for their
important contribution. So too their curatorial team, led by
Dr Erica Izett for bringing together contemporary Indigenous
artists as diverse as Emily Kngwarreye and Christian Thompson and
investigating the transcultural space through works by Ruark Lewis
and Imants Tillers, alongside those of the Yolngu from
eastern Arnhem Land.
Like the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, the
Australian Government shares a commitment to the sustainable
management and effective protection of the world’s oceans.
The government is also committed to promoting international
recognition and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander cultures. I express my sincere thanks to H.S.H. Prince
Albert II of Monaco, the Oceanographic Museum, the artists and
curators for this extraordinary opportunity they have created
to show Australia in Monaco, and I commend all those who have
contributed to the fulfilment of this ambitious project.
Le gouvernement australien a l’honneur de soutenir le
Pour ces peuples, le processus de création artistique
projet Taba Naba, organisé au sein de l’Institut océanographique de
est indissociable de la pratique de leur héritage culturel et de la
Monaco. Cette série de trois expositions majeures explore la relation
transmission des savoirs de génération en génération.
unique liant les peuples australiens aborigènes et insulaires du
détroit de Torres à leur environnement.
l’expression artistique », conçue par Didier Zanette, rassemble des
objets et artefacts issus des îles du Pacifique, pour mettre en lumière
L’interdépendance des hommes et de leur environnement
« Océanie : des îliens passés maîtres dans la navigation et
est en effet au cœur des croyances des peuples aborigènes et des
les similarités entre différentes traditions culturelles, autour du
îles du détroit de Torres : la nature qui les entoure subvient à leurs
thème de la mer et de la navigation. Cette exposition fait écho aux
besoins, et ils s’efforcent de l’entretenir en retour. Cette relation
collections constituées par le prince Albert Ier lors de ses expéditions
constitue pour de nombreux peuples autochtones d’Australie
scientifiques, véritables poutres maîtresses du fonds du Musée
un aspect essentiel de leur identité, de leur spiritualité et de leur
océanographique de Monaco.
bien-être culturel. Elle a influencé des millénaires de pratiques
culturelles uniques et le développement d’une tradition de gestion
les arts premiers et contemporains des peuples autochtones
durable des sols et des ressources en eau. Dès lors, le choix du
d’Australie. L’exposition rend hommage à la plus ancienne culture
Musée océanographique de Monaco, dont la mission énoncée par
du monde encore en activité et démontre l’extraordinaire capacité
son fondateur le prince Albert Ier vise à faire « connaître, aimer et
d’adaptation des artistes australiens aborigènes et des îles du détroit
protéger » les océans, prend tout son sens.
de Torres, qui ont su engager le dialogue avec d’autres cultures, à
travers différents supports. Il convient de saluer la contribution
« Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des
« Eaux vivantes » explore l’influence de ces traditions sur
Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres » regroupe six
essentielle de M. Marc Sordello et de M. Francis Missana, dont
installations monumentales réalisées par des artistes contemporains
l’importante collection est au centre de l’exposition. Il faut également
originaires des régions côtières du Nord de l’Australie. Réunis par les
remercier leur équipe de commissaires d’exposition qui a su
commissaires d’exposition Stéphane Jacob et Suzanne O’Connell, plus
rassembler, sous la direction d’Erica Izett, des artistes contemporains
de cinquante artistes ont travaillé, dont Ken Thaiday Snr., Alick Tipoti
d’horizons variés tels qu’Emily Kngwarreye et Christian Thompson,
et Brian Robinson, ainsi que des centres d’arts tels que le Girringun
tout en proposant une approche interculturelle confrontant les
Aboriginal Art Centre, dont les sculptures Bagu accueillent les
œuvres de Ruark Lewis et d’Imants Tillers à celles d’artistes du peuple
visiteurs sur le parvis du musée, Erub Arts, le Pormpuraaw Art and
Yolngu, originaire de l’Est de la terre d’Arnhem.
Culture Centre et le Tjutjuna Arts and Cultural Centre, qui ont créé
les installations spectaculaires exposées dans les salles, prenant la
un même engagement en faveur d’une gestion durable et d’une
forme de gigantesques créatures marines. Ces œuvres offrent une
protection efficace des océans. L’Australie a également à cœur
brillante illustration des traditions culturelles actuelles et de la
de promouvoir, à l’échelle internationale, la reconnaissance et la
relation unique qui unit les Aborigènes et les Insulaires du détroit de
compréhension des cultures aborigènes et des îles du détroit de
Torres à leur environnement marin.
Torres. Je tiens à remercier chaleureusement S.A.S. le prince Albert II,
Le musée et le gouvernement australien partagent
le Musée océanographique de Monaco, les artistes et les commissaires
d’exposition qui sont à l’origine de cette aventure extraordinaire
mettant à l’honneur l’Australie au cœur de Monaco, et je salue toutes
les personnes qui ont contribué à la réalisation de cet ambitieux projet.
5
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
4
foreword
Senator The Honourable Mitch Fifield, Australian Government Minister for the Arts
Monsieur le sénateur Mitch Fifield, ministre australien des Arts
Bagu
6
The Australian Government is proud to support Taba Naba, Australia,
Oceania, Arts of the Sea People at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.
Comprising works by well-known and emerging Australian Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander artists as well as works from the Pacific Islands, the exhibition conveys
a profound message about the responsibility we all have as custodians of our
environment, culture and heritage. It also celebrates the great richness and diversity
of the art of Australia and the Pacific region.
The exhibition at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco offers an
opportunity for international audiences to experience the new works created for this
exhibition. I extend my congratulations to the artists and curators involved in this
extraordinary project and commend the vision of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II
of Monaco and the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco. Australia is proud to be
collaborating with Monaco on this important exhibition.
Le gouvernement australien est fier de soutenir Taba Naba, Australie, Océanie,
Arts des peuples de la mer au Musée océanographique de Monaco. Cette exposition,
qui présente des œuvres d’artistes aborigènes et du détroit de Torres connus et moins
foreword
avant-propos
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, Premier of Queensland and Minister for the Arts
Madame Annastacia Palaszczuk, Premier ministre et ministre des Arts du Queensland
It is my great pleasure to share the extraordinary work of Queensland’s Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander artists featured in 'Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Island Art' as part of the Taba Naba, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People.
I invite visitors to experience the unique art from Queensland and to embrace the
landscape, country and people of the world’s oldest living culture. Our Queensland artists, many
of whom live in remote communities, produce works that attract collectors and lovers of art
nationally and internationally.
My Government has provided financial support for this prestigious exhibition to ensure
Queensland artists can take their art to a global audience. This investment is part of Backing
Indigenous Arts, a landmark Queensland Government initiative that has been creating sustainable
economic opportunities and ethical pathways for Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
artists since 2007 and continues to nurture the next generation of artists.
It is my hope that this exhibition will encourage visitors to come to Queensland and see
for themselves the natural and unique beauty of the Great Barrier Reef and the lands that inspire
our artists. I congratulate the artists and Indigenous Art Centres presented here and trust that
works from Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island artists will continue to make their way
into international collections.
connus, est porteuse d’un message puissant : la protection de notre environnement,
de notre culture et de notre patrimoine nous incombe à tous. L’exposition rend aussi
hommage à la grande richesse et à la diversité de l’art australien et du Pacifique.
Queensland et du détroit de Torres présentées dans l’exposition « Australie : la défense des océans au cœur
de l'art des Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres », dans le cadre du projet Taba Naba, Australie,
Le Musée océanographique de Monaco propose à un public international
C’est avec un immense plaisir que nous partageons les œuvres des artistes insulaires du
des œuvres créées spécifiquement pour cette exposition. Je veux féliciter les artistes et
Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer.
les conservateurs impliqués dans cet incroyable projet, ainsi que Son Altesse Sérénissime
le Prince Albert II de Monaco et le Musée océanographique de Monaco d’avoir voulu
ancienne culture vivante du monde à travers le paysage, la géographie et les peuples qui la constituent.
et permis cette exposition. L’Australie est fière de collaborer avec Monaco pour cette
Nos artistes du Queensland, pour la plupart issus de territoires communautaires reculés, réalisent des
extraordinaire exposition.
œuvres qui attirent les collectionneurs et les amateurs d’art aussi bien en Australie que dans le monde
J’invite les visiteurs à découvrir la scène artistique unique du Queensland et à explorer la plus
entier. Mon gouvernement a fourni un soutien financier à cette prestigieuse exposition pour permettre
aux artistes du Queensland de toucher un public international.
Cet investissement s’inscrit dans l’initiative de soutien aux arts aborigènes mise en œuvre par
le gouvernement du Queensland sous le nom de « Backing Indigenous Arts ». Depuis 2007, cette initiative
contribue à créer une économie durable fondée sur des valeurs éthiques pour les artistes insulaires du
Queensland et du détroit de Torres, tout en offrant un tremplin à la prochaine génération d’artistes.
J’espère que cette exposition encouragera les visiteurs à séjourner dans le Queensland pour
découvrir par eux-mêmes la beauté naturelle et unique de la Grande Barrière de corail et des paysages qui
inspirent nos artistes. Je félicite les artistes et les centres d’art prenant part à cet événement en espérant
que les artistes du Queensland et du détroit de Torres rencontreront au cours des prochaines années
le succès qu’ils méritent au sein des collections internationales.
7
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
foreword
avant-propos
Matter and Spirit:
The Quintessence of Bagu Rainforest Country
By Jane Raffan
“The land and its relationship to the coast and marine habitat under-pins each of the stories. The
sky that connects these elements is represented by the Bagu and its traditional significance and links
to the shooting star1.”
This is the realm of the Bagu, a fire-making tool devised as an anthropomorphic
representation of the fire creation spirit Jiggabunah, whose presence is revealed in the night skies by
shooting stars. The Bagu's earthly realm is a region of spectacular scenic beauty encompassing vast areas
of pristine rainforest canopy and wet/dry sclerophyll forests stretching to the coast and the fringes of the
Great Barrier Reef. Viewed from the mountain tops rising above the canopy, the lush landscapes in this
region are adorned with a myriad of waterways, gorges, waterfalls, mangroves and beaches.
Earth, Air, Fire and Water: Landscape and the Elements
Matière et esprit :
la quintessence de la forêt
tropicale humide, berceau du Bagu
Par Jane Raffan
« La terre, dans son rapport à la côte et au milieu marin, est le fil conducteur
de toutes les histoires. Le ciel qui relie ces éléments entre eux est représenté par le Bagu,
à travers sa signification traditionnelle et ses liens avec l’étoile filante1. »
Bagu Installation in
the forecourt of the
Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco, 2016 /
Installation Bagu sur
le parvis du Musée
océanographique de
Monaco, 2016
Pour les peuples de Girringun originaires des forêts humides du Nord
du Queensland, le Bagu, planche à feu traditionnelle, est une représentation
anthropomorphe de l’esprit créateur du feu, nommé Jiggabunah, dont la présence se
manifeste la nuit sous forme d’étoiles filantes. La terre qui a vu naître le Bagu offre des
paysages d’une beauté stupéfiante englobant de vastes zones de forêt humide vierge et
de forêts sclérophylles sèches/humides, qui s’étendent vers le littoral, jusqu’à l’orée de la
Grande Barrière de corail. Observés depuis les sommets montagneux qui s’élèvent audessus de la canopée, les paysages luxuriants de la région s’habillent d’une myriade de
cours d’eau, de gorges, de chutes d’eau, de mangroves et de plages.
9
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
The ancestral and custodial country of Traditional Owner groups represented by the Girringun
Aboriginal Corporation is part of a larger expanse of traditional country of Australia’s Indigenous
Rainforest Peoples, which stretches some 1,250,000 square kilometres along the Far North
Queensland (FNQ) in the World Heritage region known as The Wet Tropics2. The Girringun groups
have responsibility for country located in the southern areas of the expanse: rainforests and other
lands, waters and seas covering some 25,000 square kilometres3.
The Wet Tropics receive a mean annual rainfall ranging from 1,200 to over 8,000 millimetres
with some sites recording much higher volumes, with the wettest region lying between Cairns and Tully
on the coast and sub-coastal ranges, where the total is generally over 3,000 millimetres4.
Most rain falls in the summer or monsoonal months, from December through March.
“The rainbows show where the rain is coming from (…) from the east means there is
more rain to come. He starts off in the saltwater to make rain. When he picks up a lot of
water for rain in the sea he will bring it over this side to the land. When the rain stops, and
when he sets in the west he takes all the rain with him. It goes into the ground with him.”
‘Maangi Rainbow’ Bagu by Emily Murray, Girramay/Jirrbal Traditional Owner
L’Extrême-Nord du Queensland est également soumis à des phénomènes
météorologiques violents, en particulier des cyclones tropicaux5. En 2011, un cyclone
tropical de catégorie 5, nommé Yasi, a balayé la côte de Mission Beach, à proximité
du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre basé à Cardwell, dévastant sur son passage la
communauté et de larges étendues de terres traditionnelles aborigènes.
“The Bagu is an important tool for us. It tells a story about culture (…) about fire and
water. Things we needed for basic survival. This Bagu tells the story about water. Where
there is life there is water. When it rains it flushes out the creeks and rivers and makes
everything fresh again. The wet season and the drought season, they are one.”
‘Communicating Safety’ Bagu by John Murray, Girramay/Jirrbal Traditional Owner
FNQ is also subject to severe weather events, in particular tropical cyclones5. In 2011,
a severe (category 5) tropical cyclone, Yasi, crossed the coast at Mission Beach, close to the Girringun
Aboriginal Art Centre’s base in Cardwell is devastating the community and large swathes of traditional
country across the region.
Terre, air, feu et eau : le paysage et ses éléments
tombe à seaux. Le niveau des rivières monte. Enfin, le cyclone disparaît.
Les arbres repoussent peu à peu. Et la vie reprend son cours. »
Eileen Tep, communauté Jirrbal, à propos du Bagu Gumbarda-Cyclone
Territoire et droit coutumier, traditions communes
et valeurs patrimoniales
Les Tropiques humides sont l’unique région d’Australie où l’on recense une occupation
Bagu and jiman by Gladys J. Henry /
Bagu et jiman par Gladys J. Henry
10
peuplés par les communautés aborigènes de la forêt tropicale humide. Cette zone s’étire
permanente de la forêt humide par des groupes aborigènes6. Il s’agit également de la
dernière grande région de l’État du Queensland à avoir été occupée par les Européens,
des années 1860 aux années 18807. Les stratégies de subsistance des habitants de la forêt
Les terres coutumières ancestrales des groupes aborigènes représentés par le Girringun
Aboriginal Art Centre font partie d’une étendue plus vaste de territoires traditionnels
« Le cyclone se forme sur le littoral. Il commence à tourner inlassablement.
Alors, le vent se met à souffler. Et la tempête commence à gronder. La pluie
humide et leur schéma d’occupation du territoire selon les différents écosystèmes locaux
Wallaman Falls near Ingham /
Chutes de Wallaman près d’Ingham
étaient alors influencés par les conditions climatiques saisonnières, notamment par les
pluies de mousson, qui rendaient plus difficile la recherche de nourriture et de matériaux.
11
du Queensland (Far North Queensland), dans la région des Tropiques humides du
Daniel Beeron,
Bunyaydinyu Bagu
Ceramic and cane / céramique
et jonc, 42 x 18,5 x 8 cm, 2012
Queensland, inscrite au patrimoine mondial de l’humanité2. Les peuples de Girringun
assument la responsabilité des terres situées dans les zones méridionales de cette
étendue – forêt tropicale humide et autres territoires, points d’eau et zones littorales –
couvrant quelque 25 000 kilomètres3.
Les Tropiques humides du Queensland reçoivent des précipitations annuelles
variant de 1 200 à 8 000 millimètres, avec des volumes bien plus importants encore pour certains
sites. La région la plus humide s’étend entre Cairns et Tully, sur les zones littorales et sublittorales,
où les précipitations annuelles dépassent généralement les 3 000 millimètres4. La majeure
Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre artists:
Doris Kinjun, Ethel Murray, Alison Murray
with coordinator Len Cook /
Artistes du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre :
Doris Kinjun, Ethel Murray, Alison Murray
avec le coordinateur Len Cook
partie des pluies se concentre pendant l’été ou les mois de mousson, de décembre à mars.
« L’arc-en-ciel indique d’où vient la pluie (…) si elle vient de l’est, l’averse
se prolonge. L’arc-en-ciel puise dans l’océan pour donner la pluie. Lorsqu’il puise
beaucoup d’eau dans la mer, il amène la pluie vers nous, sur la côte. Quand
l’averse s’arrête, l’arc-en-ciel se déplace à l’ouest et emporte toute la pluie avec
lui. L’eau plonge dans la terre avec lui. »
Emily Murray, communauté Girramay/Jirrbal,
à propos du Bagu Maangi-Arc-en-ciel
« Le Bagu est un outil important pour nous. Il parle de notre culture (…)
du feu et de l’eau. De choses essentielles à notre survie. Ce Bagu raconte
l’histoire de l’eau. Là où il y a de la vie, il y a de l’eau. Les pluies vidangent
les ruisseaux et les rivières et redonnent sa fraîcheur au paysage. La saison
des pluies et la saison sèche ne font qu’un. »
John Murray, communauté Girramay/Jirrbal,
à propos du Bagu Communication de sécurité
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
sur quelque 1 250 000 kilomètres carrés, d’un bout à l’autre de l’Extrême-Nord de l’État
“The cyclone starts at the seaside. It starts to go round and round. That’s when the
wind starts to blow. And the storm will start to roar. The rain will start to pelt down. The
rivers will start to rise. After the cyclone is gone. The trees will start to grow back. And
life begins again.”
‘Gumbarda–Cyclone’ Bagu by Eileen Tep, Jirrbal Traditional Owner
Customary Lands, Law, Shared Traditions and Heritage Values
Weaver ants build nest with wattle
leaves / Fourmis tisserandes
construisant un nid avec
une feuille d’acacia
Bagu
12
The Wet Tropics is the only place in Australia where Indigenous people have permanently inhabited
a tropical rainforest environment6 and was the last major area in the state to be encroached upon by
European occupation and resource exploitation, with concentrated efforts in the region occurring from
the 1860s through 1880s7.
In the Wet Tropics, Rainforest Peoples’ subsistence strategies and settlement practices across
the diverse ecosystems of traditional lands were subject to seasonal conditions, such as monsoonal
rains, which made gathering foods and materials more difficult. Research into these practices has
revealed a sophisticated network of frequent and complex social, political, economic and ceremonial
interactions throughout the various language groups, who shared cosmological traditions and
narratives8. Moreover, the language differences across Rainforest Peoples did not place limitations on
their “charter for the various kinds of sharing and use of country encountered in this region9.”
Girringun represents nine Traditional Owner groups: the ten artists exhibiting in Monaco stem
from three, the Girramay, Gulnay, and Jirrbal peoples; the others being the Nywaigi, Gugu, Badhun,
Warrgamay, Warungnu, Bandjin and Djiru peoples.
Des recherches effectuées sur ces pratiques ont révélé un réseau
sophistiqué d’interactions sociales, politiques, économiques et cérémonielles,
Tully River / Fleuve Tully
fréquentes et complexes, entre les groupes locuteurs de différents dialectes, qui
partageaient les mêmes traditions et récits cosmologiques8. De plus, pour les habitants
View to Hinchinbrook Island /
Vue sur l’île d'Hinchinbrook
Ces valeurs permettent de promouvoir l’héritage culturel unique des peuples de
traditionnels de la forêt humide, les différences linguistiques ne constituaient pas une
la forêt humide, à savoir leurs traditions distinctives, leurs lois, leurs innovations techniques,
barrière à la « charte définissant les différents modes de partage et d’utilisation du
leurs méthodes de gestion du territoire et leur expertise du traitement et de la préparation
territoire caractéristique de cette région9 ».
de certaines plantes toxiques pour un usage alimentaire, ainsi qu’un grand nombre de
préparations médicinales traditionnelles. C’est ainsi que plusieurs artistes participant à
La communauté de Girringun représente neuf groupes tribaux
traditionnels : les onze artistes qui exposent à Monaco sont issus de trois d’entre eux, à
l’exposition de Monaco font référence à l’utilisation des paniers tressés pour le stockage
savoir les peuples Girramay, Gulnay et Jirrbal ; les autres peuples de Girringun sont les
du mirrany, graine toxique du châtaignier d’Australie (Castanospermum australe), dont les
Nywaigi, les Gugu, les Badhun, les Warrgamay, les Warungnu, les Bandjin et les Djiru.
poisons sont extraits par un procédé d’immersion et de lavage dans les cours d’eau11.
« Pour les hommes et les femmes de la forêt humide, le quotidien s’inscrit
dans un paysage où leurs habitations, leur environnement et ses secrets ne font qu’un.
Chaque arbre, chaque feuille et chaque liane possèdent un nom spécifique associé
les transmettons aux plus jeunes, car elles nous guident dans la protection
à une utilisation particulière, chaque méandre de rivière est chargé de souvenirs et
des terres et des océans, pour vivre dans le respect de l’environnement.
de significations, dans chaque pierre, chaque affleurement, un ancêtre sommeille,
Aujourd’hui encore, les jeunes nous questionnent sur la bonne manière de
renfermant en lui une force et une vie invisibles10. »
faire les choses, comment fabriquer un midja12, ce qui se mange et ce qui ne se
mange pas, ce genre de choses. »
Les Tropiques humides ont été inscrits au patrimoine mondial
« Nous restons toujours à l’écoute des histoires traditionnelles et nous
de l’humanité en raison de leur biodiversité exceptionnelle et de leur flore
Emily Murray, communauté Girramay/Jirrbal,
particulièrement riche. Cette région regroupe des spécimens permettant de dérouler
à propos du Bagu Maangi Arc-en-ciel
la plupart des grandes étapes de l’évolution de la flore, notamment de nombreuses
espèces apparues au temps où l’Australie était encore rattachée au supercontinent
préhistorique du Gondwana. Afin de valoriser l’importance des cultures aborigènes
obtenir une soupe. Nous devons protéger l’environnement pour pouvoir
dans la région, le gouvernement australien a annoncé, en 2012, l’inclusion d’un certain
nombre de « valeurs patrimoniales autochtones » dans la liste du patrimoine mondial.
Flowers of the black bean tree /
Fleurs de châtaignier d'Australie
« Les anguilles sont un excellent remède (...) on les fait bouillir pour
continuer à chasser et à manger comme nous l’avons toujours fait. »
Elizabeth Nolan, communauté Jirrbal, à propos du Bagu Anguille-Jubbun
“We still listen to the old stories and carry them on to the little ones because the
stories are all about looking after land and the sea, about living the right way.
The younger ones still come and ask us the right way to do things, how to build a midja12,
what food to eat and not to eat, all those things.”
‘Maangi-Rainbow’ Bagu by Emily Murray, Girramay/Jirrbal Traditional Owner
Bagu
14
“Eel is very good for healing people (...) they boil it up as a soup. We need to look
after environment so that we can continue to hunt and eat like we have always done.”
‘Jubbun Eel’ Bagu by Elizabeth Nolan, Jirrbal Traditional Owner
INDIAN
OCEAN
Darwin
Cairns
Girringun
NORTHERN
TERRITORY
WESTERN
AUSTRALIA
PACIFIC
OCEAN
QUEENSLAND
Alice Springs
Brisbane
SOUTH
AUSTRALIA
Right / À droite
Rainforest beside Corduroy
Creek, Girramay country /
Forêt humide près de Corduroy
Creek, territoire Girramay
Adelaide
NEW
SOUTH
WALES
Sydney
Canberra
VICTORIA
Melbourne
TASMANIA
TASMAN
SEA
Hobart
15
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Wallaby in the surrounds of
Jirrbal country / Wallaby près
du territoire Jirrbal
“Place (…) is still everything for the rainforest men and women: their places, their
habitat and its secrets. Each tree and leaf and vine has its special name and use for them,
each river bend is full of memories and meanings, each rock and each outcrop is a frozen
ancestor, tense with force and hidden life10.”
The World Heritage status of The Wet Tropics rainforests derives from its significant
biodiversity, especially the flora, with the area containing an almost complete record of the major
stages in earth’s plant life evolution, and with many species originating in the time when Australia
was still part of the prehistoric continent of Gondwana. Recognising the significance of Indigenous
culture in the region, in 2012 the Australian Government announced the inclusion of particular
‘Indigenous heritage values’ as part of the existing World Heritage listing.
These values include acknowledgement of Rainforest Peoples’ unique cultural heritage, in
particular their distinctive traditions, law, technical innovation, use of fire in land management techniques
and their expertise employed to process and prepare toxic plants as foods, as well as a large number
traditional medicines. For example, several of the artists exhibiting in Monaco reference woven baskets
used as containers for mirrany or native black bean (Moreton Bay Chestnut, Castanospermum australe),
the poisons of which were exuded through submerging and washing in waterways11.
Il faut rappeler qu’au milieu du xixe siècle, la colonisation européenne ainsi que
l’usurpation des terres aborigènes, transformées en zones pastorales par les colons,
ont eu des répercussions importantes sur l’environnement, le mode de vie et la
culture des peuples aborigènes. Au début des années 1900, de vastes étendues de terre
ont été accaparées au profit de l’élevage, de l’agriculture et de l’exploration minière.
En parallèle, les peuples aborigènes sont alors décimés par les conflits coloniaux,
une situation aggravée par la dispersion des survivants13. L’histoire postcoloniale
de l’Australie est largement marquée par la résistance aborigène, les guérillas et les
massacres, mais il s’agit avant tout d’une histoire de résilience : aujourd’hui, tous les
groupes traditionnels représentés au sein de la Girringun Aboriginal Corporation ont
fait valoir leurs droits sur leurs terres ancestrales. Le groupe tribal des Gulnay est à ce
titre le dernier à avoir obtenu ces droits en 2014.
où matière et esprit ne font qu’un : la terre, l’eau, le feu et l’air fournissent les éléments
essentiels à la vie et l’esprit de chaque individu est nourri et préservé à travers un
rapport à la terre, à la culture et au monde des esprits, qui transcende l’histoire, les lois
et le temps linéaire du monde occidental.
Préservation de la vie et du territoire : utilisation du feu
et gestion des ressources
les récits créationnistes constituent le fondement des traditions et des lois applicables
aux terres coutumières. Chaque groupe possède ses propres histoires, expliquant
la genèse du territoire et des cours d’eau, ainsi que l’origine du feu. Aujourd’hui, les
Aborigènes sont de plus en plus reconnus pour leurs compétences en matière de gestion
environnementale, notamment pour leur expertise du feu, utilisé comme mécanisme
de contrôle et comme outil permettant de préserver la biodiversité et la durabilité de
l’environnement.
John Murray and his Bagu /
John Murray et son Bagu
Les histoires ancestrales axées sur le feu occupent une place importante dans
l’art des peuples du désert. En 2011, le peuple Martu, originaire d’Australie-Occidentale,
a dédié une exposition à cet élément central. Il existe au sein de cette communauté
des termes spécifiques décrivant la repousse de la végétation selon cinq étapes après
les brûlis15. Le feu est également un élément fondamental au sein d’autres cultures,
notamment pour les Yolgnu du Territoire du Nord16.
« Les anciens racontent comment ils utilisaient le Bagu et le jiman pour
faire du feu. À l’époque, il n’y avait pas d’allumettes. Juste le Bagu et le jiman.
C’est avec ces outils que nous avons grandi. »
John Murray, Communicating Safety /
Communication de sécurité
Aluminium frame, polyurethane
matting for wet areas / boats, plastic bath mats,
communication cable, plastic coated wire, wire ties /
structure aluminium, natte en polyuréthane pour
sol mouillé, rideau de douche plastique, câbles
de communication, fil de fer enrobé de plastique,
attaches de câble, 300 x 125 x 75 cm, 2015
17
Pour l’ensemble des peuples aborigènes disséminés à travers le continent australien,
Preserving Life and Land: Fire-making
and Management
Creation stories form the basis of the customary laws and
traditions of all Indigenous people from different cultures
and regions across Australia and individual groups have
principal or foundational stories about the creation
of their traditional lands and waters, as well as the
origin of fire. Australia’s Indigenous people are
now increasingly being recognised for their
environmental management skills, within which fire
is employed as a mechanism for control, as well as
a tool for ensuring bio-diversity and sustainability.
Les documents de revendication des terres par le peuple Gulnay font état
de protocoles relatifs au feu et au Bagu14. Le berceau du Bagu est un vaste territoire
Ninney Murray, communauté Jirrbal, à propos du Bagu Wungarr-Piège à
anguilles
« Le gardien désigné par le groupe était
chargé de conserver ces outils au sec, une lourde
responsabilité dans le climat humide de la forêt. »
“The designated keeper was under great pressure to keep
these fire-making implements dry, particularly in wet weather.”
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
16
In the late 19th century, European exploration and the
beginnings of colonial usurpation of Traditional Owners’ lands
for pastoral leases began to impact the environment, lives
and culture of Indigenous peoples. By the early 1900s,
vast tracts of lands were being cleared and subsumed by
grazing and farming in tandem with the decimation of
Indigenous peoples through warfare and the dispersal
of survivors13.
Indigenous resistance, guerrilla warfare and
massacres form a large part of Australia’s postcolonial history, and resilience too, for all the
Traditional Owner groups represented by Girringun
Aboriginal Corporation have now registered legal
claims over their traditional country, the most recent
being Gulnay in 2014.
The Gulnay people’s claim registration
referenced their fire-making protocols and the Bagu14.
The Bagu’s realm is a place where matter and spirit are
one: where earth, water, fire and air provide life giving
elements, and an individual’s spirit is nourished and preserved
through a connection to country, culture and the spirit world
that transcends white man’s history, laws and recorded time.
Fire Making
with Bagu and Jiman
Eileen Tep, Bagu with jiman,
Jirrbal Traditional Owner, rainforest
softwood, milky pine tree with ochres
and charcoal, sticks: softwood, strings:
handrolled from inner bark
Bagu et jiman, communauté Jirrbal,
bois tendre de la forêt humide, quinquina
d'Australie, ocres et charbon, bâtons :
bois tendre, ficelle : roulée à la main à
partir de l'écorce intérieure d'arbre,
30 x 10 x 7 cm, 2014
Also known as fire-drill base, fire-stick
board, hearth board, fire-stick figure
II
Also known as spindle, drill, ignition
shaft
III
Also known as Chikka-Bunnah,
Chic-ah-bunnah, Chicka-bunnah,
Jigubina and Djibugina
IV
Also referenced as boogadilla,
bubadilla, and bubarrila
V
Quoted in Nicolas Rothwell, ‘Aboriginal
People of the North Revive Old Craft
of Bagu Figures’, The Australian,
7 December 2013
I
The hand drill method usually requires the fire
board and fire-stick to be made of two different
strengths of wood. In the case of the Bagu
and jiman, the Bagu were carved from the soft
wooded bugadillaIV (milky pine tree, Alstonia
scholaris) and the jiman from plant material with
a tough outer skin, such as mudja (wild guava,
Eupomatia laurina), hibiscus, and djiman or djidu
(Tetra beech, Tetrasynandra pubescens).
Early fire-boards and contemporary
Bagu are decorated with natural ochres and
pigments: magera (yellow), jillan (black mixed
with wallaby blood), and garba (white), while
jiman are undecorated.
After use, the Bagu and jiman were
bound together with string made from the
bumbil tree (hairy fig, Ficus hispida) and wrapped
in a fire-making kit or bundle to keep them dry.
They were transported from camp to camp on
the body or in a jawun, a traditional bicornual
basket woven from split lawyer cane (Calamus
moti). The fire-making bundle was entrusted
only to the fire-makers – usually always senior
men – who bore the life-preserving responsibility
for maintaining everyday access to this vital
resource in the wet tropics of north Queensland.
Claude Beeron, Girramay Traditional
Owner, recounts the Bagu’s power: “When they
were making that fire the way a man used to
make fire, in the old days, they used to talk to
that thing: they could be there for a while with
the sticks, but when you talk and sing, that thing
smokes up quick! It's alive, it's got force, and
that's why it's such a live-looking object, and why
we make it the way we do.”V
Bagu (fire-stick figure)
Unidentified artist, North Queensland
rainforest area, carved softwood with
natural pigments, 34 x 8.6 x 2.5 cm,
c. 1930-1940
Bagu (figurine allume-feu)
Artiste anonyme, forêts humides
du Nord du Queensland, bois tendre
sculpté et pigments naturels,
34 x 8,6 x 2,5 cm, vers 1930-1940
Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane,
Acc. 2012.379
(purchased in / acheté en 2012)
Depuis des millénaires, des outils simples servant
à faire du feu sont utilisés au sein de nombreuses
cultures indigènes à travers le monde.
Le dispositif utilisé par les peuples aborigènes
des Tropiques humides du Queensland repose sur
une technique de friction manuelle et se compose
d’une planchette et d’un bâton à feu (fine tige de
bois). Les planchettes à feu traditionnelles en bois
sculpté utilisées par les Aborigènes de la forêt
humide sont de formes allongées et ovales. Elles
peuvent aussi prendre la forme anthropomorphe
du Bagu. Le Bagu est une représentation de
JiggabunahI, l’esprit du feu, qui créa les étoiles
filantes en lançant à travers la nuit des bâtons
enflammés, les jiman.
Le Bagu comporte plusieurs encoches
ou orifices. Pour produire du feu, le bâton à
feu (jiman) est inséré dans l’un des orifices et
maintenu entre les paumes de l’utilisateur. Celuici le fait rouler entre ses mains en effectuant un
mouvement de friction rapide de haut en bas afin
d’assurer une pression continue du bâton contre
la paroi du Bagu. Cette opération se prolonge
jusqu’à l’apparition de particules incandescentes
ou de braises, obtenues grâce à la chaleur générée
par la friction du bâton contre la planchette. Une
poignée de brindilles récoltées à l’avance peut
ensuite être allumée pour obtenir un petit foyer.
La technique de rotation manuelle
nécessite généralement que la planchette et
le bâton soient fabriqués à partir de variétés
de bois de densités différentes. Le Bagu était
donc sculpté dans le bois tendre du bugadillaII
(quinquina d’Australie, Alstonia scholaris),
tandis que le jiman était taillé dans des bois plus
durs, tels celui du mudja (Eupomatia laurina),
de l’hibiscus, ou bien encore du djiman/djidu
(Tetrasynandra pubescens).
Tout comme les planchettes à feu
traditionnelles, les Bagu contemporains sont
décorés avec des ocres et pigments naturels :
magera (jaune), jillan (pigment noir mélangé au
sang du wallaby) et garba (blanc), tandis que les
jiman conservent leur apparence naturelle. Une
fois utilisés, le Bagu et le jiman étaient attachés
ensemble à l’aide de ficelle en fibres de bumbil
(Ficus hispida), puis enveloppés afin de les protéger
de l’humidité. Ces outils étaient transportés d’un
camp à l’autre dans le jawun, un panier traditionnel
en feuilles de palmier (Calamus moti) tressées.
Cet attirail n’était confié qu’aux dignes
gardiens du feu — généralement des hommes
d’âge mûr — qui assumaient la responsabilité de la
survie du groupe en préservant l’accès quotidien à
cette ressource vitale dans les Tropiques humides
de Queensland. Claude Beeron, membre du groupe
aborigène Girramay, raconte le pouvoir du Bagu :
« Dans le temps, quand les hommes allumaient
le feu comme ils avaient l’habitude de le faire à
l’époque, ils parlaient à cet objet : parfois, ils en
avaient pour un moment à manier les bâtons,
mais en parlant et en chantant la fumée venait
plus vite ! Le Bagu est vivant, il possède une force,
c’est ce qui explique sa personnification, et c’est la
raison pour laquelle nous le fabriquons ainsiIII. »
Également appelé Chikka-Bunnah,
Chic-ah-bunnah, Chicka-bunnah,
Jigubina et Djibugina
II
Autres appellations : boogadilla,
bubadilla et bubarrila
III
Nicolas Rothwell, « Aboriginal
People of the North Revive Old Craft
of Bagu Figures », The Australian,
7 décembre 2013
I
19
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
18
Simple fire-making implements have
existed for millennia, and continue to be utilised
in many indigenous cultures across the world.
The method and device employed by Rainforest
Peoples of Far North Queensland is most
commonly described in anthropological lexicon
as a hand drill, and comprises two components:
a fire boardI and a fire-stickII, which is a thin,
straight wooden shaft.
Early examples of carved wooden
fire boards employed by rainforest peoples
include elongated and oval shapes as well
as the anthropomorphic Bagu. The Bagu is a
representation of an important spirit figure
known as JiggabunahIII, who threw jiman or firesticks across the night sky, leaving a trail of fire,
visible to those on earth as shooting stars.
Bagu fire boards are pierced or notched with
several holes. To make fire, the jiman fire-stick
is set in one of the holes and held between the
fire-maker’s hands. The fire-stick is then rapidly
rolled back-and-forth between the hands, while
the fire-maker applies continuous downward
pressure by moving his hands seamlessly up and
down the shaft.
This operation continues until
smouldering powder or an ember is created from
the heat generated by the friction of the firestick against the board. Breath is then applied
to ignite a bundle of soft dry tinder material,
prepared in advance, to create a small fire.
Bagu et jiman :
les instruments du feu
Dans les forêts du sud des Tropiques humides, la gestion du
territoire par les brûlis est aujourd’hui contrôlée par la Girringun
Aboriginal Corporation et ses représentants traditionnels, en
coopération et en partenariat avec d’autres groupes aborigènes,
différents organismes gouvernementaux et autorités locales,
qui supervisent un certain nombre de zones aborigènes protégées
importantes 17.
En dehors des techniques de gestion du territoire, les peuples
traditionnels de la forêt humide utilisaient quotidiennement le feu dans
la sphère domestique. Valerie Keenan, directrice du Girringun Aboriginal
Art Centre, explique ainsi son importance :
« Le feu était une ressource essentielle à la vie quotidienne. Les interactions
sociales s’organisaient autour du feu qui était utilisé pour la cuisine,
le chauffage, la fabrication d’armes, la conservation des aliments et les
cérémonies. Les Bagu (planchette à feu) et les jiman (bâtons à feu) en bois
étaient transportés d’un site à l’autre au gré des déplacements saisonniers et
le gardien désigné par le groupe était chargé de conserver ces outils au sec,
une lourde responsabilité dans le climat humide de la forêt. »
Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre
artists, from left to right:
Emily Murray, Maleisha Leo
(assistant), Clinton Murray Jnr.
and Alison Murray / Artistes
du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre,
de gauche à droite : Emily Murray,
Maleisha Leo (assistante),
Clinton Murray Jnr. et Alison Murray
Ancestral stories about fire feature strongly in the art of desert peoples, and in 2011 the
Martu People of Western Australia – who have terms describing five distinct stages of vegetation
after controlled burns – dedicated an exhibition to its cultural significance15. For other cultures,
particularly the Yolgnu from the Northern territory, fire is elemental16.
Dans son histoire intitulée Baddagulli, qui met en scène le
barramundi, poisson très apprécié des pêcheurs, Doris Kinjun, membre
de la communauté Gulnay, témoigne de l’impact du cyclone Yasi sur
les ressources alimentaires et sur l’utilisation du feu pour la cuisson :
« Aujourd’hui, la pêche est devenue vraiment calme (...) on n’entend
plus sauter le poisson comme avant. Depuis le cyclone Yasi, on ne
“The old people tell about the Bagu and how they use jiman to make the fire. There were
no matches then. Just Bagu and jiman. That was all we were bought up with.”
‘Wungarr - Eel Trap’ Bagu by Ninney Murray, Jirrbal Traditonal Owner
trouve plus de crevettes et on trouve davantage de poisson dans
la mer qu’en eau douce (...) D’abord, il faut faire un lit de galets
et allumer un feu dessus, puis retirer les braises et déposer le
gingembre et le barramundi sur les galets, puis les feuilles de
In the rainforests of the southern Wet Tropics, fire management of land is now controlled
by the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation and its Traditional Owners in cooperation and partnership
with other Traditional Owner groups, government agencies and local authorities, which oversee a
number of important Indigenous Protected Areas17.
In addition to land management, traditional Rainforest Peoples employed fire on a daily basis
for domestic uses. Dr Valerie Keenan, Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre Manager explains its importance:
“Fire was vital to daily life. It provided a focal point for social interaction and was used for cooking,
warmth, making weapons, preserving food and in ceremonies. Wooden Bagu (fire-stick figures)
and jiman (fire-sticks) were carried from site to site as people moved camp seasonally and the
designated keeper was under great pressure to keep these fire-making implements dry, particularly
in wet weather.”
Gulnay Traditional Owner Doris Kinjun references the impact of Cyclone Yasi on food
sources, and cooking with fire, in her Bagu story ‘Baddagulli’ about the Barramundi fish:
“Fishing has gone really quiet now (...) you don’t hear the fish chopping like you used to.
Since Cyclone Yasi we don’t get the prawns anymore and there seems to be more fish in the
saltwater than in the fresh (…) You put the stones down and light a fire, then scrape away the fire put
down the ginger and the barramundi, cover it with ginger leaf and scrape the sand back over it. Put
the charcoal back on top and light a small fire.”
21
gingembre, et recouvrir le tout avec du sable. Ensuite, il suffit de
replacer le charbon sur le sable et d’allumer un petit feu. »
Emily Murray, Maangi–Rainbow /
Maangi–Arc-en-ciel
Aluminium frame, stainless trawler ropes with stainsteel
fittings, synthetic rope, sandpaper discs / structure
aluminium, corde armée, corde en nylon, disques de
papier de verre, 150 x 80 x 60 cm, 2015
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
20
Culture and Country – One and the Same
The Bagu’s creation story is just one among many cultural riches of its peoples. The development
in the Bagu figuration, however, exemplifies Indigenous ingenuity and artistic innovation. Its
physical transformation – from a small, flat carved wooden fire-board to anthropomorphic three
dimensional clay sculptures and the impressive installation scale works in various forms seen here
in Monaco incorporating new and found materials – is symbolic of a transformation in Australia’s
cultural landscape: the increase in visibility and empowerment of Indigenous artists. In Monaco, far
from home, the Bagu stand as sentinels: strong symbols of Indigenous artistic innovation and selfdetermination, and guardians of country and culture.
The Monaco Bagu artists and other Traditional Owners have taken this message to the
world for some years now: “there is no divide between culture and their relationship with country
(…) caring for country and cultural preservation is impossible in isolation from one another18.” The
physical presence of the Monaco Bagu artists’ installation commands attention, admiration and
respect: for the works themselves, and the artists’ statements about cultural vitality and the spiritual
potency and importance of caring for country.
Culture et territoire : des forces indissociables
L’histoire créationniste du Bagu n’est qu’un exemple des nombreux
trésors culturels des Aborigènes. Cependant, l’évolution de la
représentation du Bagu illustre l’ingéniosité et l’innovation
artistique de ces peuples. Sa transformation physique –
de la surface plane en bois brut aux sculptures d’argile
anthropomorphes en trois dimensions, pour en arriver
enfin aux installations artistiques incorporant de nouveaux
matériaux, telles les œuvres exposées en 2016 à Monaco –
symbolise une autre transformation dans le paysage australien :
une mutation sociale synonyme de visibilité et d’émancipation
pour les artistes aborigènes. À Monaco, loin de leur berceau originel,
les Bagu s’érigent en sentinelles, véritables gardiennes du territoire
et de la culture, témoignant de l’innovation artistique et de
l’autodétermination des peuples aborigènes.
Depuis de nombreuses années, les créateurs de Bagu
“The Gulnay design and patterns on this Bagu represent the connection between the
land and sea (...) blue for the sea, yellow for the sand, white for the white caps of the sea
and black which represents our connection to the sea and land in the Tully area.”
‘Marine Bagu’ by Clarence Kinjun, Gulnay Traditional Owner
22
qui exposent à Monaco, mais aussi d’autres communautés
traditionnelles, s’efforcent de livrer au monde ce message
essentiel : « l’héritage culturel et le rapport à la terre sont
indissociables... la préservation de l’environnement et de la culture
ne peuvent être envisagés séparément18 ». La présence physique
23
“The Gulnay design and patterns on this Bagu
represent the connection between the land and sea.”
« La forme et les motifs de ce Bagu représentent les liens entre terre et mer. »
l’attention et imposent l’admiration et le respect, pour les œuvres
en elles-mêmes comme pour le message porté par leurs auteurs :
défendre l’environnement en tant qu’ingrédient essentiel de la
vitalité culturelle et spirituelle.
« La forme et les motifs de ce Bagu représentent
les liens entre terre et mer (...) le bleu pour l’océan, le jaune
pour le sable, le blanc pour l’écume marine, tandis que
le noir symbolise notre rapport à la mer et à la terre dans
la région de Tully. »
Clarence Kinjun, communauté Gulnay,
à propos du Bagu marin
Clarence Kinjun, Marine
Bagu / Bagu marin
Recycled timber mooring
post, marine grade acrylic
paint and varnish, reflectors,
aluminium stand / bois
d’amarrage recyclé, peinture
acrylique et vernis, réflecteurs,
barre d’aluminium,
220 x 20 x 20 cm, 2015
Dressmaker Ann Goodin
and Eileen Tep /
La couturière Ann Goodin
et Eileen Tep
Eileen Tep, Gumbarda–Cyclone
Aluminium frame, dive suit fabric (new and recycled),
synthetic ropes, marine grade threads, cotton jersey
inner / structure aluminium, combinaisons de plongée
recyclées, corde armée, corde en nylon, intérieur coton
jersey, 150 x 80 x 60 cm, 2015
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
des installations mettant en scène le Bagu à Monaco attirent
24
Alison Murray & Clinton Murray Jnr.
Bagu: Contemporary Innovation and Critical Appraisal
In 2003, the art of Queensland’s Indigenous peoples was explored in a ground breaking and highly
overdue exhibition called Story Place19. Five years later, the Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre
commenced full-time operations and, today, the Rainforest Peoples’ culture is being appreciated
on the world stage through the art of their weavers, painters, sculptors, potters, textile artists and
makers of traditional objects20, many of whom were actively working as artists in a variety of media
decades before the centre’s official establishment21.
In the early years of the Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, the Bagu spirit figure was
seized upon as the perfect cultural symbol to take to the inaugural 2009 Cairns Indigenous Art
Fair (CIAF)22. While there were occasional exceptions to the rule, making the traditional Bagu was
normally a male preserve. A group discussion between artists and community elders saw permission
granted for the Bagu to take new form in the hands of artists of both sexes.
The Bagu’s morphing from wood to clay also proved to be a salient comment on the
nexus between contemporary practice, culture and access to traditional country, as “the shift from
wood to clay was influenced by the scarcity of suitable wood, previously accessible on land now
privately owned or declared National Park23.”
The clay Bagu broke expectations and brokered a new appreciation of art from the
Rainforest Peoples, described by a prominent critic as “a new class of Indigenous object for the
market24.” On the occasion of their first showing at the 2009 CIAF, Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre
Manager Dr Valerie Keenan remarked that they “caught the eye through difference (…) the pieces
were seen as rough and ready, as not painted, as somehow real, and true25.”
The raw and seemingly naïve qualities of the clay Bagu lead one reviewer to equate
them with outsider art26. This represents an attitude I have previously described as symptomatic of
the ‘Modernist vexation’, whereby commentators and critics resort to comparisons with Western
Modernism and other art canons in lieu of an appreciation of the significance of contemporaneity
in Indigenous culture and art practise: the past is the present, the present the past; Indigenous time
is ‘everywhen’27. A critical paradigm based on Western cultural and artistic hegemonies is ultimately
unhelpful as it ensures Aboriginal art is kept at the margins.
As Henry Skerritt recently commented, “the best Aboriginal art poses extraordinary
challenges to mainstream models28.”
25
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Ningura Napurrula
Left / À gauche
Alison Murray,
Saltwater Bagu /
Bagu d’eau salée
Aluminium frame, commercial
grade vinyl with image,
synthetic rope, glue, fishing
braid / structure aluminium,
reproduction image sur vinyl,
corde en nylon, colle, fil de pêche
tressé, 300 x 80 x 60 cm, 2015
Bagu : innovation contemporaine
et accueil critique
En 2003, l’art des peuples aborigènes du Queensland a été mis à
l’honneur lors d’une exposition inédite et très attendue intitulée
Story Place19. Cinq ans plus tard, le Girringun Aboriginal Art
Centre ouvrait ses portes. Aujourd’hui, la culture des peuples de
la forêt humide est enfin appréciée à sa juste valeur sur la scène
internationale, à travers les œuvres de tisserands, peintres, potiers,
artisans textiles et fabricants d’objets traditionnels20 qui, pour
bon nombre d’entre eux, pratiquaient déjà leur art sur différents
supports plusieurs décennies avant l’ouverture officielle du centre21.
Durant les premières années d’activité du Girringun
Aboriginal Art Centre, la figure spirituelle du Bagu s’est imposée
comme un symbole culturel idéal à présenter lors de l’inauguration
de la Foire d’Art aborigène de Cairns (Cairns Indigenous Art Fair ou
CIAF), en 200922. En dehors de quelques rares exceptions à la règle,
la fabrication du Bagu traditionnel était généralement réservée
aux hommes. Suite à une concertation entre artistes et dignitaires
aborigènes, il a été convenu que le Bagu pouvait désormais prendre
une nouvelle forme, entre les mains d’artistes des deux sexes.
26
La transformation du Bagu à travers le passage du bois à
27
pratique contemporaine, culture et accès aux terres ancestrales. En
effet, « le passage du bois à l’argile a été influencé par une pénurie
des variétés de bois recherchées, traditionnellement accessibles dans
des zones aujourd’hui privées ou soumises aux réglementations des
parcs nationaux23 ». Le Bagu d’argile, décrit par un critique renommé
comme « une nouvelle catégorie d’objet aborigène sur le marché »,
a fait tomber les stéréotypes tout en ouvrant la voie à une nouvelle
perspective sur l’art des peuples de la forêt humide24.
Left / À gauche
Daniel Beeron, The Right Conditions / Les Bonnes Conditions
Aluminium frame, aluminium sheet (new and recycled), aluminium and plastic
coated wire, trawler netting, plastic hose / structure aluminium, feuilles
d’aluminium (recyclées et neuves), fil de fer enrobé d’aluminium et de plastique,
filet de chalutier, tuyau en plastique, 150 x 80 x 60 cm, 2015
Right / À droite
Theresa Beeron, Utti-Stingray / Utti-Raie
Aluminium frame, aluminium sheet, aquaculture net, plastic coated wire,
synthetic rope, glue / structure aluminium, feuilles d’aluminium,
filet d’aquaculture, fil de fer enrobé de plastique, corde en nylon, colle,
150 x 80 x 60 cm, 2015
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
l’argile met également en lumière la relation d’interdépendance entre
Ninney Murray, Wungarr–Eel trap / Wungarr–Piège à anguille
Aluminium frame, irrigation pipe, banana twine, trawler rope, plastic matting, wire, bottle
tops / structure aluminium, tuyau d'arrosage, ficelle à banane, cordage de chalutier, natte
en plastique, fil de fer, bouchons de bouteille, 250 x 98 x 57 cm, 2015
À l’occasion d’une première exposition lors de l’inauguration de la CIAF
en 2009, Valerie Keenan, directrice du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, a déclaré que
ces Bagu d’un genre nouveau « attiraient l’attention par leur différence (…) les œuvres
étaient perçues non pas comme des objets d’art contemporain ornés de peintures,
mais plutôt comme des pièces artisanales d’aspect plutôt brut, et par conséquent
d’une certaine authenticité25 ».
En raison de leur aspect relativement brut et de leur naïveté apparente, les
Bagu d’argile ont alors été assimilés à de l’art brut par un critique26. C’est une attitude
caractéristique de ce que l'on peut appeler le « complexe moderniste », une attitude par
laquelle les commentateurs et critiques ont recours à des comparaisons avec l'art moderne
occidental et avec d’autres canons artistiques, plutôt que d’apprécier la véritable portée
de la contemporanéité dans la culture et les arts aborigènes : le passé est présent, le
présent est passé, le temps aborigène est « omniprésent27 ». Le paradigme critique fondé
sur l’hégémonie culturelle et artistique du monde occidental s’avère, à terme, contreproductif puisqu’il relègue les arts aborigènes en marge de la scène contemporaine.
Comme Henry Skerritt l’a récemment souligné, « les plus grandes œuvres
d’art aborigène représentent des défis extraordinaires pour les modèles classiques »28.
« C’est la densité des échanges – entre supports et motifs, cultures et catégories – qui
rend les artistes si captivants (...) ils ont imposé une réévaluation et un réalignement
des catégories de valeurs influençant le jugement artistique (...).
La nature de la recherche interdisciplinaire implique que chaque discipline
29
soulève des questions inédites (...) ce processus demande une ouverture à différents
axes de recherche et un respect des idées qu’apporte chaque discipline29 ».
Simon Wright, ancien directeur de la galerie d’art de la Griffith University,
a habilement remarqué que ce changement d’approche dans la fabrication du
Bagu soulignait la nature contemporaine de la pratique des artistes de Girringun,
bien que celle-ci s’enracinât dans des traditions multicentenaires : « Dans le
contexte de l’art contemporain, leur pratique repousse les barrières que posent
les contingents idéologiques, matériels et techniques actuels, et se développe
en dehors des conventions transmises de génération en génération. Dissociée
Elizabeth Nolan,
Jubbun–Eel / Jubbun–Anguille
Aluminium frame, trawler nets, synthetic ropes,
twines and threads, stockings, recycled vinyl
seat covers from boats / structure aluminium,
filets de chalutier, cordes de nylon, ficelles et
fils, bas, housses de sièges de bateau en vinyle
recyclé, 300 x 137 x 75 cm, 2015
de l’histoire, cette pratique ne pourrait exister car elle repose sur une remise en
question des traditions, des enseignements fondamentaux et des genres établis (...)
pour les artistes, le passé constitue un référentiel à travers lequel ils s’approprient
la pratique de leur art, non pas seulement dans l’optique d’un contre-courant ou
d’une stratégie subversive, mais avant tout pour prouver la perpétuation du passé
dans le présent et promouvoir la continuité et la vitalité culturelle (...) plutôt que de
se reposer sur des usages et procédés traditionnels tenus pour acquis, ils engagent
un dialogue avec le passé pour se réinventer, enrichir leur pratique et y ajouter de
nouvelles nuances30 ».
« Les artistes de Girringun restent tournés vers l’avenir.
Depuis 2008, leurs œuvres ont été mises à l’honneur
dans plus de quatre-vingts expositions et remises de prix artistiques. »
“Girringun artists have not looked back. Since 2008, they have had work included
in over eighty public and commercial exhibitions and awards.”
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
28
“It is the density of exchange – between media and motifs,
cultures and categories – that makes artists so captivating
(…) they have forced a reassessment and realignment of
the categories of artistic value and judgement (...) The
nature of interdisciplinary scholarship should mean
that each discipline brings (…) their own unique
questions (…) this requires an openness to different
lines of inquiry and a respect for the insights that
each discipline can bring.”
Simon Wright, former Director
of Griffith University Art Gallery, astutely
identified the shift in approach to making Bagu
as emphasising the contemporary nature of the
Girringun artists’ practice, albeit born of centuries-old
traditions: “Their practice as contemporary art contests
the boundaries of current understanding, materials and
technique, and develops out of conventions handed down
through generations. Without history it is nothing, for it is
reliant on a negotiation with tradition, learnt fundamentals and
accepted genres (...) artists consider the past as a repository
from which to appropriate, not only as a counterpoint or
subversive strategy, but to prove the past's perpetuation
in the present and to argue cultural continuity and
vitality (…) they do not take for granted previous ways
and means, but converse with the past to morph
knowledge, to add further nuance and richness30.”
The Bagu clay figures arrived on the art scene at the
2009 CIAF to frenzied acceptance by collectors and curators
alike, with gallery owner Suzanne O’Connell describing
the scene akin to panic31. Keenan acknowledged the
clamour: "We were mobbed. We didn't understand what was
happening, we had no idea what the reception was going to
be. This was such a new thing for the artists as well as for the
art world32."
The fervour for the figures continued, along with
a flow of exhibition invitations. In 2010 the Girringun
Bagu were accepted as finalists in the prestigious National
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards. A year later,
the artists were awarded the prize for Artistic Excellence33
at the Strand Ephemera festival of contemporary arts in
Townsville, the largest city in the region.
The Fire Spirit
Jiggabunah
Bagu
30
“When he took off from the earth there was
a frightful bang and a roaring rushing noise”.
Dangerous to look upon, beholders could be
blinded by the “strange blue light” he emittedIII.
Although “frightful” and seemingly malevolent –
instilling “great fear in the hearts of beholders”,
there is no evidence of Jiggabunah ever having
caused any harmIV. Traditional carved and
decorated anthropomorphic Bagu fire boards
–“entities that hid the spark of fire”V – are
revered as representations of Jiggabunah.
The Bagu was a source of power, and its holes,
into which the jiman were set in the process of
creating fire, were subject to strict protocols.
Gulnay Traditional Owner Doris Kinjun
recounts a memory: “We were not allowed to put
our finger in the holes of the Bagu …. Maybe it
was a way to keep the fire pureVI.”
Hinchinbrook Channel, Bandjin
Country / Territoire Bandjin
–
Left / À gauche
Lacy Creek
Jiggabunah :
l’esprit du feu
Également appelé ChikkaBunnah, Chic-ah-bunnah,
Chicka-bunnah, Jigubina
et Djibugina
II
« Beings of the Spirit World »,
G. J. Henry, Girroo Gurrll:
The First Surveyor and Other
Aboriginal Legends, W. R. Smith
& Paterson Pty Ltd, Brisbane,
1967, p. 55
III
Ibid.
IV
Ibid.
V
Nicolas Rothwell, « Aboriginal
people of the north revive old
craft of Bagu figures », The
Australian, 7 décembre 2013
VI
Bronwyn Watson, « Public
works », The Australian,
22 juillet 2010
I
Pour l’ensemble des peuples aborigènes
disséminés à travers le continent australien, les
récits créationnistes constituent le fondement
des traditions et des lois applicables aux terres
coutumières. Chaque groupe possède ses propres
histoires, expliquant la genèse du territoire et des
cours d’eau, ainsi que l’origine du feu.
Pour les peuples de Girringun originaires
des forêts humides du Nord du Queensland,
JiggabunahI est un esprit du feu ayant pris
forme humaine. Après s’être nourri de charbons
ardentsII, il projeta à travers ciel le premier bâton
enflammé, un jiman, laissant derrière lui une
trainée de feu rendue visible aux habitants
de la terre sous la forme d’une étoile filante.
On raconte que Jiggabunah se manifestait parfois
sur terre dans des lieux spécifiques, notamment
sur la colline Goondarlah (fleuve Murray), sur un
grand rocher à l’ouest de la crête de Bulleroo (Mount
Tyson), et sur un autre rocher de Davidson Valley.
« Lorsqu’il décollait du sol, une terrible
détonation et un grondement assourdissant se
faisaient entendre. » Sa seule apparition était
dangereuse et les témoins risquaient d’être
aveuglés par « l’étrange lumière bleue » qu’il
émettaitIII. Bien que « terrible » et apparemment
malveillant, capable de faire naître « une
peur immense dans le cœur des témoins », il
semblerait cependant que Jiggabunah n’ait jamais
causé de tort à un AborigèneIV.
Les Bagu — « entités accueillant
l’étincelle du feu »V —, planches à feu
traditionnelles sculptées et décorées, sont des
représentations anthropomorphes de Jiggabunah,
vénérées par les Aborigènes. Le Bagu était source
d’énergie et ses orifices, dans lesquels les jiman
étaient insérés pour faire naître le feu, faisaient
l’objet de protocoles stricts.
Doris Kinjun, issue du groupe aborigène
Gulnay, nous fait part de ce souvenir : « Nous
n’avions pas le droit de mettre les doigts dans
les orifices du Bagu... Peut-être était-ce pour
préserver la pureté du feuVI ».
31
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Also Chikka-Bunnah, Chicah-bunnah, Chicka-bunnah,
Jigubina and Djibugina
II
‘Beings of the Spirit World’ in G.
J. Henry, Girroo Gurrll: The First
Surveyor and Other Aboriginal
Legends, W. R. Smith & Paterson
Pty Ltd, Brisbane, 1967, p. 55
III
Ibid.
IV
Ibid.
V
Nicolas Rothwell, ‘Aboriginal
people of the north revive old
craft of Bagu figures’, The
Australian, 7 December 2013
VI
Quoted in Bronwyn Watson,
‘Public works’, The Australian,
22 July 2010
I
Creation stories form the basis of
customary laws and traditions of all Indigenous
people from different cultures and regions across
Australia, and individual groups have principal
stories about the creation of their traditional lands
and waters, as well as the origin of fire.
For the Girringun rainforest peoples of
north Queensland, JiggabunahI is a spirit of fire
who had taken the shape of a man. He ate red
hot coalsII and threw the first fire-stick, a jiman,
across the sky, leaving a trail of fire visible to
those on earth as a shooting star. It is said
Jiggabunah came to earth occasionally at certain
places: Goondarlah, a hill on the Murray River,
the large rock on the western side of the crest
of Bulleroo (Mt Tyson) and another rock in the
Davidson Valley.
Right / À droite
Doris Kinjun,
Baddagulli–Barramundi
Aluminium frame, recycled aluminium
cans, silver foil covered foam,
reflectors, glue, rivets, net / structure
aluminium, canettes en aluminium
recyclées, isolant couvert de feuilles
d'aluminum, réflecteurs, colle, rivets,
filet, 300 x 77 x 75 cm, 2015
And in the same year, they were commissioned to cover the side of one of Queensland’s high
speed ‘Tilt Trains’ with Bagu (and other) imagery. No longer confined to the rainforests, the Bagu carried
the message about connection to country and cultural resilience up and down the length of FNQ.
Girringun artists have not looked back. Since 2008, they have had work included in over eighty public
and commercial exhibitions and awards.
The 2011 Strand Ephemera installation comprised a large scale sculptural installation of
fifteen works and marked an accelerated move from clay and ochre to embracing a diverse array
of modern materials and new large scale forms. The project also engineered substantial new skill
sets amongst the Girringun artists to combat the technical challenges posed by high winds at the
beachside location of the installation34.
After the devastation of Cyclone Yasi, Cardwell’s foreshore underwent major
reconstruction and due to the public admiration and critical success of the Bagu at Strand
Ephemera, Eileen Tep and fellow Girringun artist Charlotte Beeron were commissioned to create
large scale Bagu sculptures painted in traditional designs, which were installed with other permanent
public art along a seven kilometre stretch of coastal pathway in November 2013.
Material Matters: Protecting Country and Defending the Waters
In caring for country, the Traditional Owners represented by the Girringun community have had to
consider strategies to deal with a wide range of environmental threats and degradation, including
water quality, watercourse diversions and invasive introduced species and the impact on fish stocks
in fresh and saltwater environments from boating and fishing practices, to name a few35.
Bagu
32
Lors de l’inauguration de la CIAF en 2009, l’entrée des Bagu d’argile sur la scène
artistique a déclenché un véritable déchainement d’enthousiasme chez les collectionneurs
comme chez les commissaires d’exposition, un mouvement de foule presque affolant, si
l’on en croit le témoignage de Suzanne O’Connell, directrice de galerie31. Valerie Keenan
était aux premières loges : « Nous étions assaillis par la foule. Nous ne comprenions pas
ce qui se passait et nous n’avions aucune idée de l’accueil réservé aux œuvres. La situation
était totalement inédite tant pour les artistes que pour le monde de l’art32. »
Cette ferveur artistique se prolonge, et les invitations pleuvent. En 2010,
les Bagu de Girringun sont finalistes du prix le plus prestigieux récompensant les
œuvres aborigènes d’Australie et du détroit de Torres (National Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Art Awards). Un an plus tard, les artistes reçoivent un prix d’excellence
artistique33 lors du festival « Strand Ephemera » des arts contemporains à Townsville,
capitale de la région. La même année, ils sont invités à peindre des Bagu sur les parois
de l’un des trains à grande vitesse du Queensland (Tilt Train). Sortis de l’ombre des
forêts humides, les Bagu diffusent aujourd’hui d’un bout à l’autre de l’Extrême-Nord du
Queensland un message de résilience culturelle qui valorise le rapport à la terre.
Les artistes Girringun restent tournés vers l’avenir. Depuis 2008, leurs œuvres ont été
mises à l’honneur dans plus de quatre-vingts expositions et remises de prix artistiques.
En 2011, le festival « Strand Ephemera » mettait en scène une installation de grande
envergure composée de quinze sculptures illustrant l’évolution technique qu’avaient
connue les Bagu, de l’utilisation de l’argile et des pigments naturels, à l’emploi d’un large
éventail de matériaux modernes permettant de donner dès lors naissance à des œuvres
Maleisha Leo
de plus grand format. Ce projet a également mobilisé de nouvelles compétences chez
les artistes de Girringun, qui ont su composer avec les défis techniques liés aux grands
vents qui balayaient la plage où se trouvait l’installation34.
Left / À gauche
Pages suivantes / Next pages
Bagu Installation in the
forecourt of the Oceanographic
Museum of Monaco /
Installation Bagu sur le parvis
du Musée océanographique de
Monaco, 2016
Après le passage dévastateur du cyclone Yasi, l’estran de Cardwell a fait
l’objet d’importants travaux de reconstruction. Compte tenu du succès rencontré par
les Bagu du « Strand Ephemera » auprès du public et des critiques, deux artistes de
la communauté de Girringun, Eileen Tep et Charlotte Beeron, ont été invitées à créer
des sculptures de Bagu de grande envergure, décorées de motifs traditionnels peints.
En novembre 2013, ces sculptures ont été installées parmi d’autres œuvres d’art public
permanent, sur quatre kilomètres de sentier côtier.
Enjeux matériels : protéger la terre et défendre la qualité de l’eau
Dans leur lutte pour la protection du territoire, les Aborigènes représentés au sein
de la communauté de Girringun ont dû élaborer des stratégies pour répondre à de
nombreuses menaces et dégradations environnementales liées, entre autres, à la qualité
de l’eau, au détournement des cours d’eau, aux espèces envahissantes exogènes et aux
impacts des activités de pêche et de plaisance sur les populations de poisson d’eau douce
ou d’eau salée35.
« La mangrove se rencontre surtout à l’embouchure des fleuves et
des marais. Elle pousse sur le sol et dans la mer. Elle constitue une zone de
reproduction pour les poissons et, parfois, des déchets s’y accumulent.
Il faut la préserver. En évitant de polluer le littoral, on préserve la santé
et la saveur du poisson. »
35
Alison Murray, communauté Girramay, à propos du Bagu d'Eau Salée
« Mon Bagu raconte l’histoire de l’eau de mer (…) et des déchets qui
s’échouent sur la côte avec les marées. La base de ma sculpture représente
le jawun, le panier à tout faire. Le jawun était utilisé pour transporter le
Bagu, le jiman et les poissons des pêcheurs, ou le fruit de la chasse et de la
cueillette dans le bush. »
Theresa Beeron, communauté Girramay/Jirrbal, à propos du Bagu Utti-Raie
Les grands Bagu présentés à Townsville (« Strand Ephemera ») et à Monaco illustrent le
dialogue continu entre artistes de Girringun et art contemporain, à travers l’évolution
des idées, des pratiques et des matériaux. Ainsi perçoit-on une trajectoire commune
à de nombreux artistes contemporains et communautés aborigènes d’Australie dans
les œuvres exposées à Monaco, en particulier chez les artistes originaires du détroit
de Torres et du golfe de Carpentarie, qui utilisent les filets de pêche perdus en mer,
appelés filets fantômes, ou ghost nets. Cette évolution des pratiques s’inscrit dans un
mouvement global qui influence l’art contemporain depuis les années 1970 . Pour cette
exposition, les artistes Girringun ont créé des Bagu incorporant des matériaux recyclés,
trouvés dans les cours d’eau de leur région.
« Les peuples de Girringun de la forêt humide sont venus
raconter à Monaco leur vécu individuel. »
“The Girringun Rainforest Peoples have brought their personal stories
of cultural continuity to Monaco.”
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Left and opposite
(detail) / ci-contre
et à droite :
Body Paint,
acrylic on linen,
acrylique sur toile,
152 x 107 cm, 2013
“xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxx”
« xxxxxxxxxx »
Vue du parvis
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
37
Bagu
36
“Mangroves are mostly around the mouth of rivers and creeks. They grow on the
land and the sea. It’s where the fish breed and sometimes there is rubbish that ends up in
there. It needs to be looked after. If you keep the land clean the fish will stay healthy and
the fish will taste alright.”
‘Saltwater Bagu’ by Alison Murray, Girramay Traditional Owner
“My bagu is a story about the saltwater (…) and the rubbish that washes up on the shore.
The bottom of my bagu represents the jawun, the dilly bag. Jawun was used to carry the
bagu and jiman and the fish they caught and to carry bush tucker they gathered.”
‘Utti–Stingray’ Bagu by Theresa Beeron, Girramay/Jirrbal Traditional Owner
de cordes que l’on retrouve traditionnellement sur les flotteurs de verre, tandis que le
« Les matériaux synthétiques utilisés au jourd’hui sont loin d’être banals et
sont chargés d’autant de sens que leurs ancêtres organiques. Les matériaux sont des
signaux éloquents de la mutation sociale postcoloniale et s’ajoutent à une longue liste
de corps "étrangers" introduits dans les communautés aborigènes, avec tout leur cortège
potentiel d’impacts négatifs, mais transformés positivement par l’art37. »
Le Bagu Mangrove d’Alison Murray, par exemple, est enserré dans un maillage
Bagu d’Eileen Tep est fabriqué à partir d’un matériau utilisé dans les combinaisons de
plongée. Une myriade de matériaux sont ainsi récupérés dans les cours d’eau et recyclés :
Clarence Kinun sculpte un Bagu dans une bitte d’amarrage en bois, Ninney Murray jette
son dévolu sur un tuyau d’arrosage, tandis que Doris Kinjun orne sa sculpture de feuilles
Rainforest Peoples’ material culture from the 1870s and '80s, during the early period of
colonial incursion and settlement of their country, features strongly in ethnographic collections.
From the 1860s through to 1939 when the office of the Queensland Department of Native
Affairs was established, many thousands of objects had been collected/taken from the Indigenous
peoples of FNQ and sent to museums across the world as examples of cultures expected soon to
disappear38.
Nearly 150 years later, the Girringun Rainforest Peoples have brought their personal
stories of cultural continuity to Monaco, to stand proudly in solidarity with the Principality, whose
visions, values and quests for environmental sustainability are complementary. These principles are
revealed by the Bagu against the back-drop of an altogether different kind of museum. Endowed
with the mission to promote the need to protect the earth for future generations, this is a museum
in tune with the ancient songs of vibrant living Indigenous cultures across the world.
d’aluminium provenant de boîtes de conserve et canettes usagées. Les Bagu de John
Murray et d’Elizabeth Nolan sont fabriqués à partir de banquettes et de revêtements en
vinyle provenant de bateaux. D’autres artistes tels que Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron
et Emily Murray utilisent des chaluts, des filets d’aquaculture, des pièces de quincaillerie
maritime et autres matériaux synthétiques dans leurs œuvres.
Jane Raffan, principal of ArtiFacts Art
Services, is a Sydney-based art advisor,
valuer and writer with over twenty
years experience working in both
public and commercial art sectors,
including the Art Gallery of New
South Wales.
Raffan is the author of Power +
Colour: New Painting from the
Corrigan Collection of 21st Century
Aboriginal Art.
www.artifacts.net.au
« Les marais à mangroves ne sont plus que des flaques stagnantes si
aucun animal n’y vit. Les bonnes conditions doivent être réunies. La nature
offre les structures adéquates pour accueillir les poissons. Lorsque l’on va
pêcher, on retrouve les poissons dans les mangroves. Ils les utilisent pour
39
s’abriter et se protéger (...) Le métal utilisé reproduit la forme des petits
crustacés qui se fixent sur les rochers, les algues sont fabriquées à partir
de filets de pêche et les yeux du Bagu imitent les coraux en spirale que l’on
trouve sur les récifs. »
Daniel Beeron, communauté Girramay/Jirrbal,
à propos du Bagu Les Bonnes Conditions
Les vestiges de la culture des peuples de la forêt humide dans les années 1870 à 1880, à
l’époque de l’invasion de leurs terres, sont largement représentés dans les collections
Jane Raffan, directrice d'Artifacts
ethnographiques. De 1860 à 1939, période pendant laquelle le département des affaires
Art Services, installée à Sydney, est
indigènes du Queensland a été créé, des milliers d’objets ont été collectés et usurpés aux
conseillère artistique, experte et auteur.
Aborigènes de l’Extrême-Nord du Queensland, puis envoyés dans les musées du monde
Elle a plus de vingt ans d'expérience
entier pour témoigner de ces cultures vouées à une disparition prochaine38.
dans le domaine de l'art, aussi bien
Près de cent cinquante ans plus tard, les peuples de Girringun de la forêt humide sont
dans le secteur privé que public, elle a
venus raconter à Monaco leur vécu individuel et leur vision de la continuité culturelle.
notamment travaillé pour l'Art Gallery of
Ils sont venus défendre, en solidarité avec la principauté dont ils partagent l’engagement
New South Wales (Sydney).
et les valeurs, une quête pour la protection de l’environnement. Les Bagu ont pris pour
Elle est l'auteur de Power + Colour: New
un temps leurs quartiers dans ce musée d’un genre nouveau, pour mieux nous livrer
Painting from the Corrigan Collection of
ce message. À travers la mission du musée, engagé à promouvoir la protection de notre
21st Century Aboriginal Art.
planète pour les générations à venir, résonne l’écho des chants anciens et toute la
www.artifacts.net.au
richesse des cultures aborigènes d’hier et d’aujourd’hui.
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Bagu
38
The recycled materials used in the large scale Bagu on the Strand Ephemera and Monaco
installations speak of the Girringun artists’ ongoing engagement with contemporary ideas, practices and
materials – principles shared with a large number of Indigenous contemporary artists and communities in
Australia, such as their fellow Monaco exhibitors, particularly the Ghost Net artists of Queensland’s Torres
Strait and Gulf of Carpentaria – and are part of a global trend in contemporary art since the 1970s36.
For this exhibition, the artists from Girringun have focussed on creating their Bagu
incorporating new and recycled materials found in waterways, local dumps, boat yards and beaches, from
the community’s vicinity stretching as far away as Cairns and Townsville. “The synthetic materials being
used now are far from banal, and are as loaded with significance as their organic precursors were. The
materials are an eloquent signifier of post colonial societal change, and join a long list of 'introduced'
matter in Indigenous communities with the potential for negative impact, but adapted positively37.”
Alison Murray’s Mangrove Bagu, for example, is bound with knotted ropes, as was used
around glass buoys; while Eileen Tep’s Bagu is made from diving-suit material. Amongst the myriad
of recycled materials, Clarence Kinun’s Bagu is made from a recycled timber mooring post, Ninney
Murray’s Bagu features irrigation pipe, and Doris Kinjun’s Bagu is adorned with aluminium from
discarded drink cans; John Murray and Elizabeth Nolan’s Bagu utilise matting and vinyl seat covers
from boats, and other artists – Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron and Emily Murray – all feature
trawler net, aquaculture netting, marine grade fittings or synthetics in their works.
“A wetlands area is just a wetland if there is no life there. The conditions have to be right. In
nature there are structures that are right and provide homes for fish. When we go fishing we
find the fish in the snags. They use the snags for home and protection for themselves (…) the
metal was meant to be barnacle covered steel and the seaweed was made from fishing nets
and the eyes were meant to be the spiral coral you get at the reef.”
‘The Right Conditions’, Bagu by Daniel Beeron, Girramay/Jirrbal Traditonal Owner
Dr Valerie Keenan, Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre Manager, personal correspondence with author.
The Wet Tropics of Queensland was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1988 and was one of 15 World Heritage places included in the National Heritage List on
21 May 2007, see https://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/world/wet-tropics.
3
From Mission Beach to Rollingstone (north of Townsville), out to Herberton and Ravenshoe, South West to the Clarke River and Valley of Lagoons and Greenvale and
offshore Islands waters surrounding Hinchinbrook, Gould, Brooke, Family and Dunk Islands.
4
Wet Tropics Management Authority, ‘The Wild Wet Season’, Tropical Topics 2011, p. 1.
5
There have been ten cyclones affecting Queensland since the Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre commenced full time operation in 2008. Further information: http://
www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/about/eastern.shtml#history
6
See https://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/world/wet-tropics.
7
Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest, (exhibition catalogue) Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2003, p. 158.
8
Girringun Aboriginal Corporation, Girringun Region Indigenous Protected Areas - Management Plan 2013-2023, p. 9.
9
Dr S. Pannell, ‘Beyond the ‘Descent of Rights: The Recognition of other Forms of Indigenous ‘Rights’ in the Context of Native Title Consent Determinations’, paper
presented at the Centre for Native Title Anthropology Symposium, 21-2 2 June 2012, P e r t h, p. 4.
10
Nicolas Rothwell, ‘Aboriginal People of the North Revive Old Craft of Bagu Figures’, The Australian, 7 December 2013.
11
Theresa Beeron, John Murray and Ninney Murray.
12
Midja is a traditional shelter/dwelling made from locally available materials such as lawyer cane and paperbark, bound together using string made from the inner
bark of trees (courtesy Girringun Aboriginal Corporation).
13
Material culture and artefacts collected/taken in the 1860s from the peoples in this region can be found in the collection of the British Museum, courtesy of sugar
planation owner John Ewen Davidson. The exhibition ‘Encounters: Revealing Stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Objects from the British Museum’ (National
Museum of Australia) acknowledges that “he began as a shocked observer of the violence of the occupation, yet within six months he was part of it.” See http://www.
nma.gov.au/exhibitions/encounters/mapping/rockingham_bay.
14
The Native Title Act 1976 (Cth) enables Indigenous people to launch legal claims for return and control of traditional lands in Commonwealth possession. The Bagu
reference was made as part of the evidentiary burden of proof of the Gulnay’s physical connection to county.
15
‘Waru! Holding Fire in Australia's Western Desert’, Stanford University, USA, 28 June–31 July 2011, see https://web.stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/
web/?q=node/887.
16
Bob Gosford, ‘Making Fire in Indigenous Arts’, The Daily Review, 14 January 2015, see http://dailyreview.com.au/making-fire-in-indigenous-arts/17303.
17
An Indigenous Protected Area is an area of Indigenous-owned land or sea where traditional owners have entered into an agreement with the Australian Government
to promote biodiversity and cultural resource conservation.
18
Melanie Zurba, ‘Caring for Country Through Participatory Art: An Emerging Method for Exploring Regional Values and Aspirations’. Paper presented to the Canadian
CoastalCURA conference, ‘People in Places: Engaging Together in Integrated Resource Management’, 27-19 June 2011. The Girringun Aboriginal Corporation has
hosted ‘caring for country’ workshops and conferences since its incorporation in 2006.
19
Story Place represented the language groups of East and West Cape York and Rainforest regions of Queensland and has been described as “a significant aesthetic
and cultural mapping of a little known and previously underrated area”. Susan Cochrane, ‘Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest’, Artlink, Vol. 23.
No.4, 2003.
20
Artists continue to make various styles of baskets (jawun, burrajingal, gundala and mindi), eel traps (wungarr), shields (bigin), swords (bagur) as well as paintings,
prints, pottery and sculpture.
21
For details of early activity see Katrina Chapman, ‘Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre: Reinvigorating Rainforest Traditions’, Art Monthly, Issue 247. March 2012, p. 15
22
The Cairns Indigenous Art Fair is a government sponsored initiative aimed to present and promote the work of Queensland art and artists to the world.
23
Keenan, correspondence with the author.
24
Nicolas Rothwell, ‘Contemporary works alive with the rhythms of the past’, The Australian, 23 August 2010, p. 21.
25
Quoted in Nicolas Rothwell, ‘Aboriginal People of the North Revive Old Craft of Bagu Figures’, Op.cit.
26
Darren Jorgensen, ‘Review: Girringun Guni Mara: A Long Way from Home’, The West Australian, 21 December 2011.
27
One cannot “fix” the Dreaming in time: it was, and is, everywhen–anthropologist WEH Stanner, 1953, see http://blog.qagoma.qld.gov.au/everywhen-everywhere/.
28
Henry Skerritt, ‘Aboriginal Art Criticism and Its Discontents’, Art Guide Australia, 17 December 2015, see http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/new-item-63/
29
Ibid.
30
Griffith University Art Collection, ‘Recycled Bagu’ by Emily and John Murray, text accompanying accession numbers 2362-64.
31
Quoted in Rosemary Sorenson, ‘Firestick sculptures light the way’, The Australian, 22 March 2010.
32
Keenan, ibid.
33
Awarded jointly with Erica Grey for her sculpture 'Rock Anemone'. Seven of the artists exhibiting in Monaco were represented (refer to the Bagu artists’ Exhibition
history in this catalogue).
34
Comment by Keenan quoted in Nathalie Fernbach, ‘Girringun artists fire up for Strand Ephemera’, ABC North Queensland (radio), 18 August 2011.
35
Keenan, personal correspondence with author.
36
Simon Wright, Op.cit.
37
Ibid.
38
Collections can be found throughout Great Britain, and in Germany, Austria, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Italy, Ireland, the former USSR, South Africa,
New Zealand and the USA. Lindy Allen, ‘Regular Hunting Grounds: A History of Collecting Indigenous Artefacts in North Queensland’, Story Place: Op.cit., pp. 30–37
1
2
Bagu
40
notes
Valerie Keenan, directrice du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, correspondance personnelle avec l’auteur
Les Tropiques humides du Queensland ont été inscrits au patrimoine mondial de l’humanité en 1988 et font partie des quinze sites du patrimoine mondial à avoir rejoint la liste du patrimoine national australien
le 21 mai 2007 (https://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/world/wet-tropics).
3
Une large boucle reliant Mission Beach à Rollingstone (au nord de Townsville), en passant par Herberton et Ravenshoe, pour rejoindre, au sud-ouest, Clarke River et la vallée des lagons (Valley of Lagoons), puis
Greenvale, sans oublier les îles Hinchinbrook, Gould, Brooke, Family et Dunk Islands
4
Wet Tropics Management Authority, « The Wild Wet Season », Tropical Topics 2011, p. 1
5
Depuis l’ouverture à plein temps du Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, en 2008, dix cyclones ont touché le Queensland.
6
Voir https://www.environment.gov.au/heritage/places/world/wet-tropics
7
Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest, catalogue d’exposition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2003, p. 158
8
Girringun Aboriginal Corporation, Girringun Region Indigenous Protected Areas - Management Plan 2013-2023, p. 9
9
“The Recognition of other Forms of Indigenous "Rights" in the Context of Native Title Consent Determinations », publication présentée dans le cadre de la conférence du Centre for Native Title Anthropology, du 21
au 22 juin 2012, Perth, p. 4
10
Nicolas Rothwell, « Aboriginal People of the North Revive Old Craft of Bagu Figures », The Australian, 7 décembre 2013
11
Theresa Beeron, John Murray et Ninney Murray
12
Le midja est un abri traditionnel fabriqué à partir de matériaux locaux comme la feuille de palmier (Calamus moti) et le Melaleuca, dont les éléments sont reliés à l’aide de ficelle en fibre végétale (informations
fournies par la Girringun Aboriginal Corporation).
13
Les vestiges culturels et les artefacts collectés/usurpés aux peuples de cette région dans les années 1980 figurent dans la collection du British Museum. Il s’agit d’un don de John Ewen Davidson, propriétaire
d’une plantation de canne à sucre. L’exposition du National Museum of Australia, intitulée « Encounters: Revealing Stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Objects from the British Museum », se penche
sur l’histoire de ces objets traditionnels et livre un saisissant portrait de John Ewen Davidson : « d’abord choqué par le spectacle violent de l’occupation, il ne lui faudra que six mois pour changer de bord et en
devenir lui-même acteur. » Voir http://www.nma.gov.au/exhibitions/encounters/mapping/rockingham_bay
14
Le Native Title Act de 1976 permet aux peuples aborigènes de lancer des actions en justice pour revendiquer leurs droits sur les terres jusqu’alors administrées par le Commonwealth. Dans ce contexte, l’histoire
du Bagu a été présenté comme une charge de preuve démontrant le lien tangible qui unit le peuple Gulnay à ses terres.
15
« Waru! Holding Fire in Australia’s Western Desert », Stanford University, États-Unis, du 28 juin au 31 juillet 2011, voir https://web.stanford.edu/dept/anthropology/cgi-bin/web/?q=node/887
16
Bob Gosford, « Making Fire in Indigenous Arts », The Daily Review, 14 janvier 2015, voir http://dailyreview.com.au/making-fire-in-indigenous-arts/17303
17
Une zone indigène protégée (« Indigenous Protected Area ») désigne une zone terrestre ou maritime traditionnellement occupée par les Aborigènes, ayant fait l’objet d’un accord passé avec le gouvernement
australien afin d’y promouvoir la biodiversité et la protection des ressources culturelles.
18
Melanie Zurba, « Caring for Country Through Participatory Art: An Emerging Method for Exploring Regional Values and Aspirations », publication présentée dans le cadre d’une conférence sur le projet CoastalCURA au Canada, intitulée « People in Places : Engaging Together in Integrated Resource Management », du 26 au 29 juin 2011. Depuis sa création en 2006, la Girringun Aboriginal Corporation a organisé des
ateliers et conférences sur le thème « Veiller sur l’environnement ».
19
L’exposition Story Place réunissait les groupes indigènes des régions de la forêt humide situées à l’est et à l’ouest de la péninsule du cap York et offrait, selon les mots de Susan Cochrane, « une cartographie
esthétique et culturelle importante de cette zone méconnue et largement sous-estimée ». Susan Cochrane, « Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest », Artlink, Vol. 23, no 4, 2003
20
Les artistes continuent de produire différents styles de paniers (jawun, burrajingal, gundala et mindi), de pièges à anguilles (wungarr), de boucliers (bigin) et d’épées (bagur), ainsi que des peintures,
linogravures, poteries et sculptures.
21
Pour plus d’informations sur leurs précédentes activités, voir la publication de Katrina Chapman, « Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre : Reinvigorating Rainforest Traditions », Art Monthly, n° 247, mars 2012, p. 15
22
La Foire d’Art aborigène de Cairns (CIAF) est une initiative soutenue par le gouvernement qui vise à présenter et à promouvoir les œuvres des artistes du Queensland à l’échelle internationale.
23
Valerie Keenan, correspondance avec l’auteur
24
Nicolas Rothwell, « Contemporary works alive with the rhythms of the past », The Australian, 23 août 2010, p. 21
25
Nicolas Rothwell, « Aboriginal People of the North Revive Old Craft of Bagu Figures », op. cit.
26
Darren Jorgensen, « Review: Girringun Guni Mara: A Long Way from Home », The West Australian, 21 décembre 2011
27
« Il est impossible de "fixer" le Rêve dans le temps : il était, il est et restera omniprésent », traduction d’une citation de l’anthropologue William Edward Hanley Stanner, 1953, voir http://blog.qagoma.qld.gov.
au/everywhen-everywhere/
28
Henry Skerritt, « Aboriginal Art Criticism and Its Discontents », Art Guide Australia, 17 décembre 2015, voir http://artguide.com.au/articles-page/show/new-item-63/
29
Ibid.
30
Griffith University Art Collection, « Recycled Bagu » par Emily et John Murray, texte accompagnant les numéros d’entrée 2362-2364
31
Citation extraite de la publication de Rosemary Sorenson, « Firestick sculptures light the way », The Australian, 22 mars 2010
32
Valerie Keenan, op. cit.
33
Prix également décerné à Erica Grey pour sa sculpture « Rock Anemone ». Sept des artistes qui exposent à Monaco étaient représentés (consulter l’historique des expositions pour les auteurs de Bagu dans ce
catalogue).
34
Commentaire de Valerie Keenan, cité par Nathalie Fernbach, « Girringun artists fire up for Strand Ephemera », ABC North Queensland (radio), le 18 août 2011
35
Valerie Keenan, correspondance personnelle avec l’auteur
36
Simon Wright, op. cit.
37
Ibid.
38
Ces collections sont présentes à travers toute la Grande-Bretagne, mais aussi en Allemagne, en Autriche, en Suède, en Norvège, aux Pays-Bas, en Italie, en Irlande, dans l’ex-URSS, en Afrique du Sud,
en Nouvelle-Zélande et aux États-Unis. Lindy Allen, « Regular Hunting Grounds: A History of Collecting Indigenous Artefacts in North Queensland », Story Place, op. cit., p. 30-37
1
2
41
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
notes
CHRONOLOGIE DES EXPOSITIONS DES ARTISTES DE GIRRINGUN REPRÉSENTÉS
DANS L'INSTALLATION DE MONACO (SÉLECTION)
Note: all exhibition venues and collecting institutions are located in the state of Queensland (QLD) unless
otherwise stated / Note : toutes les expositions référencées ont eu lieu dans l’État du Queensland, sauf celles
comportant les références suivantes :
New South Wales / Nouvelle-Galles du Sud (NSW), South Australia / Australie-Méridionale (SA), Victoria
(VIC), Western Australia / Australie-Occidentale (WA), Australian Capital Territory / Territoire de la Capitale
Australienne (ACT) et Northern Territory / Territoire du Nord (NT).
Bagu
42
Suzanne O’Connell
and Girringun artists /
Suzanne O’Connell et
les artistes de Girringun
2015
n Encounters, National Museum of Australia, Canberra ACT (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison
Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n CIAF Curated Exhibition, Cairns Cruise Terminal (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, John Murray,
Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Parcours des Mondes, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun,
John Murray)
n Sculpture at Scenic World, Katoomba, NSW (Daniel Beeron)
n Sculpture Otherwise, Blue Mountains City Art Gallery, Katoomba, NSW (Daniel Beeron)
n Sorority, International Women’s Day Exhibition, Tanks Art Centre, Cairns (Emily Murray, Ninney
Murray, Elizabeth Nolan, Eileen Tep)
n Take it Home: Collectible Art Exhibition, Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns (Alison Murray, Emily Murray,
John Murray, Ninney Murray, Theresa Beeron, John Murray)
Tarnanthi: Festival of Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art, curated exhibition at
Tandanya, Adelaide, SA (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Tarnanthi Marketplace, Adelaide, SA (Theresa Beeron, Daniel Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray,
John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
Warriors, Sorcerers & Spirits - Contemporary Interpretations of Unique Ancestral Stories, KickArts
Contemporary Arts, Cairns (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney
Murray, Eileen Tep)
2014
n Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron,
Clarence Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Eileen Tep, Ninney Murray)
n Cardwell Art Prize, Cardwell (Emily Murray–First Prize, Clarence Kinjun–Judges Prize, Daniel Beeron,
Ninney Murray)
n Chain Reaction, Artisan Queensland Design and Craft Centre, Brisbane (Emily Murray)
n Girrungun at Tali Gallery, Tali Gallery, Rozelle, NSW (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Emily Murray, John
Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Parcours des Mondes, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Doris Kinjun, Ninney Murray)
n Solid! Contemporary Indigenous Sculpture, Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns (Daniel Beeron)
2013
n Art Elysées, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison
Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Arts d’Australie, Galerie 49, Saumur, France (Daniel Beeron)
n Dijabina Muddi Muddi, Jam Factory, Adelaide, SA (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray,
Emily Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Balmain Art and Craft Show, Tali Gallery, Rozelle, NSW (Theresa Beeron, John Murray)
Body and Soul, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Eileen Tep)
Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John
Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Darwin Indigenous Art Fair, Darwin Convention Centre, Darwin, NT (Daniel Beeron, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen
Tep)
n Girringun, Mission Arts and Unique Frames, Mission Beach (Daniel Beeron, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Girringun at Salt, Salt Contemporary Art Gallery, Queenscliffe, VIC (Daniel Beeron, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Kinship, CIAF Presents, Tanks Art Centre, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, Eileen
Tep)
n Ochres and Barks, Salt Contemporary Art Gallery, Queenscliffe, VIC (Emily Murray, Doris Kinjun, Eileen Tep)
n Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne Exhibition Hall, Melbourne, VIC (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen
Tep)
n Parcours des Mondes, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Daniel Beeron, Alison Murray, John Murray)
n Salon Des Refusés, Old Bank Building, Darwin, NT (John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n
n
2012
n Art Élysées, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun, John Murray, Ninney Murrray, Eileen Tep)
n Art with Altitude, Brisbane Airport, Brisbane (Clarence Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Bagu Visit Mission, Unique Frames, Mission Beach (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Clarence Kinjun, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray,
Eileen Tep)
n Girringun at Merenda, Merenda Gallery, Fremantle, WA
(Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Clarence Kinjun, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily
Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Dulgu Barra Bagu, Umbrella Studios, Townsville (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, John Murray)
n Girringun at Canopy, Canopy Artspace, Cairns (Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Gijalordi–Kingfisher Story, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John
Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Indigenous Ceramic Art Award Exhibition, Shepparton Art Museum, VIC and Flinders University Gallery, Adelaide SA (Emily Murray,
John Murray, Eileen Tep)
n John’s Stories, Artslink Queensland Exhibition Touring Program, multiple venues, QLD (John Murray solo exhibition)
n Lineart, Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Gent, Belgium (Daniel Beeron)
n Melbourne Art Fair, Royal Exhibition Hall, Melbourne, VIC (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray,
Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Parcours des Mondes, galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murrray,
John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Tully District Heritage Trail Signage, Cassowary Coast Regional Council, Tully (Clarence Kinjun)
n The Tully & District Show, Tully (Daniel Beeron awarded second prize in ‘Landscape or Sea’ category; Eileen Tep)
2011
n Across Country: Five years of Indigenous Australian Art, Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (Daniel Beeron, Theresa
Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n After The Storm, Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns (Eileen Tep)
n Bagu on The Strand, Strand Ephemera, Townsville (joint recipients Artistic Excellence Award: Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Clarence
Kinjun, John Murray, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Bagu with Jiman, Umbrella Studio Contemporary Arts, Townsville (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, John Murray)
n Bunyaydinyu Bagu, Merenda Gallery, Fremantle, WA (Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Bunyaydinyu Bagu, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Clarence Kinjun, Alison Murray,
John Murray, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray, Elizabeth Nolan, Eileen Tep)
n Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Clarence Kinjun, Emily Murray, John
Murray, Eileen Tep)
43
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
EXHIBITION HISTORY OF GIRRINGUN ARTISTS REPRESENTED
IN THE MONACO INSTALLATION (selection) /
Bagu
44
2010
n Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Tanks Art Centre, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun, John Murray,
Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Cardwell Art Prize, Hinchinbrook Gallery, Cardwell (John Murray – Excellence Award)
n Girringun, Gallerysmith, Melbourne, VIC (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray,
Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Girringun at Canopy, Canopy Art+Space Project, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun,
Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Girringun at Hinchinbrook, Hinchinbrook Art Gallery, Ingham (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron,
Doris Kinjun)
n Girringun Yunggil: One Together, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery, Brisbane (Daniel Beeron, Theresa
Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray,
Ninney Murray)
n John’s Stories, KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns (John Murray solo exhibition)
n Pay Attention, City Gallery, Wellington, New Zealand (Theresa Beeron, Ninney Murray)
n “Shalom Gamarada Ngiyani Yana” (“We walk together as friends”), Shalom College, University of
NSW, Sydney, NSW (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney
Murray)
n Spirited, Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (Doris Kinjun, Emily Murray, John Murray)
n Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, Museum and Art Gallery of the
Northern Territory, Darwin, NT (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n The Tully & District Show, Tully (Doris Kinjun – First Prize: Ceramics, Eileen Tep – Second Prize:
Traditional Aboriginal Craft)
2009
n Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Tanks Art Centre, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun,
Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Floating Life: Contemporary Aboriginal Fibre Art, Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane
(Ninney Murray)
n Girringun, GallerySmith, Melbourne, VIC (Theresa Beeron, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Hinchinbrook Art Awards, Ingham (John Murray)
n Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival, Laura, Cape York Peninsula (John Murray)
n Marking Places, KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron)
n Mundi – Big Mob, Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, Cardwell (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison
Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Emily Murray)
Murray Upper and Beyond, Girirngun Aboriginal Art Centre, Cardwell (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John
Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Three Hundred and Thirty, Gallerysmith, Melbourne, VIC (Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Yalyn Bulai Jamanjarran, Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, Cardwell (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n
2008
n Blak Roots, KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Ninney Murray)
n Jettison Wove, Craft Queensland, Brisbane, Museum & Galleries Travelling Exhibition (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Ninney Murray)
2007
n Bunyaydinyu Rainforest Weaving, Perc Tucker Regional Gallery, Townsville (Doris Kinjun)
2006
n Wabu-Barra: Art from the Rainforest, The Cultural Centre, Townsville (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Ninney Murray)
2005
n The Woven Purpose: Weavings from the Jumbun, Lockhart River and Aurukun Communities, Craft Queensland Gallery, Brisbane
(Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Ninney Murray)
2003
n Story Place: Indigenous Art of Cape York and the Rainforest, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane (Doris Kinjun)
COLLECTIONS / COLLECTIONS
Artbank, Sydney, NSW (Theresa Beeron, John Murray)
Arts Queensland Art Collection, Brisbane (John Murray)
n British Museum, London (Clarence Kinjun, Emily Murray)
n Cassowary Coast Regional Council Art Collection, Tully (Clarence Kinjun)
n Charles Darwin University ACIKE Collection, Darwin, NT (Emily Murray)
n Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane (Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney
Murray)
n Gidjalordi Multi Purpose Centre, Tully State High School, Tully (Doris Kinjun, Emily Murray, John Murray, Daniel Beeron, Eileen Tep, Ninney
Murray)
n Griffith University Art Collection, South East Queensland (Emily Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Lady Cilento Mater Children’s Hospital, Brisbane (Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep, Alison Murray, Doris Kinjun,
Theresa Beeron)
n National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, ACT (Doris Kinjun)
n National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, VIC (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beron, Emily Murray)
n National Museum of Australia, Canberra, ACT (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray,
Eileen Tep)
n Parliament House Art Collection, Canberra, ACT (Doris Kinjun)
n Rockhampton Art Gallery, Rockhampton (John Murray)
n State Library of Queensland Art Collection, Brisbane (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, John Murray, Eileen Tep, Emily Murray)
n University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane (Theresa Beeron, Clarence Kinjun, Doris Kinjun, Emily Murray, John Murray, Eileen Tep)
n World Wildlife Fund Collection, Sydney, NSW (Emily Murray)
n
45
n
M a t t e r a n d S p i r i t i n R a i n f o r e s t Co u n t r y
L'esprit de la forêt tropicale
Gijalordi, KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns and Alcheringa Gallery, Victoria, British Columbia,
Canada (Daniel Beeron, Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray,
Eileen Tep)
n Girringun Guni Mara (Long way from home), Merenda Gallery, Fremantle, WA (Daniel Beeron,
Theresa Beeron, Doris Kinjun, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Melbourne Art Fair, Melbourne Exhibition Hall, Melbourne, VIC (Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray)
n Queensland Rail Tilt Train, art+place Queensland Public Art Fund, launched Cairns (Daniel Beeron,
Theresa Beeron, Clarence Kinjun, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray)
n Shalom Gamarada Ngiyani Yana (We walk together as friends), Shalom College, University of NSW,
Sydney, NSW (Daniel Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Alison Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray,
Ninney Murray, Eileen Tep)
n Spinifex Country and Beyond, Gatakers Art Space, Maryborough (Doris Kinjun, Alison Murray,
Emily Murray, John Murray)
n Tanks Indigenous Arts Development, Tanks Arts Centre, Cairns (Daniel Beeron)
n The Tully & District Show, Tully (Daniel Beeron, Eileen Tep)
n
In its determination to fully embrace its responsibilities as a member
of society, METROPOLE Gestion has been pursuing an active cultural
sponsorship policy since the very beginning. The aim of our ongoing
commitment to support artists and institutions is not only to encourage
access to all forms of culture by as many people as possible, but also to
promote best practices in terms of sustainable development. To this end, the
company supports “METROPOLE Solidarité”, an association that works to
provide disadvantaged youths with access to culture and regularly conducts
initiatives in favour of French museums (Grand Palais and Quai Branly
in Paris, Confluences in Lyon). A partnership has also been established
with the University of Auvergne, which helps incorporate environmental,
social and governance criteria in its socially responsible investment process.
Of the six monumental works presented in the exhibition entitled
“Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islands Art”, METROPOLE Gestion chose to support the creation of
Bagu sculptures by artists’ collective Girringun, combining originality with
the preservation of aboriginal cultural heritage and raising awareness of
efforts to combat the pollution of the oceans.
We would like to thank the Oceanographic Institute Foundation Albert I,
Prince of Monaco, for opening the door to a partnership true to our values.
METROPOLE Gestion is thus as dedicated as ever to its convictions as a
responsible investor, much as it has always been in conducting its portfolio
management business.
Dans sa volonté d’assumer ses responsabilités d’acteur sociétal,
METROPOLE Gestion poursuit depuis ses débuts une politique active de
mécénat culturel. Cet engagement permanent aux côtés des artistes et
des institutions vise non seulement à favoriser l’accès à toutes les formes
de culture par le plus grand nombre mais également à promouvoir les
meilleures pratiques en matière de développement durable. Ainsi, la société
soutient l’association « METROPOLE Solidarité » pour la diffusion de la
culture auprès des jeunes défavorisés et intervient régulièrement en faveur
de musées français (Grand Palais et Quai Branly à Paris, Confluences à Lyon).
Elle a par ailleurs noué un partenariat avec l’Université d’Auvergne, qui l’aide
à intégrer les critères environnementaux, sociaux et de gouvernance dans
son processus d’investissement socialement responsable.
Parmi les six œuvres monumentales présentées dans le cadre de l’exposition
« Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des Aborigènes et des
Insulaires du détroit de Torres », METROPOLE Gestion a choisi de soutenir
la réalisation des sculptures Bagu du collectif d’artistes Girringun,
qui allient avec originalité préservation de l’héritage culturel aborigène
et sensibilisation à la lutte contre la pollution des océans.
Nous remercions l’Institut océanographique Fondation Albert Ier,
Prince de Monaco, d’avoir ouvert la voie à ce partenariat fidèle à nos
valeurs. METROPOLE Gestion continue ainsi d’affirmer ses convictions
d’investisseur responsable, comme elle l’a toujours fait pour mener à bien
ses activités de gestion de portefeuille.
Contact: METROPOLE Gestion
Romuald de Lencquesaing, Deputy Managing Director,
[email protected]
+33 (0)1 58 71 17 55
9, rue des Filles Saint Thomas 75002 PARIS
Contact : METROPOLE Gestion
Romuald de Lencquesaing, Directeur Général Adjoint,
[email protected],
+33 (0)1 58 71 17 55
9, rue des Filles Saint Thomas 75002 PARIS
Remerciements / Acknowledgements :
Catalogue published for the exhibition TABA NABA, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People in collaboration with Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre,
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, March 24 - September 30, 2016
Catalogue réalisé à l’occasion de l’exposition TABA NABA, Australie, Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer en collaboration avec le Girringun Aboriginal Art
Centre, Musée océanographique de Monaco, du 24 mars au 30 septembre 2016
“Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands Art”
Project Manager, Coordinator & Senior Curator: Stéphane Jacob, Director Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob (Paris)
Associate Curator: Suzanne O’Connell, Director Suzanne O’Connell Gallery (Brisbane)
« Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres »
Commissaire scientifique et chef de projet : Stéphane Jacob, directeur de la galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob (Paris)
Commissaire associée : Suzanne O’Connell, directrice de la galerie Suzanne O’Connell (Brisbane)
The “BAGU” Installation has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Ministry for the Arts’ 'Catalyst Australian Arts and Culture Fund',
the Australia Council for the Arts and the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland.
L’installation « BAGU » a bénéficié du soutien du gouvernement australien par l’intermédiaire du fonds Catalyst pour les arts et la culture d’Australie
du Ministère fédéral des Arts, de l’Australia Council for the Arts ainsi que celui du gouvernement du Queensland (département des Arts du Queensland).
Main sponsor / mécène principal : Métropole Gestion
Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre, Girringun (Cardwell, Queensland) :
Art Centre Manager / directrice du centre d’art : Dr Valerie Keenan
Workshop coordinator / coordinateur du projet : Len Cook
Artists / Artistes : Ninney Murray, Emily Murray, Sally Murray, Ethel Murray, Debra Murray, Alison Murray, John Murray, Jonas Murray, Theresa Beeron,
Daniel Beeron, Philip Denham, Maleisha Leo, Eileen Tep, Clarence Kinjun, Doris Kinjun, Marjorie Kinjun, Elizabeth Nolan, Sigourney Thaiday, Leonard Andy
Special thanks Girramay Elder Claude Beeron / Nous adressons nos remerciements particuliers à Girramay Elder Claude Beeron.
The Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre is funded by Arts Queensland’ 'Backing Indigenous Arts' and Ministry for the Arts’ 'Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support'.
Le Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre est subventionné par 'Arts Queensland Backing Indigenous Arts' et par le ministère australien des Arts dans le cadre
du programme 'Indigenous Visual Arts Industry Support'.
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco / S.A.S. le Prince Albert II de Monaco
His Excellency Mr Stephen Brady AO CVO, Australian Ambassador to France and to the Principality of Monaco and his team /
Son Excellence Monsieur Stephen Brady, Ambassadeur d’Australie en France et à Monaco et ses équipes
Senator the Honourable Mitch Fifield, Australian Government Minister for the Arts, and his team /
Monsieur le Sénateur Mitch Fifield, ministre australien des Arts et ses équipes
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, Premier of Queensland and Minister for the Arts, and her team /
Madame Annastacia Palaszczuk, Premier ministre et ministre des Arts du Queensland et ses équipes
Robert Calcagno, CEO of the Oceanographic Institute and his team / Robert Calcagno, directeur de l’Institut océanographique et ses équipes
Hélène Lafont-Couturier, Director of the musée des Confluences (Lyon) and her team /
Hélène Lafont-Couturier, directrice du musée des Confluences (Lyon) et ses équipes
Lisa Airasca, Paolo Alvarez, Eleonora Alzetta, Jean-Christophe Arnoux, Jérôme Arnoux, Julie Arnoux, Olivier de Baecque, Anne-Gaële Duriez de Baecque,
Harriet Baillie, Elisabeth Baltzinger, Patrick Bani, Gaël Baslé, Marie-Claude Beaud, Emmanuel Behrendt, Natacha Bernet, Pamela Bigelow, Anna Bijelic,
Natalie Bochenski, Catherine Bodet, Anne-Marie Boisbouvier, Myriam Boisbouvier-Wylie & John Wylie, Eric et Isabelle Bonnal, Laurence Bonnefond,
Sylvie Boucherat, Muriel Bubbio, Lee-Ann Buckskin, Béatrice Calcagno, Anne Candy, Tiziana Caporale, Daniel Caravano, Michael Carr, Sébastien Carré,
Raffaele Carrozza, Anne-Marie Cattelain, Gaëlle Charbonnel, Falila Coiba, David Comte, Veronica Comyn, Miriam Cosic, Georges Cotton, Benjamin Curtet,
Michel Dagnino, Anne-Marie Damiano, Romuald de Lencquesaing, José-Luis de Mendiguren, Fiammetta de'Santis, Marc & Nelly Debailleul,
Véronique Delandemare, Laurent Delannet, Laurent Delval, Jérémy Devos, Pierine di Giacomo, Tea Dietterich, Régis Dorey, Bruno Dufosse,
Olivier Dufourneaud, Nicolas Dupont, Tony Ellwood, Mickael Fabre, Gilles Fage, Daphné Ferrié, Florence Forzy, Philippe Foutrel, William Foye,
Blaise Franco, Julien Frappa, Emmanuelle Gaillard, David Galloway-Penney, Marine Gaudin, Carole Ge, Marylin Georgeff, Bruce, Judith & Genevieve Gordon,
Laurent Giauffret, Renai Grace, Michel Guillemot, Philippe Haddad, Joël & Martha Hakim, Claire Harquet, Mélanie Harquet, Robert Heathcote,
Béatrice Hedde, Kirsten Herring, Sarah Heymann, Monika Horvath, Erica Izett, Philippe & Liliane Jacob, Denis Jacob, Caroline & Georges Jollès,
Markus Keller et les équipes d'AccorHotels, Julia King, Gilles Laffay, Trish Lake, Anne Langerôme, Eric Langevin, Valérie Langevin, Sarah Lanzi, Jérémy Larini,
Sylvie Laurent, Anne Parsons & Roger Le Mesurier, Sébastien Leduc et les équipes de l’imprimerie Iro (La Rochelle), Marie-Antoinette Lemoine, Claire Leny,
Jonathan Levine, Isabel Levy, Helen & Bori Liberman, Louise Litchfield, José Littardi et les équipes du restaurant La Terrasse, Laëtitia Loas-Orsel,
Noëlle Loison, Isabelle Lombardo, Antoine Loudot, Judith Lovell, Cherisse Lyons, Olivier Maguet, Jean-Claude Mangion, Céline Mathieux, Elsa Milanesio,
Arielle Barabino & Richard Milanesio, Lydia Miller, Gilles Millet, George Mina, Damien Montat, Magali Moret, Roger Moreton, Eva Muller, Eve-Anna Musso,
Rupert Myer, Debra Nicholson, Agnès Niel, Béatrice Novaretti, Harriet O'Malley, Germain Ortolani, Frédéric Pacorel, Romain Parlier, Catherine Pascaud,
Joël Passeron, Alessandra Penayo, Véronique Pernin, Marie Perrier, Nathalie Perrin et les équipes de Co-Influence, Auriane Pertuisot, Maria Petturiti,
Laetitia Pierrat, Patrick Piguet, Isabel Pires, Valérie Pisani, Didier Poteau, Sandra Puch, Jane Raffan, Frédéric Ramin, Guillaume Rapin et les équipes du Novotel
Monte-Carlo, Maïté René-Watts, Marc Rigazzi, Nathalie Ritz, Neelame Roustarealy, Isabel Rubio, Sémir Saidi, Isabelle Sanfilippo, Béatrice Schawann,
Penelope Stockdale, Valérie Suda, Bernard Tabary & les membres d’ABIE, Emilie Tarditi, François Tetienne, Didier Théron et ses équipes,
Thierry Thévenin, Jacques Tomasini, Ingrid Trawinski, Alexandre Trueba et les équipes de WES, Brian Tucker, Alexia Tye, Olivier Valero, Anne Vissio,
Julien Vivaudo, Karl Wildman, Andrew Willis, Gabrielle Wilson, François-Marie Wojcik, Mark Young, Marie-Pascale Zugaj Benteo et les animateurs
et animatrices vacataires du Musée océanographique et les animatrices et animateurs stagiaires du Pavillon Bosio de Monaco,
l'École de la Condamine de Monaco : les enfants de la classe de CPM à horaires aménagés option musique et leurs parents, Mme Pascale Bellingeri,
directrice, M. Alain Serra, enseignant, l’Académie de musique Rainier III de Monaco : M. Christian Tourniaire, directeur, Mme Bernadette Hudelot,
assistante direction, Mme Brigitte Clarys, professeur de musique de la classe, M. Damien Gastaud, professeur de musique,
Mairie de Monaco : Mme Karyn Ardisson-Salopeck, élue chargée de l'école de musique.
Crédits photo / Photographic credits
Couverture / front cover : Theresa Beeron, Utti-Stingray / Utti-Raie, 2015
4e de couverture / back cover : « Les artistes de Girringun et l’équipe du centre d’art » /
« Bagu artists and Girringun staff » © Girringun Aboriginal Art Center
Ambassade d'Australie en France : 4 ; Benjamin Curtet : 10h/top ; GJ Henry : 11 ; Valerie Keenan / Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre :
10 b/bottom, 12h/top, 13b/bottom, 14 b/bottom, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 37, 42 ;
Peter Lik / Tourism and Events Queensland : 11b/bottom ; Laëtitia Loas-Orsel : 8, 14 b/bottom ; Palais princier, Monaco : 2 ;
Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane : 19 ; Queensland Government : 7 ; Tourism and Events Queensland : 12 b/bottom ;
Susan Wright/Tourism and Events Queensland : 13, 30
Tous droits réservés : les artistes, l’auteur, Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob et Suzanne O’Connell Gallery
Éditeur / Publisher France : éditions Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris.
Conception / Editor : Stéphane Jacob, Emmanuelle Gaillard (Le Faune éditeur), Benjamin Curtet
Design graphique / Graphic Designer : Laëtitia Loas-Orsel
Impression / Printing : IRO Imprimeur - La Rochelle, France
Mai 2016 / May 2016
Traduction / Translation : 2M Language Services
Coordination France : Stéphane Jacob, Emmanuelle Gaillard (Le Faune éditeur), Benjamin Curtet
Coordination Australie : Suzanne O’Connell
Textes / Texts : « Matter and Spirit: The Quintessence of Bagu Rainforest Country »,
« Making Fire with Bagu and Jiman », « The Fire Spirit Jiggabunah » © Jane Raffan
ISBN : 978-2-9544576-9-7
© Tous droits réservés : les artistes, l’auteur, Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob et Suzanne O’Connell Gallery
Toute reproduction de cet ouvrage, même partielle, est interdite sans l’autorisation préalable de l’éditeur.
© The artists, authors, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery and Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob. This work is copyright.
Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 (Australian Government), no part may be reproduced by any process without prior
written permission of the copyright holders and publisher.
Catalogue imprimé avec des encres végétales sur du papier PEFC issu de forêts gérées durablement.
Catalogue printed using vegetable-based inks on PEFC-certified paper sourced from sustainably-managed forests.
Impression
05 46 30 29 29 -
LES LANGUES AUTOCHTONES D’AUSTRALIE
Les Aborigènes et les Insulaires du détroit de Torres représentent dans leur
ensemble la culture autochtone d’Australie. Leurs cultures et leurs langues
sont distinctes, ils ont d’ailleurs chacun leur drapeau. Avant la colonisation, il y
avait deux cent cinquante groupes linguistiques aborigènes – ou « nations »
– et près de six cents dialectes. On estime aujourd’hui que soixante langues
sont encore parlées en Australie.
Dans le détroit de Torres, deux langues sont actuellement parlées assez
largement sur les différentes îles : le Kala Lagaw Ya dans les îles occidentales,
et le Meriam Mir dans les îles orientales. Des dialectes de ces langues sont
parlés dans les îles du Centre-Ouest, du Nord-Ouest, les îles centrales et les
îles orientales.
Même au sein de ces groupes linguistiques, les Aborigènes et les Insulaires
du détroit de Torres voient leur identité culturelle comme étant unique et
différente de celle de leurs voisins.
Selon l’artiste Alick Tipoti : « La langue est l’ingrédient essentiel qui connecte
toutes les cultures du monde actuel. Tout ce que l’on fait, traditionnellement
ou culturellement, évolue à partir d’une langue. Connaître la langue, c’est
connaître la culture ».
PEFC/10-31-1371
AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES
Australia’s Indigenous people are divided into Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander groups as each is culturally distinct, with its own flag that proclaims
their separate identities.
Prior to white settlement there were more than two hundred and fifty
Aboriginal language groups or nations with around six hundred dialects spoken
across the continent. An estimated sixty languages are still spoken today.
In the Torres Strait there are two languages which are spoken fairly widely
throughout the islands today. Kala Lagaw Ya is spoken in the Western islands
and Meriam Mir in the Eastern islands. Dialects of these are spoken in the
Mid Western, Top Western, Central and Eastern islands.
Even within these language groups or nations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islanders see their cultural identity as unique and different from their
neighbours. Alick Tipoti believes that ‘ language is the vital ingredient that
binds all cultures in the world today. Everything you do, traditionally or
culturally, evolves from a language. When you know the language, you know
your culture.’
Catalogue réalisé à l’occasion de l’exposition TABA NABA, Australie, Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer
en collaboration avec le Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre Musée océanographique de Monaco, du 24 mars au 30 septembre 2016
Catalogue published for the exhibition TABA NABA, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People
in collaboration with Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, March 24 - September 30, 2016
www.artsdaustralie.com/monaco-bagu
Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob
179, Boulevard Pereire, 75017 Paris. France
Tel : + 33 (0)1 46 22 23 20 - Fax : + 33 (0)9 55 72 05 90
E-mail : [email protected]
Sur rendez-vous / By appointment only
Expert en art aborigène
Membre de la Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en Objets d’Art et de Collection (C.N.E.S.)
Membre du Comité Professionnel des Galeries d’Art
Signataire de la Charte d’éthique australienne “Indigenous Art Code”
www.ar tsdaustralie.com

Documents pareils