Media Coverage Report on WACD Launch

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Media Coverage Report on WACD Launch
Launch of the West Africa
Commission on Drugs
Coverage report
15 February 2013
Page 2
This report captures media coverage relating to the 31 January 2013 launch of the West Africa Commission on
Drugs (WACD) in Accra, Ghana by the Kofi Annan Foundation.
The launch generated significant and widespread coverage in regional and international media. In addition to
coverage of the launch, there were multiple placements of an Op-Ed piece by Kofi Annan in top-tier outlets in
English and French.
Below is a summary of the coverage from 31 January to 15 February:
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A very successful Associated Press piece on the launch, with 161 hits and counting, including in top
outlets such as the Huffington Post, the Washington Post, ABC News and Yahoo News
Other top tier coverage includes hits in Voice of America, IRIN, Agence France Presse, Agence Presse
Africaine, and Ghana News Agency
There has been Anglophone and Francophone coverage
We have obtained coverage in international Francophone outlets such as: Jeune Afrique, Agence Ecofin
and Radio France Internationale
The launch has received significant media coverage in African countries, including: Ghana, South Africa,
Angola, Nigeria, Morocco, Ivory Coast, Burking Faso, Guinea, Benin, Mali and Algeria
The launch has also received international coverage in the following countries: the US, UK, Malaysia,
China, Argentina, India and Lebanon
In addition to online and print media coverage, there was also broadcast coverage of the launch
including President Obasanjo’s interview with BBC Newsday, Kofi Annan’s interviews with RFI and BBC
Focus on Africa, and the Jeune Afrique interview with Pedro Pires.
The Op-Ed, originally published in The Guardian, has already appeared in the following outlets:
o Fraternité Matin, Ivory Coast
o Le Quotidien d’Oran, Algeria
o Le Matin, Morocco
o Business Day, Nigeria
o Business Day, South Africa
o Le Soleil, Senegal
o L’Essor, Mali
o Le Pays, Burkina Faso
o Ghanaian Chronicle, Ghana
o The Namibian, Namibia
o Le Republicain, Togo
A number of other national newspapers have expressed interest in publishing the Op-Ed. This coverage
report will be updated as and when further coverage appears.
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Wires
Associated Press
Kofi Annan tackles drug trafficking in West Africa
Laura Burke
31 January 2013
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AF_GHANA_DRUG_TRAFFICKING?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME
&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT
Former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan launched a commission Thursday to tackle drug
trafficking in West Africa as the region increasingly becomes a stopover point for cocaine and marijuana
shipments from the Americas to Europe.
The 10-member commission, headed by former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, will raise awareness,
promote regional capacity to deal with the problem, and develop policy recommendations for political leaders,
he said. The Commission on the Impact of Drug Trafficking on Governance, Security and Development in West
Africa is sponsored by the Koffi Annan Foundation
The U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime said in a report last year that cocaine trafficking in West and Central Africa
generates some $900 million annually for criminal networks.
In July, the Executive Director of the UNODC, Yury Fedotov, said some 30 tons of cocaine were trafficked to
West Africa in 2011. He also reported an increase in heroin trafficking, as evidenced by an upsurge in seizures
from 20 kilograms seized in 2008 to almost 400 kilograms in 2011. Methamphetamine laboratories have also
recently been discovered in West Africa, he said.
The tiny coup-prone nation of Guinea-Bissau served as the entry point for drug smuggling in West Africa about
a decade ago, Annan said, and is now frequently dubbed a "narcostate."
In Guinea-Bissau key members of the military have been named as complicit in the trade, including several
army and navy chiefs who are now on the United States' "drug kingpin" list. The infusion of illicit cash has
emboldened an already bloated army, and fueled several coups.
But the trade has in recent years moved along the continent's western coast and through its porous borders in
the Sahel, Annan said.
Annan blamed the international community for ignoring the threat posed by corrupted states like GuineaBissau.
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"As an international community we tend to be rather short-sighted. We have to be careful how we deal with
failed states," Annan said. "We ignored Somalia for 20 years until it came back to bite us in the form of central
piracy, and everybody then woke up. And by then it had done lots of damage to the whole region and to global
commerce. In a way we are doing the same with Guinea-Bissau. That's where it started, and we have allowed
it to fester," he said.
Annan said drug traffickers have linked with terrorist groups in the region, who are threatening regional stability
as they threaten to take the reins of power in Mali and other parts of the Sahel.
And another concern for regional leaders: West Africans are also starting to use the drugs. "We have ceased to
be just transit zone. We have become manufacturing zone and consuming zone," Obasanjo said. "We don't
want it to reach an epidemic trend. We want to stop it and reverse it."
Yet Annan acknowledged his commission is "not a police force," and cannot hold smugglers, criminal gangs,
terrorists, or corrupt officials accountable.
"All governments and people in this region have to be aware and do whatever they can to contain it," he said.
"But we also rely on our partners in Europe, in Latin America and the U.S. to work with us in dealing with this
menace."
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The Associated Press article received widespread coverage particularly in the US among top-tier outlets, the
highlights of which are summarised below. In total, the article has been published in 161 outlets worldwide.
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Agence France Presse
W. African drug smuggling aids extremists: Annan
31 January 2013
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/afp/130131/wafrican-drug-smuggling-aids-extremists-annan
The AFP piece was picked up by the Global Post in the US and the New Age in South Africa.
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Ex-UN chief Kofi Annan said Thursday that drug smuggling in west Africa had aided extremists in a region
where Islamists had taken control of northern Mali and risked destabilising other nations.
Annan made the comments as he launched a commission to study the problem in the Ghanaian capital Accra.
Convened by Annan and chaired by former Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo, the West African
Commission on Drugs will release a report by the end of the year with recommendations for how narcotics
trafficking from South American through West Africa can be checked.
"In West Africa there is evidence that drug traffickers have linked up with extremist groups," he said. "All of
these developments threaten the stability of our region as we have witnessed so graphically in Mali in recent
weeks."
According to Annan, "the linkages between smugglers, criminal gangs and extremists along the coast and all
the way through the Sahara is now evident for all to see.
"It's also been clear over the past couple of years there has been hostage-taking in the Sahel, cigarette
smuggling and drugs are also involved. So I think what is happening in Mali cannot be seen in isolation. There
is a threat to the whole region."
Chronic instability in Guinea-Bissau has made the country an attractive destination for South American
druglords seeking a hub to move cocaine into Europe. Annan said the international community tends to ignore
such problems until they spill over into other countries.
"We ignored Somalia for 20 years until it came back to bite us in the form in central piracy," Annan said. "In a
way, we are doing the same with Guinea-Bissau ... we've allowed it to fester."
West Africa has long been known to be a trans-shipment point for cocaine and other drugs coming from South
America.
Recently however concerns have been raised about whether extremist groups wreaking havoc in the region -most notably Islamist groups in northern Mali -- may run drugs to pay for their activities. Obasanjo said drug
cartels are now also selling to and producing drugs in west Africa.
"We have ceased to be just a transit zone. We have become a manufacturing zone and a consuming zone,"
Obasanjo said.
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Agence Presse Africaine
Annan alarmed by W/Africa drugs trafficking
31 January 2013
http://www.apanews.net/news/en/wire.php
The APA piece was also picked up by Star Africa.com
The former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan has decried massive upsurge of illegal drug
trafficking in the West African Sub-region which he observed threatens the stability and development of the
region.
Speaking at an inaugural ceremony of the West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drug Trafficking on
Governance, Security and Development on Thursday at Kofi Annan Peace Keeping Training Centre in Accra,
the former UN boss said for the past ten years drug trafficking had increased in the sub-region, saying if
unchecked it could erode the social, economic development gains the region had made.
The ex UN boss therefore called for collaboration from state and private institutions to combat the menace.
Ghanaian Vice President Paa Kwesi Amissah Arthur who officially inaugurated the Commission contended that
Ghana was not the only country confronted with drug trafficking menace therefore it would collaborate with the
United Nations, African Union and ECOWAS to combat drug trafficking so as to protect the youths from ruining
their future.
A former President of Nigeria, Olusegun Obasanjo who chaired the function pointed out that illegal drug trade
has the potential of causing political instability and social upheavals and called for
concerted effort in battling it.
The Commission was established by Kofi Annan Foundation in consultation with international and regional
partners, national governments and civil society organisations in response to sudden upsurge in drug trafficking
in West Africa for the past ten years.
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Ghana News Agency
Vice President Stresses Collaboration In Fight Against Drug Trafficking In W/A
31 January 2013
http://www.ghananewsagency.org/social/vice-president-stresses-collaboration-in-fight-against-drugtrafficking-55748
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The Ghanaian Vice President, Paa Kwesi Bekoe Amissah-Arthur today said there was the need for countries to
work closely with drug producer and consumer regions for the world to deal effectively with drug trafficking. He
said Ghana was not alone in facing problems of drug trafficking, and therefore would continue to collaborate
with the ECOWAS, the African Union and the United Nations to enhance its ability to respond to threats of the
drug trade.
The Vice President stressed the need to receive accurate information about drugs, adding, ”we must make
every effort to ensure that our youth are given the kind of help that reduces their vulnerability to drug
pushers and diminish the risks they run in using drugs.”
Vice President Amissah-Arthur said this when he addressed the inaugural ceremony of the West Africa
Commission on the Impact of Drug Trafficking on Governance, Security and Development, held at the Kofi
Annan International Peace Keeping Training Centre, at Teshie, in Accra.
The Commission was established by the Kofi Annan Foundation, in consultation with international and regional
partners, national governments and civil society organisations, in response to the dramatic surge in drug
trafficking through West Africa over the past decade.
The Commission is chaired by former President Olusegun Obasanjo of Nigeria, and the members are a group
of distinguished West Africans, including President Pedro Verona Pires o f Cape Verde.
Vice President Amissah-Arthur said the Government of Ghana welcomes the initiative, which was taken by
former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan to raise awareness of the negative impact of drug trafficking in the
sub-region.
He said the initiative came at a crucial time when the countries in the sub-region were facing the threat of
sustained instability due to the destructive activities and corrupting influence of drug traffickers.
Vice President Amissah-Arthur said West Africa had become a significant point for the trafficking of drugs from
South America to Europe and some estimates suggest more than a third of the drugs that go to Western
Europe have West Africa as point of entry.
The Vice President said:“The value of the drug trade is a significant proportion to our national GDP. It therefore
has the ability to undermine national institutions. The profits from the drug trade can fund and corrupt national
institutions and subordinate them to the will of the traffickers.
“Drug trafficking is thus a great threat to the well-being, security and stability of our countries.”
Vice President Amissah-Arthur noted that the percentage of substance abusing patients using cocaine, heroin
and pethidine appears to have grown substantially over the last five years, and the ingestion of drugs by
injections had grown, heightening the risk of HIV transmission.
Also the UN Office of Drugs and Crime suggests that in 2009 locals consumed about a third of the South
American cocaine shipped through West Africa, and this situation, the Vice President said, was a concern since
the consumption of illicit drugs in the West African sub-region created serious problems of dependency, with
further burden on health services.
While acknowledging the several fronts Ghana had taken to deal with the threats posed by drug trafficking, the
Vice President called for more to be done, and gave the Commission the assurance that the Mahama
Administration would lend full support to its work.
Mr Kofi Annan said the massive surge in drug trafficking over the last decade presents a serious and growing
threat to the region’s stability and development.
“Left unchecked, illegal drug trafficking could compromise the encouraging progress that West African Nations
have made in strengthening democracy and promoting human and economic development,” he added.
Former President Obasanjo said the illegal trade in drugs could cause political instability and social upheavals.
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“The trade in illegal drugs has already caused devastation in other regions of the world. We must all work to
prevent West Africa from experiencing the same fate. The Commission looks forward to its urgent and
important work,” he said.
The Commission, which will publish a comprehensive report later this year, aims to develop evidence based
policy recommendations for political and civil society leaders to address drug trafficking, mobilize public
awareness and political commitment around the issue and promote local and regional capacities to deal with
drug trafficking.
The Ghana News Agency piece received significant pick up by Ghanaian outlets, including:
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Agence Télégraphique Suisse
Kofi Annan crée une commission contre le trafic de drogue
31 January 2013
L'ex-secrétaire général de l'ONU Kofi Annan a dévoilé jeudi une nouvelle initiative pour lutter contre la menace
posée par le trafic de drogues en Afrique de l'Ouest. La Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la
sécurité et le développement a été inaugurée à Accra (Ghana).
Lancée au Centre Kofi Annan de Maintien de la Paix à Accra, la commission est une réponse à la flambée
dramatique du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l'Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie, a précisé un
communiqué diffusé à Genève.
Selon le Bureau des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC), le trafic illégal de stupéfiants est lié à
des activités criminelles et terroristes dans la région. Il alimente la croissance de la consommation locale de
drogues illégales.
La commission est créée par la Fondation Kofi Annan, en consultation avec des partenaires internationaux et
régionaux, des gouvernements et des organisations de la société civile. Elle comprend un groupe de
personnalités d'Afrique de l'Ouest, dont deux anciens chefs d'Etat. L'ex-président du Nigéria Olusegun
Obasanjo en assure la présidence.
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Agence EcoFin
Kofi Annan part en guerre contre le trafic de drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest
2 February 2013
http://www.agenceecofin.com/gestion-publique/0202-8749-kofi-annan-part-en-guerre-contre-le-traficde-drogues-en-afrique-de-l-ouest
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Autour de Kofi Annan, ancien secrétaire général des Nations unies, s’est constituée une Commission
composée de personnalités ouest-africaines décidées à combattre le trafic de drogue qui gangrène les Etats,
les sociétés et les économies d’Afrique de l’Ouest.
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien président du Nigeria assurera la présidence de cette structure de haut niveau qui
compte un second ex-chef d’Etat en la personne de Pedro Pires (Cap Vert).
La Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la sécurité et le développement dans le contexte de la
lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants travaillera avec des partenaires internationaux et régionaux, des
gouvernements nationaux et des organisations de la société civile.
« Si rien n’est fait, le trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès encourageants que les pays d’Afrique de
l’Ouest ont réalisés en matière de renforcement de la démocratie et de développement humain et
économique,» a alerté Kofi Annan.
La Commission se compose également du Dr. Idrissa Ba, professeur, Hôpital psychiatrique de Thiaroye, de
Justice Bankole-Thompson, du Tribunal spécial pour la Sierra Leone, d’Alpha Abdoulaye Diallo, National
Coordinator du Réseau Afrique Jeunesse, de Mary Chinery Hesse, du Panel des sages de l'Union Africaine, de
Gilbert Houngbo, ancien Premier ministre du Togo, de Christine Kafando, co-fondatrice de l’Association Espoir
pour Demain, d’Adeolu Ogunrombi, coordinateur du projet YouthRISE sur la réforme de politique de drogues
au Nigeria et en Afrique de l’Ouest, de Mahmou Ould Mohamedou, professeur à l'Institut de Hautes Études
Internationales et du Développement et Directeur du Programme sur le Moyen-Orient et l'Afrique du Nord au
Centre de Politique de Sécurité de Genève et la chanteuse malienne Oumou Sangaré.
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CSOs tasked to stand against the rise of drug-trafficking in West Africa
Ghana News Agency
11 February 2013
http://www.ghananewsagency.org/human-interest/csos-tasked-to-stand-against-the-rise-of-drugtrafficking-in-west-africa-56180
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The Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) on Monday said the rise of wealthy organized crime
syndicates now illicitly trafficking narcotic across West Africa has thrown yet another mix into the already
lengthy and ‘toxic brew’ of threats plaguing the region.
“The rise in drug trafficking, including an increase in local drug production and consumption, is fast becoming
a mighty adversary to overcome in the pursuit of peace, stability and security in West Africa,” it said in a
statement..
The statement, copied to the Ghana News Agency, said it was a challenge that required a coordinated and
multi-pronged solution and also requires the active involvement of civil society actors across the region.
Ms Afia Asantewaa Asare-Kyei, OSIWA Programme Manager in Charge of Law, Justice and Human Rights,
signed the statement.
OSIWA said West Africa’s geographical proximity to European markets makes it strategically located for
drug-smuggling purposes and it is not only a trans-shipment zone, local production but also consumption is
also on the rise especially among its burgeoning youth population.
Over 70 per cent of the sub-region’s estimated 300 million people are under the age of 35. The vast majority
have limited education and are unemployed or working in the informal sector.
Lack of employment opportunities or reliable income put youth in precarious positions where they may be
vulnerable to involvement in the drug-trade and drug use itself.
The statement recounted last week’s inauguration of West Africa Commission on Drugs by Vice President
Kwesi Amissah-Arthur at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Training Centre chaired by the former Nigerian
President Olusegun Obasanjo.
OSIWA described the establishment of the Commission as a good omen and its inauguration timely to
examine ways and means to crack down on drug trafficking and prioritize grappling with drug trafficking
impacts on West Africa.
According to the statement trans-shipment of illicit narcotics from Latin America through to West Africa and
onwards to Europe has increased significantly.
It said since 2008, the volume of cocaine transiting through West Africa was roughly 50 tons a year and its
annual worth estimated at US$2 billion. Nearly 50 per cent of all non-U.S. bound cocaine, or about 13 per
cent of all global flows are now smuggled through West Africa.
According to the statement, apart from the damaging effects of drug use on West Africa’s human resource
base, related offences such as corruption and money laundering have also had a severe impact on the
socio-economic development and governance of the region.
It said drug-related corruption and money laundering accentuate the chronic poverty in many West African
states by disrupting effective economic governance. In a number of countries, the profits from trafficked
drugs exceed the gross national income.
The statement noted that a lot of time and resources have been invested in trying to combat this scourge,
stressing that at the regional level, the African Union (AU) has just developed its fourth revised plan of
action.
This new 2013-2017 policy on drug control seeks to strengthen continental and international cooperation and
further integrate drug control issues into national legal and institutional frameworks.
“On a sub-regional level, the ECOWAS issued a declaration entitled “Community Flame Ceremony: the fight
against drugs” and set up a regional fund for financing drug control activities in West Africa.
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The statement said 10 years later, ECOWAS adopted the Praia Plan of Action and the Abuja Declaration to
address the security threats posed by drug trafficking in the sub-region.
At the national level, OSIWA acknowledged that almost all ECOWAS states have adopted National
Integrated Programmes (NIPs), whilst some have amended their drug trafficking and consumption
legislations, empowered their judicial authorities, established new drug enforcement agencies and imposed
stiffer penalties for offenders.
OSIWA noted that in spite of the efforts poor implementation, lack of funding, and singularly focusing on
toughening punitive measures have accounted for the seemingly failures of the interventions.
It said “apart from the absence of political will and a clear vision from West Africa’s leaders, there has been
an absence or altogether inability to mobilize a critical mass of the population to actively participate in the full
stretch of the process – from inception to implementation, through to monitoring and review.”
The Ghana News Agency piece received pick up by Ghanaian outlets, including:
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Broadcast
The launch of West Africa Commission on Drugs (WACD) also received notable broadcast coverage, including
the BBC and RFI.
Representing WACD, both Kofi Annan and President Obasanjo gave interviews on high-profile international
media, in both French and English.
Broadcast coverage includes:
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RFI – Kofi Annan – Thursday
(available at http://www.rfi.fr/emission/20130202-kofi-annan-ancien-secretaire-general-nations-unies)
BBC Focus on Africa (Radio and TV) – Kofi Annan – Thursday – 17:00 and 17:30 GMT
BBC Newsday on BBC World Service – President Obasanjo – Friday – 07:30 GMT
Radio France Internationale
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On 31 January, the day of the WACD launch, an interview with Kofi Annan was broadcast on RFI’s
“Monde en direct” programme
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With an estimated 35.6 listeners, RFI is one of the most popular international radio stations.
BBC World
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On 31 January, an interview with Kofi Annan was broadcast on the 17:00 GMT radio edition of Focus on
Africa and at 17:30 GMT on the TV edition
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On 1 February, President Obasanjo gave a live interview at 07:30 GMT on the BBC World Service’s
early morning news and current affairs programme, Newsday
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The BBC World Service is the world’s largest international broadcaster, reaching an audience of 188
million people a week on average. It is estimated that Newsday has one of the largest, if not the largest,
audience of any radio programme in the world.
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Op-Ed
Kofi Annan’s Op-Ed “In Mali, military intervention is not enough”, was first published in The Guardian (UK) on
30 January 2013 both online and in print. The Guardian is currently the world’s thirst most read newspaper
website with 30.4 million readers a month.
After the Op-Ed was published in The Guardian, it was also placed in numerous daily leading national
newspapers in Africa, both in French and in English. To date, the Op-Ed has been published three times in
English and three times in French.
The following African outlets have published Kofi Annan’s Op-Ed:
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Fraternité Matin, Ivory Coast
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Le Quotidien d’Oran, Algeria
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Le Matin, Morocco
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Business Day, Nigeria
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Business Day, South Africa
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Le Soleil, Senegal
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L’Essor, Mali
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Le Pays, Burkina Faso
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Ghanaian Chronicle, Ghana
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The Namibian, Namibia
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Le Republicain, Togo
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The Guardian
In Mali, military intervention is not enough
Kofi Annan
30 January 2013
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/30/mali-military-intervention-drugscrime?INTCMP=SRCH
The Guardian is a British daily newspaper with the world’s third most read newspaper website with 30.4
million readers as of June 2012.
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Business Day (South Africa)
Find ways to bring stability to West Africa
Kofi Annan
5 February 2013
http://www.bdlive.co.za/opinion/2013/02/05/find-ways-to-bring-stability-to-west-africa
Business Day (South Africa) is regarded as Africa’s leading business daily newspaper. It is a national daily
newspaper in South Africa, published from Monday to Friday.
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Business Day (Nigeria)
Mali: A wake up call?
Kofi Annan
5 February 2012
http://www.businessdayonline.com/NG/index.php/analysis/commentary/51063-mali-a-wake-up-call
Business Day (Nigeria) is one of West Africa’s leading daily newspapers and the only Nigerian newspaper
with an Accra bureau.
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Ghanaian Chronicle
Mali: A wake up call?
Kofi Annan
11 February 2013
http://ghanaian-chronicle.com/mali-a-wake-up-call/
The Ghanaian Chronicle is an English language daily newspaper published from Accra, Ghana. It is the
biggest private newspaper in Ghana with a circulation of 45,000 copies.
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The Namibian
A Wake-Up Call from Mali
Kofi Annan
12 February 2013
http://www.namibian.com.na/columns/full-story/archive/2013/february/article/a-wake-up-call-frommali/
The Namibian is the largest daily newspaper in Namibia with a circulation of 40,000. It is published in
English and Oshiwambo.
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Full Text - English
West Africa rarely figures prominently on the global agenda. So it is clear that something very serious is
happening when it dominates the news headlines and political debate around the world.
The seizure of Northern Mali by an al-Qaida franchise and the terrible events in Algeria have brought
international attention to the extremist threat in the region and the impact it could have on the wider world. We
must hope the joint military operations under way are successful; but they cannot obscure the roots of this crisis
and the threat not only to Mali, but the region as a whole: a threat that seriously risks reversing the real
progress we have seen.
West Africa may be one of the poorest parts of the world, but the recent story has been remarkably upbeat.
After a violent and chaotic period in the aftermath of the cold war, it has clocked up impressive growth on the
back of a raw materials boom, sounder economic management, human investment and debt relief.
As one of the world's major sources of commodities such as gold, uranium, oil, gas, diamonds, cocoa and
coffee, west Africa's strategic value is growing too. The US alone is set to depend on the region for up to 25%
of its oil imports by 2015, bringing new investment and more diplomatic attention. But there are less positive
trends, and Mali must be a loud wake-up call.
One of the most potent dangers to west Africa's stability is the massive surge in drug trafficking and other
criminal activity over the last decade. The region has become the major conduit for narcotics from Latin
America to Europe, while opiates arrive in west Africa from Afghanistan and Pakistan via east Africa to be cut
and packaged and sent on to the US. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that at least 60 tonnes of
cocaine passes through west Africa each year. The region has also emerged as a transit route for human and
small arms trafficking and diamond smuggling, and a base for piracy and kidnapping. The profits from these
illegal activities help finance extremist groups, the UN agency warns.
Governance, poverty and geography have conspired to make west Africa particularly vulnerable to
transnational criminal activity. Institutions are weak, borders are porous, coastlines are under-patrolled, and
underpaid officials are vulnerable to bribery.
The military and law-enforcement agencies, ostensibly the major defences against insurgency and organised
crime, are sometimes part of the problem. Often kept deliberately weak to minimise the threat they pose to their
governments – an understandable concern given the history of the region – they are not always capable of
effectively playing their respective roles: guarding the state and protecting its people. The dismal failure of
Mali's army to defend its territory underlines the point.
What's worse, some security forces are actually complicit in these illegal activities. The April 2012 coup in
Guinea-Bissau, the most dramatic example, has been widely ascribed to the army's ambitions to take control of
the country's lucrative drugs trade.
These problems are exacerbated by some of the highest population growth rates in the world. A young
population can be a huge asset, of course, but not if there is a severe shortage of schools or jobs. Unskilled,
unemployed young men without a future are particularly vulnerable to the siren calls of drugs, unscrupulous
politicians, radical ideologies and crime.
While the region's economies are on the rise, job creation is below par. Most of the growth comes from capitalintensive industries, like oil and mining, rather than labour-intensive ones. The result is a growing divide in
wealth and opportunity between a narrow elite benefiting from the commodities boom and the majority, further
fuelling popular discontent.
The security threats Mali has exposed are symptoms of deeper regional problems that need to be addressed in
full. A military intervention in Mali, unavoidable as it has proved to be, will not solve the underlying drivers of
instability in west Africa. West African governments must plough the benefits of growth into security sector
reform, infrastructure, agriculture, vocational training, education and family planning if we want to keep the
region on track towards fulfilling its promise.
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Because I am deeply concerned about these problems, I have called on a diverse group of eminent west
Africans to join a commission to examine and propose solutions to the menace of drug trafficking and its
insidious impact on security, governance and development. This commission, which the former Nigerian
president Olusegun Obasanjo has agreed to chair, aims to raise awareness of the dangers that drug trafficking
and organised crime represent and to propose practical action to contain the problem. We must look at west
Africa's problems holistically and not focus on one danger – however serious.
Page 29
Le Quotidien D’Oran
La sonnette d’alarme ?
Kofi Annan
2 February 2013
http://www.lequotidien-oran.com/index.php?news=5178734
Le Quotidien d’Oran is a private, French-language daily in Algeria. Its circulation of between 130,000 and
150,000 ranks it as the first or second most read French-language newspaper in the country.
Page 30
Le Matin
La sonnette d’alarme ?
Kofi Annan
2 February 2013
http://www.lematin.ma/journal/-/177445.html
Le Matin in Morrocco is a French-language daily, which is recognised as the official newspaper of the
Moroccan monarchy.
Page 31
Fraternité Matin
Mali: la sonnette d'alarme?
Kofi Annan
3 February 2013
Fraternité Matin is a daily state-managed, French-language newspaper in the Ivory Coast, with a circulation
of 25,000.
Page 32
Le Soleil
Mali : la sonnette d’alarme
Kofi Annan
5 February 2013
Page 33
Le Pays
Kofi Annan tire la sonnette d’alarme
7 February
Kofi Annan
http://www.lepays.bf/?RISQUE-D-INSTABILITE-EN-AFRIQUE-DE
Page 34
L’Essor
Afrique de l’ouest : LA SONNETTE D’ALARME
Kofi Annan
8 February 2013
http://www.essor.ml/afrique-de-louest-la-sonnette-dalarme.html
Page 35
Le Républicain
Trafic de drogue et activités criminelles en Afrique de l’Ouest : Kofi Annan plaide pour une solution
plus profonde au Mali
11 February 2013
Page 36
Full Text - French
L’Afrique de l’Ouest figure rarement dans l’actualité internationale. Il ne fait donc aucun doute qu’il s’y passe
quelque chose de très grave lorsque ce pays fait la une des journaux et se trouve au centre du débat politique
dans le monde entier.
La prise du nord du Mali par un groupe affilié à al-Qaeda et les terribles événements qui ont eu lieu en Algérie
ont attiré l’attention du public international sur la menace extrémiste dans la région, et sur son impact potentiel
sur l’ensemble du monde.
Nous devons espérer que les opérations militaires en cours seront couronnées de succès, mais elles ne
doivent pas occulter les origines de la crise et la menace à laquelle sont confrontés non seulement le Mali,
mais également la région entière. Ces menaces risquent de compromettre les progrès indéniables réalisés.
L’Afrique de l’Ouest est peut-être l’une des régions les plus pauvres du monde, mais son histoire récente est
remarquablement encourageante. Après une période chaotique et violente à la suite de la Guerre froide, elle a
connu une croissance impressionnante alimentée par le boum des matières premières, une gestion macroéconomique plus saine, des investissements humains, et un allègement de la dette.
L’Afrique de l’Ouest est un des principaux réservoirs mondiaux de matières premières comme l’or, l’uranium, le
pétrole, le gaz, les diamants, le cacao et le café, de sorte que son intérêt stratégique croît au rythme de
l’expansion de ses économies. Jusqu’à 25% des importations pétrolières des seuls États-Unis devraient
dépendre de la région à l’horizon 2015, ce qui ne manquera pas de susciter de nouveaux investissements et
une attention diplomatique accrue.
Certaines tendances sont toutefois moins positives, comme vient de nous le rappeler le Mali, qui était un des
destinataires de prédilection de l’aide au développement jusqu’au coup d’État. Le Mali nous rappelle donc ainsi
brutalement à la réalité.
Un des dangers les plus pressants pour la stabilité de l’Afrique de l’Ouest est l’intensification massive du trafic
de drogue et d’autres activités criminelles au cours de la décennie écoulée. La région est devenue un axe
important d’acheminement de stupéfiants d’Amérique latine vers l’Europe, et les opiacés en provenance
d’Afghanistan et du Pakistan via l’Afrique de l’Est sont expédiés vers les États-Unis à partir de l’Afrique de
l’Ouest après y avoir été coupés et emballés.
L’Office des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC) estime qu’au moins 60 tonnes de cocaïne
passent par la région chaque année. L’Afrique de l’Ouest est également une plaque tournante pour les trafics
d’êtres humains et d’armes légères, tout comme pour la contrebande de diamants, les actes de piratage et les
enlèvements. Les recettes de ces activités illicites contribuent au financement de groupes extrémistes, nous
prévient l’agence onusienne.
En raison de facteurs liés à la gouvernance, la pauvreté et la géographie à la fois, l’Afrique de l’Ouest est
particulièrement vulnérable à l’activité criminelle transnationale. Ses institutions sont faibles, ses frontières
poreuses, ses côtes mal surveillées, et ses fonctionnaires sous-payés sont facilement tentés par la corruption.
Les armées et les forces de l’ordre, censées constituer les principales défenses contre, respectivement, les
insurrections et le crime organisé, contribuent elles-mêmes parfois au problème. Souvent délibérément
affaiblies pour minimiser toute menace potentielle de leur part à leurs propres gouvernements – une
préoccupation certes légitime compte tenu de l’histoire de la région – elles ne sont pas toujours en mesure de
jouer efficacement leurs rôles respectifs : veiller à la protection de l’état et de sa population. L’impuissance
flagrante de l’armée malienne à défendre son territoire ne fait que le confirmer.
Pire encore, certaines forces de sécurité sont en fait complices de ces activités illégitimes. Le coup d’État
d’avril 2012 en Guinée-Bissau, l’exemple le plus flagrant de ce fait, a été largement attribuable à la volonté des
forces armées de prendre le contrôle du lucratif commerce des drogues transitant à l’intérieur du pays. Ces
problèmes sont exacerbés par un des taux de croissance démographique les plus élevés du monde. La
jeunesse est sans nul doute un atout formidable, sauf en l’absence de suffisamment d’emplois ou d’écoles. Les
Page 37
jeunes hommes sans qualifications professionnelles, sans emploi et sans avenir sont particulièrement
vulnérables aux tentations de la drogue, des politiciens peu scrupuleux, des idéologies radicales et du crime.
Même si les économies de la région sont en expansion, la création d’emplois ne suit pas la même évolution.
L’essentiel de la croissance relève de secteurs à forte intensité de capital, et non de main d’œuvre, comme les
industries pétrolières et minières. Le fossé ne cesse donc de se creuser en termes de richesse et d’opportunité
entre une petite élite profitant du boum des matières premières et la majorité de la population, ce qui ne fait
qu’attiser le mécontentement populaire, en particulier chez les jeunes.
En quelques mots, je tiens à souligner le fait que les menaces à la sécurité exposées par le Mali sont les
symptômes de problèmes régionaux plus profonds pour lesquels une approche globale s’impose. Une
intervention militaire au Mali, aussi inévitable qu’elle se soit avérée, ne parviendra pas à remédier aux causes
sous-jacentes de l’instabilité en Afrique de l’Ouest.
Les gouvernements d’Afrique de l’Ouest doivent se servir des fruits de la croissance pour mettre en œuvre une
réforme du secteur de la sécurité, développer l’infrastructure, l’agriculture, la formation professionnelle,
l’éducation et le planning familial, si nous voulons que la région tienne ses promesses.
C’est animé par ces inquiétudes profondes que j’ai convié un groupe d’éminents Africains de divers horizons à
siéger au sein d’une commission ayant pour vocation d’étudier la menace du trafic de drogue et son impact
insidieux sur la sécurité, la gouvernance et le développement en Afrique de l’Ouest, et d’y proposer des
solutions. Cette commission, que l’ancien Président du Nigeria, Monsieur Obasanjo, a accepté de présider,
entend susciter une prise de conscience des dangers présentés par le trafic de drogue et le crime organisé, et
proposer des modalités d’action pratiques pour endiguer le problème. Nous devons aborder les problèmes de
l’Afrique de l’Ouest sous une perspective holistique, et ne pas concentrer notre attention sur un seul danger,
quelle que soit sa gravité.
Page 38
Other Coverage
A number of print and online outlets have written articles, based on the news release, around the launch of the
Commission.
Significant English-language coverage includes:

An article by Laura Burke on the website of US broadcaster Voice of America

An in-depth analysis of the Commission’s launch on IRIN

Several articles in Ghana, including a write-up of the website of Ghana Broadcasting Agency, Ghana
Business News, and The Ghanaian Journal

Articles in This Day Live and The Daily Independent in Nigeria

A reprint of the press release on the international Africa news and opinion website, AllAfrica. The website
serves over five million page views a month and logs more than two million unique visits.

A piece by the Open Society Initiative for West Africa, supporting WACD’s mission
Significant French-language coverage includes:

An interview with former Cape Verde President Pedro Pires in Jeune Afrique. The weekly Frenchlanguage magazine has an estimated readership of 800,000, in 80 countries.

Articles in key African Francophone newspapers and online outlets, including:
o L’Essor in Mali
o La Nouvelle Tribune in Guinea
o Le Matinal in Benin
o Le Potential in the Democratic Republic of Congo
o Sidwaya in Burkina Faso
o The Fasozine website in Burkina Faso
Page 39
Voice of America
Annan Starts New Initiative Against W. Africa Drug Trafficking
Laura Burke
31 January 2013
http://www.voanews.com/content/annan-starts-new-initiative-against-west-africa-drugtrafficking/1594692.html
This piece was also picked up by the Malaysia Sun, Argentina Star, Austin’s News Net, India’s News Net and
EzKnowHow.
Former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has launched a commission to tackle drug trafficking in West
Africa, which has increased significantly in the past decade. The 10-member commission met for the first time
Page 40
in the capital of Ghana Thursday.
Kofi Annan launched the Commission on the Impact of Drug Trafficking on Governance, Security, and
Development in West Africa on Thursday. He said the region is increasingly becoming a transit point for drugs
from the Americas and Asia that are headed to Europe, and that the illegal activity threatens to destabilize the
region. Local consumption of these drugs is also on the rise.
"We have seen what has happened in other parts of the world where it has destabilized societies, corrupted the
system and brought incredible violence," he said. "And of course we don’t want to see that happen here and
the idea is for us to look at the issue critically, get the evidence and make recommendations for action."
Drugs like marijuana, cocaine and heroin are shipped through West Africa on their way to Europe, he
said. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime said in a report last year that cocaine trafficking in West
and Central Africa generates some $900 million annually.
Former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo is chairman of the 10-member commission. He said drug
traffickers who work with criminal gangs and terrorist organizations are taking advantage of political instability
and weak institutions in the region.
"One, the institutions are weak. Two, the people are poor, and three, the pressure is heavy…. Mali is a typical
example. Guinea-Bissau is another example where institutions of government are weak and the barons, the
drug barons, take advantage," he said.
Annan said the commission will not act as a police force, but will raise awareness, promote local and regional
capacity to fight the problem, and submit policy recommendations to regional leaders.
Page 41
Ghana Business News
West Africa’s major initiative to combat growing drug threat launched in Ghana
Ekow Quandzie
31 January 2013
http://www.ghanabusinessnews.com/2013/01/31/west-africas-major-initiative-to-combat-growing-drugthreat-launched-in-ghana/
This piece also appeared on Spy Ghana.
Under his brainchild, Mr Kofi Annan, a former UN Secretary-General, today January 31, 2013 launched a major
new initiative to help tackle the growing threat from illegal drug trafficking in West Africa.
The West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drugs on Governance, Security and Development (WACD) was
launched at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Centre in Accra, Ghana.
Page 42
According to officials, the Commission was formed in response to what they say is the “dramatic surge in drug
trafficking through West Africa” over the past decade.
The Commission was established by the Kofi Annan Foundation, in consultation with international and regional
partners, national governments and civil society organizations. It comprises a group of distinguished West
Africans, including two former heads of state.
General Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of Nigeria, will serve as its chair, the Kofi Annan Foundation
announced in a statement.
The Commission said it aims to develop evidence based policy recommendations for political and civil society
leaders on how to address drug trafficking; Mobilise public awareness and political commitment around the
issue; and Promote local and regional capacities to deal with drug trafficking.
In his message, Mr. Annan said “The massive surge in drug trafficking in West Africa over the last decade
presents a serious and growing threat to the region’s stability and development. Left unchecked, illegal drug
trafficking could compromise the encouraging progress that West African nations have made in strengthening
democracy and promoting human and economic development.”
The Commission is expected to publish a comprehensive report later this year, according to the Foundation.
Page 43
allAfrica
West Africa: Kofi Annan Launches West Africa Commission On Drugs
31 January 2013
http://allafrica.com/stories/201301311497.html
This pick up of the press release was also used by Afrimoney.com.
Page 44
Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan today unveils a major new initiative to help tackle the
growing threat from illegal drug trafficking in West Africa.
The West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drugs on Governance, Security and Development (WACD) is
being launched today at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Centre in Accra, Ghana.
The Commission has been formed in response to the dramatic surge in drug trafficking through West Africa
over the past decade. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, illegal drug trafficking is
linked to criminal activity and terrorist activities in the region and is fuelling increased local consumption of
illegal drugs.
The Commission has been established by the Kofi Annan Foundation, in consultation with international and
regional partners, national governments and civil society organizations. It comprises a group of distinguished
West Africans, including two former heads of state. Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of Nigeria, will serve
as its chair.
The Commission aims to:

Develop evidence based policy recommendations for political and civil society leaders on how to
address drug trafficking

Mobilise public awareness and political commitment around the issue; and

Promote local and regional capacities to deal with drug trafficking
Kofi Annan says: "The massive surge in drug trafficking in West Africa over the last decade presents a serious
and growing threat to the region's stability and development. Left unchecked, illegal drug trafficking could
compromise the encouraging progress that West African nations have made in strengthening democracy and
promoting human and economic development."
Olusegun Obasanjo, former president of Nigeria, says: "The trade in illegal drugs has already caused
devastation in other regions of the world. We must all work together to prevent West Africa from experiencing
the same fate. The Commission looks forward to its urgent and important work".
The Commission will publish a comprehensive report later this year.
Page 45
Atlanta Blackstar
Kofi Annan Launches West African Panel on Illegal Drug Trafficking
31 January 2013
http://atlantablackstar.com/2013/01/31/kofi-annan-launches-west-africa-commission-on-drugs/
Kofi Annan, a former U.N. secretary-general, today launched a major new initiative to help tackle the growing
threat from illegal drug trafficking in West Africa.
The West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drugs on Governance, Security and Development (WACD) was
launched at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Center in Accra, Ghana.
Page 46
According to officials, WACD was formed in response to what they say is the “dramatic surge in drug trafficking
through West Africa” over the past decade.
The commission was established by the Kofi Annan Foundation, in consultation with international and regional
partners, national governments and civil society organizations. It comprises a group of distinguished West
Africans, including two former heads of state.
General Olusegun Obasanjo, former president of Nigeria, will serve as its chair, the Kofi Annan Foundation
announced in a statement.
The commission said it aims to develop evidence-based policy recommendations for political and civil society
leaders on how to address drug trafficking; mobilize public awareness and political commitment around the
issue; and promote local and regional capacities to deal with it.
In his statement, Annan said, “The massive surge in drug trafficking in West Africa over the last decade
presents a serious and growing threat to the region’s stability and development. Left unchecked, illegal drug
trafficking could compromise the encouraging progress that West African nations have made in strengthening
democracy and promoting human and economic development.”
The commission is expected to publish a comprehensive report later this year, according to the foundation.
Page 47
Ghana Broadcasting Corporation
Government Committed To Eliminating Drug Trafficking
31 January 2013
http://www.gbcghana.com/index.php?id=1.1252236
Page 48
Vice President Paa Kwesi Amissah-Arthur says the government has taken a number of actions to deal with the
multiple threats of drugs and drug trafficking.
He said the government in co-operation with the UN office on Drugs and crime has produced a national
integrated programme to tackle drug - related problems.
Vice President Amissah-Arthur said this when he inaugurated the West Africa Commission on the Impact of
Drugs on Governance, Security and Development at the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Centre at
Teshie in Accra.
He said the government will continue to collaborate with the ECOWAS, AU and UN to enhance Ghana's
response to the threats of drug trafficking and drug use.
He invited civil society groups to partner the government in the fight against the drug menace.
Page 49
The Ghanaian Journal
Kofi Annan launches West Africa Commission on Drugs
Samuel Ampah
31 January 2013
http://www.theghanaianjournal.com/newspage.php?newsID=149#.UQuhnB0j5c8
Page 50
Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan today unveils a major new initiative to help tackle the
growing threat from illegal drug trafficking in West Africa.
The West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drugs on Governance, Security and Development (WACD) is
being launched today at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Centre in Accra, Ghana.
The Commission has been formed in response to the dramatic surge in drug trafficking through West Africa
over the past decade. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, illegal drug trafficking is
linked to criminal activity and terrorist activities in the region and is fuelling increased local consumption of
illegal drugs.
The Commission has been established by the Kofi Annan Foundation, in consultation with international and
regional partners, national governments and civil society organizations. It comprises a group of distinguished
West Africans, including two former heads of state. Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of Nigeria, will serve
as its chair.
The Commission aims to:
·
·
·
Develop evidence based policy recommendations for political and civil society leaders on how to
address drug trafficking
Mobilise public awareness and political commitment around the issue; and
Promote local and regional capacities to deal with drug trafficking
Kofi Annan says: “The massive surge in drug trafficking in West Africa over the last decade presents a serious
and growing threat to the region’s stability and development. Left unchecked, illegal drug trafficking could
compromise the encouraging progress that West African nations have made in strengthening democracy and
promoting human and economic development.”
Olusegun Obasanjo, former president of Nigeria, says: “The trade in illegal drugs has already caused
devastation in other regions of the world. We must all work together to prevent West Africa from experiencing
the same fate. The Commission looks forward to its urgent and important work”.
The Commission will publish a comprehensive report later this year.
Page 51
Afrik.com
Kofi Annan crée la Commissionsur l’impact du trafic destupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest
31 January 2013
http://www.afrik.com/kofi-annan-cree-la-commission-sur-l-impact-du-trafic-de-stupefiants-en-afriquede-l-ouest
Page 52
L’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations unies Kofi Annandévoile aujourd’hui une nouvelle initiative
d’envergure qui contribuera à lutter contre la menace croissante posée par le trafic de drogues
en Afriquede l’Ouest.
La Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la sécurité et le développement dans le contexte de la
lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants est inaugurée aujourd’hui au Centre Kofi Annan de Maintien de la Paix à
Accra, au Ghana.
La Commission est une réponse à la flambée dramatique du trafic destupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest au
cours de la dernière décennie. Selon le Bureau des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC),
le traficillégal de stupéfiants est lié à des activités criminelles et terroristes dans la région et alimente la
croissance de la consommation locale de drogues illégales.
La Commission est créée par la Fondation Kofi Annan, en consultation avec des partenaires internationaux
et régionaux, des gouvernements nationaux et des organisations de la société civile. Elle comprend un
groupe de personnalités éminentes d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont deux anciens chefs d’Etat. Olusegun
Obasanjo, ancien Président du Nigéria, en assumera la présidence.
La Commission vise à :
· Formuler des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes à l’endroit des dirigeants politiques et
des leaders de la société civile en vue de renforcer la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants ;
· Sensibiliser l’opinion publique et mobiliser les politiques sur cette question ;
· Promouvoir les capacités locales et régionales de gestion de ce trafic et ses conséquences.
Kofi Annan dit : « La flambée du trafic de drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie
présente un risque sérieux et croissant pour la stabilité et le développement de la région. Si rien n’est fait,
le trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès encourageants que les pays d’Afrique del’Ouest ont
réalisés en matière de renforcement de la démocratie et de développement humain et économique. »
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancient président du Nigéria, dit : « Le trafic destupéfiants a déjà dévasté d’autres
régions du monde. Nous devons tous travailler ensemble pour éviter ce sort à l’Afrique de l’Ouest.
La Commissiona hâte d’entreprendre ce travail urgent et important. »
La Commission publiera le résultat de ses travaux à la fin de l’année.
*****
La Commission sur l’impact du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest est composée de :
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien Président du Nigeria
Pedro Pires, ancien Président de Cap-Vert
Dr. Idrissa Ba, Professeur, Hôpital psychiatrique de Thiaroye
Page 53
Justice Bankole-Thompson, Tribunal spécial pour la Sierra Leone
Alpha Abdoulaye Diallo, National Coordinator, Réseau Afrique Jeunesse
Mary Chinery Hesse, Membre, Panel des sages de l’Union Africaine
Gilbert Houngbo, ancien Premier Ministre du Togo
Christine Kafondo, Co-fondatrice, Association Espoir pour Demain
Adeolu Ogunrombi, Coordinateur De Projet, projet YouthRISE sur la réforme de politique de drogues au
Nigeria et en Afrique de l’Ouest
Mahmou Ould Mohamedou, Professeur invité, l’Institut de Hautes Études Internationales et du
Développement et Directeur du Programme sur le Moyen-Orient et l’Afrique du Nord au Centre de Politique
de Sécurité de Genève
Oumou Sangaré, chanteuse malienne et lauréat d’un Grammy awards, ambassadrice de la musique
malienne
Page 54
La Nouvelle Tribune
Lutte contre le trafic de drogue en Afrique de l’ouest : Kofi Annan Cree Une Commission
B.M. Sissoko
1 February 2013
http://www.lanouvelletribune.info/index.php/actualite/annonce/13378-kofi-annan-cree-la-commissionsur-l-impact-du-trafic-de-stupefiants-en-afrique-de-l-ouest
Page 55
L’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations unies Kofi Annan dévoile aujourd’hui une nouvelle initiative
d’envergure qui contribuera à lutter contre la menace croissante posée par le trafic de drogues en Afrique de
l’Ouest.
La Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la sécurité et le développement dans le contexte de la
lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants est inaugurée aujourd’hui au Centre Kofi Annan de Maintien de la Paix à
Accra, au Ghana.
La Commission est une réponse à la flambée dramatique du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest au
cours de la dernière décennie. Selon le Bureau des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC), le
trafic illégal de stupéfiants est lié à des activités criminelles et terroristes dans la région et alimente la
croissance de la consommation locale de drogues illégales.
La Commission est créée par la Fondation Kofi Annan, en consultation avec des partenaires internationaux et
régionaux, des gouvernements nationaux et des organisations de la société civile. Elle comprend un groupe de
personnalités éminentes d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont deux anciens chefs d’Etat. Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien
Président du Nigéria, en assumera la présidence.
La Commission vise à :
Formuler des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes à l’endroit des dirigeants politiques et des
leaders de la société civile en vue de renforcer la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants;
Sensibiliser l’opinion publique et mobiliser les politiques sur cette question;
Promouvoir les capacités locales et régionales de gestion de ce trafic et ses conséquences.
Kofi Annan dit: « La flambée du trafic de drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie
présente un risque sérieux et croissant pour la stabilité et le développement de la région. Si rien n’est fait, le
trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès encourageants que les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest ont réalisés en
matière de renforcement de la démocratie et de développement humain et économique. »
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancient président du Nigéria, dit : «Le trafic de stupéfiants a déjà dévasté d’autres régions
du monde. Nous devons tous travailler ensemble pour éviter ce sort à l’Afrique de l’Ouest. La Commission a
hâte d’entreprendre ce travail urgent et important. »
La Commission publiera le résultat de ses travaux à la fin de l’année.
La Commission sur l’impact du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest est composée de :
-
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien Président du Nigeria
-
Pedro Pires, ancien Président de Cap-Vert
-
Dr. Idrissa Ba, Professeur, Hôpital psychiatrique de Thiaroye
-
Justice Bankole-Thompson, Tribunal spécial pour la Sierra Leone
-
Alpha Abdoulaye Diallo, National Coordinator, Réseau Afrique Jeunesse
-
Mary Chinery Hesse, Membre, Panel des sages de l'Union Africaine
Page 56
-
Gilbert Houngbo, ancien Premier Ministre du Togo
-
Christine Kafondo, Co-fondatrice, Association Espoir pour Demain
-
Adeolu Ogunrombi, Coordinateur De Projet, projet YouthRISE sur la réforme de politique de drogues
au Nigeria et en Afrique de l’Ouest
-
Mahmou Ould Mohamedou, Professeur invité, l'Institut de Hautes Études Internationales et du
Développement et Directeur du Programme sur le Moyen-Orient et l'Afrique du Nord au Centre de
Politique de Sécurité de Genève
-
Oumou Sangaré, chanteuse malienne et lauréat d'un Grammy awards, ambassadrice de la musique
malienne
Page 57
Fasozine
Kofi Annan crée la Commission sur l’impact du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest
1 February 2013
http://www.fasozine.com/index.php/actualite/9809-kofi-annan-cree-la-commission-sur-limpact-dutrafic-de-stupefiants-en-afrique-de-louest
Page 58
L’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations unies Kofi Annan dévoile, ce jour 31 janvier 2013, une nouvelle
initiative d’envergure qui contribuera à lutter contre la menace croissante posée par le trafic de drogues en
Afrique de l’Ouest. L’ancien président du Nigéria, Olusegun Obasanjo, présidera cette structure de haut niveau
qui traitera de cette menace pour la stabilité régionale.
«La Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la sécurité et le développement dans le contexte de la
lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants est inaugurée ce jeudi 31 janvier 2013, au Centre Kofi Annan de Maintien de
la Paix à Accra, au Ghana. La Commission est une réponse à la flambée dramatique du trafic de stupéfiants
en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie. Selon le Bureau des Nations unies contre la drogue et
le crime (UNODC), le trafic illégal de stupéfiants est lié à des activités criminelles et terroristes dans la région et
alimente la croissance de la consommation locale de drogues illégales.
La Commission est créée par la Fondation Kofi Annan, en consultation avec des partenaires internationaux et
régionaux, des gouvernements nationaux et des organisations de la société civile. Elle comprend un groupe de
personnalités éminentes d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont deux anciens chefs d’Etat. Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien
Président du Nigéria, en assumera la présidence.
La Commission vise à:
· Formuler des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes à l’endroit des dirigeants politiques et
des leaders de la société civile en vue de renforcer la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants;
· Sensibiliser l’opinion publique et mobiliser les politiques sur cette question;
· Promouvoir les capacités locales et régionales de gestion de ce trafic et ses conséquences.
Kofi Annan dit: «La flambée du trafic de drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie
présente un risque sérieux et croissant pour la stabilité et le développement de la région. Si rien n’est fait, le
trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès encourageants que les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest ont réalisés en
matière de renforcement de la démocratie et de développement humain et économique.»
Olusegun Obasanjo, ancient président du Nigéria, dit: «Le trafic de stupéfiants a déjà dévasté d’autres régions
du monde. Nous devons tous travailler ensemble pour éviter ce sort à l’Afrique de l’Ouest. La Commission a
hâte d’entreprendre ce travail urgent et important.» La Commission publiera le résultat de ses travaux à la fin
de l’année.»
Composition de la Commission
- Olusegun Obasanjo, ancien Président du Nigeria
- Pedro Pires, ancien Président de Cap-Vert
- Dr. Idrissa Ba, Professeur, Hôpital psychiatrique de Thiaroye
- Justice Bankole-Thompson, Tribunal spécial pour la Sierra Leone
- Alpha Abdoulaye Diallo, National Coordinator, Réseau Afrique Jeunesse
- Mary Chinery Hesse, Membre, Panel des sages de l'Union Africaine
- Gilbert Houngbo, ancien Premier Ministre du Togo
- Christine Kafando, Co-fondatrice, Association Espoir pour Demain
- Adeolu Ogunrombi, Coordinateur De Projet, projet YouthRISE sur la réforme de politique de drogues au
Nigeria et en Afrique de l’Ouest
- Mahmou Ould Mohamedou, Professeur invité, l'Institut de Hautes Études Internationales et du
Développement et Directeur du Programme sur le Moyen-Orient et l'Afrique du Nord au Centre de Politique de
Sécurité de Genève
- Oumou Sangaré, chanteuse malienne et lauréat d'un Grammy awards, ambassadrice de la musique
malienne
Page 59
This Day Live
Annan Inaugurates Commission on Drug Trafficking
Sunday Okobi
1 February 2013
http://www.thisdaylive.com/articles/annan-inaugurates-commission-on-drug-trafficking/138090/
Page 60
Former United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, will today inaugurate a foremost new initiative to tackle
the growing threat from illegal drug trafficking in West Africa.
The initiative, West Africa Commission on the Impact of Drugs on Governance, Security and Development
(WACD), will be inaugurated at the Kofi Annan Peacekeeping Centre in Accra, Ghana.
A statement issued yesterday disclosed that the commission was established in response to the dramatic
surge in drug trafficking in the sub-Saharan Africa over the past decade.
According to the UN office on Drugs and Crime stated that, “illegal drug trafficking is linked to criminal activities
including terrorism in the region and is fuelling increased local consumption of illegal drugs.”
According to the statement, “WACD was established by the Kofi Annan Foundation in consultation with
international and regional partners, national governments and civil society organisations. It comprises a group
of distinguished West Africans, including ex-President Olusegun Obasanjo, who will serve as the commission
chairman.
“The commission is aimed at developing evidence based policy recommendations for political and civil society
leaders on how to address drug trafficking; mobilise public awareness and political commitment around the
issue and promote local and regional capacities to deal with drug trafficking.”
The founder, Annan, said: “The massive surge in drug trafficking in West Africa over the last decade presents a
serious and growing threat to the region’s stability and development. If left unchecked, illegal drug trafficking
could compromise the encouraging progress the nations in the region have made by strengthening democracy
and promoting human and economic development.”
Obasanjo added that: “Trade in illegal drugs has already caused devastation in other regions of the world. We
must all work together to prevent West Africa from experiencing the same fate. The Commission looks forward
to its urgent and important work.”
The Commission will publish a comprehensive report later this year, the statement added.
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Le Matinal
Commission sur l’impact du traffic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest:Kofi Annan pour une lutte plus
efficace contre la drogue
Wilfrid Noubadan
1 February 2013
http://www.actubenin.com/?Commission-sur-l-impact-du-trafic
Page 62
L’ancien Secrétaire général des Nations unies Kofi Annan a dévoilé jeudi 31 janvier à Accra, son initiative qui
contribuera à lutter contre la menace croissante posée par le trafic de drogue en Afrique de l’Ouest. La
Commission est une réponse à la flambée dramatique du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours
de la dernière décennie. La Commission créée par la Fondation Kofi Annan, comprend un groupe de
personnalités éminentes d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont 2 anciens Chefs d’Etat.
Selon le Bureau des Nations-unies contre la drogue et le crime (Unodc), le trafic illégal de stupéfiants est lié à
des activités criminelles et terroristes, et alimente la croissance de la consommation locale de drogues
illégales. La commission aura entre autres pour tâches de formuler des recommandations fondées sur des
données probantes à l’endroit des dirigeants politiques et des leaders de la Société civile en vue de renforcer
la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants. Elle sensibilisera également l’opinion publique et mobilisera les politiques
sur la question. Selon Kofi Annan, la flambée du trafic de drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière
décennie présente un risque sérieux et croissant pour la stabilité et le développement de la région. « Si rien
n’est fait, le trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès encourageants que les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest ont
réalisés en matière de renforcement de la démocratie et du développement humain et économique », a-t-il
ajouté. L’ancien président du Nigeria, Olusegun Obasanjo a pour sa part insisté sur le fait que le trafic de
stupéfiants a déjà dévasté d’autres régions du monde. « Nous devons tous travailler ensemble pour éviter ce
sort à l’Afrique de l’Ouest. La Commission a hâte d’entreprendre ce travail urgent et important », a-t-il indiqué.
Page 63
Aljazeera
Kofi Annan u borbi protiv narkotika
1 February 2013
http://balkans.aljazeera.net/vijesti/kofi-annan-u-borbi-protiv-narkotika
Page 64
Bivši generalni sekretar Ujedinjenih naroda (UN) Kofi Annan osnovao je Komisiju za borbu protiv narkotika u
zapadnoj Africi, koja je postala tranzitna oblast na putu kokaina i marihuane iz Sjeverne i Južne Amerike u
Evropu.
"Drastično povećanje obima trgovine drogom u protekloj deceniji predstavlja ozbiljnu i sve veću prijetnju po
stabilnost i razvoj regije. Ako se ništa ne preduzme, trgovina drogom bi mogla ugroziti napredak koji su
zapadnoafričke države postigle u jačanju demokratije i promoviranju ljudskog i ekonomskog razvoja", izjavio je
Annan.
Desetočlana komisija, na čelu s bivšim predsjednikom Nigerije Olusegunom Obasanjom, zalagat će se za
podizanje svijesti ljudi, promovirat će regionalni kapacitet za rješavanje tog problema i davat će preporuke
političkim liderima, rekao je on.
Komisiju o posljedicama trgovine drogom na upravljanje, sigurnost i razvoj u zapadnoj Africi sponzorira
Fondacija Kofi Annan, navodi AP.
Ured UN-a za narkotike i kriminal prošle godine je u jednom izvještaju naveo da kriminalne mreže od trgovine
kokaina u zapadnoj i centralnoj Africi stječu profit od oko 900 miliona dolara godišnje.
Page 65
Mali Actualités
Lutte contre le trafic de drogue en Afrique de l’ouest : Kofi Annan Cree Une Commission
B.M. Sissoko
1 February 2013
http://maliactu.net/lutte-contre-le-trafic-de-drogue-en-afrique-de-louest-kofi-annan-cree-unecommission/
Page 66
L’ancien président du Nigeria, Olesegun Obasanjo, présidera cette instance de haut niveau qui traitera de la
menace que représente la drogue pour la stabilité régionale
Le trafic de drogue est une menace croissante en Afrique de l’Ouest. C’est pour contribuer à lutter contre le
fléau qu’une nouvelle structure vient de voir le jour à l’initiative de la fondation Kofi Annan de l’ancien secrétaire
général de l’ONU. Il s’agit de la Commission ouest-africaine pour la gouvernance, la sécurité et le
développement dans le contexte de la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants. Elle a été inaugurée au Centre Kofi
Annan de Maintien de la Paix à Accra.
La Commission, dont la présidence sera assurée par Olusegun Obasanjo, l’ancien président du Nigéria, a été
portée sur ses fonts baptismaux par la Fondation Kofi Annan, en partenariat avec des partenaires
internationaux et régionaux, des gouvernements et des organisations de la société civile. Elle comprend un
groupe de personnalités éminentes d’Afrique de l’Ouest, dont deux anciens chefs d’Etat : Olesegun Obasanjo
(Nigeria) et Pedro Pires (Cap-Vert). Notre célèbre chanteuse, Oumou Sangaré, est également membre de la
Commission.
C’est l’ancien secrétaire général des Nations unies qui a, lui-même, dévoilé hier la nouvelle initiative
d’envergure qui contribuera à lutter contre la menace croissante posée par le trafic de drogues dans notre
sous-région.
La Fondation Kofi Annan a, dans une déclaration, indiqué que la Commission est une réponse à la flambée
dramatique du trafic de stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie. Selon le Bureau
des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (UNODC), le trafic illégal de stupéfiants est lié à des activités
criminelles et terroristes dans la région et alimente la croissance de la consommation locale de drogues
illégales.
La structure se chargera de formuler des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes à l’endroit des
dirigeants politiques et des leaders de la société civile en vue de renforcer la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants.
Elle entend sensibiliser l’opinion publique et mobiliser les politiques sur cette question. Elle va aussi promouvoir
les capacités locales et régionales de gestion de ce trafic et ses conséquences. « La flambée du trafic de
drogues en Afrique de l’Ouest au cours de la dernière décennie présente un risque sérieux et croissant pour la
stabilité et le développement de la région. Si rien n’est fait, le trafic illégal pourrait compromettre les progrès
encourageants que les pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest ont réalisés en matière de renforcement de la démocratie et
de développement humain et économique », a assuré Kofi Annan.
De son côté, Olusegun Obasanjo, a dit que «le trafic de stupéfiants a déjà dévasté d’autres régions du monde
» et que « nous devons tous travailler ensemble pour éviter ce sort à l’Afrique de l’Ouest. La Commission a
hâte d’entreprendre ce travail urgent et important».
Les résultats des travaux de la Commission seront publiés à la fin de l’année.
Page 67
Daily Independent Nigeria
Kofi Annan’s warning
4 February 2013
http://dailyindependentnig.com/2013/02/kofi-annans-warning/
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The very much highly respected statesman, former United Nations (UN) Secretary- General, Kofi Annan, went
back to his originating constituency and issued an important wake-up call to it. This was through an article
published in the Guardian Newspaper of the United Kingdom last week Wednesday titled ‘‘In Mali, military
intervention is not enough”. Annan warned in the sub-title “throughout West Africa, organized crime and drug
trafficking pose as great a threat as extremism”.
Kofi Annan’s insight is profound and it should not be taken lightly. For our Newspaper it is vindication. Our
readers will recall that two years ago, we wrote an editorial warning about how some of the drug cartels in Latin
America where shifting their base to West Africa. The danger, apart from the obvious, is that given the region’s
endemic corruption and often-weak institutions, the region could be sleepwalking towards a social catastrophe.
Our warning at that time appeared not to have had the desired effect. Mercifully, and now hopefully the words
of the statesman should have a positive effect. In his article Kofi Annan made the same observation as we did
two years ago when he stated “One of the most potent dangers to West Africa’s stability is the massive surge in
drug trafficking and other criminal activity over the last decade. The region has become the major conduit for
narcotics from Latin America to Europe, while opiates arrive in West Africa from Afghanistan and Pakistan via
east Africa to be cut and packaged and sent on to the US. The UN Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that at
least 60 tones of cocaine passes through West Africa each year. The region has also emerged as a transit
route for human and small arms trafficking and diamond smuggling, and a base for piracy and kidnapping. The
profits from these illegal activities help finance extremist groups, the UN agency warns.”
Here we see the critical link between the destabilization and seizure of Northern Mali by an AL-Qaeda
franchise, the awful events in Algeria and a resurgence of terrorist groups in key areas of the regions. There is
obviously no coherent strategy to deal with a problem that could destabilize the entire region and put a brake
on recent economic advances. Throughout the region the vulnerability to the transnational organized criminal
activity is disturbing. As we stated two years ago and as kofi Annan has now reechoed “in the region
‘’institutions are weak, borders are porous, coastlines are under patrolled, and underpaid officials are prone to
bribery”. In addition in many countries both the military and the law enforcement agencies are weak, at times,
perhaps, deliberately ineffectual.
In the face of transnational organized crime this could lead to grave dangers including the possibility of the
collapse of the state itself. If in doubt as Kofi Annan perceptively pointed out, observe how the ‘’…the dismal
failure of Mali’s army to defend its territory underlines the point’’. Worse still there are proven cases of
complicity between the law enforcement agencies and organized crime. This is not surprising in view of the
institutional weaknesses already mentioned. It is in fact to be expected. A frightening example of this comes
from the April 2012 coup in Guinea Bissau. There have been mutterings that the coup is related to the army’s
ambition to take control of the country’s lucrative drugs trade. Stranger indeed, than fiction, and a forewarning
of things to come.
There is also the ‘cannon-fodder’ factor. This Newspaper has consistently warned about a ‘demographic timebomb’ in Nigeria. Here we are already acquainted with the social consequences of a mis-managed economic
position where we have ‘growth’ without job creation. A commodities boom has also fuelled high growth rates
throughout the region. However, this has not led to the high level of job creation required to absorb the youths.
Again Kofi Annan echoes our consistently advocated foreboding as follows: “the skilled, unemployed young
men without a future are particularly vulnerable to the siren calls of drugs, unscrupulous politicians, radical
ideologies and crime.” He might as well have been writing about contemporary Nigeria. Alas, this writ runs
large throughout West Africa. And something urgent had better be done now to defuse the demographic time
bomb. Promoting a jobs led economic development can do this.
Kofi Annan is putting together a panel of eminent West Africans to join a commission to examine and propose
solutions to the menace of drug trafficking and its impact on security, governance and development. This
commission, which our former President Olusegun Obasanjo has agreed to chair, aims to raise awareness of
the dangers that drug trafficking and organized crime represent and to propose practical action to contain the
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problem. We agree with Kofi Annan that we must look at West Africa’s problems holistically and not focus on
just one immediate danger in this instance Mali alone no matter however serious.
We support him in his endeavor. However, the West Africa region’s leadership must wake up. Overall the
ultimate weapon is for the countries of the ECOWAS region to strengthen and deepen their Institutions. They
must act in accordance with the principle laid out by the French philosopher Montesquieu. This means that
democratic republics must develop the love of virtue, this is interpreted as ‘’the willingness to put the interest of
the community ahead of private interest”.
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Jeune Afrique
Pedro Pires : "Le citoyen doit s'impliquer dans la lutte contre le trafic de drogue"
Abdel Pitroipa
4 February 2013
http://www.jeuneafrique.com/Article/ARTJAWEB20130202111557/drogue-trafic-de-drogue-narcotraficpedro-pirespedro-pires-le-citoyen-doit-s-impliquer-dans-la-lutte-contre-le-trafic-de-drogue.html
Page 71
L’ancien président capverdien (2001 à 2011), est membre de la Commission sur l’impact du trafic de
stupéfiants en Afrique de l’Ouest, lancée par la fondation Kofi Annan le 31 janvier, à Accra. Il y siège en
compagnie de l’ancien chef d’État nigérian, Olusegun Obasanjo, et d’autres personnalités de la société civile
de la sous-région, comme Gilbert Houngbo, ancien premier ministre du Togo, et Oumou Sangaré, la diva
malienne. Interview.
Jeune Afrique : Pourquoi créer une commission dédiée au trafic de drogue en Afrique de l’ouest ?
Pedro Pires : Elle est née d’un constat unanime : la gravité du problème du trafic de drogue en Afrique
occidentale. Il fallait dès lors le combattre car il menace les populations et les fondements de l’État de droit. Il
était donc nécessaire de donner une nouvelle impulsion à la lutte contre le narcotrafic.
Cette commission n’est pas une institution décisionnelle, elle aura plutôt un rôle d’autorité morale. Elle aura
pour but d’interpeller et de stimuler la création des conditions pour combattre le narcotrafic et la prise en charge
des personnes dépendantes.
Qu'en est-il de la consommation locale ?
Nous nous préoccupons aussi de la santé des personnes toxicodépendantes. Selon nos chiffres, il y aurait
entre un million et un million et demi de consommateurs en Afrique occidentale. Essentiellement des jeunes
gens qui consomment les substances les moins chères, celles qui sont les plus compliquées à combattre :
drogues artificielles, comme le crack, et naturelles, comme le chanvre.
Le trafic de drogue est venu se mêler au trafic d’armes, à la contrebande, au terrorisme et au radicalisme.
Depuis quand constate-t-on une aggravation du trafic ?
Cela fait plus d’une dizaine d’années, d’où l’urgence d’un règlement du problème. Le trafic de drogue est venu
se mêler au trafic d’armes, à la contrebande, au terrorisme et au radicalisme. Cela créée d’autres risques.
Pensez-vous que le délitement de l’État malien est - au moins en partie - dû au trafic de drogue ?
Au Mali, il y a encore d’autres facteurs. Le trafic n’est pas le responsable principal. Il serait plus juste de dire
que les islamistes radicaux ont pratiqué un mélange des genres avec le trafic de drogue, la contrebande et le
trafic des armes. Mais il faut aussi évoquer la façon dont la question libyenne a été réglée, ainsi que la
faiblesse de l’État malien. C’est tout ce conglomérat qui est responsable de ce qui est arrivé.
Pourquoi cibler l’Afrique de l’Ouest ? Est-elle plus concernée que le reste du continent ?
Il faut mener la lutte sur tout le continent, mais considérez qu’à travers la commission, nous agissons en tant
que citoyens de l’Afrique occidentale confrontés à une situation critique. Nous avons décidé qu’il fallait avertir
et sensibiliser la société civile et les dirigeants de nos pays.
Quels sont les pays les plus touchés ?
Je me refuse à citer un pays en particulier, c’est un phénomène transnational. Les trafiquants sont un peu
partout. Ils passent par l’Afrique occidentale puis montent vers l’Europe, ou poursuivent leur chemin vers
l’Afrique orientale et le Moyen-Orient. En tant que pays de transit, nous devons susciter une coopération avec
les pays producteurs et destinataires.
Comment opèrent les trafiquants ?
Ils utilisent divers moyens pour parvenir à leurs fins : avions, bateaux… On dit même qu’il y aurait des sousmarins, c’est un gros réseau qui ne peut être vaincu que par un combat coordonné, une vraie coopération.
Quels types de stupéfiants sont concernés ?
Il s’agit essentiellement de cocaïne. Les autres substances sont le haschich et des drogues de synthèse.
Selon nos informateurs, le chiffre d’affaires généré tourne autour de 800 millions de dollars en une année.
Page 72
Quels sont les volumes des flux qui traversent la zone ?
Je ne saurai dire, mais selon nos informateurs, le chiffre d’affaires généré tourne autour de 800 millions de
dollars en une année.
Les responsables politiques et militaires ont-elles une responsabilité ?
Il y a bien sûr des personnalités qui sont compromises, mais ne me demandez pas des noms. De toute façon,
il faut combattre tous les réseaux et les empêcher d’infiltrer la police et les forces armées, tout comme les
sphères politiques.
Pourquoi créer une commission alors que l’Office des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (ONUDC)
existe déjà ?
Comme disait quelqu’un, « la guerre est une affaire tellement importante qu’on ne peut pas la laisser à des
seuls militaires. » Cette question du trafic est tellement sérieuse que le citoyen doit s’impliquer dans sa
résolution, soit de façon individuelle soit de façon organisée.
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IRIN
Mali a “wake-up call” for drug trafficking, says think tank
5 February 2013
http://www.irinnews.org/Report/97412/Mali-a-wake-up-call-for-drug-trafficking-says-think-tank
Page 74
ACCRA, 5 February 2013 (IRIN) - At the launch of a Ghana-based Commission on the Impact of DrugTrafficking on Governance, Security and Development in West Africa, its chair, former Nigerian President
Olusegun Obasanjo, said the situation in Mali should serve as a “wake-up call” to the perils of allowing
organized crime to escalate out of control.
He described the country’s north as a “den of drug trafficking, extremism and criminality”.
Several research groups have reported that traffickers have linked up with extremist groups in the Sahel region,
who use the profits to purchase weapons and fund radical activities. Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM),
has partially funded its activities in northern Mali over the past decade through profits from drug and cigarette
trafficking and hostage ransoms, according to a 2012 reportby the African Center for Strategic Studies.
Analysts estimate around 60 tons of cocaine are trafficked through West Africa each year, while the UN Office
on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) estimates 400kg of heroin was trafficked through the region in 2011.
The trade brings in an estimated US$900 million per year to criminal networks, says UNODC.
Some 15 percent of the cigarettes smoked in the region are bought on the black market and trafficked through
West Africa, according to UNODC. AQIM and to some extent splinter-group Movement for Oneness and Jihad
in West Africa (MUJAO) have been taxing traffickers in return for safeguarding their passage.
“Organized criminal networks are deeply involved in the trafficking. Experience elsewhere in the world suggests
that these groups will try to infiltrate political, security and financial institutions to secure their profits,” former UN
Secretary-General Kofi Annan told the audience at the launch of the Commission in Ghana’s capital last week.
Over the last decade many West African states have made gains to consolidate peace and economic growth:
the region is set to provide the US with 25 percent of its oil needs in 2015 - but drug-trafficking threatens this
progress, said Annan.
Most of the cocaine is transported from South America to Europe, using air and sea routes; while opiates tend
to come from Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Drugs are also increasingly being manufactured in the region. The police recently discovered
methamphetamine laboratories in Nigeria, according to UNODC.
Growing drug dependency
There are now as many as 2.3 million cocaine users in West and Central Africa, and methamphetamine and
heroin use are on the rise, UNODC reported in 2012. “The evidence points to a growing problem of
dependency that needs urgent attention in our region,” Obasanjo said.
Annan pointed out: “West Africa initially was seen as a transit point but no country remains a transit point for
long. The population begins to use it.”
The 10-member Commission intends to raise awareness of the impact of the drug trade, advise political
leaders, and develop policy recommendations to help leaders deal with drug-trafficking.
West Africa is an ideal environment for drug traffickers with its extensive porous borders, weak and easily
corruptible institutions, and pre-existing criminal networks. In these poor nations it is easy to buy off low-paid
and disenchanted officials and security personnel: “The police are bribed. Now, in a fairly poor African country,
US$100 to a police constable is a lot of money. All he has to do is turn his eyes,” said Obasanjo.
He added that criminal networks can easily smuggle goods through the region, buying off officials and security
personnel at borders, as they move through remote regions of the Sahel and the Sahara desert.
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Fluid networks
Criminal trafficking networks are international and very mobile, which makes it difficult to crack down on them,
says the UNODC. Local and foreign criminal networks with access to massive resources work together to
transport drugs through the region, adapting their operations in response to law enforcement efforts, according
to an April 2012 joint report by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), the Center on
International Cooperation, the Kofi Annan Foundation and the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training
Centre.
“West African organized criminal networks operate cells worldwide to facilitate the supply of goods, with
Diaspora communities playing important roles (e.g. Nigerian Diaspora in Brazil). Like criminal groups
elsewhere, they infiltrate or threaten political elites and dispirited public servants to protect and expand their
business,” the report said.
As the myriad abandoned construction sites in many West African states make clear, traffickers also
extensively operate fronts to launder their profits, creating “shell companies” in the construction and mining
sectors, as well as rental car companies.
The government and security forces of Guinea-Bissau have already largely been taken over by drug trafficking
networks, earning it the moniker of “narco-state.”
AQIM members reportedly met Colombian drug lords in Guinea-Bissau, according to a 2010 report by Francebased research group Sahel Intelligence. While the trade allegedly continues to flourish in Guinea-Bissau,
networks have also gradually moved along the coast and inland through the Sahel, Annan said. “We didn’t act
early enough when the problem started in Guinea-Bissau. That was the entry point and it’s now spread along
the coast - and through the Sahel to Europe and by ship and by plane,” Annan told reporters. Other initiatives
are way to try to quell the impact of drug-trafficking in the region, including an ECOWAS plan to address the
challenges of trafficking.
UNODC recently teamed up with the World Customs Organization to improve communications between police
and airports.
The Commission will deliver a report and submit policy recommendations to regional leaders by the end of
2013.
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Kofi Annan en guerre contre la drogue
Sidwaya (Burkina Faso)
Kader Patrick
6 February 2013
http://www.sidwaya.bf/quotidien/spip.php?article10185
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L’ancien Secrétaire général (SG) de l’Organisation des Nations unies (ONU), Kofi Annan, sous le couvert de sa
Fondation, a lancé, fin janvier 2013, la Commission sur l’impact du trafic de drogue sur la gouvernance, la
sécurité et le développement en Afrique de l’Ouest.
Cette structure aura pour, entre autres objectifs, de sensibiliser l’opinion publique et mobiliser les politiques sur
les dangers du trafic de drogue, et de promouvoir les capacités locales et régionales de gestion du phénomène
et de ses conséquences. Aussi la commission devra-t-elle formuler des recommandations fondées sur des
données probantes, à l’endroit des dirigeants politiques et des leaders de la société civile, en vue de renforcer
la lutte contre le trafic de stupéfiants. Autant que faire se peut, le comité est appelé à rendre les résultats de
ses travaux d’ici à la fin de l’année 2013. Aussi nobles que salutaires, les ambitions de cette nouvelle
commission sont toutes tracées, à l’initiative de l’ancien dirigeant de l’ONU, qui a coopté des personnalités et
pas des moindres, pour la conduire.
Outre l’ancien président du Nigéria, Olusegun Obansanjo, patron de la commission, l’ex-chef de l’Etat du CapVert, Pedro Pirès et l’ancien Premier ministre du Togo, Gilbert Houngbo, qui en sont membres. Ces
personnalités travailleront aux côtés d’un certain nombre de spécialistes et d’acteurs de la société civile
africaine, pour donner du sens à ce projet, soutenu par l’Union africaine (UA), la Communauté économique
des Etats de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (CEDEAO) et les partenaires internationaux. Convaincu que « la question des
drogues est en train de déchirer certains pays ouest-africains », Kofi Annan a jugé bon de mettre ses idées et
ses relations au service de la sous-région. Et il s’est surtout inspiré du triste cas de la Guinée-Bissau, ce pays
de moins de deux millions d’habitants où le narcotrafic est une réalité. La drogue en provenance d’Amérique ou
d’ailleurs, y transite en permanence et un marché s’est même développé in situ. Et selon un récent rapport de
l’ONU, le gouvernement et l’Armée bissau-guinéenne seraient impliqués dans le commerce de drogue.
A titre illustratif, l’on fait cas de « la responsabilité supposée de plusieurs hauts fonctionnaires du
gouvernement de l’ancien Premier ministre, Aristides Gomes, dans la disparition de 670 kilogrammes de
cocaïne saisis par les autorités ». Aussi d’importantes quantités de drogue sont-elles souvent saisies chez des
militaires, sans que ceux-ci ne soient inquiétés. Les faits sont tels que l’un des chefs de la marine, le contreamiral, José Américo Bubo Na Tchuto, figurerait même sur la liste des "barons de la drogue", établie par les
Etats-Unis. Pour certains observateurs, la montée des tensions en Guinée-Bissau entre certains responsables
du gouvernement et des membres de la hiérarchie militaire se justifierait par « la concurrence pour le droit à
assurer la sécurité des narcotrafiquants ». Ces rivalités, comme l’atteste l’histoire, se terminent parfois par des
règlements de compte. Les intérêts financiers sont tellement énormes, que le trafic de drogue est devenu une
source d’instabilité sociopolitique en Guinée-Bissau.
On le voit, ce phénomène, qui touche aussi les autres pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest, peut influer négativement sur
la gouvernance et favoriser la corruption. Une autre mauvaise nouvelle est que l’argent issu du trafic de drogue
peut alimenter le terrorisme. Là-dessus, l’ancien SG de l’ONU a soutenu que la crise malienne est un cas
« concret » du lien entre le trafic de drogue et la déstabilisation d’un pays. « (…) d’après les recherches que les
gens ont faites, les trafics passent souvent par le Sahel pour aller en Europe », a-t-il rapporté à ce propos. Il
paraît évident que le trafic de drogue constitue une menace pour la sécurité intérieure d’un pays, en ce qu’il
peut contribuer à financer des groupes armés.
Plus qu’une menace pour la gouvernance et la sécurité, le trafic de stupéfiants constitue un danger pour la
santé. Les drogues ont des conséquences néfastes sur l’organisme humain, étant donné qu’elles entrainent
des perturbations physiques ou psychologiques. Pis, les drogues dont raffolent certains jeunes en quête de
sensations fortes, conduisent à la délinquance. Il faut donc combattre, par tous les moyens, les
narcotrafiquants, qui bénéficient souvent de la complaisance de certains pouvoirs publics. A ce sujet, aucune
initiative n’est de trop et c’est en cela que la trouvaille de Kofi Annan mérite encouragement.
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Falling on Fertile Grounds: the rise of drug-trafficking and the role of CSOs in West Africa
Open Society Initiative for West Africa
Afia Asare Kyei
12 February 2013
http://www.osiwa.org/en/portal/newsroom/451/Falling-on-Fertile-Grounds-the-rise-of-drug-trafficking-and-therole-of-CSOs-in-West-Africa.htm
Page 79
As if West Africa doesn’t have enough hurdles to surmount, the rise of massive, powerful and wealthy
organized crime syndicates now illicitly trafficking narcotic across West Africa has thrown yet another mix into
the already lengthy and ‘toxic brew’ of threats plaguing the region. The rise in drug trafficking, including an
increase in local drug production and consumption, is fast becoming a mighty adversary to overcome in the
pursuit of peace, stability and security in West Africa. It is a challenge that requires a coordinated and multipronged solution. It also requires the active involvement of civil society actors across the region.
West Africa Commission on Drugs
Last week, Ghana’s Vice President Kwesi Amissah-Arthur inaugurated the West Africa Commission on Drugs.
Convened by Kofi Annan and chaired by the former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, the Commission
plans to examine ways and means to crack down on drug trafficking and prioritize grappling with drug
trafficking’s impacts on West Africa. The establishment of the Commission is welcomed and its inauguration
timely.
Trans-shipment of illicit narcotics from Latin America through to West Africa and onwards to Europe has
increased significantly. Since 2008, the volume of cocaine transiting through West Africa was roughly 50 tons a
year and its annual worth estimated at US$2 billion. Nearly 50% of all non-U.S. bound cocaine, or about 13% of
all global flows is now smuggled through West Africa. Just six hours away from Europe, and about 1,600 miles
across the Atlantic from Latin America, West Africa’s geographical proximity to European markets make it
strategically located for drug-smuggling purposes.
Drugs & Youth
West Africa is not only a trans-shipment zone, local production and consumption is also on the rise – especially
among its burgeoning youth population. Over 70% of the sub-region’s estimated 300 million people are under
the age of 35. The vast majority have limited education and are unemployed or working in the informal sector.
Lack of employment opportunities or reliable income put youth in precarious positions where they may be
vulnerable to involvement in the drug-trade and drug use itself. In desperate and troubling circumstances,
drugs offer a means of escaping the harsh realities of everyday life.
Socio-economic & governance implications
Apart from the damaging effects of drug use on West Africa’s human resource base, related offences such as
corruption and money laundering have also had a severe impact on the socio-economic development and
governance of the region. Drug-related corruption and money laundering accentuate the chronic poverty in
many West African states by disrupting effective economic governance. In a number of countries, the profits
from trafficked drugs exceed the gross national income. Rampant drug trafficking empowers criminal elements
operating outside the law, undermines governance, weakens state institutions, perverts the criminal justice
system, and hijacks prosecutors, police officers, and judges. Drug traffickers do not simply undermine
governments, they also use illicit money to acquire and in some cases seize political and economic power and
then wield such power in the most outrageous and scandalous manner.
AU & ECOWAS policies
A lot of time and resources have been invested in trying to combat this scourge. At the regional level, the
African Union (AU) has just developed its fourth revised plan of action. This new 2013-2017 policy on drug
control seeks to strengthen continental and international cooperation and further integrate drug control issues
into national legal and institutional frameworks. On a sub-regional level, the Economic Community of West
African States (ECOWAS) issued a declaration entitled “Community Flame Ceremony: the fight against drugs”.
This was over 15 years ago. That same year, they set up a regional fund for financing drug control activities in
West Africa. Ten years later, in 2008, ECOWAS adopted the Praia Plan of Action and the Abuja Declaration to
address the security threats posed by drug trafficking in the sub-region. All of these initiatives have had very
limited success. At the national level, almost all ECOWAS states have adopted National Integrated
Programmes (NIPs). Many states have amended their drug trafficking and consumption legislations,
empowered their judicial authorities, established new drug enforcement agencies and imposed stiffer penalties
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for offenders. These have fared no better than the regional efforts. The obvious question still remains: why
have these plans and policies continued to fall short? Many factors may help explain. Poor implementation,
lack of funding, and singularly focusing on toughening punitive measures are all reasons to consider. Most
policies have singularly focused on one dimension instead of employing a multi-pronged approach. Apart from
the absence of political will and a clear vision from West Africa’s leaders, there has been an absence or
altogether inability to mobilize a critical mass of the population to actively participate in the full stretch of the
process - from inception to implementation, through to monitoring and review.
The missing links: alliances & education
At the regional and national levels, the dual failure to build alliances with civil society and non-governmental
and community-based organizations, as well as the failure to educate the populace have been major missing
elements in the fight against narcotics trafficking and use. Most governments continue to treat the drug problem
as the exclusive domain of the state. Mere lip service is paid to engaging civil society. Civil society, including
NGOs and community-based organizations, has an important role in raising awareness and educating citizens.
Only token efforts have been made to provide information about the health, socio-economic, and security
problems associated with drug trafficking and consumption. In many countries, citizens unaware of the harmful
impact of drugs continue to idolize the drugs lords and dream of amassing their vast wealth, cruising around in
flashy ‘Hummers’ as so many drug barons do.
Role of CSOs
Most civil society groups currently lack the necessary expertise to make a meaningful contribution to this fight.
There is an ardent need to strengthen the capacity of civil society to monitor and report on drug trafficking and
other related crimes and to help implement the various regional and national action plans. Civil society groups
can engage the public - including influential religious and traditional leaders – and help facilitate public debate.
Both steps can make a huge difference in educating people about the impact of drugs. In most instances,
policies have been driven by external considerations. Civil society can help reverse this trend and ensure that
local perspectives are heard and that initiatives are locally owned.
The new West Africa Commission on Drugs has set as one of its key objectives to mobilize public opinion and
catalyze political support for further action at national, regional and international levels before drug-fuelled
problems become totally unmanageable. In other parts of the world, civil society-led efforts have helped
overturn social norms. It can be done in West Africa too.