FINAL PROGRAM

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FINAL PROGRAM
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FINAL
PROGRAM
Updated on June 28, 2016
At Accent 2016, the CIP│OUQ annual conference in Québec, you can expect a program with inspiring keynote addresses, a
variety of concurrent sessions, interactive workshops, and learning tours that develop your professional skills and knowledge.
The social programming promises to immerse you in the local arts, culture, and culinary scene of this historical city.
Here are few things you can expect at Accent 2016, July 5-8:
Short Sessions (SB): Learn about what professional planners are working on across the country at the concurrent sessions,
where panels of speakers will share promising practices from their communities;
Workshops (AT): Interspersed with the concurrent sessions throughout the conference program, these shorter workshops will
provide you with great opportunities for interactive learning;
Extended Workshops (AS): If you’re looking for hands-on experience and stimulating discussion, don’t miss our extended
workshops;
Learning Tours (EE): If you want to get out and experience Québec and surrounding area by foot, bike or bus, you won’t want to
miss your chance to sign up for some of the learning tours. These tours will have limited capacity so sign up early!
Student Presentation (STU): Joint presentations.
E = Session/Workshop presented in English
F = Session/Workshop presented in French
ACCENT 2016 CIP / OUQ CONFERENCE COMMITTEES
CO-CHAIRS
SECRETARY
Nathalie Prudhomme
Serge Filion, FICU
Andrée-Anne Coll
PROGRAM
SOCIAL AND CULTURAL
Co-Chair: David Belgue, MICU
Co-Chair: Paul Arsenault
Pierre Blais
Isabelle Boucher
Michaël Laliberté-Grenier
Chair: Erick Rivard
Martin Robichaud
Michaël Laliberté-Grenier
SPONSORS
COMMUNICATIONS
Serge Filion
Jean Guyard
Michelle Brynkus
Lysane Sénécal Mastropaolo
Karina Verdon
LEARNING TOURS
Paul Mackey
Accent on Planning 2016 CIP / OUQ Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 1
WELCOME FROM THE CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS
The Canadian Institute of Planners and the Ordre des urbanistes du Quebec are jointly inviting planners from across Canada
and Quebec to meet in Quebec City. Similar to a number of large cities across the world, Quebec City holds the enviable
distinction of having been declared a world heritage site by UNESCO, which considers it a treasure of humanity. Be sure not to
miss this opportunity to enjoy the beauty of a city that has achieved a fine balance between heritage and modernity, and to
explore the three themes described below, all of which pose a challenge to humanity on lands everywhere.
1. Toward shared responsibility among stakeholders
Should the traditional role of elected officials, developers, residents and planners be changed to reflect the private sector’s
growing importance in the composition and implementation of development projects?
This topic will kick off conference discussions during an opening plenary session where each partner will be asked for their
input along with audience members present. This approach is designed to elicit an open and constructive dialogue about a
major issue affecting the profession.
2. Toward an increasingly "smarter" city
In our minds, the smart city is a city established in the right location. We must never lose sight of the fact that the smart city
concept goes hand in hand with the concept of reasonable and sustainable urban and regional development.
The burgeoning growth of new technologies and their use in city governance, transportation management, property and public
area development projects in cohesive spaces cannot be overlooked. What impact will these "smart" technologies have on the
development and approval of new urban projects, the costs of municipal service management, municipal democracy, the
protection of accrued heritage assets, the overall consistency and functionality of urban landscapes, etc.?
What role will government now be required to play to ensure the protection of ground water, forest and farmland management
or heritage landscapes and the necessary control over urbanization and major transportation infrastructures?
3. Responsible water cycle management for planners
Water will always be the most important resource for the development and maintenance of life on Earth. In relation to water
resource protection and development, the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence watershed is a concern shared by all regions. At the same,
time, the undeniable impact that water bodies have had on the siting of human settlement now poses a major challenge for
planners. Based on the example provided by the 100-year outlook for an area of land covering 3.5 million square kilometers,
presented by architect Phil Enquist, a partner in the firm Skidmore, Owings Merrill of Chicago, we will examine the potential
of cross-border and international water resource development projects.
We look forward to a large turnout at the conference which, for the first time, will discuss the relevance and impact of major
cross-border and interprovincial projects, as well as important national issues. We believe that CIP has a vital, if not essential,
contribution to make in these areas of activity, each of which holds the promise of a positive federating role for our national
organization. It remains up to each of us individually to decide!
The two Co-chairs,
Mrs. Nathalie Prudhomme, Planner, Director of, Relations gouvernementales et municipales [governmental and municipal
affairs], Quebec City
Mr. Serge Filion, FCIP, OUQ planner emeritus and CIP Fellow, former Director of Aménagement et de l’Architecture
[development and architecture] with the Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec and former President of the Ordre des
urbanistes du Québec
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 2
ESSENTIAL INFORMATION FOR REGISTRANTS
REGISTRATION
Register at www.accent2016.ca
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE ACCENT 2016 EVENT!
Full conference registration includes:
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Keynote speakers
A large number of Short Sessions
Extended Workshops, many which are embedded in the program
Breakfasts, luncheons, and refreshment breaks
July 5th, Welcome Reception – Le Parlementaire (restaurant)
July 7th, Conference Dinner – Musée de la Civilisation
Enhance your Accent on Planning conference experience with additional professional Learning Tours (EE), Extended
Workshops (AS), or with one of the suggested conference-dinner. Additional fees apply. Companions are also invited to join the
Conference and may register to À la carte activities. All the costs are detailed on the website www.accent2016.ca.
For those who can’t stay for the full conference, or for students looking for a more affordable conference experience, special
daily rates are provided.
Use the Conference App by navigating to www.eventmobi.com/ACCENTPLANNING. You can bookmark the page on your
smartphone and access lots of helpful features like session detail, maps and more.
ONGOING…PLEASE STOP BY!
Conference Exhibitors
Take your time strolling through the lineup of exhibitors on hand to promote their organization, services and products.
Use the opportunity to visit also the travelling exhibition: The Great Lakes, the Saint-Lawrence and the Gulf presented at the
Hilton - Grande Place (1st floor).
Passport Program
Each attendee will receive a passport book in their registration kit which will include the participating sponsor names and
exhibit booth numbers. Attendees can visit and obtain a sticker from exhibitors listed in their passport book. Completed
passports can then be deposited at registration for a chance to win a prize.
Breaks
Take the opportunity to network, catch up with colleagues, and share new ideas from the conference.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 3
OPTIONAL ACTIVITIES
Unusual Passages 2016
Discover 12 playful, intriguing installations by visual artists and architecture collectives, that question our relation to the world
and the urban space. PASSAGES INSOLITES 2016 (Unusual Passages) walk off beaten trails to produce unusual, surprising
new ways of living the city. The location can be found at www.passagesinsolites.com/en/
Free activity
Discovery Dinner on the Île d’Orléans (Wednesday July 6 - 6:30 P.M.)
Located on Île d’Orléans, decreed by the government as a “historic borough” and a vast agricultural land, the Vignoble SaintePétronille Winery will enchant you. Along with astonishing vistas of Quebec City, you will discover unforgettable local terroir
products. On 7.5 hectares of planted vineyards, you can enjoy a leisurely walk along the interpretive vineyard and wine trail,
ending your educational stroll at the tasting room, where you will be served a mouth-watering meal of good food and fine wine.
Departure from the Hilton Québec.
Spaces are limited / Cost: $185, including transport
 RE-GROUPING AT 6:15 P.M. IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY (TRANSPORTATION BY BUS)
BY THE NUMBERS
Nearly 200 presenters
3 Keynote Speakers + 1 Special Round Table
9 Workshops (AT)
4 Awards Presentations
4 Extended Workshops (AS)
1 Discovery Dinner on the Île d’Orléans
6 Learning Tours (EE)
1 Welcome Reception at Le Parlementaire (restaurant)
52 Short Sessions (SB)
1 Conference Dinner at the Musée de la Civilisation
1 Students presentation (STU)
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Quebec Hilton
Located on Parliament Hill, Hilton Quebec is just a 20-minute drive to Quebec International Airport and five minutes from the
train and bus stations. This Quebec City hotel is steps from all major tourist attractions and festivals.
Registration
Please be advised that Learning Tours are not included in the Registration cost. A Conference program-at-a-glance is included
in your package for quick reference.
Continuous Professional Learning
All conference sessions have been rated with Learning Units under CIP’s Continuous Professional Learning Program, as well
as OUQ Learning Units. If applicable, members (Full and Candidate) attending these sessions will be entitled to use these
learning units to fulfill their own CPL obligations, in accordance with the provisions of their respective Affiliate’s CPL program.
Student volunteers are on hand to scan your badge and keep record of your attendance at a session which will then be uploaded
to your CPL record.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 4
Speaker Services
The conference speaker preparation room is located in the Hilton Room situated on the lobby level of the Hilton Quebec. Access
keys will be available at the registration desk.
Conference Proceedings
Please note that the proceedings of concurrent session presentations will be made available online following the event.
Next Year’s Conference
The Alberta Professional Planners Institute (APPI) and the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP) are pleased to announce the
CIP/APPI National Conference will be held in Calgary, AB in July 2017!
Questions and Information?
If you have any questions, or require any information please do not hesitate to ask at the Registration desk, ask a volunteer or
a Member of the Conference Organizing Committee.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 5
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
PHIL ENQUIST (FAIA SOM PARTNER)
Philip Enquist, FAIA, is the Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) Partner who leads its global
city design practice, the world’s most highly awarded urban planning group. Phil and the
planning studios in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, London and Shanghai have improved the
quality of life and the environmental performance of cities on five continents by designing
location-unique development strategies that integrate nature and urban density within a
framework of future‐focused public infrastructure.
Phil has been regularly recognized as a visionary leader in a rapidly evolving discipline. He
passionately believes that the world’s explosive growth of cities must be managed by humanely
bold and holistically sustainable strategies at the national, regional and urban scales, and that
human habitat design will be the alpha design discipline of the 21st century.
DR. ANTHONY M. TOWNSEND
Dr. Anthony Townsend is an internationally recognized expert on urbanization, ubiquitous
computing, technology innovation and economic development. He holds posts at the Data &
Society Research Institute, and New York University Rudin Center for Transportation. He is an
advisor to government and industry, currently works with Google’s Sidewalk Labs, the World
Economic Forum, Code for America, and Urban.Us on technology strategy for cities. His first
book, Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers and the Quest for A New Utopia was published by
W.W. Norton & Co. in 2013. Anthony holds a Ph.D. in urban and regional planning from
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a master’s in urban planning from New York University,
and a B.A. in urban studies with a minor in physics from Rutgers University.
JEAN HAËNTJENS
Jean Haëntjens, an economist and urban planner, is today a consultant in urban strategies
(Urbatopie). Previously, he directed public urban planning and urban project agencies. He was
involved in more than a hundred administrations, local communities, and universities in Europe.
He is the author of several works on urban development, such as Eco-urbanisme, défis
planétaires, solutions urbaines (Ecosociétés, 2015), La ville frugale (FYP, 2011), and Urbatopies
(L’aube, 2010).
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 6
TUESDAY JULY 5, 2016
8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
Observatoires Ivanhoé Cambridge
8:30 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.
 LOBBY OF THE HILTON
LEARNING TOUR
EE02F
QUEBEC’S RECREATIONAL AND UTILITARIAN BIKE NETWORK
 LU’S 7
This will be a truly mobile workshop! Participants will visit facilities designed for recreational and utilitarian cycling on the Quebec
City side of the river. The route will cover approximately 50 kilometers and is geared toward physically fit planners. The trip will lead
participants along sections of bike paths that flow against traffic, bike boulevards whose design blocks vehicular traffic, a recently
opened path that winds down a cliff, the multi-award-winning promenade Samuel-De Champlain along the St. Lawrence, a welldesigned railway crossing, a bike path that was once a railway track, a bike path up the middle of a median strip, a portion of the St.
Charles River bike path, colored bike lanes leading back up the cliff, and a ride along an invisible bike path! Lunch will be at the HôtelMusée Premières Nations in Wendake.
Presenters
Julie Forest, ministère des Transports, de la Mobilité durable et de l’Électrification des transports
Martin Joly, ministère des Transports, de la Mobilité durable et de l’Électrification des transports
Paul Mackey, President, Safestreet
Marc Panneton, Bicycle Coordinator, ministère des Transports, de la Mobilité durable et de l’Électrification des transports
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 8:15 AM (DEPARTURE BY BIKE)
Limited number of places (French and English Tour)
Cost: $120, including lunch
By heavy rain, the activity will be cancelled
8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.
LEARNING TOUR AND WORKSHOP
EE01E / EE01F
THE REINVENTION AND RECONSTRUCTION OF LAC-MÉGANTIC
 LU’S 7.5
In the early hours of July 6, 2013, an unmanned freight train derailed in downtown Lac-Mégantic, resulting in multiple explosions and
a fire that killed 47 people and destroyed an area of 2 square kilometers. Millions of liters of crude oil were also released into the lake
and the Chaudière River. This mobile workshop will lead us to the heart of reconstruction efforts in this town of 6,000 inhabitants.
Along the way, participants will learn about the participatory planning initiative conducted in 2014 by the Town of Lac-Mégantic. Once
on site, we will observe the finished work and meet those involved in reconstruction, who will present various economic stimulus and
community projects. On our walk, we will discover the activities and interpretation facilities that keep the area vibrant today. We will
also learn about the town’s approach to environmental management and how it is rebuilding its downtown. On the way back, we will
discuss the lessons that can be learned from this kind of post-catastrophe reconstruction.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 7
Your guides will be employees at Convercité, the organization that led the participatory planning process to rebuild the downtown
area. They were both directly involved in this unique project.
Presenters
Gabrielle Immarigeon, MUP, Project Manager, Convercité
Léa Riou, Convercité, and Relève en urbanisme (RU)
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 8:15 AM (DEPARURE BY BUS)
Limited number of places (French and English Tour)
Cost: $150, including lunch
AS01E
CANU “ACCENT ON DESIGN” URBAN DESIGN CHARRETTE
 LU’S 7.5
The “Accent on Urban Design” charrette, organized by the Council for Canadian Urbanism (CanU) will demonstrate practical design
approaches to respond to Conference theme using a demonstration site in Quebec City in a participatory format. This session will
also demonstrate the design-based approach to planning for change, for sustainable and healthy development, for authentic
placemaking, for thriving communities.
The Urban Design Charrette session will look at a particular site and will generate an urban design vision and concepts for its
development. This session will demonstrate the urban design method and technique as well as its value in the planning process. The
session leaders are well known leaders in the urban design field, experienced with this type of session and planning technique.
Organized by the Council for Canadian Urbanism.
Presenters
Joyce Drohan, MRAIC, AIBC, AAA, SAA, LEED AP, Director of Urban Design, Perkins + Will, Vancouver, BC (TBC)
Karen Hammond, MCIP, RPP, ASLA (TBC)
Dan Leeming, FCIP, RPP, Principal, Planning Partnership Toronto, ON
Rick Merrill, OAA, MCIP, RPP, Partner, The Planning Partnership, Toronto, ON
Alexandru Taranu, FCIP, RPP, OAA, Manager, Architectural Design, City of Brampton, ON
Eric Turcotte, OAA, OAQ, MCIP, RPP, Partner, Urban Strategies, Toronto, ON
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
Limited number of places
Cost: $75, including lunch
ST
10:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
EXTENDED WORKSHOP
AS03E
SHARING RESPONSIBILITY FOR CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION
 LU’S 7
Adapting to climate change is a reality every municipality faces while few understand how to do it. A successful adaptation strategy
requires a multi-disciplinary approach that engages planners and other professionals, for example engineers, landscape architects,
public works staff and emergency services providers, as well as elected officials and community members. This specialized workshop
is hosted by the National Adaptation Working Group — made up of the Canadian Institute of Planners, ICLEI Canada, the Federation
of Canadian Municipalities, Engineers Canada, and the Institute for Catastrophic Loss Reduction.
During this six hour training session you will discuss major climate change adaptation challenges, learn how to increase the
application of adaptation tools in your work, and practice how to use them effectively to implement climate change adaptation
responses. Some of the tools that you will learn about are: CIP Standard of Practice and Climate Change Adaptation Tools, Ouranos
Guidebook on Climate Scenarios, ICLEI Engagement Tools, ICLR Tool for Identifying Intensity-Duration-Frequency Curves, and
Engineers Canada PIEVC Risk Assessment Tool.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 8
Using case study information from current municipal climate change adaptation examples, you will work in facilitated small groups
to draft climate change adaptation planning responses such as bylaws, official plans and local areas plans, policy statements and
program responses. You will also explore the role that you can play in fostering a multidisciplinary approach in your workplaces to
address the climate change adaptation needs of municipalities. This session is suitable for you if you possess basic practical and
applied knowledge of climate change adaptation and you want to learn more about how to integrate climate change adaptation tools
into your practice. Presentations will be in English and participants are invited to speak in the language of their choice.
Moderator
Emilie Adin, Deputy Director, Community Development, City of North Vancouver
Presenters
Elisabeth Arnold MCIP, RPP, Principal Consultant, Sustainable Community Development, Montreal, Quebec
Devin Causley MCIP, RPP, Manager of Climate Change Programs, Federation of Canadian Municipalities
Isabelle Charron, Ph.D., Climate Scenario Specialist, Ouranos
David Lapp, FEC, P. Eng., Practice Lead, Engineering and Public Policy, Engineers Canada
Connor Smith, BA, Land Development Planner, Al-Terra Engineering Ltd.
Michael Sullivan MCIP, RPP, Principal Planner, SullivanPlan
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
Limited number of places
Cost: $50, including lunch
ND
1:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.
WORKSHOP
AT01E
INTRODUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF LARGE RETAIL/COMMERCIAL URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
 LU’S 3
Large retail development is the biggest game in town and affects The City’s realm on its form, movements, community building,
revenue and place making. But in the past planning undervalued and underestimated the importance of retail area design and left it
more or less to developers in order to satisfy primarily shopping needs.
This workshop will focus on how to apply the Guidelines site design criteria on development applications. Participants will be informed
about developer and retailers response on this Guideline. Participants will learn about trends in retail area development and
redevelopment and how they have an impact on retail site development. There will a background information of an IPSOS REID survey
on large retail area experiences in Calgary.
There will be an introduction of the Guidelines and the specific "Development Strategy Tool" which allows an applicant or a file
manager or a community association a self assessment of a retail development proposal for overall alignment to the Guidelines and
broader Corporate objectives. The “Tool” exercise will provide immediate testing results, direct learning experiences and a steep
learning curve on how to evaluate and prepare large retail applications on their urban design quality and to understand the importance
of retail area design on cohesive site planning and establishing community context.
There will be a discussion around "before-after” retail developments from Calgary since working with the guidelines in 2014.
Workshop participants are encouraged to bring their own examples or current files of large commercial site along for discussion.
Issues and challenges participants have worked through could be shared with the rest of the group.
Presenter
Lothar Wiwjorra, Urban Designer, Dipl.Ing., Senior Urban Designer, City of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta
 ROOM BEAUMONT/BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 9
1:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
WORKSHOP
AT02F
THE SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEM: POTENTIAL STRATEGIES FOR URBAN PLANNERS
 LU’S 4
The sustainable food system (SFS) is a promising approach that encompasses every link in the food chain: rural and urban agriculture.
biofood processing; food distribution, sale, and consumption; and waste management. Municipalities have the capacity to help roll out
the SFS in a way that provides real benefits for all stakeholders. Urban planners are key actors in this process. For example, favorable
urban planning and innovative regulatory initiatives can be adopted to improve access to fresh food through community gardens, urban
farming, small health food grocery stores and seasonal fresh food markets; by maintaining neighborhood stores that are within walking
and biking distance; by limiting access to junk food by capping the number of fast food restaurants allowed; and so on. Municipalities can
introduce healthy lifestyle policies, create food policy boards, and implement public and private projects to develop or support the various
aspects of the SFS. Many of these projects require support from private, public, and community stakeholders to work on complementary
aspects such as organizing neighborhood activities, increasing residents’ feeling of belonging and safety, and taking steps to combat
climate change. The presenters will provide a variety of concrete strategies with real-life examples drawn from Montreal and elsewhere.
The workshop also includes interactive, hands-on exercises.
The workshop objectives are to help urban planners identify the benefits of a sustainable food system (SFS) in their areas and the changes
in professional practices that result. The goal is also to present urban planners with various action strategies that municipalities are
currently using in SFS planning and deployment (planning, regulation, municipal policies, projects, consultation structure).
Presenters
Catherine Brouillette, Environmental Research Officer, Burrough of Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie, Ville de Montréal
Monique Côté, Planning Advisor, Sustainable Development Division, Ville de Montréal
Vincent Galarneau, Agricultural and Environmental Advisor, Vivre en Ville
Jean-Philippe Grenier, Urban Planning Advisor, Montreal
Jean-Philippe Vermette, General Manager, Carrefour alimentaire Centre-Sud and Marché Frontenac
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French
6:00 P.M. – 8:30 P.M.
WELCOME RECEPTION (LE PARLEMENTAIRE)
For the welcome reception, you are invited to Le Parlementaire. While this restaurant has been the scene of many State dinners
and formal receptions, it is also the location par excellence for savouring Quebec products in the company of members of the
National Assembly and citizens alike. Le Parlementaire is located in the Parliament Building on Parliament Hill in the Old City.
Reserved for parliamentarians from 1917 to 1968, it has been open to the public for more than forty years. During the evening,
you will be able to visit the premises, which are imbued with Quebec’s political history.
 RESTAURANT LE PARLEMENTAIRE, PARLIAMENT BUILDING (WALKING DISTANCE))
Ville de Québec
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 10
WEDNESDAY JULY 6, 2016
7:00 A.M. – 8:30 A.M.
REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
Observatoires Ivanhoé Cambridge
7:30 A.M. – 8:30 A.M.
 LOBBY OF THE HILTON
BREAKFAST
Groupe Dallaire
8:30 A.M. – 10:30 A.M.
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
CONFERENCE OPENING – PLENARY WITH PLANNERS PANEL
THE ROLE OF ELECTED OFFICIALS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE DEVELOPERS, CITIZENS, PLANNERS AND DESIGN
PROFESSIONALS IN THE MAKEUP AND FUTURE OF CITIES AND REGIONS
The rapid emergence of large-scale projects, both public and private, imposes regular reconsideration of planning issues by all
parties involved. What role do planners have in all this? How do they fit into the decision-making process? Does the conventional
planning and regulatory model need to be re-thought? What approaches might be used with elected officials, developers, citizens,
and other professionals to maximize uptake of urban design concerns?
This issue will be discussed in a plenary panel session featuring a diverse array of speakers and providing plenty of room for
contributions from conference-goers.
Moderator
Pierre St-Cyr, Urban Planner, Quebec City
Panelists
François Bourque, Journalist, le Soleil, Quebec City
Stéphane Dion, Regional Director Quebec, Urban Development Institute of Quebec, Quebec, QC
Raphaël Fischler, School of Urban Planning, McGill University
Jennifer Keesmaat MCIP, RPP, Chief Planner, City of Toronto, Toronto, ON
Hélène Laperrière, Commissioner, Office de consultation publique de Montréal
Brent Toderian, Toderian UrbanWORKS, Vancouver
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
10:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M.
BREAK
The Personal Insurance Company
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
 GRANDE PLACE OF THE HILTON QUÉBEC (1ST FLOOR)
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 11
11:00 A.M. – 12:15 P.M.
SHORT SESSIONS
SB01F
WHAT IS THE BEST URBAN PLANNING STRATEGY AT THE PROVINCIAL LEVEL?
 LU’S 1.25
In the face of 21st century challenges, especially those related to climate changes, international organizations are urging states to
develop national urban planning strategies. Can these strategies help local and regional planners achieve greater consistency in
urban and land use planning across different levels of government?
Two Canadian examples illustrate the potential planning role senior governments can play. Ontario adopted the Smart Growth for
Our Communities Act in 2015, along with provincial land use plans for the populous Greater Golden Horseshoe region and the Places
to Grow program. In Quebec, Alliance Ariane, whose members include Ordre des urbanistes and Vivre en Ville, is calling for the
adoption of a Quebec land use and urban planning policy to coordinate planning initiatives by different stakeholders across the
province. The goal of this brief session is to engage a dialogue on these crucial issues.
Presenters
Marie-Claude Aubin, Planner, Associate & Director of Planning–Lemay, and President, Comité révisions législatives, Ordre des
urbanistes du Québec
Audrey Bennett, Director, Provincial Planning Policy Branch, Local Governement and Planning Policy Division, Ministry of
Municipal Affairs and Housing of Ontario
Christian Savard, MCRP, Executive Director, Vivre en Ville & co-spokesman for Alliance Ariance
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French session
SB02E
MAJOR ISSUE – PROTECTING AND DEVELOPING WATER RESOURCES
 LU’S 1.25
Early in the process, stakeholders identified “water as a resource” as a key planning element to be highlighted, protected and
experienced in the plan. Consequently, the plan has been developed with a view to integrating water into: the identity for the area; a
meaningful framework for street design and the public realm; to improve micro-climate; and as a communal experience. The plan
considers the water features (i.e. lakefronts, river and shipping channel) as defining linear systems to frame the plan. It also highlights
water as: an amenity; as a destination; as a viewscape; as a mode of transportation; and as a port. At the street level, over the course
of the project a range of alternatives have been considered including conventional approaches and an innovative approach to treating
water as a resource that integrates an ecological approach to stormwater management including open channels as stormwater parks
along streets, bioswales to connect urban and wild areas and a series of green streets. Pilot areas are being recommended that
showcase stormwater and low impact design within the street rights of ways such as open channels and swales, planted and paved
open channels and hybrid planted open channels
Presenters
Kenneth M. Dion, Senior Manager of Special Projects, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)
Ann Joyner MCIP, RPP, MES, Partner, Dillon Consulting Limited, Toronto, Ontario
Cassidy Ritz, Project Manager, SIPA, City of Toronto, Ontario
Amanda Santo, Waterfront Toronto
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB03E
PLEASE DIMBY YOUR CAR-FREE CONDO PROJECT (DEVELOP IN MY BACK YARD)!
 LU’S 1.25
“N3” is Canada’s first truly no parking, multi-residential mixed use building. The N3 project is located within Calgary’s East Village
community. East Village is a 49 acre brownfield redevelopment site located in downtown Calgary, which is being transformed by
Calgary Municipal Land Corporation, into an amenity-rich, mixed-use urban village home to 11,500 new residents. As the public
developer, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation has invested over $350 million dollars into the community attracting over $2.4 billion
of multi residential, cultural, commercial and retail investment to the area. The once blighted and disconnected community is quickly
transforming into one of Calgary’s most walkable and bikeable and connected communities. Continuing on the East Village’s success
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PAGE 12
of creating an active modes focused community, CMLC chose the Knightsbridge Homes N3 concept to broaden the community’s
residential mix and satisfy CMLC’s objective of delivering an inclusive and vibrant community. The car-free development project
responds to Generation Y’s profile as an engaged and environmentally conscious group wanting an urban life-style. Research
identified that millennials are less likely to own a vehicle than any generation before it, thus creating a new market, with a unique set
of demands. Unlike a typical NIMBY response, the N3 received unanimous Council support at the public hearing, with residents
speaking out in favour of the project. Come learn how the car-free condominium development came to fruition, and how the City of
Calgary is responding to this changing market demand.
Presenters
Thom Mahler MCIP, RPP, Manager, Local Area Planning and Implementation, City of Calgary
Amber Osadan-Ullman MCIP, RPP, Project Manager, Calgary Municipal Land Corporation, Calgary, Alberta
Joe Starkman, President, Knightsbridge Homes
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB04E
ARE SMART CITIES ENOUGH?
 LU’S 1.25
The world is awash with literally hundreds, if not thousands of cities, towns and regions proclaiming their competitive advantages as
a “Smart City”. Every community that has laid a strand of fiber-optic cables or built a wireless mesh of WiFi has begun to make these
claims, but this is insufficient to be a truly smart city. In fact, as planner, is that all we want our cities, towns and regions to be? Or
should we take a more holistic approach for the successful transformation of our communities, especially as disruptive technologies,
changing environments and shifts in the economy are impacting our plans for them? Insights on what a “Smart City” is and how it
differs from an “Intelligent Community” will be covered and why planners need to take note of this. What will our communities need
planners to consider with the impending influence of the Internet of Things, Autonomous Vehicles and Artificial Intelligence and how
will technology help planners engage its citizens to deal with these inevitable impacts? What is the role of the planner, civic leadership,
collaboration and citizen engagement in developing the vision and in executing a community’s plans to become a truly smart,
connected and intelligent community? This session will cite Canadian and global examples and case studies of Smart Cities and
Intelligent Communities, including a recent survey of Canada’s designated 27 Intelligent Communities and what separates them from
the growing list of smart cities.
Presenter
John G. Jung, Executive Director, ICF Canada (Toronto) and Chairman and Co-Founder, Intelligent Community Forum (ICFNYC, USA), Toronto, Ontario
APPLYING THE CONCEPT OF SMART CITIES TO A RURAL MUNICIPAL CONTEXT
In 2014 Parkland County become recognized as a Smart 21 municipality by the Intelligent Communities Forum organization. The
recognition came from Parkland County applying the Smart Communities indicators to use information and communication
technologies to generate economic and community development in a rural context. Smart Parkland today has modified the Intelligent
Communities Forum indicators to apply a more holistic approach to community sustainability and community economic development.
Parkland County believes their approach to the Smart City concept will provide rural and smaller municipalities with an innovative
methodology to position themselves for the future. The presentation will touch on each of the seven indicators and the programs
established in Parkland County. Lessons learned will include the challenges faced with creating a broadband network in a low density
rural landscape, and what is needed to have residents take advantage of the technology. The presenter will also provide insight as to
how planners should consider incorporating technology into the design of rural communities.
Presenter
Peter Vana MCIP, RPP, General Manager, Development Services, Parkland County, Parkland County, Alberta
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
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SB05F
INTERVENING ON THE SHORELINE OF A CAPITAL CITY
 LU’S 1.25
Having long been preferred access routes to an entire continent, the St. Lawrence River and its main affluent, the Ottawa River, hold
an important place in the discovery of Quebec and Canada. Both in Quebec City and in Ottawa, they nevertheless gradually gave way
to the modern arterial system, such that the urban environment developed away from their shores, even turning its back on them in
some places. Since then, the expectations of the population have changed, and the shoreline is increasingly coveted as a place for
public events to meet local, regional, and even national needs. Lucie Bureau, Urban Planner and Chief, Planning and Transportation
at the National Capital Commission (NCC) in Ottawa, will present the approach favoured for improving the public lands of the Sir John
A. Macdonald Parkway and the North Shore of the Ottawa River, and will also discuss a few initiatives that are under way.
Josiane Dufault, Urban Planner and Urban Design Advisor at Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, will present the process
that led to the achievement of the Promenade Samuel-De Champlain and the new participatory initiatives promoted in the project
Paysages en dialogue – Ouvrir des perspectives sur la capitale [Landscapes in dialogue – Opening up perspectives on the capital].
Presenters
Lucie Bureau, Urban Planner, Chief, Planning and Transportation, NCC Environmental Strategy, National Capital
Commission - Ottawa
Josiane Dufault, Urban Planner and Urban Design Advisor, Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Quebec City
 ROOM BEAUMONT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB06F
 LU’S 1.25
LAND DEVELOPMENT AND SUSTAINABLE RAINWATER MANAGEMENT: TERMINOLOGY, CRITERIA, AND PRINCIPLES
The best rainwater management approaches rethink the way drainage infrastructure should be integrated into the urban fabric, drawing
on sound knowledge of urban development and its impact on the water cycle. Multipurpose measures using green or low-impact
infrastructure have been acknowledged as key to reproducing the natural hydrological conditions that can help minimize flooding and
the degradation of waterways. These issues have been exacerbated by climate change, making it all the more important that both new
development and rehabilitation projects make maximum use of drainage infrastructure with the least impact on the water cycle.
Urban planners and land use planning stakeholders are key to developing and putting in place sustainable rainwater management
infrastructure because it all starts with them—they set everything in motion. Considering that these new approaches require that urban
planners, landscape architects, and engineers work closer together than ever before, the presentation’s main goal is to provide urban
planning officials with a general framework of analysis so they can account for hydrological conditions in their planning (whether in terms
of watersheds, integrated setors, or sources).
Presenter
Gilles Rivard, Eng., M.Sc., Vice-President, Hydrologie Urbaine et Associé, Lasalle NHC, Montreal, Quebec
PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION CASE STUDY: LONGUEUIL PUBLIC MARKET: SUSTAINABLE RAINWATER
MANAGEMENT AS A CATALYST FOR A SUSTAINABLE REGIONAL APPROACH
The Longueuil Public Market is an innovative case study in multidisciplinary design, bringing together urban planners, civil enginers,
landscape architects, and developers. The project includes three treatment trains allowing for integrated rainwater management. The
design team monitored its development from start to finish to ensure the integration of all three aspects of sustainable development: the
economy, society, and the environment. Thanks to sustainable upstream integrated rainwater management, the project was
economically sound and made optimal use of the landscape. Water management also served as a real catalyst for sustainable
development at various territorial levels.
OMPs were selected based on location, layout, retention, and treatment. They were designed in a series so as to combine their strengths
and maximize their effectiveness in the event of rain, no matter how heavy. The goal was to achieve synergy between the various OMPs.
The system was conceived with a comprehensive approach to rainwater management. What makes the project so innovative is that it
takes three different perspectives and merges them into a single overall solution.
Presenters
Marie Dugué, Eng., PA LEED, M.Sc.A., Associate, Vinci Consultants
Pascale Rouillé, OUQ/OPQU, Urban Planning Director, Vinci Consultants, Montreal, Quebec
 ROOM BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
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SB07E
 LU’S 1.25
WATERING DOWN BY GROWING UP: INTEGRATING LEADING-EDGE WATER RESOURCE TECHNOLOGIES INTO MUNICIPAL
GROWTH PLANNING
Unique to Ontario, conservation authorities exist under the provincial Conservation Authorities Act as local watershed management
agencies that protect and manage water and other natural resources in partnership with government, landowners and interest
groups. Delegates will learn about the challenges that Toronto and Region Conservation Authority planners, engineers and ecologists
face within rapidly developing greenfield communities and intensifying urban centres of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). TRCA's
perspective will be shared on finding opportunities to enhance the resilience of new and redeveloping communities from the potential
impacts of climate change with innovations in the protection and management of water resources. TRCA planning and engineering
staff will discuss their experiences in striving to balance objectives for decreasing flood risk, protecting and enhancing natural
heritage and water resource systems, as well as revitalization of provincially mandated growth areas. This leading-edge work will be
highlighted through the examination of a number of planning projects from around the GTA, which will include visualization of new
and innovative flood plain modeling to better define and manage flood risk in highly altered urban environments.
Presenters
Mary-Ann Burns MCIP, RPP, Senior Planner - Policy, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)
Nick Lorrain, Senior Project Manager, Engineering Services, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)
Adam Miller, Senior Planner, Development Planning and Regulation, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)
Laurie Nelson MCIP, RPP, Associate Director, Planning and Policy, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA), Downsview,
Ontario
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM LAUZON (GROUND FLOOR)
SB08E
THE FOURTH P: THE ROLE OF THE PLANNER IN P3S (PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS)
 LU’S 1.25
Public Private Partnerships (P3s) have become an important vehicle in Canada to build big infrastructure projects such as transit,
bridges, roads, arenas and art centres. By off loading risk on the private sector, public authorities argue that they can save time and
money. Without getting into the financial value of P3s, this session proposes to examine the Planner’s role in these projects. From
the municipal real estate departments, planning approvals, consultants and consortium team members, Planners play an important
role. But do these roles conflict? How do you ensure the public is consulted without given away the competitive advantage, and how
can these Planners continue to represent the public good? As creative ways are found to finance important civic projects, Planners
need to be able to maneuver around these complicated projects while still being publically accountable and bringing value to the
process.
Presenters
Rob MacKay, Director Project Development, PPP Canada
Lauren Reeves MCIP, RPP, Senior Planner, Real Estate Partnerships and Develpment Office, City of Ottawa
Pamela Sweet FCIP, RPP, Senior Vice President, FOTENN Planning and Urban Design, Ottawa, Ontario
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM JONQUIÈRE (GROUND FLOOR)
SB09E
 LU’S 1.25
FUNDING THE FUTURE: PROTECTING THE PUBLIC INTEREST AT THE INTERSECTION OF PRIVATE FUNDING, POLITICAL
INFLUENCE, AND DIVERSE STAKEHOLDERS
Despite the recent economic downturn, Calgary is continuing to grow, while municipal finances are tightening. The public is becoming
more interested and well-versed in planning issues than ever before. Developers and politicians expect development to proceed at a
rapid pace with greater efficiency. How can a planner possibly satisfy all of these competing interests?
Introducing The City of Calgary’s Developer-Funded planning program: the mechanism through which in just two years, The City
produced six innovative new community plans for 5,000 hectares of greenfield land to accommodate 185,000 people and 55,000 jobs.
This interactive presentation will outline how planners in Calgary arranged funding agreements with private developers, arrived at
agreeable outcomes with dozens of diverse stakeholders, managed political influence, and collaborated with industry, all with a focus
on creating plans for innovative new communities. The presenters will examine the various roles that planners play today, with an
emphasis on protecting the public interest in public-private partnerships.
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PAGE 15
Participants will leave the session with practical knowledge on how to implement the developer-funded plan processes, and
answers to more thought-provoking questions about the planner’s role in the future.
Presenters
Jamal Ramjohn MCIP, RPP, Coordinator, Local Area Planning and Implementation, The City of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta
Jill Sonego, Planner, The City of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM DUQUESNE (GROUND FLOOR)
SB10E
DELIVERING DENSITY: LESSONS FROM VICTORIA, B.C.
 LU’S 1.25
This session will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn about the real world challenges associated with putting planning
policy into action from the perspective of front line municipal Development Planners.
Focusing specifically on three master-planned mixed-use developments located in close proximity to downtown Victoria, BC, the
presentation will provide background on each of these projects, including an overview of the masterplan, urban design objectives and
current project status before delving deeper into the policies, guidelines and legal tools that were established to ensure the
completion of key project deliverables, including public amenities and environmental sustainability.
A key component of this presentation will be to identify where these planning and legal tools have been successful and conversely,
where they have not been successful before examining the different lessons learned from each of these unique projects.
Presenters
Jim Handy MCIP, RPP, MRTPI, Senior Planner - Development Agreements, City of Victoria
Mike Wilson MCIP, RPP, Senior Planner - Urban Design, City of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
12:15 P.M. – 2:00 P.M
LUNCHEON – FELLOWS INDUCTION AND YOUNG PLANNERS AWARD ENDS
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
2:00 P.M. – 3:15 P.M.
SHORT SESSIONS
SB11E
 LU’S 1.25
PLANNING MEGA DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS IN CANADA: MANAGING DEVELOPMENT OF THE CANADIAN OIL SANDS AND
LINEAR CORRIDORS TO ACHIEVE PUBLIC INTEREST OUTCOMES
Development of the Canadian oil sands and associated infrastructure to transport oil represents the most significant and
controversial industrial developments in Canadian history. Oil production is forecast to more than double by 2030 and more than $40
billion is planned for investment in transportation infrastructure including four major pipeline projects and rail development that will
crisscross Canada to transport oil to market.
This session will provide participants with an assessment of the potential impacts of these major projects and evaluation of planning
methods such as multiple account analysis and planning governance options to manage these impacts in Canada’s public interest.
Presenter
Thomas Gunton, RPP, Director, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the English session
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PAGE 16
SB12F
 LU’S 1.25
PARTICIPATORY URBAN PLANNING AS A LEVER FOR NEIGHBOURHOOD TRANSFORMATION: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A
LINEAR TRAIL IN CHICOUTIMI
How can a participatory urban planning approach enrich a land use project? Adopt the six-phase process developed by the Montreal
Urban Ecology Centre and its added value for your projects. The MUEC will present, among other things, the keys to successful
participation, as well as participatory urban planning tools and the context in which to apply them. During the second part of the
presentation, Municipal Councillor Simon-Olivier Côté will present a participatory land-use plan for a linear trail located on a former
CN lot passing through the centre of the borough of Chicoutimi (City of Saguenay). As an elected official, Mr. Côté will share what he
has learned, and the challenges and benefits of this decision-making process, which differs from traditional decision-making models.
This pilot project is part of the Active Neighbourhoods Canada/Réseau Quartiers verts (ANC/RQV) partnership, led by the MUEC and
its partners thanks to the support of the Public Health Agency of Canada.
Presenters
Simon-Olivier Côté, Municipal Councillor for District #11, City of Saguenay
Odile Craig, Urban Planner, Project Manager, Montréal Urban Ecology Centre, Montreal, Quebec
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB13F
FROM WATER MANAGEMENT TO HYDROELECTRIC NETWORK PLANNING
 LU’S 1.25
This 75-minute session will be divided into three components. The first part will explore the history of work carried out to date,
revealing how an understanding of the network’s development—through research on disappeared rivers, reconfigured river basins,
and the strategic and technological choices of the past—can directly impact planning perspectives. This will be followed by two
presentations on issues and planning challenges encountered at the wider neighborhood and city levels. Rather than propose any
specific solutions, the presenters will demonstrate the need for a new approach, examine its potential impact, and discuss related
issues and challenges.
The session will end with a poster presentation (±10) of various student research papers related to the issues raised.
Presenters
Gérard Beaudet, Planner Emeritus and Professor, School of Planning and Landscape Architecture at the Faculty of
Environmental Planning, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec
Danielle Dagenais, Associate Professor, School of Planning and Landscape Architecture at the Faculty of Environmental
Planning, Université de Montréal
Franck Scherrer, Professor and Director of the School of Planning and Landscape Architecture at the Faculty of Environmental
Planning, Université de Montréal
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB14E
LESSONS LEARNED, LOOKING FORWARD
 LU’S 1.25
In a Pecha Kucha format, the Fellows tell stories about the mistakes they made, the lessons learned early in their careers, the fun
they had, and how that led to success and the exciting things they are working on now. What’s changed and what remains the same!
Presenters
Linda Allen, RPP, FCIP, Managing Partner, CitySpaces Consulting Ltd., Victoria, British Columbia
Marta Farevaag, RPP, FCIP, PFS Studio
Dan Leeming, Founding Parnter, The Planning Partnership
Glen Miller, Senior Associate, Canadian Urban Institute
Mark Seasons, RPP, FCIP, Professor, School of Planning, University of Waterloo
Pamela Sweet, Vice-President, FoTenn Planning and Urban Design Consultants
Alexandru Taranu FCIP, RPP, OAA, MRAIC, Manager, Architectural Design, City of Brampton
Michael vonHausen, RPP, FCIP, MVH Urban Planning and Design Inc.
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
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SB15E
WINTERGREEN: AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO RURAL REDEVELOPMENT
 LU’S 1.25
Resorts of the Canadian Rockies (RCR) has engaged Urban Systems Ltd to design and develop a new residential community on the
Wintergreen Golf & Country Club lands in Bragg Creek, Alberta. The lands were formerly used as the Wintergreen Ski Hill, and the
resulting Wintergreen Redevelopment Conceptual Scheme provides the framework for a four-season recreational community that
utilizes sustainable rural development practices and incorporates existing natural water resources.
The conceptual scheme document is graphically-focused and is intended to be a visual interpretation of the planning policy. A visual
impact analysis, utilizing 3D Modelling, was conducted to understand the visual impact of residential development on the adjacent
community. Delegates will learn about the use of water resources in rural Alberta, a visual and graphic approach to plan writing, and
landscape conservation and issues relating to residential development on the slopes of a former ski hill.
Presenters
Mike Coldwell, Planner, Urban Systems Ltd., Calgary, Alberta
Patrick Majer, Resort Utility + Development Manager, Resorts of the Canadian Rockies
Brier Reid, Planner, Urban Systems Ltd.
 ROOM BEAUMONT/BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB16E
PLANNING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES: IF YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, THEN YOU ARE ALSO WHERE YOU LIVE
 LU’S 1.25
The link between health and lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise is well documented. So too is the relationship between health
and the built environment. The way we design our cities has real health impacts. As planners we have the opportunity to create healthy
communities at all stages of planning. This session will share how The City of Calgary is changing their approach to new community
master planning by sharing the story behind the Nose Creek Area Structure Plan. The Nose Creek Area Structure Plan (ASP) is a
statutory planning document that has created a unique planning approach by fully integrating a Health Impact Assessment (HIA) into
the document without impacting project timelines or costs. Through realizing its vision, health principles and policies, along with the
supporting Health Impact Assessment, Nose Creek will be a health-focused, inclusively planned community. This session will include
a presentation by the General Manager of Urban Strategies from the City of Calgary who will talk about strategies on changing the
mindset of council and a very suburban city, the Project team that created the approach and implemented the first policy plan in
Calgary / Alberta with an Health Impact Assessment (HIA) embedded, the Nose Creek Area Structure Plan; and the HIA consultant
and medical doctor to provide insight on how planners can use an HIA as a tool.
Presenters
Breanne Harder, Planner 2, City of Calgary
Murray Lee, MD (DR), Found Partner, Habitat Health Impact Consulting
Rollin Stanley, RPP, General Manager of Planning Development and Assessment, City of Calgary
Joyce Tang MCIP, RPP, AALA, CSLA, Senior Planner, City of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
WORKSHOPS
AT03E
ENGINEERS AND FINANCE OFFICERS: A PLANNER’S NEW BEST FRIENDS?
 LU’S 3
Asset management is a system for managing infrastructure that is being adopted formally in many municipalities across Canada.
When done well, it brings together the analysis of planners, engineers and finance officers, among others in the municipality so that
decisions about how infrastructure dollars are spent will yield the best possible long-term economic, social and environmental value
for our communities.
Land use and sustainability planners have tended to be relatively disconnected from asset management, which has largely been the
domain of engineers and finance officers. By engaging meaningfully in the asset management process, planners can better analyze
the full costs and benefits of building and servicing different types of development. In doing so, they will be better equipped to drive
the needed transition towards resilient and low carbon communities in the first half of this century.
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PAGE 18
This 2.5 hour training workshop is designed to:
•
•
•
Help planners understand asset management and their important role in the process;
Learn about the BC government’s Community Infrastructure Decision Support Tool, which planners can use to integrate asset
management data to better analyze different development options; and
Develop solutions to support improved collaboration between municipal planners, engineers and finance staff that will lead to
more integrated municipal decision making.
Presenters
Emilie K. Adin, Deputy Director, Community Development, City of North Vancouver
Adam R. Bell, CPA, CMA, Financial Reporting and Accounting Manager, Finance & Administration, City of Fredericton
Narissa Chadwick, MCIP, RPP, Senior Planner, British Columbia Ministry of Community Sport and Cultural Development
Donna Chiarelli, Senior Advisor, Knowledge Services, Federation of Canadian Municipalities, Ottawa, Ontario
Lourette Swanepoel, Senior Associate, Stantec Consulting Inc.
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM DUQUESNE (GROUND FLOOR)
AT04E
STRENGTHENING AGRICULTURAL LAND USE POLICIES FOR FARMLAND PROTECTION
 LU’S 3
Legislative frameworks for agricultural land use planning vary significantly between provinces and among jurisdictions within provinces.
Within these frameworks, beyond minimum requirements, local governments can choose the extent to which it aligns its land use
priorities with the provincial interest. At the same time, the growing interest in food systems have changed the political landscape within
which land use policies are developed and interpreted. Thus, more than ever, local governments must make their rationale for
agricultural land use policies clear and explicit, and land use planners need better tools in order to respond to the new political
environment for agricultural land use planning. This workshop draws from a national research project that examined guiding principles
and beneficial practices that strengthen agricultural land use planning. The research was based on local case studies that culminated in
a national forum to help formulate policy recommendations and a call to action for protecting farmland, which will be presented for
discussion during the workshop. We will also introduce a new toolkit for how to assess the strength of legislative frameworks to protect
farmland. This toolkit is based on four guiding principles: maximize stability; integrate public priorities across jurisdictions; minimize
uncertainty; and accommodate flexibility. In a world of never-ending pressure on a finite supply of farmland, it’s time for planners to put
these principles into better practices. Policy-makers can use the principles as criteria to evaluate policy options.
Presenters
Christopher Bryant, Retired Professor, University of Montreal
Wayne Caldwell, RPP, Professor, University of Guelph
Arthur Churchyard, RPP, Rural Planner - Central-East Ontario, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
David Connell, RPP, Associate Professor, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM LAUZON (GROUND FLOOR)
AT05E
PLANNERS, PLACES, PEOPLE AND PASSION - TACTICAL URBANISM AS A TOOL FOR URBAN PLANNERS
 LU’S 3
Traditionally, planners work on projects that affect the built environment in large or permanent ways. Think Municipal Development
Plans, Zoning Bylaws, or neighbourhood plans - often these come with a 10 year scope, if not longer.
However, citizens and stakeholders are increasingly expressing their desire to see meaningful change on the ground quickly. The desire
to ‘reclaim’ spaces within our city in ways that do not necessarily reflect traditional power structures and planning paradigms is often
referred to as tactical urbanism.
CITYlab was launched in March of 2015, and is a unit within the Sustainable Development department at the City of Edmonton. We are
urban planners who collaborate on small, temporary placemaking and planning projects with internal and external stakeholders.
Our workshop will look at how we are using tactical urbanism as a tool to engage in conversation about how cities evolve, connect people
to place and each other, learn by testing or piloting and highlight city planning goals. What can we learn from each other? How can this
be applied to planning practice, policy and implementation? How can tactical urbanism improve our professional practice?
Presenters
Marco Melfi, Provisional Member, Planner, CITYlab, City of Edmonton, Edmonton, Alberta
Yvonne Pronovost, Principal Planner, CITYlab, City of Edmonton
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM JONQUIÈRE (GROUND FLOOR)
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PAGE 19
AT06E
 LU’S 3
GETTING AHEAD OF THE CROWD: ENTERTAINMENT DESTINATIONS CAPACITY THEORY, AND THE APPLICATION OF
ADVANCED ANALYTICS TO ENHANCE PLANNING FOR VIBRANT LATE NIGHT ENTERTAINMENT AREAS
The City of Edmonton is working to redefine how cities can better plan and manage mixed-use entertainment areas, using data to
make evidence-based policy decisions. Nighttime uses within mixed-use entertainment areas are complex, and cities have
traditionally been planned for daytime and early evening use. This lack of focus on the late night often results in issues impacting
quality of life (such as garbage, noise, and public urination) and safety (including assaults, sexual assaults, and pedestrian
injuries/fatalities). The City of Edmonton’s Responsible Hospitality Edmonton (RHE) contends that Entertainment Areas with a high
concentration of late-night businesses have a maximum capacity; however, chaos within these areas is not inevitable. Vibrancy of
neighbourhoods is the foundation and unifying factor among different concepts that interplay in defining capacity. RHE partnered with
the City’s Analytics Centre of Excellence (ACE) to characterize vibrancy and chaos using advanced analytics techniques. The City of
Edmonton intends to use this knowledge to better plan and manage mixed-use entertainment areas. The work will augment a
smoother operation of the late night economy, and preserve the delicate balance between vibrancy and chaos. This workshop will
explore "Entertainment Destinations Capacity Theory" and examine the analytics work that has been done to date. Workshop
attendees will be invited to participate in a hands-on review of a case study and explore the many facets of “the other 9 to 5.”
Presenters
Koosha Golmohammadi, Data Scientist, Analytics Centre of Excellence, City of Edmonton, Alberta
Karen Parker, Business Solutions Analyst, Analytics Centre of Excellence, City of Edmonton, Alberta
Miki Stricker-Talbot, Hospitality Destinations Planner, Responsible Hospitality Edmonton, City of Edmonton, Alberta
 ROOM BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M
LEARNING TOUR
EE03E / EE03F
THE TRANSFORMATION OF RELIGIOUS HERITAGE
 LU’S 3
Many localities in Quebec boast a wealth of religious heritage whose survival is threatened by declining church attendance. Quebec
City is a prime example, with built heritage dating back to the seventeenth century. Efforts to repurpose these sites have been ongoing
for years. Following an overview of the situation in Quebec, participants will be led on a walking tour of a former Anglican church that
was converted into a library in the 1980s, a former United church that found a second life as a concert hall before it too become a
library, a sprawling convent complex that currently houses various health-related organizations, and a national heritage landmark
Catholic church that is posing a repurposing challenge. We will thoroughly examine the issue by exploring the many steps required
to preserve these structures.
Presenters
Michel Bonnette
Mylène Gauthier, Director of Projects – Quebec City Library, Quebec City
Francis Jacques, Historian, Séminaire de Québec
Paul Mackey, S.A.C.C.R.É. Enr., Responsable
Jean-Philippe Marcoux Fortier, Institut Canadien de Québec
Denis Robitaille, Project Manager, Monastère des Augustines
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 1:45 PM (WALKING TOUR)
Limited number of places (French or English Tour)
Cost: $25
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PAGE 20
2:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M
WORKSHOP
AT10E
CIP’S BUILDING BLOCKS: NATIONAL PLANNING INITIATIVES
Join CIP staff and members of the National Initiative Advisory Committee (NIAC) in a workshop designed to discuss and evaluate
CIP’s national policy and advocacy program. If you’re passionate about National issues and raising the profession’s profile, this
is an opportunity to voice your ideas. We will provide an overview of CIP’s current and past initiatives, discuss our strengths
and weaknesses, followed by an interactive discussion about planning themes and trends, policy, advocacy and outreach. Your
contribution can help shape CIP’s National and International initiatives.
Moderator
Anissia Nasr, Manager, Partnerships & Outreach, Canadian Institute of Planners
Facilitators – Members of the National Initiatives Advisory Committee
Jamie Burke MCIP
Lesley Cabott MCIP, RPP
Jeff Cook MICP, RPP
Elicia Elliott MICP, RPP
Darwin Horning MCIP
Ronald Morrison MCIP, RPP, NIAC Co-Chair
Olimpia Pantelimon MCIP, RPP, MOUQ
Pamela Shaw PhD, MCIP, RPP
Tony Sroka MCIP, RPP, NIAC Chair
Mike Sullivan MCIP, RPP, Principal Planner, SullivanPlan
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM WOLFE/MONTCALM (3 FLOOR)
Please register by emailing [email protected]
Spaces are limited
RD
3:15 P.M. – 3:45 P.M.
BREAK
 GRANDE PLACE OF THE HILTON 1 FLOOR)
ST
The Personal Insurance Company
3:45 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
& DELTA HOTEL, BALLROOM FOYER (GROUND FLOOR)
SHORT SESSIONS
SB17F
 LU’S 1.25
INDIGENOUS SETTLEMENTS: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ACTORS IN THE SEARCH FOR MORE SUSTAINABLE AND
CULTURALLY SENSITIVE COMMUNITY PLANNING
Since their recent sedentation, the Innu communities of Nitassinan and the Inuit of Nunavik have been facing challenges to their way
of life. In these communities, sustainable and culturally appropriate planning requires an awareness of indigenous governance and
calls for reflection on ways to better involve those actors who are most affected by planning—and so often excluded from defining its
direction. Indigenous planning will be explored through four themes: Northern areas in transformation: the shape of Inuit villages in
Nunavik (M. Rochette) • Sustainable development issues in Nunavik: research/creation and participatory workshop on urban design
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 21
(G. Vachon and M. Rochette) • Aboriginal representation in development plans on Amerindian reservations, in Inuit villages, and in
Quebec urban planning (D. Piché and G. André-Lescop) • Tools to facilitate communities’ appropriation of urban design principles (M.
Blais).
Presenters
Gaëlle André-Lescop, Civil Engineer, Assistant Director, Capital Assets and Infrastructure, Innu Takuaikan Uashat mak ManiUtenam (ITUM) Band Council
Myriam Blais, Architect, Professor at the School of Architecture − Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec
Denise Piché, Associate Professor at the School of Architecture − Université Laval
Maxime Rochette, Intern Architect, Project Coordinator − Living in Northern Quebec: Mobilizing, Understanding, Imagining
(CRSH, 2015-2020), School of Architecture - Université Laval
Geneviève Vachon, Architect, Professor at the School of Architecture − Université Laval
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French session
SB18F
NATURAL SPACES, A GLOBAL ISSUE
 LU’S 1.25
Gaston Déry will situate COP21 and the agreement signed by 195 countries in the context of the challenges that lie ahead. SOM’s St.
Lawrence Watershed management initiative proposes concrete steps as part of a solution that respects stakeholder needs and
expectations. Mr. Déry will emphasize the importance of citizen initiatives by drawing on his own personal experiences with Île aux
Pommes. He will exhaustively document the need to protect the St. Lawrence and its natural habitats and demonstrate the benefits
of such an approach, as well as looking at which approaches can be used to provide enough protection to make a difference. He will
propose potential solutions, including the creation of private nature reserves and partnerships with Canadian organizations such as
the Nature Conservancy of Canada and other key players. He will conclude with reflections on the strategic role that planners must
play in this ambitious initiative. We are duty-bound to succeed.
Presenter
Gaston Déry, F.E., M. Sc., President and Vice-President, Société de protecton et d'aménagement de l'île aux Pommes and
Arrimage Québec, Quebec City, Quebec
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB19E
 LU’S 1.25
THE GREAT URBAN MASHUP: RETHINKING CONTEMPORARY COLLABORATIVE PLANNING FROM COAST TO
COAST
Across Canada, the methods and tools for developing and delivering large-scale city building/transformative initiatives vary
vastly. This session will examine lessons to be learned from each region, comment on the diversity of new and ongoing work
across the country, and explore how these projects contribute to community prosperity.
Members of the Council for Canadian Urbanism (CanU) representing each major region of the country (West Coast, Prairies,
Ontario, Quebec and the East Coast) will be sharing examples of how change can be managed. The session will include 5-6
short presentations and conclude with an interactive discussion between the presenters and the audience.
Presenters
Joyce Drohan, MAIBC, AAA, SAA, LEED AP, Associate Principal, Perkins & Wills
Sylvain Ducas, urban planner, Director, Urban Planning Department, City of Montreal, QC
David Gordon FCIP, RPP, AICP P.Eng., Professor and Director, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Queen’s University
Harold Madi, Urban Design Director, City of Toronto
Thom Mahler, M.PL., RPP, MCIP, Manager, Local Area Planning, City of Edmonton
Peter Murphy, ADU-DUAP, Conseiller en architecture ou design urbain, Ville de Québec
Jacob Ritchie MCIP, LPP, Urban Design Manager, City of Halifax
Eric Turcotte MCIP, RPP, OAA, OAQ, LEED AP BD+C, Partner, Urban Strategies Inc., Toronto, Ontario
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
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PAGE 22
SB20E
CONNECTING HOME TO WORK: A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO CITY BUILDING
 LU’S 1.25
This brief session will examine the thinking behind SmartTrack, an innovative ‘surface subway’ concept to link up Mississauga,
Markham and Toronto with higher order transit. SmartTrack provides an affordable, practical solution to the Greater Toronto Area’s
worsening traffic congestion by offering high speed, two-way connectivity between the Region’s three major office concentrations.
Following 40 years of unprecedented growth, the GTA now has more than 215M sq. ft. of office space, making it Canada’s largest
centre of office employment. The majority of new office space built in recent decades has occurred in car-dependent locations
surrounding Toronto. This consigns tens of thousands of office workers to increasingly lengthy, frustrating commutes. SmartTrack
will allow commuters to leave their cars at home, resulting in widespread support from the public and private sectors. As a new
generation moves into the labour force, it will be important to find ways to ensure that the next wave of office development –
approximately 100M sq. ft. will be needed by 2041 – is directed to high quality mixed use locations well served by public transit.
Presenters
Iain Dobson, Co-founder, Strategic Regional Research Alliance
Angela Gibson MCIP, RPP, Head, Performance Monitoring and Research, Transportation and Community Planning Department,
Region of York
Glenn Miller FCIP, RPP, Director, Canadian Urban Institute, Toronto, Ontario
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB21F
UNDERSTANDING RESIDENTIAL DEMAND IN THE QUEBEC CITY AREA
 LU’S 1.25
Whenever there is discussion about demographic projections for the Quebec City area, one word consistently recurs: “ageing.” But
focusing on this phenomenon (which is very real) too often hides the fact that the region has experienced sustained growth for a
number of years and that urban sprawl is continuing. An in-depth analysis of residential demand that takes into consideration, on the
one hand, the “residential trajectory” of households and migration to the cities, and, on the other hand, the capacity of municipalities
to accommodate new residents is essential for fully understanding the issues of demographic growth in the region.
Presenters
Pierre Desgagnés, B.A. M.Urb., Specialized Consultant in Socio-Demographics of Transportation, Ministère des transports du Québec
David Duval, Urban Planner, City of Québec, Quebec City, Quebec
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
SB22E
 LU’S 1.25
ENGAGING DEVELOPERS AND LANDOWNERS IN DEVELOPING BUILT FORM AND URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES
Referencing the recently developed Downtown Hamilton Tall Buildings Guidelines and Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Built Form
Guidelines as primary case studies, this session examines the process of developing built form and urban design standards to shape
the relationship between built form, land use and the public realm. A particular focus will be on the process of engagement with not
only staff and the public, but also landowners and developers. Underpinned by flexibility, the Guideline documents are based on a
collaboratively developed set of vision, principles and design intent. They are intentionally performance based versus prescriptive in
order to allow for variations in built form response and private sector innovation.
With a highly graphic presentation, Shonda Wang, Lead, Urban Design at SvN and Clara Romero, Urban Designer/ Architect at SvN,
will draw from their extensive and varied experience grappling with urban growth, land use, architecture, public realm design and
engagement. They will discuss and demonstrate methods to work with clients, stakeholders and residents to design our communities
in a way that balances power and participation in the growth and development of responsive built form that contributes to vibrant
centres and communities.
Presenters
Clara Romero, M.U.D., M. Arch, LEED, Senior Urban Designer, SvN
Shonda Wang, BSW, MSc, MCIP, RPP, Lead, Urban Design, SvN, Toronto, Ontario
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
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PAGE 23
STARTING AT 5:00 P.M.
ALUMNI RECEPTION
École supérieure d’aménagement du territoire et de développement régional — ÉSAD – Laval University
McGill's School of Urban Planning
NSCAD-TUNS-DAL School of Planning
Queens University
School of Environmental Planning at the University of Northern British Columbia
University of British Columbia – SCARP
University of Manitoba
 BAR ALLEGRO, HILTON QUEBEC
5:15 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
MOVIE: “LE GRAND RÊVE DU PETIT CHAMPLAIN”
LE GRAND RÊVE DU PETIT CHAMPLAIN is the story of an architectural, artistic, historical and social adventure initiated by two
visionaries, two dreamer friends, Gerry Paris and the father of film director Jacques de Blois. The story of the renovation of the
Quartier Petit Champlain in Quebec City, one of the most visited areas in Quebec, as seen from the interior with those who
collaborated in the work. A documentary to revive the memory and present the people who shared in this adventure, to attempt
to communicate the energy and pride that can arise from dreams. A film written and directed by: Isabelle de Blois
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
The movie is shown in French, with English captioning
ST
DEPARTURE AT 6:30 P.M.
DISCOVERY DINNER ON THE ÎLE D’ORLÉANS (FREE EVENING)
Located on Île d’Orléans, decreed by the government as a “historic borough” and a vast agricultural land, the Vignoble SaintePétronille Winery will enchant you. Along with astonishing vistas of Quebec City, you will discover unforgettable local terroir
products. On 7.5 hectares of planted vineyards, you can enjoy a leisurely walk along the interpretive vineyard and wine trail,
ending your educational stroll at the tasting room, where you will be served a mouth-watering meal of good food and fine wine.
 RE-GROUPING AT 6:15 P.M. IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY (TRANSPORTATION BY BUS)
Spaces are limited / Cost: $185, including transport
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PAGE 24
THURSDAY JULY 7, 2016
7:00 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.
REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
Observatoires Ivanhoé Cambridge
7:00 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.
 LOBBY OF THE HILTON
BREAKFAST & CIP GENERAL ASSEMBLY
Groupe Dallaire
9:00 A.M. – 10:30 A.M
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
KEYNOTE SPEAKER ANTHONY TOWNSEND
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
10:30 A.M. – 11:00 A.M
BREAK
Provencher_Roy
11:00 A.M. – 12:15 P.M
 GRANDE PLACE OF THE HILTON QUÉBEC (1 FLOOR)
ST
SHORT SESSIONS
SB23F
SMART CITIES AND OUR URBAN FUTURE
 LU’S 1.25
Quebec City believes that smart cities will play an important role in making sustainable development a reality. Smart cities create and
establish information and telecommunications infrastructure to enhance the quality of life of their residents and improve city services,
management, and planning. In other words, urban planners truly lead the way.
In 2015, six priority areas were identified as key to smart cities: citizen services, water, transportation, safety, economic growth, and
buildings and infrastructure.
People are at the heart of smart cities—Quebec City understands this. According to its latest survey, satisfaction rates for municipal
services are very high among city residents. Now the goal is to maintain those satisfaction levels, in part by keeping a keen eye on
what other municipal governments are doing.
Présentateurs
Myriam Claveau, Online Communications Advisor and Social Media Manager, Communications Department, Quebec City
Frédéric Martel, Enterprise Architecture Supervisor, IT Department, Quebec City
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French session
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PAGE 25
SB24F
HOW LAND-USE PLANNING MEASURES CAN ENHANCE ROAD SAFETY IN QUEBEC
 LU’S 1.25
Road accidents still occur far too frequently in Quebec and work must be done to improve road safety. Integration of transport
planning with urban planning offers promising ways forward. In reality, planning decisions have a direct impact on the needs and
modes of transportation, affecting traffic and road safety conditions.
Decisions regarding major land-use zones, the delineation of urban areas, the location of major travel hubs, land use, and population
density along roadways all influence traffic flow, user type, frequency of access and intersections, as well as entrance and exit
maneuvers. All these factors combine to determine road accident risk.
The presentation will show how certain land-use planning measures can mitigate road safety issues by revealing the potential
impacts of these measures on traffic and collision risks. Two examples will be used to illustrate the presentation: Charlevoix-Est
Regional Municipal County and the RCM of L'Assomption.
Presenter
Catherine Berthod, Engineer and City Planner, Ministère des Transports du Québec, Quebec City, Quebec
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB25F
CITY LIGHTING PLANNING AS AN ENHANCEMENT TOOL IN A CAPITAL CITY
 LU’S 1.25
In Europe in the late 1980s, city lighting planning changed the way in which urban lighting was designed. Having initially been a
technical means to meet functional and security requirements, lighting subsequently became a full-fledged component of night-time
urban development. Through the vision and implementation of their respective lighting plans, Commission de la capitale nationale
du Québec (CCNQ) and the National Capital Commission (NCC) in Ottawa will discuss urban lighting from the perspective of the
enhancement of a capital city. While the lighting plan in Quebec City has existed since 1998, Ottawa’s plan was initiated in 2014.
According to the development stage of their initiative, the two organizations will outline the following: strategy and development tools
for implementing a lighting plan; the enhancement approaches that they promote through the illumination of heritage and
emblematic sites of a capital city; and various observations and reflections concerning the beautification of nocturnal landscapes,
light pollution, and new urban lighting technologies.
Presenters
Christopher Hoyt, OAA, MRAIC, AIA, Senior Architect, National Capital Commission, Capital Planning Branch
Véronique Koulouris, B.Arch., M.Arch., Consultant in Architecture and Lighting Design, Project Manager for the Lighting Plan,
Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Direction of Development and Architecture, Quebec City, Quebec
Miriam MacNeil MCIP, RPP, Principal Urban Planner, National Capital Commission, Capital Planning and Environmental
Management
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB26E
YOUNG CREATIVES CREATING THE CREATIVE CITY
 LU’S 1.25
For cities in a knowledge economy, attracting young people is a matter of survival. No one is better qualified to articulate what kind
of city young people want to live in than themselves, and yet, almost by definition, they tend to have low seniority in decision-making
bodies.
Fusion, a youth networking organization, offers a model for how to bring young people together to develop the capacity to amplify
their position themselves. The organization invites young professionals from all disciplines to work together without commitment to
a specific ideological position. In this way, Fusion’s Urban Development Action Team benefits from the input of professional planners,
architects, project managers, engineers and real estate agents from the private, public and non-profit sector.
We are working with designers and marketers to produce a beautiful, visually-focused pitch to spark the public’s imagination.
Interventions include bus rapid transit, a minimum grid of bike lanes, investment in pedestrian-friendly streets, stronger affordable
housing requirements, and connections from every community to nature.
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PAGE 26
Our presentation at CIP will highlight key elements of this plan and will introduce participants to the organizational structure that allowed
it to come to fruition. We believe this structure can offer generalizable insights for how cities can access the perspective of youth.
Presenters
Tristan Cleveland MCIP Candidate, Urban Planning Advocate, Ecology Action Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Elora Wilkinson MCIP Candidate, Urban Design Technician, Halifax Regional Municipality
Houssam Elokda, Researcher, Happy City
FOR YOUTH BY YOUTH: MOBILIZING A NEW GENERATION OF CITY BUILDERS IN TORONTO
In our fast-growing cities of today, understanding the views of a diverse cross-section of residents is vital for planners in determining
the public interest. Youth, in particular, are a fast-growing demographic group that is a driving force behind population and
employment growth across the country. Yet their voices are often missing from conversations about planning, especially in relation
to older homeowners. In Toronto, English speaking homeowners 55 and over are more than 3 times as likely to participate in a
planning process than people aged 18-34. This session will explore how Toronto City Planning is involving more youth in the planning
process through the development of its first ever Youth Engagement Strategy.
By attending this session, you will learn how a team of Youth Researchers was assembled to create a Strategy for youth by youth, as
well as some of the specific actions that emerged from that process, and the way they are being implemented in Toronto.
Presenter
Ian Malczewski MCIP, RPP, Associate, Swerhun Facilitation, Toronto, Ontario
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
SB28E
PATHWAYS TO LOW CARBON COMMUNITIES: GOOD TO GREAT SOLUTIONS FOR PLANNERS
 LU’S 1.25
Communities in Canada account for over half of all over greenhouse gas emissions and it is expected that energy use, energy costs
and greenhouse gas emissions will continue to increase using current planning practices. Planners are fundamentally challenged
with the difficult task of reconciling expectations for population and employment growth, while supporting energy conservation and
efficiency, improved air quality, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and climate change adaptation.
Session experts have each worked with scores of local governments across multiple jurisdictions, as well as senior governments,
utilities, transit authorities, real estate developers, and academics advancing climate action. They will look into the past, present and
future to share lessons on the imperatives for action around three themes: the seminal role of good urban planning and design in our
local and national challenge, the imperative of new governance models amongst local and senior governments and key private and
public sector players; and, cutting edge technologies to help understand our challenge, plan and deploy solutions.
Presenters
Alex Boston, Principal, Boston Consulting
Devin Causley MCIP, RPP, Manager Climate Change Programs, Federation of Canadian Municipalities, Ottawa, Ontario
Brent Gilmour MCIP, RPP, Executive Director, QUEST
Yuill Hebert, Modeler, Director, Sustainability Solutions Group
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB29F
WHEN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION MEETS LAND DEVELOPMENT: LÉVIS'S STRATEGY
 LU’S 1.25
The City of Lévis is booming, both economically and demographically. To take full advantage of this accelerated growth, it seeks to
steer development in a way that maximizes the benefits while minimizing the impacts on the natural environment. Embracing its role
as a leader that takes consistent action, the City of Lévis has developed a residential, commercial, and industrial development strategy
targeting and prioritizing development in the most suitable sectors of the city. It has gone to great lengths to identify these areas:
watercourse surveys, natural area management plan, water and wastewater development plans, identification of reserve areas, etc.
It is now has all the tools it needs to foster smart development.
Presenters
Jean-Claude Belles-Isles, Project Office Coordinator, City of Lévis, Quebec
Dominic Deslauriers, Director of Urban Planning, City of Lévis, Quebec
 ROOM BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
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PAGE 27
SB30F
 LU’S 1.25
HEALTHIER SOUND ENVIRONMENTS: HOW TO PREVENT THE EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL NOISE BY USING BEST
PRACTICES
Environmental noise is one of the most widespread forms of pollution and represents a major environmental challenge. This problem
is one of the challenges involved in land-use planning intended to foster development that is more beneficial for human beings and
more environmentally friendly. While long viewed as merely a nuisance, environmental noise is now considered to be a health risk
and a public health issue. The effects of noise exposure on health can be prevented, or at least mitigated. The presentation will provide
an overview of the proven effects of environmental noise on health and on quality of life, Quebecers’ exposure to environmental noise,
and initiatives that can guide the different levels of government. The emphasis will be on good practices, particularly on measures
that can be applied locally (in municipalities): transportation, construction, real estate developments, integration with the fight against
air pollution, mixed uses, etc.
Presenters
Pierre Deshaies, M.D., M.Sc., FRCPC, Medical Specialist in Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Institut national de santé
publique du Québec (INSPQ)
Richard Martin, M.A., Scientific Advisor, Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), Quebec City, Quebec
 ROOM BEAUMONT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB31E
BUILDING TORONTO’S WATERFRONT FOR RESILIENCY AND INNOVATION
 LU’S 1.25
This learning session will provide insight into the leadership needs currently faced by cities in key areas of resiliency and innovation
as they are being approached by Waterfront Toronto. Waterfront Toronto (WT) is committed to revitalizing 2,000 acres of land into a
global model for sustainable development in Toronto’s waterfront. Since 2005 Waterfront Toronto’s development program has been
guided by the Sustainability Framework, developed to guide the creation of mixed use neighbourhoods. Commitment to sustainability
and recognition of the importance of effective energy management to the economy and environment, means WT is striving to reduce
on-site CO2 emission below zero as an ongoing commitment with the C40. This objective is amplified by COP 21 climate change
commitments.
The city of the future focus in Toronto’s Waterfront, is to push market transformation further, to include resilience to climate change
and continued measured innovation to define the next level of leadership in economic, social, and environmental benefits long-term.
This new framework, presented in spring 2016, will be applied waterfront-wide in all precincts, with a focus on infrastructure,
including the naturalization of the Don River Mouth, green buildings, neighbourhoods and smart cities of the future. It will advance
existing Waterfront Toronto tools, showcase implementation and performance measures as a model for cities.
Presenters
Peter Halsall, P.Eng, Executive Director, Canadian Urban Institute
Lisa Prime MCIP, RPP LEED AP, Director of Environment and Innovation, Waterfront Toronto, Toronto, Ontario
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM DUQUESNE (GROUND FLOOR)
SB50E
PSB VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM LAUZON (GROUND FLOOR)
12:15 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.
LUNCH – AWARD FOR PLANNING EXCELLENCE AND PLAN CANADA AWARDS
Join CIP/OUQ members and colleagues in celebrating the achievements of the planning profession with the presentation of the
Award for Planning Excellence and Plan Canada Awards to their recipients.
 BALLROOM (1ST FLOOR)
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2:00 P.M. – 3:15 P.M
SHORT SESSIONS
SB32F
USING MICRO-INTERVENTIONS TO UNDERSTAND, DEVELOP, AND CREATE PUBLIC SPACE
 LU’S 1.25
This session will consist of four complementary presentations and address the potential of tactical urban planning to transform public
space in fragmented and disjointed cities. Small-scale, micro-interventions—tactical and transformative actions strategies that take
a modest, temporary, or playful approach—can reveal the hidden potential of places and landscapes and unravel complex urban
issues. Referencing various experiments and micro-interventions, the co-presenters will discuss their complementary objectives,
share their results, and examine the lessons that can be applied to urban design and city planning.
Two frameworks will guide the presentations and discussions. First, an academic framework from Université Laval’s School of
Architecture, where 1:1 interventions carried out in Quebec used theoretical reflection and an empirical approach to develop urban
diagnoses. Second, a practical framework in which the lessons of tactical urbanism were applied in installing parklets and new,
smaller public squares in Quebec. This emerging practice asks designers to rethink their role in creating small-scale, neighbourhood
urban projects.
Presenters
Alexandre Boulianne, Intern Architect, Le Collectif de la Fourchette
Érick Rivard, MOAQ, Associate Architect, Groupe A/Annexe U, Quebec City, Quebec
Jean-Philippe Simard, Intern City Planner, Atelier Le Banc
Geneviève Vachon, MOAQ, Professor at the School of Architecture, Université Laval
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French session
SB33F
URBAN PLANNING PRACTICES IN AN ERA OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
 LU’S 1.25
Urban planning as a professional practice increasingly incorporates an “injunction” to facilitate sustainable development (SD). Elected
officials, public or private developers, citizens, and urban planning and design professionals are mobilized more than ever in favour
of environmental governance of cities and territories. It is this new context that will be examined in this workshop, by more closely
scrutinizing the professional practices of urban planners. To this end, it is proposed to consider these practices in the light of the two
fundamental components of SD, i.e., the “procedural” component, which pertains particularly to “collective deliberation and
transaction approaches” to SD issues, and the “substantive” component, which is concerned more specifically with integrating the
three dimensions of SD into interventions and “standardizing” practices that further SD.
Presenters
Marie-Claude Aubin, Associate, Division of Urban Planning, Environment and Sustainable Development, LEMAY Group
Claudia Bennicelli, Advisor, Land Use Planning and Urban Planning, Vivre en Ville
Johanne Brochu, Ph.D., Urban Planner, Professor, ÉSAD, Université Laval
Mario Carrier, Ph.D., Urban Planner, Professor, ÉSAD [Graduate School of Regional Planning and Development], Université
Laval, Quebec City, Quebec
Geneviève Cloutier, Ph.D., Professor, ÉSAD, Université Laval
Marie-Josée Coupal, Environmental Advisor, Division of Urban Forestry and Horticulture, Department of Water and the
Environment, City of Québec
Sébastien St-Onge, Consultant, Environment and Urban Planning
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
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SB34F
THE ELECTRIFICATION OF TRANSPORTATION IN THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC
 LU’S 1.25
On October 9, 2015, the Quebec government launched its Transportation Electrification Action Plan with the theme “Propelling Quebec
forward with electricity”. This action plan builds on Quebec’s strengths and aims to position the province as a leader in the use of
electric-powered means of transportation and a forerunner in the realm of sustainable mobility. The arrival of electric vehicles—a
global phenomenon—presents a host of land-use planning challenges. How can we meet the growing need for recharging
infrastructure to service individual electric cars, fleets of taxis and delivery vehicles, and public transit?
Presenters
François Chamberland, Executive Director – Engineering, Infrastructure and Major projects, Société de transport de Montréal
Gilles Dufort, Division Head, Transportation and Mobility Planning, Urban Planning Department, Ville de Montréal
Isabelle Gattaz, Coordinator, Transportation Electrification, Ministère des Transports, de la Mobilité durable et de
l’Électrification des transports, Québec
France Lampron, Director, Transportation Electrification, Hydro-Québec
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB35E
EAU CANADA: CLIMATE CHANGE + VULNERABILITY – WHAT IT MEANS FOR PLANNERS
 LU’S 1.25
Water is key to Canada’s history. Our country’s earliest settlements, for both Indigenous and post-contact communities, were next to
the ocean and along our great rivers. The close ties between Canadians and water has left a legacy that includes one of the world’s
largest economies and a nation built in floodplains. This session will explore how Canadians can take advantage of this historical
relationship with water while managing the risks that come along with it. The presenters will explore how communities can adapt,
and are adapting, to a changing environment by connecting climate science with community-level vulnerability and adaptation
processes. On-the-ground examples will be presented on how 21st century climate issues are being managed from coast to coast
using lessons from our past to navigate tomorrow’s planning challenges.
Presenters
Graham Farstad, MA, MCIP, RPP, Principal, Planner, The Arlington Group Planning + Architecture Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia
Amanda Grochowich, MSc.P, PIBC/CIP Candidate Member, Assistant Planner, The Arlington Group Planning + Architecture Inc.
Nathan Vadeboncoeur, PhD, Community Risk Network
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
SB36E
A VIEW OF MARKHAM’S GROWTH STRATEGY FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE COUNTER
 LU’S 1.25
The Public Sector can plan for growth but the Private Sector has to deliver it. It is crucial to understand the role each plays in shaping
the growth of a community, because Public Sector goals are not always aligned with the economic cycles and market conditions that
influence Private Sector decision making. This session looks at the creative tension that binds the two sectors and their approach to
growth by discussing two case studies in Markham: “Intensification” and “Greenfield.” Most of Markham’s growth (over 60%) will be
through “intensification” and will occur in the nodes and corridors straddling higher order transit routes. The largest node being
Markham Centre, Markham’s new high density downtown, which will eventually be home to over 41,000 residents and 39,000 jobs.
The “Greenfield” component is the “Future Urban Area” of undeveloped, urban expansion land along Markham’s northern boundary.
With an area of about 975 developable hectares, it is planned to accommodate approximately 40,000 persons in 13,000 units in a
series of residential neighbourhoods, and 19,000 jobs. Each of these case studies will start with a brief presentation by City Staff on
the policy framework and municipal vision for growth, followed by a presentation by a developer representative describing their
response to the municipal plans, given their constraints regarding economic cycles, market realities, engineering costs, etc.
Presenters
Jim Baird, Commissioner, Development Services, City of Markham
Maria Gatzios, Principal, Gatzios Planning + Development Consultants Inc.
Richard Kendall MCIP, RPP, Manager - Central District, City of Markham, Markham, Ontario
Randy Peddigrew, Vice-President, Land Development, The Remington Group Ltd.
Richard Vandezande MCIP, RPP, Manager - Growth Management and Secondary Plans, City of Markham
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
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SB37E
FIXING THE FIVE ‘I’S OF PLANNING FAILURE
 LU’S 1.25
While stakeholders employ lofty buzzwords (livability, sustainability, walkability) to describe the modern-day urban planning
philosophy, the reality on the ground is often much different. The preponderance of growth in many urban centres continues to happen
on the peripheries of cities where the transportation and planning mistakes of yore continue to the present-day. The result –
separated land uses, overbuilt road infrastructure, large-scale retail and commercial development – is still leading to new
communities that are car-dependent and function as economic drains on the treasuries of Canadian cities.
How does this outcome persist despite a widely accepted urban planning pedagogy that – in theory – rejects it? Elected officials, landuse planners, transportation engineers and developers all share responsibility. This session will critically examine the obstacles
frequently encountered in the planning process and will spark frank discussion on how both politicians and planners contribute to
planning failure. Through case studies and group discussions, we will explore strategies for implementing long-term solutions to
ensure the public interest is better reflected in the future development of Canadian cities and regions.
Presenter
Tobi Nussbaum, City Councillor, City of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario
 ROOM BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB51E
PSB OVERVIEW
 ROOM BEAUMONT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB52E
TRANSFORMING YOUR CITY BY GETTING TRANSIT PLANNING RIGHT
Transit isn't an amenity that we wedge into the urban fabric of a city after the land use planning is done. Rather, great transit planning
begins with - and ultimately shapes - a citywide vision for growth, liveability and prosperity. As planners, we must connect the dots
from big thinking right down to technical due diligence. This session will identify some of the big moves in transit planning and analysis
that can position any city for success, using recent transit planning in Toronto as a case study."
Presenter
Jennifer Keesmaat MCIP, RPP, Chief Planner, City of Toronto, Toronto, ON
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM LAUZON (GROUND FLOOR)
2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M
WORKSHOPS
AT07F
INTEGRATED DESIGN: INNOVATIONS IN URBAN PLANNING
 LU’S 3
Despite the fact that people have been talking about sustainable development for over 30 years, it is still a struggle to actually make
it happen in practice. The integrated design approach is a promising way to tackle the challenges holding back innovation. The
integrated design process (IDP) involves using multiple collaborative strategies and technological tools (3D, BIM, LEAN) to design
holistic solutions to increasingly complex problems.
Louis-Michel Fournier, an urban planner and integrated design and sustainable urban planning training specialist, will start with a
brief training session on the basics of this approach and how it can be applied in urban planning. Training topics: integrated design
applications for cities or large regions, benefits of the approach, IDP success stories, and practical tools.
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A co-creative workshop will follow the training session to give attendees the chance to immerse themselves in a well-known “design
thinking” activity: persona design. Attendees will not only learn the basics of how to apply integrated design, but also how to put this
knowledge into practice to foster the emergence of innovative, sustainable solutions, even in communities most resistant to change.
Presenter
Louis-Michel Fournier, Urban Planner, CEO, L'Atelier Urbain, Montreal, Quebec
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM DUQUESNE (GROUND FLOOR)
AT09E
PLAN EVALUATION WORKSHOP
 LU’S 3
Plan evaluation has been advocated for years, yet remains a relatively under-used part of the plan-making and implementation
experience. Plan evaluation can help planners and community stakeholders assess the desirability of planning interventions,
reflect on past approaches, and improve future planning efforts. This workshop will demonstrate how monitoring and
evaluating plans can lead to better planning and, by extension, better planned communities.
The workshop will introduce basic skills and knowledge about plan evaluation in a small group learning setting.
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Understand basic principles and approaches to plan evaluation design and implementation, and
2. Design a plan evaluation process for a typical planning scenario
Presenters
Dave Guyadeen MCIP, RPP (Non-Practicing), PhD Candidate, University of Waterloo - School of Planning
Mark Seasons FCIP, RPP, Professor, University of Waterloo - School of Planning, Waterloo, Ontario
 DELTA HOTEL, ROOM JONQUIÈRE (GROUND FLOOR)
2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M
LEARNING TOURS
EE04F
QUEBEC CITY’S INNOVATIVE STREETS
 LU’S 3
Recently, planners have started talking in terms of complete streets and shared streets. Quebec City has been experimenting with
different types of streets for some twenty years: Grande Allée, with its flexible design that lets parking spaces double as outdoor
patios, Cartier and Saint-Joseph Streets with their low curbs that ease pedestrian access, Sault-au-Matelot and Sainte-Claire—
shared streets that are not subject to any specific regulation—Saint-Jean Street with its central drainage system, and more. We will
also visit Petit-Champlain Street, winner of the CIP “Great Street” Award in 2015.
The tour will be led by André Plante, a Quebec City landscape architect and project manager and recent recipient of the Frederick-GTodd Award from Association des architectes paysagistes du Québec, honoring his distinguished career. The workshop will be
conducted in English and French, with translations provided.
Itinerary: Depart from Hilton Hotel, René-Lévesque Blvd., Cartier St., Grande Allée, Saint-Louis Street, the Breakneck Steps, PetitChamplain Street, Sault-au-Matelot Street, Côte Dambourgès, Côte du Palais, Saint-Jean Street, Honoré-Mercier Street, return to
the hotel.
Presenters
Paul Mackey, Safestreet, Inc.
André Plante, Québec City
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY
Limited number of places (French and English Tour)
Cost: $25
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EE05F
REHABILITATION OF HISTORICAL BUILDINGS
 LU’S 3
Often, the successful conservation of built heritage depends on finding new uses for a building that will ensure its survival while
remaining true to its architecture, environment, history, and symbolic value. This workshop will present the remarkable story of the
fight to save Domaine Cataraqui. Participants will visit the site and take part in discussions examining issues around its conservation
and the quest to repurpose the Domaine and the Nouvelles-Casernes, an iconic part of Old Quebec. The workshop will address two
topics: The rehabilitation of Domaine Cataraqui and the issues surrounding its conservation, and the vision for the NouvellesCasernes
Presenters
Nicolas Giroux, Historian / Project Manager, Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Quebec City
Frédéric Smith, Historian / Project Manager, Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Quebec City
Étienne Talbot, Director of Development and Promotion, Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Quebec City
Juan Vargas, OAQ, Director of Planning and Architecture, Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec, Quebec City
Location
Domaine Cataraqui, 2141 Saint-Louis Road, Quebec City
Limited number of places (French and English Tour)
Cost: $35 - Departure by bus from the Hilton Québec
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 1:45 PM (DEPARTURE BY BUS)
EE06F
COHABITAT QUÉBEC PROJECT
 LU’S 3
We will be taking a tour of Cohabitat Québec, a one-of-a-kind housing project that took up the challenge of creating an affordable
living environment in the heart of Quebec City. The Cohabitat project offers its residents the opportunity to own one of 42
condominiums while encouraging a mutually beneficial environment for residents, the community, and the environment.
We will be presenting the innovative approach that enables this organization to successfully complete projects, particularly with
regard to the low-cost units offered through the CMHC’s affordable housing program. We will also explore the idea of healthy spaces
and living environments where all generations can play a role, in response to the current aging population and the notion of aging in
place.
Presenters
René Babin, Knowledge Transfer Consultant for CMHC
Marie-Claude Cantin, Affordable Housing Consultant for CMHC
Guillaume Pinson, Cohabitat
Limited number of places (French and English Tour)
Cost: $30 - Departure by bus from the Hilton Québec
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 1:45 PM (DEPARTURE BY BUS)
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3:15 P.M. – 3:45 P.M.
BREAK
 GRANDE PLACE OF THE HILTON 1 FLOOR)
ST
Provencher_Roy
3:45 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
& DELTA HOTEL, BALLROOM FOYER (GROUND FLOOR)
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS
STU01
CONTEMPORARY PLANNING ISSUES IN THREE CANADIAN CITIES:
A ROAD THAT DIVIDED A CITY: ASSESSING THE KEY FACTORS THAT INFLUENCED THE DECISION TO REBUILD THE GARDINER
EXPRESSWAY EAST IN TORONTO
In June 2015, Toronto’s city council voted on the future of the eastern portion of the Gardiner Expressway, an elevated innercity
highway that creates a barrier between the downtown and the waterfront. Although the majority of planning professionals
recommended removing the highway and replacing it with an at-grade boulevard, and an environmental assessment that supported
this change, the city council voted 24-21 to rebuild the elevated highway. This research assesses why the recommendations of
planners were not followed. More broadly, this outcome calls into question the value placed on the professional expertise of planners
in transportation planning decisions.
Presentator
Lindsay Vanstone, McGill University School of Urban Planning
STEP BY STEP TOWARD COMPLETE STREETS: HOW TO BUILD A MULTI-CRITERIA APPROACH TO REDESIGN QUEBEC CITY'S
STREETS AS COMPLETE STREETS»
In a context where a street is expected to accommodate different transportation modes and user types, how can public authorities
assess and take into account the various municipal stakeholders’ concerns?
Structuring a new decision-making process for the rehabilitation and the redesigning of streets in Quebec City tries to address this
issue.
Presentator
Francis Marleau Donais, École supérieure d’aménagement du territoire et de développement régional (ÉSAD), Université Laval
RIDING WITH ROBOTS
Shared vehicle fleet services such as Car2Go, ZipCar, and Communauto have become increasingly attractive alternatives to personal
auto ownership in recent years, often offering greater flexibility and convenience in comparison to transit services, and for many
individuals, at a lower cost compared to personal auto ownership. Mobility-as-a-service providers including Uber and Lyft have
likewise gained popularity, while automakers, big tech firms, and small-scale start-ups race towards the reality of fully autonomous
vehicles (AVs), which inevitably have a role to play in the future of transportation.
Presentator
Scott Bagg
 ROOM BEAUMONT (2 FLOOR)
ND
3:45 P.M. – 5:00 P.M
SHORT SESSIONS
SB38E
TRANSFORMING AND URBANIZING SUBURBIA – THE CANADIAN EXPERIENCE
 LU’S 1.25
Canada may be considered an urban country but most of our cities are car oriented, suburban in nature. Suburban development
in Canada has specific characteristics and aspects and its transformation and urbanization has already begun.
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In the context of current global issues such as climate change, sustainability, public health issues the transformation and urbanization
of large car-oriented, single use suburban areas is one of the key priorities for planners and urban designers.
This session will offer an update of key trends and issues related to urbanizing suburbia, including current research; sustainable
mobility and transit-oriented development; intensification and revitalization projects; compact, complete urban extensions; and
planning and design tools to speed up the urbanization process. Presenters are Council of Canadian Urbanism members who are
prominent planners from across Canada.
Presenters
Joyce Drohan, MAIBC, AAA, SAA, LEED AP, Associate Principal, Perkins & Wills
David Gordon FCIP, RPP, AICP, P. Eng, Ph D, Professor and Director, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Department of
Geography and Planning, Queen’s University
Dan Leeming FCIP, RPP, Partner, Planning Partnership
Jacob Ritchie MCIP, LPP, Urban Design Manager, Halifax Regional Municipality
Alexandru Taranu FCIP, RPP, OAA, MRAIC, Manager, Architectural Design, City of Brampton, Brampton, ON
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the English session
SB39F
 LU’S 1.25
THE ROLE OF URBAN PLANNING IN CREATING SAFE ENVIRONMENTS: REAL CASES, INNOVATIVE PRACTICES
People are starting to make the connection between healthy lifestyle habits and public spaces, and populations are now asking more
of their cities. Environments that promote healthy eating, encourage physical activity, and allow residents to leave their cars at home
were at one time discounted, ignored, or viewed as extravagant or unworkable in urban areas. Today, this kind of urban design is
sought out by baby-boomers, Generation Y, and, of course, young people and their families, whose priorities rotate between health,
quality of life and environment, well-being, safety, and so on. Lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and increased physical activity
are slowly becoming the new norm and are now seen as the way to the future. Everyone has a role to play, even urban planners!
Presenters
Sylvie Bernier, Québec en Forme’s Healthy Lifestyle Ambassador
Patrick Bouillé, Municipal Councillor Responsible for Families and the Elderly, Deschambault-Grondines Municipality
Russell Copeman, Mayor, Côte-des-Neiges/Notre-Dame-de-Grâce Borough, Montreal
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB40E
 LU’S 1.25
MEASURING LIVABILITY IN SMALL SCALE ENVIRONMENTS FOR THOSE WHO ARE COGNITIVELY IMPAIRED: A REVIEW OF HOGEWEY, THE
DEMENTIA VILLAGE LOCATED IN WEESP, THE NETHERLANDS, AND THE DOTSA BITOVE WELLNESS ACADEMY, IN TORONTO, ONTARIO
Utilizing the concept of livability is proposed to better address the physical and social environmental attributes of a space designed
for those with Alzheimer’s and other memory-related disorders.
This session will summarise the presenters’ personal experience of visiting Hogewey, the dementia village located in Weesp, the
Netherlands along with the Dotsa Bitove Wellness Academy, in Toronto, Ontario. Both Hogewey and the Dotsa Bitove Wellness
Academy have garnered national and international attention as being innovative spaces for those who are cognitively impaired. In
particular, a connection will be made from the presenters’ experience and how urban planners should try to incorporate the concept
of livability when assessing pre and post design of environments. Key livability indicators will also be highlighted that are considered
most effective when conducting an analysis of small-scale environments.
Presenter
Stephanie Lacey-Avon, M.A. Urban Planning Graduate Student, Student, University of Waterloo, Kitchener, Ontario
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AGE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES, ACCESSIBILITY, SMART GROWTH…: FRAMING A COHERENT APPROACH TO THE PLANNING
CHALLENGES OF CITIES AND REGIONS
By now, most community planning and design professionals are acutely aware of the changing demographic character of urban North
American communities and of the challenges that this represents for community services and physical infrastructure. In brief, the
retirement of the baby boomer generation has already begun, and in just over two decades it is projected that 20 percent of the North
American population will be 65 years or older. Although an aging population will represent a dramatic shift in housing choices,
mobility patterns and community support needs, the “senior surge” or “silver tsunami” is likely to be more of a challenge than a
crisis.For planning professionals, it is worth asking whether the complementarity between age-friendly communities, accessibility,
walkability and several other planning initiatives should be clearly and explicitly identified, and perhaps be combined into a singular
framework that seeks to enhance the physical and social quality of life for residents across the life spectrum. For municipal
governments, financial and organizational efficiencies would result if the latest Planning policy “flavor of the month” from provincial
agencies does not necessitate recruiting new staff, reallocating scarce budget resources or burdening existing staff with what is
perceived to be a new policy initiative. Drawing on research and policy work with Ontario municipalities and provincial agencies, the
proposed presentation contends and demonstrates that Planners’ efforts to work with elected officials, other professionals within
government organizations, developers and residents would be better served through a policy framework that addresses the salient
issues of the day and “…takes account of as many planning concerns as possible.”
Presenter
John Lewis, Associate Professor, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario
 ROOM COURVILLE/MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB41E
TALKING DESIGN WITH DESIGN TALKS
 LU’S 1.25
In 2015, Design Talks (d.talks) and Urban Systems began collaborating to examine the ways in which people experience space in
winter and how elements of physical planning and urban design can create spaces that people frequent or avoid in colder
temperatures. From these efforts, the Winterspot Project was conceived. Recognizing the potential role of technology and information
systems, the project team created a web application that systematically collects information from the public about their favourite
spots to visit in Calgary during the winter. This session will reflect on the project team’s experience with the web application as both
an engagement and research tool, and share some of the key findings about what elements Calgarians associate with great winter
spaces. Come prepared to identify your own favourite winter spot and share what you think makes it so enjoyable!
Presenters
Amery Calvelli, Co-Founder, Design Talks (d.talks)
Leighton Ginther MCIP, RPP, Principal and Urban Designer, Urban Systems Ltd., Calgary, Alberta
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
SB42F
BUILDING UP THE HEARTS OF BIG CITY NEIGHBORHOODS
 LU’S 1.25
Neighborhood round tables and community organizations have an intimate understanding of local issues and the people who live in
their community. In spite of this, they often are not consulted until the final phases of a project, which forces them into reaction mode.
Yet the knowledge and expertise of these organizations could be put to good use to help cities develop in keeping with the aspirations
of their residents. That is why architecture and urban planning firm Rayside Labossière has worked side by side with community
development stakeholders since the company was founded. Using real life examples, Ron Rayside will discuss the challenges he has
faced on the ground, and share his vision of the current and future challenges facing urban planners in major Canadian cities.
Presenters
Ron Rayside, Arch, Associate Architect, Rayside Labossière architectes, Montreal, Quebec
Philippe Cossette, OUQ, Urban Planner, Rayside Labossière architectes, Montreal, Quebec
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
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5:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
CANU GATHERING AT THE CIP CONFERENCE, QUEBEC
An informal gathering of planners involved and interested in CanU, the Council for Canadian Urbanism, a national advocacy
organization for liveable, sustainable, authentic Canadian urbanism and urban design.
Celebrating 10 years since a similar gathering at the CIP Conference/World Planners Congress/World Urban Forum in Vancouver,
this gathering will present the participants CanU, its past and planned activities and will offer opportunities for dialogue about
urbanism in Canada, the role of urban design, key issues, projects, experience as well as involvement with the organization and its
activities.
 FOYER (2 FLOOR)
If you’d like to participate please send an email to the organizer, Alex Taranu ([email protected])
CanU Board member and Corporate Secretary
ND
STARTING AT 6:30 P.M.
MAIN DINNER - CULTURE AND FINE DINING AT MUSÉE DE LA CIVILISATION
Local terroir flavours and the circus arts await you in the heart of Old Quebec for an evening of discovery at Musée de la
civilisation. The grand hall and interior courtyard offer you the freedom to meet informally with your colleagues and observe
the evolving site of the future Place des canotiers. This evening will show Quebec City at its finest!
The evening will give place to the distribution of the President’s Award, and of the Vision in Planning Award by CIP; and the
Induction of Membres Émérites by OUQ.
Ville de Montréal
 RE-GROUPING IN THE HILTON QUÉBEC LOBBY AT 6:15 PM (DEPARTURE BY BUS)
 Shuttle service between the Quebec Hilton and the Musée de la Civilisation
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PAGE 37
FRIDAY JULY 8, 2016
7:00 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.
REGISTRATION DESK OPEN
Observatoires Ivanhoé Cambridge
7:30 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.
 LOBBY OF THE HILTON
BREAKFAST
Groupe Dallaire
8:00 A.M. – 9:00 A.M.
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
OUQ GENERAL ASSEMBLY
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
9:00 A.M. – 9:15 A.M.
PLANNING STUDENT TRUST FUND AWARDS
Join CIP/OUQ members and colleagues for the presentation of the Student Trust Fund Scholarship Awards to their recipients.
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
9:15 A.M. – 10:00 A.M.
KEYNOTE SPEAKER JEAN HAËNTJENS
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
10:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M
PLENARY - KEYNOTE SPEAKER PHIL ENQUIST
 BALLROOM (1 FLOOR)
ST
11:00 A.M. – 11:30 A.M
BREAK
EXP Group
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 GRANDE PLACE OF THE HILTON QUÉBEC (1 FLOOR)
ST
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PAGE 38
11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M
SHORT SESSIONS
SB43F
 LU’S 1.25
HOW GREEN BELTS AND BLUE BELTS MAKE URBAN AREAS MORE RESILIENT IN A CONTEXT OF GLOBAL CHANGE
Green belts and blue belts encompass natural and seminatural habitats that provide ecosystem services essential to the well-being
of individuals and communities. They help offset heat island effects, control surface runoff, and improve air and water quality. Against
the current backdrop of acute environmental pressures, the spatial configuration of remaining natural habitats is key to preserving
biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. This session offers a strategy for building an interconnected network of natural and
seminatural habitats to improve long-term environmental quality and human well-being in urban centers. By applying the principal
of ecological connectivity in planning natural habitats and green spaces, we can create a network that is more robust and resilient to
climate change and prioritize conservation areas to stimulate specific ecosystem services.
The session will also address ways to boost resilience by optimizing tree planting strategies in urban centers.
Presenters
Jérôme Dupras, Professor, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Ripon, Quebec
Andrew Gonzalez, Professor, Department of Biology, McGill University
Christian Messier, Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal/Université du Québec en Outaouais
 ROOM DUFFERIN (LOBBY LEVEL)
Translation services provided for the French session
SB44F
BONAVENTURE PROJECT: FROM EXPRESSWAY TO BOULEVARD
 LU’S 1.25
The Bonaventure Project takes up the challenge of accommodating, through a network of urban thoroughfares, regional vehicle
traffic connected with the Bonaventure Expressway as well as local travel in a dense, mixed environment. Furthermore, in order to
meet the project objectives that were set, special attention is given to the interaction between the various modes of transportation, as
well as the quality of the improvements and facilities intended for pedestrians, cyclists, and public transit users. Of the initiatives
planned, particularly noteworthy is the implementation of an intellligent transportation system that includes traffic lights with
adjustable phasing according to the vehicle queues at intersections.
Presenter
Pierre Sainte-Marie, Engineer and Urban Planner, M.B.A., Division Head, Major Projects Division, Infrastructures, Roads and
Transportation Department, City of Montréal, Montreal, Quebec
 ROOM SAINTE-FOY/PORTNEUF (1 FLOOR)
ST
SB45E
RESTRICTING WATER USE ON THE ‘WET COAST’ – SAY WHAT?!!
 LU’S 1.25
Although Vancouver is one of Canada’s wettest cities (with an annual rainfall of around 1500mm), an unprecedented dry, hot spring
and summer in Metro Vancouver in 2015 required the regional district to enact increasing restrictions of drinking water usage (Stages
2 and 3) of the Water Shortage Response Plan (WSRP). Metro Vancouver and its local government members received a substantial
amount of feedback from residents, businesses, and staff about the impacts of these stages of the WSRP. In response to the input
received, Metro Vancouver is reviewing and updating the current WSRP to ensure it effectively reduces drinking water use –
particularly in Stages 1, 2 and 3. Our presentation will provide an overview of the hardships experienced in the 2015 drought, the
regional district’s approach to water conservation and supply, and a preview of our current work to update the WSRP, including a best
practices summary from similar jurisdictions.
Presenters
Lisa Moffatt, M. A., MCIP, RPP, Program Manager, Public Involvment, Water Services, Metro Vancouver, British Columbia
Nermine Tawfik, Policy Coordinator, Water services, Metro Vancouver, British Columbia
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PLANNING OUR CITIES, CONSERVING OUR WATER
Water resources management is quickly emerging as a "hot topic" across the country, and for good reason: it is essential to life. An
ongoing concern among municipal water operators is how they can minimize the volume of potable water used to support the needs
of its customers and the surrounding ecosystems.
The City of Red Deer, Alberta, achieved an exciting milestone, reaching a population of over 100,000 in 2015. With this in mind, along
with continual business growth and future climate change threats, The City is placing water conservation and efficiency at the
forefront of environmental management, across City departments.
This active participation, knowledge-sharing session highlights and explores opportunities for water conservation in the urban and
municipal context. The session discusses three key topics:
1. Why should potable water conservation be a priority to municipalities?
2. Challenges faced by municipalities when planning for water conservation
3. Innovative projects that can achieve potable water savings for all sectors in municipalities.
Presenter
Katina Tam, M.Sc., AIT, Environmental Program Specialist, The City of Red Deer, Alberta
 ROOM BÉLAIR (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB46E
CO-OPETITION: APPROACHING COMMUNITY DESIGN DIFFERENTLY
 LU’S 1.25
The Rangeview Area Structure Plan (ASP) is the result of a holistic planning process that represents an innovative approach to policymaking and community planning, recognizing that planning policy is enhanced through creative friction, idea generation and input
from a variety of stakeholders. As the first stages of development in the Rangeview area are currently in the midst of approvals, the
team members are looking to share how the Rangeview Design Co-opetition evolved, the innovative results that emerged, and what
some of the most challenging obstacles have been in this exercise of shared responsibility. To help better understand the benefits
and potential challenges faced in a design co-opetition, a project simulation will walk small groups through a collaborative design
co-opetition, substituting an abstract physical design for an ASP area. The exercise will demonstrate the cooperation, problemsolving, diversity of perspectives, and creative thinking necessary to drive a similar process. All materials will be provided.
Presenters
Jane Power MCIP, RPP, Principal and Senior Planner, Urban Systems Ltd.
Tara Steell MCIP, RPP, LEED AP, Development Manager, Planning, Calgary Communities, Brookfield Residential, Calgary, Alberta
 ROOM BEAUPORT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB47E
RE-IMAGINING THE TRADITIONAL SUBURBAN MALL
 LU’S 1.25
Once a proud vision of suburban utopia, many of traditional shopping malls have run the course of their lifecycle, forcing cities and
retail property owners to rethink their use. Some of the trends underpinning this rethink include changing demographics and
consumer patterns, increases in online shopping, an aging population and increased urbanization. Sustainability concerns also play
an important role as consumers are tending to prefer mixed use developments where they can live, shop and work all within walking
distance – instead of having to get into a car and drive to a suburban mall.
The proposed conference session will highlight the opportunities, challenges and best practices associated with re-imagining
traditional shopping malls. In addition, this session will explore two shopping mall redevelopment proposals located in the City of
Ottawa. Both are located along transit priority routes and include a mix of residential, commercial and office land uses with a high
quality public realm and open space.
Presenters
Matthew McElligott MCIP RPP, Planner, FOTENN Consultants
Michael Stott, Director Urban Design, FOTENN Consultants, Ottawa, Ontario
 ROOM COURVILLE (1 FLOOR)
ST
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SB48F
DISCRETIONARY PROCESSES OF CITY PLANNING: CONDITIONS FOR EFFECTIVE ADVISORY BODIES
 LU’S 1.25
Throughout Western society, urban developers face increasingly complex processes in which discretionary evaluation plays a critical
role. Stakeholders must not only take into account issues such as aesthetics, the environment, heritage, and technical demands, they
must also meet ethical and democratic requirements and give thought to projects’ social acceptability.
My presentation will explore the conditions that allow for efficient discretionary processes involving advisory bodies. It will draw on
my 15 years of experience as a member of planning advisory committees as well as my experience as president and member of
various expert committees in architecture, urban planning, and heritage over the past 25 years.
Presenter
Marie Lessard, Planner Emeritus (OUQ) and Professor at the School of Planning and Landscape Architecture, Université de
Montréal, Montreal, Quebec
 ROOM BEAUMONT (2 FLOOR)
ND
SB49E
"DENSITY DONE WELL" – A DEEP DIVE FOR CANADIAN CITIES
 LU’S 1.25
Cities across Canada are struggling with the challenges of growing upward & inward, not just outward! Changing conversations &
processes around densification/intensification are a big part of that struggle. Smart cities know that tech won't replace the need to
make different decisions around land-use, density, mobility & design. Former Vancouver Chief Planner Brent Toderian is advising
cities around Canada & the Globe on "density done well," and this session will allow for a deep dive into the issues & solutions around
smart infill & intensification in cities. Aligning land use and transportation, rethinking streets around place-making, growing a culture
of great design, & leveraging density for amenities & affordability, all play a role in changing the perception and reality of density in
smart cities.
Presenter
Brent Toderian, Toderian UrbanWORKS, Vancouver
 ROOM PLAINES (23 FLOOR)
RD
SB53E
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE PROVINCIAL AND TERRITORIAL DIRECTORS OF LAND-USE PLANNING
 HF 1.25
For about the last eight years, the directors have held their annual meeting around the same time and in the same city as the ICU
conference. This year, the ministère des Affaires municipales et de l’Occupation du territoire (MAMOT) will host the meeting, which
will be held in their offices in Quebec City, on July 4 and 5. The directors will take this opportunity to discuss the most important issues
with regards to land-use planning and urbanism. The implementation of various policies and programs, climate change, relations
with Aboriginal peoples, and an integrated approach to land-use planning taking into account fiscal impacts and infrastructure are
some of the themes to be discussed at this meeting.
This bilingual session will present a brief overview of the discussions during this meeting.
Presenters
Stéphane Bouchard, Executive Director, Direction générale de l’urbanisme et de l’aménagement du territoire, ministère des
Affaires municipales et de l’Occupation du territoire du Québec
Janet Drury, OUQ, conseillère en urbanisme et aménagement du territoire, ministère des Affaires municipales et de
l’Occupation du territoire du Québec
Ralph Leibel, MCIP, RPP, executive Director, Community Planning Branch, Ministry of Government Relations, Saskatchewan
 ROOM MONTMORENCY (1 FLOOR)
Simultaneous translation is not be offered
ST
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CONFERENCE BASICS
CONFERENCE VENUE AND HOST CITY
HILTON HOTEL
The Hilton Quebec is the perfect base for exploring the heritage and charm of Canada's oldest city. Located on Parliament Hill,
Hilton Quebec is just a 20-minute drive to Quebec International Airport and five minutes from the train and bus stations. This
Quebec City hotel is steps from all major tourist attractions and festivals. Enjoy proximity to the city's government and business
attractions. Visit the Old Town to take in Quebec's culture and historical significance.
With 20 flexible function rooms and the city's largest ballroom, this is the ideal venue for the Accent 2016 conference.
The Hilton Quebec City hotel now offers also complimentary Wi-Fi to all guests
THINGS TO DO IN QUÉBEC
Distance from the hotel
•
•
•
•
•
Old Town – 1 KM
Quartier Petit Champlain and Place Royale (historical square) – 1 KM
The Battlefields Park (Plaines d'Abraham battlefield and Des Braves Park) – 1 KM
The Grande-Allée – 1 KM
Montmorency Falls – 12 KM
GETTING AROUND IN TOWN
PUBLIC TRANSIT (LOCAL BUSES)
The Réseau de transport de la capitale (RTC) serves Québec City, Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures, Wendake, and AncienneLorette. The Côte-de-Beaupré, Île d'Orléans, Jacques-Cartier, and Portneuf areas are not part of RTC territory.
The Parcours 21 route serves the Upper Town and the Old Port area and connects to the ferry terminal.
LIMOUSINE
Limousine rentals.
TAXI
Québec City area taxis can be identified by the sign on their roofs. There are several companies. We suggest that you call one
of them and they will send a car. You can also get a cab at one of the various taxi stands in the city.
TAXI-BOAT
To go from point A to point B along or across the St. Lawrence River, take the taxi boat (zodiac type). Reservation necessary
CAR
Car rentals can be a practical way to visit areas less than an hour from downtown, such as Île d'Orléans, Côte-de-Beaupré,
Jacques-Cartier, and Portneuf regions.
Information on vehicle and parking regulations.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 42
FERRY
The ferry links Québec City and Lévis 7 days a week, 365 days a year. It sails on the hour and half-hour during the day and on
the half-hour at night.
MOTORCYCLE
Note that motorcycles are not allowed inside the walls of the Old City unless you have a reservation at a hotel inside the walls.
Motorcycle rentals
CYCLING
The Québec City area has close to 400 km of bicycle paths and bikeways.
Bicycle rentals
ON FOOT
Québec City's historical Upper Town and Lower Town districts are easy to explore on foot.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 43
SPONSORS
The Canadian Institute of Planners and l’Ordre des urbanistes du Québec would like to thank the following sponsors for making
the ACCENT 2016 conference possible:
DIAMOND
City of Québec
https://www.ville.quebec.qc.ca/en
City of Montréal
ville.montreal.qc.ca
GOLD
Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec
www.capitale.gouv.qc.ca
EIFS Council of Canada (EIF)
http://eifscouncil.org
Groupe Dallaire
www.groupedallaire.ca
Observatoire Ivanhoé Cambridge du développement urbain et immobilier
http://observatoire-ivanhoecambridge.umontreal.ca
WSP|MMM
www.wspgroup.ca
SILVER
EXP Group
www.exp.com
Provencher_Roy
http://provencherroy.ca
The Personal Insurance Company
www.thepersonal.com
BRONZE
AON
www.aon.com
Lemay
www.lemay.qc.ca
Université Laval, Faculty of Planning, Architecture, Arts and Design
https://www.ulaval.ca
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 44
EXHIBITORS
The Canadian Institute of Planners and the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec would like to thank the following exhibitors for
making the ACCENT 2016 conference possible:
Canadian Institute of Planners
www.cip-icu.ca
CIP/APPI 2017 National Conference
www.cip-icu.ca/Resilience2017
City of Montréal
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca
Coalition québécoise sur la problématique du poids
www.cqpp.qc.ca/en
Fanshawe College
www.fanshawec.ca
KAYCAN - KWP
www.kaycan.com
Ordre des urbanistes du Québec
www.ouq.qc.ca
Professional Standards Board
www.psb-planningcanada.ca
Québec en forme
www.quebecenforme.org/en.aspx
Sign Association of Canada
www.sac-ace.ca
Techsport Inc
www.techsport.ca
Photo Credit: Camirand
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
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PAGE 45
EXHIBITION FLOOR PLAN
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 46
BIOGRAPHIES
ADIN EMILIE K.
AT03E
at the project office of the city of Lévis. Sporadically, he has collaborated to
the Territorial development and air quality sector as general director’s
assistant.
ALLEN LINDA
SB14E
ANDRÉ-LESCOP GAËLLE
SF17F
M. Belisle specialises in sustainable development and environmental issues
and cumulates more than 25 years of experience as a manager and scientific
counsellor. His diverse professional background allowed him to work for
governments, private sector, as well as municipal and associative
organisations. M. Belisle is the author of more than a hundred scientific
publications, technic reports and popular scientific work.
Gaëlle André-Lescop is a civil engineer who has worked with many natives
communities trohought the province of Québec. She is currently working as
an assistant director for long time investments and infrastructure sector for
the Innu Takuaikan Uashat mak Mani-Utenam (ITUM) band council. She
represented the Innu community from Uashat mak Mani-Utenam when
collaborating to the research project ARUC-Tetauan (CRSH, 2009-14) with
the Group Habitats+Cultures from University Laval. Recipient, in 2015 of the
trust fund award from the graduated women’s association of the Universities
of Québec (AFDU) she is now completing a scientific master’s degree in urban
design at the Architectural school of Quebec (M.SC – DU).
ARNOLD ELISABETH
AS03E
Elisabeth is an urban planner working as an independent consultant with a
focus on sustainable community development. Her background includes a
unique combination of experience in local government, executive-level
management skills, and professional expertise at both the national and
community level. Her clients include organizations seeking advice and
support to achieve their goals in sustainable community development. From
1994 to 2003 she served as a member of Ottawa City Council, during which
time she was appointed to numerous positions including Chair of the
Planning and Development Committee and Vice Chair of the Health,
Recreation and Social Services Committee. Elisabeth is the former Director
of the Centre for Sustainable Community Development at the Federation of
Canadian Municipalities (2004-2007). Elisabeth is active member of the
Canadian Institute of Planners. She is presently a member of the CIP Climate
Change sub-committee and served on the program committee of the 2010
CIP Annual Conference, “Climate Change + Communities: A Call to Action”.
She also participated as a Team Member in the Canadian Institute of
Planners’ Building Capacity for Community Climate Change Adaptation
Planning in Nunavut project (2008-2010).
AUBIN MARIE-CLAUDE
SB01F
BAIRD JIM
SB36E
BAGG SCOTT
STU01
BEAUDET GÉRARD
SB13F
Emeritus planner of the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec, Gérard Beaudet is
a full professor at the Planning and landscape architecture school at the
University of Montréal. His interests include morphogenesis of urban areas,
patrimonials valorisation of touristics and landscapes ressources in
metropolitain regions.
BELL ADAM R.
AT03E
BELLES-ISLES JEAN-CLAUDE
SB29F
BENNETT AUDREY
SB01F
BERNIER SYLVIE
SB39F
Originaire de Sainte-Foy (Québec), Sylvie Bernier a remporté la première
médaille d'or du Canada en plongeon au tremplin de 3m lors des Jeux
olympiques de 1984 à Los Angeles et elle est toujours la seule à ce jour. Elle
a aussi été la première Canadienne à être élue au Temple de la renommée
des sports aquatiques au niveau international.
Après sa carrière d'athlète, Sylvie Bernier a obtenu un baccalauréat en
administration des affaires et une maîtrise en gestion internationale de la
santé. Elle a été chroniqueuse à l'émission Salut Bonjour plus de 15 ans
abordant des sujets touchant la famille et les saines habitudes de vie.
Elle a contribué à la couverture médiatique des Jeux olympiques de 1988 à
2004. De plus, elle a été Chef de mission adjointe lors des Jeux olympiques à
Turin, Italie en 2006, Chef de mission à Beijing, Chine en 2008 et finalement
à nouveau Chef de mission adjointe à Londres en 2012.
Depuis 2012, elle travaille avec Québec en Forme comme Ambassadrice des
saines habitudes de vie. Son rôle consiste à influencer les décideurs ainsi
que les acteurs clés des communautés sur leur pouvoir d'agir afin que les
jeunes adoptent et maintiennent de saines habitudes de vie. En plus de son
rôle d’ambassadrice des saines habitudes de vie, Sylvie préside la Table sur
le mode de vie physiquement actif de même que la Table québécoise sur la
saine alimentation.
Aujourd'hui, Sylvie Bernier a à cœur que toute la population doit être
sensibilisée à ce mode de vie sain et que bouger et bien manger deviennent
un plaisir pour tous. Elle veut aussi mobiliser les acteurs clés à modifier des
environnements pour favoriser une saine alimentation et un mode de vie
physiquement actif. (Translation to come)
BERTHOD CATHERINE
SF24F
Diplôme d’ingénieure des Travaux Publics de l’État (France). Maîtrise en
aménagement du territoire et développement régional, Université Laval,
Québec. Membre de l'Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec et de l'Ordre des
urbanistes du Québec.
En poste à la direction de la sécurité en transport, au ministère des
Transports du Québec, depuis 2007. Coordonnatrice du partenariat en
sécurité avec les municipalités.
Participation active aux travaux de l’Association québécoise du transport et
des routes (AQTR), de l’Association des transports du Canada (ATC) et de
l’Association mondiale de la route (AIPCR). Membre du réseau Rues, réseau
francophone d’échanges sur la sécurité routière en milieu urbain (Belgique,
France, Luxembourg, Québec et Suisse).
With studies in biology and a Master and Doctorat degree in environmental
studies, Jean-Claude Belisle works as the director and assistant coordinator
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PAGE 47
BLAIS MYRIAM
SF17F
Myriam Blais is an architect (MOAQ 1987) and a chair professor at University
Laval, Quebec city. She is a graduate from University Laval (B. Arch 1983; M.
Arch. 1987) and University of Pennsylvania (M. Sc. 1992 and Ph. D. 1994). She
teaches principaly architectural design, architectural theories as well as
methodolgy in research and creation. She took part in international
cooperative projects in Vietnam for exemple and is now working in
partnership with Natives, Innues and Inuuit communities in northerne
Québec. She was a member of the Commission d’urbanisme et de
conservation du patrimoine de Québec and was very active within the
Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB).
BOSTON ALEX
AT02F
Catherine Brouillette est agente de recherche en environnement à la division
des communications de l’arrondissement de Rosemont - La Petite-Patrie.
Titulaire d'une maîtrise en urbanisme à l’UdeM, elle est également diplômée
de l'UQAM pour l’obtention d'un baccalauréat en design de l’environnement.
BRYANT CHRISTOPHER
AT04E
Christopher Bryant is a Retired Professor, Department of Geography,
University of Montreal. His areas of interest include protection of agricultural
land, urban and peri-urban agriculture, community economic analysis, and
regional development.
SB28E
Alex Boston, MSc, has leda multiple award winning community energy plans
and projects in small towns, big cities, and booming suburbs. As principal of
Boston Consulting, Alex has led several national deep reduction urban
agenda projects for FCM, Canadian Academy of Engineering and Suzuki
Foundation. His work nationally and locally, serving local and senior
governments, and utilities and developers has afforded him a unique
perspective on the magnitude of Canada’s challenges and the pragmatism of
the opportunities.
BOUCHARD STÉPHANE
SB53E
BOULIANNE ALEXANDRE
SB32F
Alexandre Boulianne est designer urbain et stagiaire en architecture. Il est
le co-fondateur du Collectif La Fourchette dont les micro-installations ont
remporté plusieurs prix au Québec et en France, en plus d'être largement
diffusées dans les médias. Son essai de fin d’études à la maîtrise en design
urbain a porté sur l’évaluation d’une micro-intervention -- #chaisesnomades
-- installée sur le campus de l’Université Laval. Avec des collègues, il s’est
mérité une mention -- la seule parmi les équipes canadiennes -- au concours
international de design urbain GD Hines de l’Urban Land Institute (ULI, 2014).
(Translation to come)
BOUILLÉ PATRICK
BROUILLETTE CATHERINE
SB39F
BUREAU LUCIE
SB05F
Lucie Bureau est urbaniste membre de l’Ordre des urbanistes du Québec et
de l’Institut canadien des urbanistes et œuvre dans le domaine depuis 30 ans.
Géographe et urbaniste, elle a pratiqué l’urbanisme municipal à divers
postes au sein l’ex-ville de Hull, maintenant Ville de Gatineau. Elle a réalisé
de nombreux plans et règlements relié au zonage, au patrimoine à la santé
urbaine et la famille.
Elle travaille, depuis 1999, à la Commission de la capitale nationale. Après
avoir fait partie de l’équipe professionnelle des approbations de projets et
avoir géré la réalisation du plan directeur du parc de la Gatineau approuvé
en 2005, elle est maintenant chef planification et transports à la CCN en plus
d’être responsable de la stratégie environnementale. Elle supervise une
équipe d’une dizaine de professionnels qui réalise les plans et les politiques
d’utilisation du sol à long terme des terrains de la CCN pour la région de la
capitale du Canada, et assure la coordination en matière d’urbanisme avec
les municipalités de la région et les autres agences gouvernementales
fédérales.
Lucie a également livré des conférences et ateliers dans le contexte de cours
universitaires à l’université du Québec en Outaouais, l’université de Montréal
et à la School of Urban and Regional Planning de l’université Queens.
(Translation to come)
BURNS MARY-ANN
SB07E
A graduate of Laval University in Journalism and French Literature, François
Bourque has been a columnist with Le Soleil since 2006. He collaborates
regularly on information and public affairs broadcasts (Radio-Canada, FM 93,
etc.) and on discussions on democracy and access to information issues.
Mary-Ann Burns, MCIP, RPP, is a Policy Planner for the Toronto and Region
Conservation Authority (TRCA). Since 2001, Mary-Ann has worked in
development review and policy and guideline development for the planning,
environmental assessment and permitting roles and responsibilities of
TRCA. Mary-Ann holds degrees in Geography, English and Urban Planning
and a Certificate of Environmental Management from Ryerson and York
Universities. Prior to TRCA, Mary-Ann worked at a commercial real estate
firm in research, consulting and valuation.
He was President of the Professional Federation of Journalists of Quebec,
Director of information at Le Soleil and a journalist-reporter for 18 years with
the Journal de Québec.
CALDWELL WAYNE
BOURQUE FRANÇOIS
BROCHU JOHANNE
PLENARY
SF33F
Johanne Brochu est urbaniste et se spécialise en design urbain. Les rapports
entre théories et pratiques de l’urbanisme, entre cadres conceptuels et
élaboration de projets sont au cœur de ses intérêts de recherche. Plus
précisément, ses travaux visent à mieux cerner la spécificité de l’urbanisme
comme discipline et comme pratique de projet. Le rôle des dimensions
sensibles et esthétiques, de la prise en charge de l’existant et du patrimoine
urbain et paysager dans la réactualisation des pratiques urbanistiques font
l’objet d’une attention particulière. Elle est membre du Centre de recherche
en aménagement et développement (CRAD), du Groupe Design et Société.
(Translation to come)
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
AT04E
Wayne Caldwell is currently the Interim Dean of the Ontario Agricultural
College and Professor in Rural Planning and Development. He also has a
career long affiliation with the County of Huron Department of Planning and
Development. Dr. Caldwell has lectured across Canada on the future of rural
communities and has published extensively in the areas of planning,
community development, agricultural land preservation, siting livestock
facilities, rural land use, and the environment.
CALVELLI AMERY
SB41E
Design advocate amery Calvelli is a co-founder of the grassroots non-profit
organization, Design Talks (dtalks.org), that hosts conversations about
design and the built environment. With an aim of broadening public
awareness for the value of thoughtful design, d.talks produces panel
discussions, film screenings, exhibitions and design competitions—creating
opportunity for design to contribute towards greater livability in Calgary.
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PAGE 48
CARRIER MARIO
SF33F
Mario Carrier est sociologue et urbaniste. Dans le cadre de ses activités
d'enseignement et de recherche, il s'intéresse au développement
économique local et régional, aux réseaux d'innovation, à la gouvernance
territoriale à différentes échelles et aux politiques publiques en matière de
développement, d'aménagement et d'environnement. Il est membre du
Centre de recherche en aménagement et développement (CRAD), du réseau
interuniversitaire Villes Régions Monde (VRM). (Translation to come)
CAUSLEY DEVIN
AS03E, SB28E
Devin is the Manager, Climate Change Programs at the Federation of
Canadian Municipalities where he has worked since 2003. He is responsible
for managing and developing programs on climate change, energy and
sustainable community planning, including the Partners for Climate
Protection program. Devin holds a Master of Applied Environmental Studies
in Local Economic Development and a Bachelor of Environmental Studies in
Planning from the University of Waterloo. He is a registered professional
planner with the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP) and trained facilitator.
Beyond his work with FCM, he is an active member of several external
working groups including the PIEVC committee of Engineers Canada.
Drawing upon these experiences, Devin is a member of the Climate Reality
Leadership Corps and regularly publishes articles on climate change and
sustainable planning. In his time away from work Devin is an avid traveller
that includes back country canoe camping and traveling more than 35
countries.
CHADWICK NARISSA
AT03E
Narissa has been working as a senior planner with BC’s Ministry of
Community Sport and Cultural Development for the past 11 years. Previous
to that she worked for the Union of BC Municipalities and Fraser Basin
Council. Her work at the Ministry has focussed primarily in the areas of
integrated community sustainability planning and climate action.
CHAMBERLAND FRANÇOIS
SB34F
CHARRON ISABELLE
AS03E
Isabelle has been part of the Climate Scenarios and Services group at
Ouranos, a consortium on regional climatology and adaptation to climate
change, since 2010. She has contributed to a large number of Vulnerabilities,
Impacts and Adaptation projects in different sectors, notably in forestry,
energy demand, and northern environment. Most recently, she wrote a
guidebook on climate scenarios that aims to familiarize decision-makers
with climate information and contributed to Ouranos’ synthesis on climate
knowledge in Quebec. Isabelle holds a doctorate degree in Forest Ecology
from the University of Calgary and a post-doctorate degree in fluvial
geomorphology from the University of Montreal.
Isabelle will present the Ouranos guidebook on climate scenarios which is a
resource to help decision-makers increase their capacity to understand
different types of climate information in order to make better use of that
information in adaptation planning. It also allows users to better evaluate
their own climate information needs. It is geared to all actors involved in
climate change adaptation, from those in the early stages of climate change
awareness to those involved in implementing adaptation measures.
CHIARELLI NARISSA
AT03E
Donna Chiarelli is a senior advisor with the Federation of Canadian
Municipalities’ Green Municipal Fund (GMF), a program that provides funding
and knowledge to municipalities to support environmental initiatives in
communities across Canada. She is currently leading a new pilot initiative
that combines grant funding with peer learning to support innovation in asset
management planning in Canadian municipalities. Donna has been working
in capacity building for close to 20 years in Canada and internationally in the
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
fields of environmental sustainability, international development and local
governance.
CHURCHYARD ARTHUR
AT04E
Arthur is currently the Rural Planner for Central-East Ontario with the
Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. His previous work
includes policy and development review with the Huron County Planning
Department and agri-environmental policy analysis with Agriculture Canada.
CLEVELAND TRISTAN
SB26E
Tristan Cleveland is 31 years old with a Masters in Planning from McGill. He
currently works for the Ecology Action Centre as the coordinator for
OurHRMAlliance, an organization of 54 urban, suburban, and rural groups
that advocates for sustainable regional growth. Previously he has worked in
both Guyana and Venezuela.
CLOUTIER GENEVIÈVE
SF33F
Geneviève Cloutier s'intéresse aux interactions sociales, à l’action collective,
aux acteurs qui font et vivent la ville. Ses projets de recherche portent sur
les formes de la participation, l'adaptation aux changements climatiques et
les expérimentations locales. Sa recherche et ses activités d'enseignement
sont orientées vers la création de ponts entre la théorie et la pratique et entre
les diverses disciplines mobilisées par les études urbaines (urbanisme,
aménagement, sociologie, science politique, etc.). Elle est membre du
Centre de recherche en aménagement et développement (CRAD), du réseau
interuniversitaire Villes Régions Monde (VRM). (Translation to come)
COLDWELL MIKE
SB15E
Mike is a planner with Urban Systems who brings his varied experience in
municipal governments and background in architectural design to his
specialization in land development processes. He has been involved in
residential, commercial, industrial, institutional and mixed-use development
from conception through to construction. With in-depth knowledge of the
Calgary region, Mike brings unique local insight and understanding to all of
his projects at Urban Systems.
CONNELL DAVID
AT04E
David Connell is an Associate Professor at the University of Northern British
Columbia. He recently led a national project about principles and beneficial
practices for protecting farmland, as well as an assessment of the state of
agricultural land use planning in northern BC. Past research includes
evaluating agricultural planning by local governments and assessing socioeconomic benefits of farmers markets.
COPEMAN RUSSELL
SB39F
COSSETTE PHILIPPE
SB42F
CÔTÉ MONIQUE
AT02F
Monique Côté est conseillère en planification à la division du développement
durable de la direction générale de la Ville de Montréal. Architecte, PA LEED
ND, elle est également titulaire d'une maîtrise en planification urbaine de
l'université McGill et d'un MBA (UQAM et Paris-Dauphine). Elle enseigne au
département d'études urbaines et touristiques de l'UQAM. (Translation to
come)
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 49
CÔTÉ SIMON-OLIVIER
SB12F
Conseiller municipal à Ville de Saguenay dans le district #11, Simon-Olivier
Côté intervient depuis plus de 8 ans au Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean dans la mise
sur pied d’organismes et d’entreprises sur le territoire. Il est entre autres
cofondateur de la Coop V.E.R.T.E., du Forum social régional, de FIJI et d'une
entreprise en gestion immobilière. Il est détenteur d’une maîtrise en
Géographie régionale et développement durable de l'Université de Montréal.
Il a été présent sur plusieurs dossiers de recherche tel que le Portrait en
économie sociale du Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, le Forum social régional 2005,
la gestion intégrée de l'eau au Québec, les changements climatiques et
l'agriculture, la démocratie participative. (Translation to come)
CRAIG ODILE
SB12F
Odile Craig est diplômée en urbanisme et membre de l’Ordre des urbanistes
du Québec. Dès le début de sa carrière, elle a été chargée de projets pour
deux démarches de revitalisation urbaine dans la couronne nord de Montréal
avec la Fondation Rues principales. Durant ce mandat, elle a coordonné
différents projets d’amélioration du cadre bâti et des espaces publics. Elle a
aussi œuvré au développement économique et commercial dans une
approche de planification participative en milieu municipal.
Passionnée par les milieux de vie actifs et en santé, Odile a joint l’équipe du
CEUM en 2012. Depuis, elle s’est consacrée à développer et promouvoir
l’urbanisme participatif, une manière unique d’aménager la ville avec et pour
ses citoyens. Elle est d’une rigueur inouïe lorsque vient le temps d’analyser
l’environnement bâti, d’établir un processus participatif ou de réfléchir à une
stratégie de mise en œuvre des aménagements.
Que ce soit par les services de soutien qu’elle exerce auprès de municipalités
et d’organisations partout au Québec, les formations qu’elle anime, les outils
qu’elle développe ou les bonnes pratiques qu’elle documente, Odile a à cœur
d’améliorer les conditions favorisant les déplacements actifs dans les
milieux de vie. (Translation to come)
DAGENAIS DANIELLE
SB13F
Danièlle Dagenais, professeure agrégée à l’École d’urbanisme et
d’architecture de paysage UdeM. Ses plus récentes recherches portent sur
le design avec les végétaux et les aspects techniques et l’intégration
paysagère des phytotechnologies (toits verts, systèmes végétalisés de
gestion des eaux pluviales, etc.). (Translation to come)
DALE-HARRIS LINDSAY
SB14E
DÉRY GASTON
SB18F
Gaston Déry présente une feuille de route diversifiée où les plans
économique et environnemental se sont côtoyés. Il a œuvré au niveau
national et international.
Un Phénix de l’environnement du Québec lui a été en 2007 pour ses
réalisations dans la protection et la mise en valeur de l’île-aux-Pommes.
Il est aussi associé à la promotion d’une utilisation durable du Saint-Laurent
avec de nombreux organismes en lien avec la mise en valeur du SaintLaurent.
Identifié comme l’un des acteurs associés à la concrétisation du
développement durable au Québec, il veille aujourd’hui plus que jamais à
marier les notions économie, social et environnement dans un monde plus
durable à bâtir. (Translation to come)
DESGAGNÉS PIERRE
Ministère de Affaires municipales, d'abord au sein de la Direction générale
de l'urbanisme puis à la Direction de la recherche et des politiques.
Au début des années 90, Pierre s'est joint au service «Économie, statistiques
et prospective», nouvellement crée au sein du MTQ pour soutenir les
exercices de planification régionale des transports. Presque 25 ans plus tard,
Pierre s'est acquis une solide expertise dans le domaine de la sociodémographie des transports. Il est le concepteur et développeur principal du
modèle ES-3. (Translation to come)
DESHAIES PIERRE
SB30F
Pierre Deshaies œuvre principalement dans les domaines de la santé
environnementale, de la santé au travail et de la surveillance à tous les
paliers, soit du local à l’international. Il s’intéresse plus particulièrement au
bruit et à ses effets à la santé depuis 1994. Il est coauteur de l’avis
scientifique sur une politique québécoise de lutte au bruit environnemental.
Il a notamment collaboré comme expert à des travaux de l’Organisation
mondiale de la santé ayant mené à la publication sur le fardeau de la maladie
causé par le bruit environnemental en mars 2011. Il a participé et présenté à
des congrès nationaux et internationaux en plus d’être membre du groupe
scientifique Bruit et audition de l’Institut national de santé publique du
Québec. (Translation to come)
DESLAURIERS DOMINIC
SB29F
Monsieur Dominic Deslauriers est titulaire d’un baccalauréat en Science
Politique et d’une maîtrise en aménagement du territoire et développement
régional de l’Université Laval. Il est actuellement directeur de l’urbanisme à
la Ville de Lévis et a notamment la responsabilité d’élaborer et de mettre en
œuvre la stratégie de développement résidentiel, commercial et industriel
dont s’est dotée la ville.
Monsieur Deslauriers œuvre depuis près de 13 ans dans l’administration
publique, tant au niveau provincial que municipal. En effet, il a exercé
différentes fonctions professionnelles et de gestion au ministère des Affaires
municipales et de l’Occupation du territoire avant d’accepter un poste de
directeur à la Ville de Lévis, d’où il est d’ailleurs natif. (Translation to come)
DION KENNETH M.
SB02E
Ken Dion started at TRCA in 2001, and has managed several Environmental
Assessment projects including the Lakeview Waterfront Connection Project,
the Don Mouth Naturalization and Port Lands Flood Protection Project, and
the Lower Don River West Remedial Flood Protection Project. In addition to
these large multi-facetted EAs, Ken has overseen the construction of a
railway bridge lengthening project over the Don River at Union Station,
Toronto. This railway bridge project, in conjunction with the construction of a
Flood Protection Landform in the West Don Lands, was critical in providing
flood protection to downtown Toronto, while also serving as the foundation
for the new Corktown Commons and 2015 Panam Games Athlete Village.
Currently, Ken is overseeing TRCA's involvement in the Port Lands Due
Diligence work in collaboration with Waterfront Toronto, City of Toronto and
Toronto Port Lands Company. This due diligence work will seek to refine the
design, cost and implementation strategies for the combined concepts that
result from the Don Mouth EA and Lower Don Lands Master Plan Class EA.
Ken is also supervising TRCA's involvement in the Detailed Design process
of the Lakeview Waterfront Connection Project, in support of the Region of
Peel and Credit Valley Conservation. Ken oversees, mentors and advises the
works led by other Project Managers in the Project Management Office. They
are currently working on such projects as the Scarborough Waterfront Park
Project, Gibraltar Point Erosion Control Project, and Humber Bay Project.
SB21F
Titulaire d'une maîtrise en urbanisme sanctionnant des études à l'Institut
d'Urbanisme de l'Université de Montréal et l'Institut d'Aménagement
Régional d'Aix-en-Provence, Pierre a travaillé une douzaine d'années au
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 50
DION STÉPHANE
PLENARY
Stéphane Dion is a consultant who has managed major economic, realestate, and urban development projects on behalf of various clients. In 2008,
as part of his mandates, he became the Regional Director – Quebec region of
the Urban Development Institute of Québec (UDI). He is also the editor of the
magazine Espace Québec, a publication recognized by the real-estate and
urban industry of the Québec capital.
The diversified growth of his consulting activities led him to establish the
agency Paradigme Affaires publiques. Since its founding, Paradigme has
become a leader in the field of strategic consulting and communication,
public relations, and government interventions with major public institutions
and private corporations in Québec.
DOBSON IAIN
SB20E
Iain Dobson founded Real Estate Search Corporation 15 years ago following
a successful career in commercial real estate development. RESC maintains
a proprietary database established to meet a need for accurate,
comprehensive data for commercial real estate professionals. Since 2008, he
has been collaborating with CUI, work that resulted in the formation of SRRA.
He served on the Ontario government’s Transit Investment Panel, and is a
Board Member of Metrolinx, the regional transportation agency for the GTHA.
Iain has presented at many national and international conferences. He is also
a Senior Associate of the Canadian Urban Institute.
DROHAN JOYCE
AS01E, SB38$, SB19E
Joyce Drohan is an architect and urban designer with extensive experience
in the design of complete communities, including the Blatchford
Redevelopment - a plan that transforms Edmonton’s municipal airport into a
global model of sustainable city-building. In 2014, Blatchford won a Globe
Award for Urban Sustainability and an RAIC medal in the National Urban
Design Awards.
Joyce was also a lead member of the master planning teams for Vancouver’s
most celebrated sustainable communities – South East False Creek
(including the Olympic Village) and East Fraserlands (now The River District).
Her key interest is in meaningful places that express the historic, cultural
and social aspects of a community. This is underpinned by a deep
commitment to sustainable design, especially as it relates to livability and
urban health.
Joyce is a Board member of the Council for Canadian Urbanism. (Translation
to come)
DRURY JANET
SB53E
DUCAS SYLVAIN
SB19E
Sylvain Ducas is Director of the Urban Planning Department at the City of
Montreal since January 2013. He has been practising for over 35 years. He is
been working for the City of Montreal since 1987 and has been mainly
involved in planning processes and major urban projects management.
Sylvain Ducas coordinated the first Montreal City Plan – 1993 CIP Award of
Excellence. He received, in 2003, the Hans Blumenfeld Award from the Ordre
des urbanistes du Québec (OUQ) and was designated OUQ Fellow in 2015, for
his commitment to urban planning.
DUFAULT JOSIANE
SB05F
Josiane Dufault est conseillère en design urbain et urbaniste à la direction
de l’aménagement et de l’architecture de la Commission de la capitale
nationale du Québec. Elle agit comme responsable de la conception et de la
planification de projets d’aménagement d’ensemble visant à valoriser les
espaces publics et les paysages identitaires de la capitale. Elle est titulaire
de deux maîtrises en design urbain et en aménagement du territoire et
développement régional de l’Université Laval, ainsi que d’un baccalauréat en
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
design de l’Université Concordia. Impliquée dans son milieu, elle collabore
activement à la mission de l’Association du design urbain du Québec (ADUQ)
comme représentante pour la région de Québec, en mettant en valeur le
design urbain à travers des activités, telles Les Saisons du design urbain à
Québec. (Translation to come)
DUFORT GILLES
SB34F
Monsieur Gilles Dufort occupe le poste de chef de division de la planification
des transports et de la mobilité à la Direction de l’urbanisme de la Ville de
Montréal. Titulaire d’une maitrise en urbanisme et membre de l’Ordre des
urbanistes du Québec, il participe depuis plus de 25 ans à la planification et
la gestion du territoire de la Ville de Montréal, particulièrement au centreville. Ses fonctions actuelles comprennent l’élaboration d’un nouveau plan
de mobilité et d’une politique de stationnement pour Montréal de même que
la coordination de stratégie municipale d’électrification des transports.
(Translation to come)
DUGUÉ MARIE
SB06F
Marie Dugué, Ingénieure, M.Sc.A, PA LEED
Ingénieure civil depuis 2004, associée chez VINCI CONSULTANTS depuis
2008, elle a développé une expertise en gestion durable des eaux de
ruissellement. Elle a réalisé plusieurs études dans ce domaine tel qu'une
maîtrise recherche à l'École Polytechnique (2010) sur la conception d'un
jardin de pluie en climat québécois, la revue des mesures d'atténuation
d'ilots de chaleurs urbains pour l'INSPQ (2011) et la rédaction partielle d'un
cours de certificat à l'École Polytechnique (2011-2012) intitulé l'eau et les
matériaux dans les bâtiments durables. Elle est actuellement réviseur
technique pour les accréditations LEED. En parallèle, elle a été chargée de
projet pour plus de 200 projets. Parmi les plus notables, on compte des
études préconcepts (gestion durable des eaux de ruissellement sur le
boulevard Décarie entre les rues Maisonneuve et St-Jacques), des plans et
devis de stationnements pour des bâtiments standards (tête de ligne
Vidéotron) et LEED (Siège social de la caisse populaire, Louiseville), des
suivis expérimentaux (Stationnement du MEC, Longueuil) et la supervision
de projets LEED (Écocentre Lasalle). (Translation to come)
DUPRAS JÉRÔME
SB43F
Jérôme Dupras est professeur au Département des sciences naturelles de
l’Université du Québec en Outaouais et chercheur à l’Institut des Sciences de
la Forêt tempérée. Il est titulaire d’un doctorat en géographie et d’un
baccalauréat en biochimie de l’Université de Montréal et a réalisé un stage
postdoctoral au Département de biologie de l’Université McGill. Ses intérêts
de recherche se centrent sur l’évaluation économique des services
écosystémiques, la relation entre les écosystèmes et la production de
services écosystémiques et la gouvernance et l’aménagement du territoire,
notamment en ce qui a trait aux trames vertes et bleues urbaines. Il a aussi
co-fondé le Mouvement Ceinture verte, une coalition dédiée à
l'aménagement durable du territoire et à la protection de l'environnement,
et est président de la Fondation Cowboys Fringants. (Translation to come)
DUVAL DAVID
SB21F
David est détenteur d’un baccalauréat en urbanisme de l’Université du
Québec à Montréal et d’une maîtrise en planification urbaine de l’Université
McGill. Il a travaillé dans des firmes d’architectes et d’urbanistes de la région
de Montréal ainsi qu’à titre de consultant en urbanisme. Entre 1994 et 2003,
David a travaillé à la planification du territoire pour la Municipalité régionale
de Comté de Desjardins sur la Rive-Sud de Québec et la Ville de Lévis. Depuis
2003, il travaille à la Ville de Québec à titre d’urbaniste-senior. David a
notamment collaboré à la préparation du Plan de mobilité durable rendu
public en 2011. (Translation to come)
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 51
ELOKDA HOUSSAM
SB26E
Houssam Elokda is 23 years old with a Masters in City Planning and
Regeneration from the University of Glasgow. He specializes in researching
how urban design affects happiness, with critically acclaimed author of
Happy City and urbanist, Charles Montgomery. An urban activist in both Cairo
and Halifax, Houssam has founded and participated in grassroots
movements that helped generate real change in both cities.
FARSTAD GRAHAM
SB35E
Graham is an award winning professional planner with over 30 years of
experience, as both municipal planning director and consultant. He has
received several awards for Planning Excellency from the Canadian Institute
of Planners and the Planning Institute of B.C. – most recently for the Sea
Level Rise Adaptation Primer in 2014. This publication, supported by NRCan
and the BC Climate Action Secretariat, addressed strategies and planning
tools used in 5 provinces on Canada’s east and west coasts. Since becoming
a Principal of the Arlington Group in 1992, Graham has undertaken numerous
projects focused on flood hazard management and climate change
adaptation. He has been a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners
since 1980.
FAREVAAG MARTA
FISCHLER RAPHAËL
SB14E
PLENARY
Raphaël Fischler is an associate professor at McGill University's School of
Urban Planning, where he was Director for six years.
He received training in architecture, urban design, urban planning, and landuse planning. His research focuses on the public administration of urban
development and on the history, theory, and teaching of urban planning.
He considers his work as researcher and teacher relevant to his involvement
in decision-making as a member of public commissions and as a consultant
for public, community, and private organizations.
Mr. Fischler is a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners and an
emeritus member of the Ordre des urbanistes du Québec.
FOURNIER LOUIS-MICHEL
AT07F
GALARNEAU VINCENT
AT02F
Vincent Galarneau est titulaire d'un baccalauréat en sciences de
l'environnement et d'une maitrise en anthropologie de l'Université Laval. Il a
coordonné la réalisation de jardins collectifs et participé à des projets de
recherche et de développement sur l'agriculture urbaine et la mise en
marché des aliments locaux. Conseiller et conférencier pour Vivre en Ville
depuis 2012, il s'intéresse aux rôles de l'alimentation, de l'agriculture et de
la végétation dans l'aménagement des milieux de vie. Vincent Galarneau est
le rédacteur principal de Villes nourricières: mettre l’alimentation au cœur
des collectivités, un ouvrage de Vivre en Ville paru en 2015. (Translation to
come)
GATTAZ ISABELLE
SB34F
GATZIOS MARIA
SB36E
GIBSON ANGELA
SB20E
Angela is a senior manager responsible for managing a multidisciplinary
team at the Region of York. Before joining the Region in 2010, Angela worked
for the Town of Ajax to lead transportation planning, including active
transportation. She is an executive board member of the Institute of
Transportation Engineers Toronto Section. As an alumnus of the University
of Toronto Urban Planning program she established a scholarship for visible
minorities in the Urban Planning field at the University of Toronto to help
support continued diversity within the planning profession.
GILMOUR BRENT
SB28E
As Executive Director of QUEST — Quality Urban Energy Systems of
Tomorrow — Brent Gilmour leads the research, engagement, and advocacy
activities to advance Smart Energy Communities in Canada. Brent is a
registered professional planner with 12+ years of experience in community
energy, transportation, land use planning, downtown revitalization and public
infrastructure investment. A passionate champion for sustainable
development, he has also worked with the Canadian Urban Institute, the
University of Toronto’s Sustainability Office, and as an independent research
consultant; and remains active at the community level serving as an
occasional instructor with York University, Osgoode Hall Law School.
Bio de Louis-Michel Fournier
Louis-Michel Fournier est urbaniste et co-fondateur de la firme d’urbanisme
et de design urbain L’ATELIER URBAIN. À titre de directeur, il travaille ou a
travaillé avec plus de 40 municipalités sur divers mandats de planification,
de réglementation, de design urbain ou de développement immobilier.
Persuadé qu’une bonne pratique de l’urbanisme doit s’appuyer sur
l’innovation, une conception intégrée et la participation des acteurs
impliqués, ces trois piliers deviendront les fondements de L’ATELIER
URBAIN et ses trois forces professionnelles. Il possède une solide
expérience, tant en conception qu’en gestion de projets à diverses échelles.
Son expertise en pratique privée est complétée par une expérience
municipale de directeur du service d’urbanisme. Louis- Michel Fournier est
aussi formateur et il est souvent appelé à donner des conférences, à
participer à des colloques ou à des concours. Actuellement, il est formateur
en urbanisme durable pour l’organisme Écohabitation et la COMBEC. Il est
aussi formateur en conception intégrée pour le Centre de formation en
développement durable de l’Université Laval. Il s’implique également à
l’international : en 2014, il effectue un plan d’urbanisme de détail dans la
zone périurbaine de Dakar, au Sénégal. En 2011, Louis-Michel reçoit une
bourse pour participer à une mission commerciale au colloque international
Ecobuild à Londres. En 2010, il effectue une mission en Chine auprès de
firmes et d’universités chinoises. Son expérience d’ici et d’ailleurs bonifie sa
pratique de l’urbanisme au quotidien." (Translation to come)
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
GINTHER LEIGHTON
SB41E
Leighton is a principal with Urban Systems and leads the organization’s
master planning and urban design team focused on designing, revitalizing
and redeveloping sites and neighbourhoods within complex urban and
suburban environments. Leighton has practiced urban design and planning
for public and private clients in small and large communities across Western
Canada for more than twenty years.
Leighton is a strong advocate for a collaborative process. He regularly leads
workshops that engage council, staff, and stakeholders including the public,
in identifying issues, exploring potential approaches and generating
implementable solutions. Leighton is also keen on understanding the
characteristics that make each community, neighbourhood, or site unique
and then working to enhance these characteristics for the benefit of the
broader community.
GIROUX NICOLAS
E05F
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 52
GOLMOHAMMADI KOOSHA
AT06E
Koosha Golmohammadi is a Data Scientist at the Analytics Centre of
Excellence (ACE) leading advanced analytics projects. ACE is an Open City
initiative at the City of Edmonton whose mission is to assist the City in
understanding and leveraging analytics to improve outcomes for staff and
citizens. ACE leverages the vast stores of the City’s electronic data and
analytics capability to support informed policy development, planning and
decision making. Before joining ACE, Koosha was a member of the worldrenowned Alberta Innovates Centre for Machine Learning (AICML) where he
worked on several complex data modeling problems aimed at improving
business outcomes. Koosha has an extensive background in data science and
has published many peer-reviewed papers. Koosha has a BS in Software
Engineering and a Masters in Software Engineering and Intelligent Systems.
Koosha is currently working on his PhD thesis manuscript on anomaly
detection in financial time series.
GONZALEZ ANDREW
SB43F
GORDON DAVID L.A.
SB19E, SB38E
David Gordon is Professor and Director of the School of Urban and Regional
Planning at Queen’s University. He received degrees in engineering and
planning from Queen's and a doctorate in urban design from Harvard GSD.
David was a practicing planner for 15 years prior to becoming a professor,
twice sharing CIP national awards. Dr. Gordon teaches planning history,
community design and urban development and has also taught at Toronto,
Ryerson, Riga, Western Australia, Harvard and Pennsylvania, where he was
a Fulbright Scholar. David’s most recent books include Town and Crown: An
illustrated history of Canada's capital (2015) and Planning Canadian
Communities (with Gerald Hodge), which won a 2014 CIP National Award. His
latest research compares Canadian and Australian suburbs
GRENIER JEAN-PHILIPPE
AT02F
Jean-Philippe Grenier, formé en architecture, en urbanisme et en gestion du
développement économique urbain, Jean-Philippe est conseiller en
urbanisme à la Ville de Montréal. Il a développé une passion professionnelle
pour l’architecture, la planification urbaine à l’échelle du quartier, le
transport collectif et actif, le développement en milieu urbain et les
règlements d’urbanisme. Il a une connaissance approfondie des principes et
pratiques de la planification, de l'expérience avec l'engagement
communautaire et de l'enthousiasme pour la résolution de problèmes.
L'esprit curieux, il a un sens de l'exploration qui ne laisse rien au hasard au
cours d’un processus de planification, s’assurant que les alternatives
envisagées reflètent non seulement les pratiques courantes, mais une
pensée novatrice.
GROCHOWICH AMANDA
SB35E
Amanda is a bilingual researcher, analyst and planner with special interest
in promoting and developing sustainable economies and accessible
communities. She combines her undergraduate training in international
commerce and management with a graduate degree in community planning
to seek comprehensive solutions to social, economic and environmental
challenges. A part of the Arlington Group since 2013, Amanda supports
collaborative approaches to community-based challenges and through her
work seeks to achieve positive systemic change. She has supported the
preparation of the second edition of the award-winning Sea Level Rise
Adaptation Primer, the development of a Coastal Flood Risk Assessment for
the City of Vancouver, as well as several other community plans for coastal
communities.
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
GUNTON THOMAS
SB11E
Dr. Gunton is the Director of the Resource and Environmental Planning
Program at Simon Fraser University. He has had a extensive professional
career including holding the position of Deputy Minister of Planning and
Policy and Deputy Minister of Environment for BC, Assistant Deputy Minister
of Energy (Man) as well as consultant to a number of First Nations, NGO and
private sector clients. He has been studying the impacts of oil development
and pipelines for over a decade and has participated as an expert before the
National Energy Board on major energy project development
GUYADEEN DAVE
AT09E
Dave Guyadeen is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Planning at
the University of Waterloo, focusing on the theory and practice of plan
evaluation in regional planning practice. Before commencing his doctoral
studies, Guyadeen worked as a professional planner at the regional and local
levels of government in Ontario. He also holds a Master of Public
Administration degree, and he has a well-developed understanding of
government institutions and the importance of evaluation within public sector
organizations. Guyadeen teaches an undergraduate course on policy analysis
and program evaluation for Ryerson University’s planning program.
HALSALL PETER
SB31E
Peter Halsall, Executive Director, Canadian Urban Institute
Peter Halsall is an award-winning engineer and entrepreneurial
businessman who joined CUI as Executive Director in 2013. Prior to that he
led the growth of an employee-owned group of 3 national companies to more
than 350 people located in eight offices across Canada: Halsall Associates, a
building engineering firm, Pivotal Projects Ltd., a project management firm,
and Loop Initiatives Ltd, a management consulting firm for sustainability. The
group was purchased by Parsons Brinckerhoff in 2010, for which he served
as the Global Sustainability Lead. In addition to his CUI role, he leads a
philanthropic foundation with his wife, is Chairman of a building engineering
firm and volunteers on several Boards. Peter is committed to motivating
change in urban development to incorporate evidence based decisionmaking towards more balanced outcomes.
HAMMOND KAREN
AS01E
Karen is and educator, urban designer, planner and landscape architect with
extensive experience teaching generations of students the “art and science
of cities”. She is lecturer and manager of design at the University of Waterloo,
School of Planning and has interest in Urban design and re-development,
Landscape design, Community design, Visual resource planning, View
protection and other key issues in contemporary urbanism. Karen led
numerous studio projects, charrettes and workshops and had important
contributions to research such as the Ontario’s Downtown Malls with prof.
Fillion (also exhibited at the Urbanspace Gallery in Toronto)
Karen is frequent lecturer at conferences, part of the Urban Design
Education Network teaching urban design to planners in Ontario and was
chair of the OPPI Urban Design Working Group. She is member of the Council
for Canadian Urbanism and was member of numerous juries and panels.
HANDY JIM
SB10E
Jim Handy, BA (Hons), DipTP, MRTPI, MCIP, RPP – Senior Planner –
Development Agreements – City of Victoria
Jim is a Senior Planner in the City’s Development Services Division. Joining
the City in 2012 from the City of Calgary, Jim is principally responsible for
reviewing complex development applications, negotiating, managing and
monitoring Master Development Agreements associated with major
development sites and handling planning issues relating to the City’s
Harbour.
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 53
Jim previously practiced as a Professional Planner in the UK. He began his
career as a Development Planner in the Public Sector before moving into
Private Practice where he project managed major housing developments and
renewable energy projects. Jim holds a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Town
and Country Planning and a Diploma in Town and Country Planning from the
University of Newcastle Upon Tyne (UK).
sustainable design guidelines studies for the area surrounding the Hamilton
International Airport. Her work has also encompassed a wide range of
sustainable community design guidelines and plans as well as a numerous
environmental assessment projects.
JUNG JOHN G.
HARDER BREANNE
SB16E
Breanne Harder, BA, MPlan, Planner II
Planning, Development and Assessment, City of Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Breanne Harder has a keen interest in policy development that integrates the
elements of active transportation and public space design. Breanne has
worked as an urban planner for municipal governments in both Canada and
Mexico. At The City of Calgary, her projects have included developing an
annual bike monitoring program and launching an employee mobility plan for
City of Calgary staff. In her current role, she is the project planner for the
Nose Creek Area Structure Plan and the project lead for the South Hill
Station Area Plan. Breanne holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from the
University of Calgary and a Master of Planning from Dalhousie University.
HEBERT YUILL
SB28E
Yuill has worked as a member of SSG on sustainability consulting projects
for over fifteen years; Yuill has worked on dozens of community energy and
GHG plans and models across Canada. He has leading expertise on climate
change mitigation and adaptation - systems modelling that incorporates
energy, GHG emissions and co-benefits. Yuill serves as a director on the
boards of the Canada Research Chair on Sustainable Community
Development, the Canadian Worker Cooperative Federation and
Tatamagouche Community Land Trust.
SB04E
John is an award winning registered urban planner, urban designer,
economic developer, author and global speaker on planning, development,
urban design and economic development related issues. He is recognized for
his work for over 3 decades related to smart/intelligent cities.
John is the former CEO of Canada’s Technology Triangle (2008-2015),
President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Marketing Alliance (1998-2008);
President and CEO Calgary Economic Development Authority (1995-1998);
Planning and Development Director, Toronto Harbour Commission (19871995) and held various senior level and executive planning positions across
North America from 1973. He is the principle of Smart2Intelligent (S2I
Incorporated), a smart and intelligent city-building advisory.
John has been the Chairman and Co-Founder of the global think-tank called
the “Intelligent Community Forum” (ICF) (www.intelligentcommunity.org)
headquartered in New York City since its inception about 20 years ago. John
is also the President the Intelligent Community Forum Foundation
representing a league of nearly 150 intelligent communities around the world
and the inaugural Executive Director of ICF Canada representing nearly 30
cities across Canada. In addition to leading urban planning departments and
economic development and regional marketing alliances, he advises several
international leaders and heads of government on planning, economic and
development issues. As former head of a private sector consulting and
development firm in the 1990’s, he has also been involved in unique
development projects in Canada, USA, Brazil, the UK and Hong Kong.
KEESMAAT JENNIFER
HOYT CHRISTOPHER
SB25F
Christopher Hoyt is currently Senior Architect with the National Capital
Commission and is the co-project manager for the development of the
Capital Illumination Plan. He is licensed in the District of Columbia and is a
member of the Ontario Association of Architects, The Royal Architectural
Institute of Canada, and the American Institute of Architects.
JOYNER ANN
SB02E
Ann is a partner with Dillon who currently leads the planning and design
portfolio within Dillon. She has 26 years of experience coordinating
environmental assessments, land use planning and sustainable community
development studies in various Canadian communities and internationally.
Ann’s most recent work focuses on integrating sustainable development and
environmental protection into land use decisions at the strategic and sitespecific levels. These projects have focused on supporting viable, long-term
employment opportunities while developing attractive neighborhoods with
affordable hard and social infrastructure. Careful integration of new growth
with existing communities is always a critical issue. Her approach is to work
closely with community stakeholder groups to jointly explore objectives, land
use and design alternatives.
SB52E
As Chief Planner for the City of Toronto, Jennifer is committed to creating
places where people flourish. Over the past decade Jennifer has been
repeatedly recognized by the Canadian Institute of Planners and OPPI for her
innovative work in Canadian municipalities. Most recently, Jennifer was
named as one of the most influential people in Toronto by Toronto Life
magazine and one of the most powerful people in Canada by MacLeans
Magazine.
Her planning practice is characterized by an emphasis on collaborations
across sectors, and broad engagement with municipal staff, councils,
developers, business leaders, NGO's and residents associations. Her
priorities include implementing a divisional strategic plan, leading an Official
Plan review process, refining public consultation to provide more access to
city building conversations, a renewed focus on evidence based transit
planning, midrise development on the City of Toronto's many avenues, and
overseeing development review for over 4000 applications annually.
Jennifer is the founder of Project Walk, which premiered its first short film
in 2011, as an official selection at the TIFF. In 2012 Jennifer debuted her first
TED talk, Walk to School and in 2013 she delivered her second, Own Your City.
Jennifer is a graduate of the University of Western Ontario (combined
honours English and Philosophy) and has a Master in Environmental Studies
(Politics and Planning) from York University.
Ann has managed and coordinated a number of projects that integrate
community planning and environmental assessment in important city
building contexts. Most recent projects include the Port Lands and South of
Eastern Project for the City of Toronto. The City is establishing a planning
framework for over 300 ha of land on the Toronto waterfront. Dillon is
working closely with the City leading the transportation and servicing Master
Plan to develop a network of complete streets connecting the built up area
on Eastern Ave. to the lakefront and prioritizing transit and active
transportation and a walkable network of local and arterial streets with
workable development blocks and innovative low impact stormwater
systems. Ann recently managed a significant employment area Secondary
Plan and worked with the team on the associated EA Master Plan and
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 54
KENDALL RICHARD
SB36E
Richard graduated from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute (now University) with
a Bachelor of Applied Arts Degree in Urban and Regional Planning. He is a
Registered Professional Planner and a Member of the Canadian Institute of
Planners.
Richard has extensive public sector planning experience, including the
former City of Etobicoke and the City of Toronto. For the past 12 years Richard
has been with the City of Markham, serving as the Manager of Development
for the Central Planning District, which includes Markham Centre,
Markham’s emerging downtown.
In his Manager of Development role Richard supervises a multi-disciplinary
Team responsible for responding to the complete range of planning issues
and development applications within the District. The Team works with a
variety of stakeholders and implements various policy initiatives aimed at
achieving the City’s long term objective to create a truly mixed-use, urban
centre in the heart of Markham.
KOULOURIS VÉRONIQUE
SB25F
After an architectural training, Véronique Koulouris became interested in the
role light plays in architectural design and urban space and obtained a
master’s degree in architecture from Laval University. Her career led her to
become one of the first professionals to be involved in lighting design projects
in Quebec City. She has managed the Illumination Plan for the Commission
de la capitale nationale du Québec for almost 10 years now. As part of her
duties, she acts as a consultant in architecture and lighting design. Drawing
on her expertise, she contributes to project planning, design, and
implementation. Projects she has coordinated include the illumination of the
Grand Théâtre de Québec and of the Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church for
which she won a lighting design prize (IES Montréal 2010). More recently, she
has served on an international jury as part of the 2015
city.people.light.competition.
LACEY-AVON STEPHANIE
SB40E
My name is Stephanie Lacey-Avon and I am a 2nd year MA graduate student,
in Urban Planning, at the University of Waterloo. For my thesis I am
investigating how physical and social characteristics of built environments
influence livability for people with Alzheimer’s and other memory-related
disorders. My research is fueled by my passion for care, and my desire to
further understand how we can better accommodate those who are
cognitively impaired. I have a strong familial connection with Alzheimer’s,
and I also personally know many people who have experienced a loved one
suffering from the disease. I am thrilled by the recent attention Alzheimer’s
disease is getting on a global scale, with researchers focusing on plausible
treatments, various preventative measures, and innovative environments for
care.
This past spring, I had the opportunity to visit Hogewey, in Weesp, The
Netherlands, a village that is known for offering a unique and innovative style
of living for those with advanced stages of Alzheimer’s. I have also spent time
at the Dosta Bitove Wellness Academy in Toronto, which is a day program for
people living with memory loss that focuses on relationships and human
expression of self through movement and art. I believe that the field of urban
planning provides individuals, such as myself, a platform to create innovative
spaces that will better cater to the aging demographic, and particularly those
with Alzheimer’s and other memory-related disorders. (Translation to come)
LAMPRON FRANCE
SB34F
LAPP DAVID
AS03E
1997. Currently he serves as Practice Lead, Engineering and Public Policy,
focusing his work on infrastructure, environment, sustainability and climate
change issues and their impact on the practice of engineering.
Since 2005 he has served as project manager for a long-term national project
to assess the engineering vulnerability of public infrastructure to the impacts
of a changing climate. This project has developed an infrastructure climate
risk assessment tool known as the PIEVC Engineering Protocol. David
provides advice, training and ongoing technical and administrative support
for applications of the Protocol across Canada as well as internationally.
He manages the Secretariat for the World Federation of Engineering
Organizations Committee on Engineering and the Environment, hosted and
chaired by Engineers Canada. This assignment continues until December
2015.
LEE MURRAY
SB16E
Murray Lee, MD, MPH
Founding Partner of Habitat Health Impact Consulting, Calgary, Alberta
Murray Lee is a practicing physician who specializes in rural and remote
medicine. He has worked extensively with Aboriginal populations across
Canada’s North and is currently the regular visiting GP for Repulse Bay,
Nunavut. In addition to his medical qualifications, Dr. Lee holds a Master’s
Degree in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley, with a
special emphasis on the impact of the built environment on community
health and human health behaviours. Dr. Lee is a Clinical Assistant Professor
in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the University of Calgary,
a Research Affiliate with the Population Health Intervention Research Centre,
and Chair of the Population Health course at University of Calgary medical
school. Murray co-founded Habitat Health Impact Consulting in 2006 and has
since been involved in many of Habitat’s Health Impact Assessments and
other population health projects.
LEEMING DAN
AS01E, SB14E, SB38E
Dan is a founding Partner of The Planning Partnership with over 40 years of
experience. He has worked on the design and development of many new
towns and planned communities for both private and public agencies
throughout Ontario and the United States.
Dan’s extensive portfolio of work throughout Ontario and the United States
has received awards from Provincial and National Planning Associations, as
well as private sector building and development organizations. He has
managed multidisciplinary teams through the design and approval process
for many new community master planning and urban design projects across
Ontario. Dan was the project manager for the Measuring Sustainability
Program for Brampton, Richmond Hill and Vaughan, was the project
manager in creating the Healthy Development Evaluation Tool for the Region
of Peel Public Health, and led the development of the plan for Seaton New
Town in Pickering. Dan was the project lead on several phases of the Cornell
Community master plan and Angus Glen Community in Markham, two award
winning projects that used innovative and sustainable planning and design
strategies to guide the development of suburban Ontario neighbourhoods.
Dan is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Planners, and a Board Member
with the Council on Canadian Urbanism and with Active Healthy Kids Canada.
He was the 2014-2015 University of Waterloo ‘Planner in Residence’, is a
member of the Mississauga Urban Design Advisory Panel and a member of
the Provincial Climate Change Advisory Committee. He is the former Vice
Chair of the Toronto Design Review Panel and co-chaired the Canadian
LEED-ND review committee.
LEIBEL RALPH
SB53E
David Lapp, FEC, P.Eng. graduated with a degree in geological engineering
from the University of Toronto in 1978. After nearly twenty years working as
a consulting engineer in Canada’s Arctic region on marine navigation
systems and ice information systems, he joined Engineers Canada in July
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 55
LESSARD MARIE
SB48F
Membre émérite de l’Ordre des urbanistes du Québec, Marie Lessard est
professeure titulaire à l’École d’urbanisme et d’architecture de paysage de
l’Université de Montréal. Sa recherche, son enseignement et ses
interventions professionnelles sont centrés sur le design urbain, la gestion
publique du projet urbain et la gestion du patrimoine. Marie Lessard est
également spécialiste de l’urbanisme en Amérique latine. Elle a été
présidente du Conseil du patrimoine de Montréal (2007-2012), membre de
plusieurs comités d’urbanisme et de patrimoine et siège sur le comité
Jacques-Viger de la Ville de Montréal (un CCU à l’échelle de la ville). Elle a
présidé le Groupe d'experts sur l'avenir des bâtiments hospitaliers
excédentaires du CHUM et du CUSM en 2013-2014 et co-préside
actuellement le comité aviseur du plan directeur du Vieux-Port de Montréal.
(Translation to come)
LEWIS JOHN
SB40E
Dr. John Lewis is an urban planner and landscape architect with research
expertise in the areas of urban and landscape design, geodesign software,
accessible planning, and age friendly communities. He has worked
professionally as an urban planner for the City of York, as an environmental
planning consultant for the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia, the
Yukon Government, the Government of Canada, and is currently an agefriendly planning advisor to the Ontario Seniors’ Secretariat, the City of
Waterloo, the Town of Hanover, the Municipality of Huron East and the City of
Temiskaming Shores. A faculty member of the School of Planning at the
University of Waterloo since 2005, Dr. Lewis is also a member of the
University of Waterloo’s Research Institute for Aging and is the CEO and CTO
of Vidyā Consultants Inc.
LORRAIN NICK
SB07E
Nick Lorrain is a Senior Project Manager with the Engineering Services
Group at the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). He has 15
years of experience in both the private and public sector and has worked on
various projects from watershed planning to floodplain management. At
TRCA, Nick leads a team of engineers and scientists in reviewing
development applications, implementing water resources projects including
hydrology and hydraulic updates and developing water management
guidelines and policies.
MACNEIL MIRIAM
SB25F
Miriam MacNeil is Senior Planner with the National Capital Commission
(NCC) and is the co-project manager for the development of the Capital
Illumination Plan. Prior to joining the NCC, Miriam was a Senior Planner with
FoTenn Consultants Inc. in Ottawa and also worked as a municipal planner
in Canada and the United States.
MAHLER THOM
SB03E, SB19E
Thom Mahler is currently the Manager, Local Area Planning and
Implementation for the Centre-West Area with the City of Calgary. He is
responsible for managing both long term planning and reviewing
development applications for Calgary's Centre-West area including the
Centre City. He has been with the City for 15 years and has worked on a
number of significant projects. He was the planning lead on Calgary’s billion
dollar West LRT project, a major extension to Calgary’s light rail transit
system and was the project leader for the preparation of Calgary’s Centre
City Plan.
Thom has over 25 years of experience in city planning and has worked in the
areas of development review, urban design, policy planning and economic
development. In addition to his 15 years of experience with the City of Calgary,
he has also practiced in Southwestern Ontario and the Lower Mainland of
British Columbia. Thom holds a Master of Urban and Regional Planning
degree from Queen’s University and a Bachelor of Arts, Honours degree in
geography from the University of Manitoba. He is a sessional instructor with
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary and is also an
adjunct professor with the Faculty of Environmental Design at the University
of Calgary. He is the Alberta representative on the Board of the Council for
Canadian Urbanism.
MAJER PATRICK
SB15E
MALCZEWSKI IAN
SB26E
An Associate at Swerhun Facilitation, Ian relies on his experience in urban
planning, education, and journalism to design, facilitate, and document
successful engagement processes. He has played a lead role in high-profile
projects, helping participants contribute constructive insights and supporting
decision-makers in making transparent, defensible choices. Most recently,
Ian led public and stakeholder engagement processes for the CSLA awardwinning Midtown in Focus plan, a public realm plan for Toronto’s YongeEglinton area. He has also worked on major transit planning projects (like
Metrolinx’ Yonge Relief Network Study), transportation planning projects
(like the TO 360 Wayfinding Strategy), engagement strategies (like the City of
Toronto City Planning Division’s Youth Engagement Strategy), and city
planning studies (like the Bathurst Street Built Form and Land Use Study).
He is currently working with the City of Toronto on a number of projects,
including its Complete Streets Guidelines and the TOcore Parks and Public
Realm Plan for downtown Toronto.
MARLEAU DONAIS FRANCIS
STU01
MARTIN RICHARD
SB30F
Professionnel de la recherche dans le Réseau de santé publique, il agit
comme conseiller scientifique en matière de bruit à l’Institut national de
santé publique du Québec (INSPQ). Il est l’auteur principal de l’avis
scientifique sur une politique québécoise de lutte au bruit environnemental
à l’intention du ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS) du
Québec et est actuellement membre du comité interministériel sur le bruit
environnemental. Il a notamment participé à la diffusion d’études sur les
actions prometteuses pour réduire les effets nocifs du bruit au travail, à une
étude sur le bruit comme facteur de risque d’accidents mortels au travail et
à un avis de santé publique sur les éoliennes. (Translation to come)
MCELLIGOTT MATTHEW
SB47E
Matthew McElligott is a bilingual Planner at FOTENN with experience in both
policy and development. He has a demonstrated ability of successfully
facilitating the process of obtaining planning approvals on complex sites
across Canada. Matthew works on a wide range of mixed-use, residential,
institutional and commercial projects and has experience in conducting
public Open Houses and information sessions and preparing for OMB
hearing. Matthew also has experience with the preparation of Official Plans
and Zoning By-laws throughout Northern Ontario, Nunavut and Nunavik.
Matthew has an appreciation and concern for the natural environment which
has contributed to his curiosity for fostering both aesthetic and functional
elements of urban design. He understands the complexities inherent in
development issues and is dedicated to finding solutions that bring out the
best in our urban environments.
MELFI MARCO
AT05E
Marco Melfi joined the City of Edmonton in December of 2014 and he is an
original member of CITYlab. His previous experience includes planning and
operation of school and school sites.
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PAGE 56
MERRILL RICK
AS01E
Rick is a planner, architect and urban designer with extensive experience in
Canada, US and abroad. He is partner with the Planning Parnership and led
major planning an durbans design projects across the country and
internationa.
Community Association and later co-founded and chaired the Beechwood
Village Alliance.
Tobi holds a Master of Public Administration from Harvard University, a law
degree from the University of Victoria and a Bachelor of Arts from Queen’s
University.
Rick is founding member of the Council for Canadian Urbanism
OSADAN-ULLMAN AMBER
MESSIER CHRISTIAN
SB43F
MILLER GLEN
SB14E
MILLER ADAM
SB07E
Adam is an Acting Senior Planner within the Planning and Development
division at the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). He has 12
years of experience in the public sector and has worked on high level
watershed planning projects and detailed land use planning applications,
including Ontario Municipal Board appeals. At TRCA, Adam supervises a
team of planners in reviewing planning and development applications, by
implementing the policies and objectives of TRCA's Living City Policies.
MILLER IAIN
SB20E
Glenn Miller is responsible for organizing the CUI’s educational seminars,
conferences and evidence-based research on topics ranging from population
aging to regional competitiveness. “Investing in the Value of Canadian
Downtowns” recently won the Pinnacle Award from the International
Downtown Association. Glenn was founding editor of the Ontario Planning
Journal (1996-2011) and a contributor to Plan Canada. He was Planner in
Residence at the University of Waterloo in 2012 and has also taught at
Ryerson University School of Urban and Regional Planning and Seneca
College. He has also presented at numerous CIP conferences.
SB03E
Amber holds a Bachelor of Arts in Regional and Urban Planner with High
Honours from the University of Saskatchewan. During her undergraduate
degree she was introduced and inspired by the placemaking work of Project
for Public Spaces. Marrying her planning skills with her knowledge of land
development, Amber works with the development team at Calgary Municipal
Land Corporation advancing the revitalization of Calgary’s East Village.
PARKER KAREN
AT06E
PEDDIGREW RANDY
SB36E
PICHÉ DENISE
SF17F
Denise Piché, professeure associée à l’École d’architecture, détient un
doctorat en planification urbaine et régionale de l’Université de Londres
(LSE). Ses travaux, menés en contexte québécois, vietnamien et sénégalais,
ont surtout porté sur les rapports personnes-milieux, sur les
représentations et pratiques culturelles de la ville et sur les approches
participatives à l’aménagement. Co-chercheure du projet Habiter le nord
québécois : Mobiliser, comprendre, imaginer (CRSH, 2015-2020), elle s’y
intéresse tout particulièrement aux rôles des professionnels et des
institutions dans l’aménagement des réserves autochtones et des villages
inuit. (Translation to come)
POWER JANE
SB46E
MOFFATT LISA
SB45E
MURPHY PETER
SB19E
Principal and senior planner at Urban Systems, Jane has been with Urban
Systems since 2001. She specializes in land use planning and development
permits, and has extensive experience working on large-scale projects
throughout southern Alberta.
NELSON LAURIE
SB07E
PRIME LISA A.
Laurie Nelson, MCIP, RPP, is Associate Director, Planning and Policy, for the
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA). In addition to municipal
planning experience, Laurie has twenty-five years of conservation authority
experience and has been with TRCA since 2002. Throughout her career, she
has served on several provincial, municipal and Conservation Ontario
committees related to the policy, planning and regulatory roles and
responsibilities of conservation authorities.
NUSSBAUM TOBI
SB37E
First elected as City Councillor in 2014, Tobi Nussbaum has become a
political advocate for progressive planning in Ottawa. He sits on the Planning
Committee, Transit Commission, Community and Protective Services
Committee and chairs the Built Heritage Sub-Committee.
Tobi moved to Ottawa to join the Canadian Foreign Service in 1996, starting
in the legal bureau and then taking on different responsibilities including
postings to the United Nations in New York and the World Trade Organization
in Geneva. In Ottawa, he has served in various senior positions within the
Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, the Privy Council
Office and, most recently, the Canadian International Development Agency,
where he was the Director-General of Development Policy.
In his volunteer time, Tobi has been an active community leader and
volunteer. He served as President and Board Member of the Lindenlea
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
SB31E
Lisa A. Prime, Director Environment and Innovation
Lisa A. Prime is a Registered Professional Planner and LEED AP with a
Masters of Environmental Studies (Environmental Planning) from York
University and a Bachelor Degree in Environmental Studies (Geography) from
the University of Waterloo with over 20 years’ experience. Lisa’s expertise is
focused on strategic leadership for complex issues in planning associated
with the natural environment and low carbon development. As Director of
Environment and Innovation for Waterfront Toronto, her role implements
Corporate Sustainability Policy and programs as well as the Corporations
Social Responsibility and Sustainability Report microsite. She is responsible
for environmental approvals for infrastructure and brownfield
redevelopment. Lisa’s position supports market transformation and
balancing strong community design and urban innovation, such as green
technologies and brownfield strategies. The implementation planning
around the naturalization of the Don River mouth is a large focus area in
current activities.
Lisa is a Board Member for Canada Green Building Council (National) and
has received project recognition from the Clean 50. She leads the Climate +
(low carbon) project with the C40 Sustainable Cities group and regularly
speaks at conferences locally and internationally. Lisa has led recognition
though a Globe Award in addition to many others, for her Waterfront Toronto
project work.
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 57
PRONOVOST YVONNE
AT05E
Yvonne Pronovost has been with the City of Edmonton for three years, and
was one of the founding CITYlab members. Her previous experience includes
residential infill and heritage planning.
deploy projects in various locations across Canada and throughout Atlantic
Canada. His training and experience as Engineer provides a bridge to help
cross interprofessional gaps in the design community.
RITZ CASSIDY
RAMJOHN JAMAL
SB09E
Jamal has spent much of his land use planning career in the private sector,
helping a diverse range of governmental, corporate and development clients.
He is a Registered Professional Planner (Alberta), Member of the Canadian
Institute of Planners and is presently a Coordinator of local area planning
and implementation at The City of Calgary. As a consulting planner, Jamal
worked with clients throughout Canada specializing in municipal planning,
First Nation consulting, open space master planning and growth
management. Jamal is presently an Adjunct Associate Professor in the
Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary and is a past
President of APPI and former Board Member of CIP.
RAYSIDE RON
SB42F
Diplômé d'architecture en 1972, Ron Rayside se consacre depuis plus de 40
ans à l'implication sociale. Il a siégé et continue de siéger sur différents
conseils d'administration incluant la CDEC Centre-Sud - Plateau Mont-Royal
(président), le CSSS Jeanne-Mance (président), le Regroupement régional de
Montréal de l'AQESSS (président), l'Institut de politiques alternatives de
Montréal (secrétaire-trésorier), le Conseil régional de l'environnement de
Montréal, PME MTL Centre-ville et la Corporation Mainbourg. Ron Rayside
est connu pour son implication dans ce qu'il qualifie lui-même "d'urbanisme
social". Il est membre de plus de 20 organismes, dont plusieurs tables de
quartier, œuvrant activement au développement social des quartiers
centraux de Montréal. L’une de ses principales préoccupations est la
transformation des milieux de vie. Il collabore continuellement avec les
acteurs du développement social et communautaire de ces milieux afin
d’élaborer avec eux une vision de développement urbain qui tient compte des
enjeux sociaux et répond aux besoins et préoccupations des citoyens. Cette
implication sociale est aujourd’hui devenue une composante des activités de
la firme Rayside Labossière architectes, dont il est l'associé principal.
(Translation to come)
REEVES LAUREN
SB08E
Lauren Reeves is a Registered Professional Planner with over 20 years of
experience in municipal land use planning, 10 years of which have been
focused on the delivery of public facilities and infrastructure using P3 or
similar strategic project delivery models. Most recently, she was project
manager for the delivery of a new downtown municipal art gallery that
leveraged other public and private sector interests and funding through a
partnership with the University of Ottawa, as well as a condominium and a
hotel developer. The project broke ground in June of 2015 and will be open to
the public in time for the capital’s 150th birthday celebrations in 2017.
REID BRIER
SB15E
With experience in urban planning, municipal engineering, and sustainable
community design, Brier takes an integrated approach to urban land
development. She is a key team member of the Urban Systems Stormwater
and Planning teams and has participated in a variety of projects for municipal
and land development clients throughout Alberta. Her keen sense of design
and unique perspective makes her diverse skill set an asset to the team.
RITCHIE JACOB
SB19E, SB38E
Jacob Ritchie is the Urban Design Manager for the Halifax Regional
Municipality. He leads the Urban Design team for the Municipality whose
portfolio includes Streetscaping, Heritage, and Urban Design Policy work
throughout the region. Working throughout his career in a broad cross
section of design environments Jacob has had the opportunity to manage and
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
SB02E
Cassidy has a Masters degree in Environmental Studies (Planning) from York
University and over 12 years of professional planning experience. She joined
the City Planning Division in 2005 from the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and
Housing. She worked as a Community Planner in North York and Toronto and
East York Districts In North York District, she worked on a wide variety of
complex development applications and the Toronto-York Spadina Subway
Extension. She was also the project manager and prime author of the York
University Secondary Plan. In the Toronto and East York District, Cassidy
worked on the interdivisional team that reviewed and evaluated new casino
uses in the City. She is currently project managing a series of complex
planning studies in the Port Lands area, including developing a planning
framework for the 350 hectare area, developing a precinct plan for the Film
Studio District and undertaking a Municipal Class EA process for the Port
Lands and South of Eastern area. She recently joined the City Planning
Division's newest unit – Strategic Initiatives – as a Project Manager and is
leading the Growth, Built Form and Infrastructure Review currently
underway in the Yonge and Eglinton area.
RIVARD ÉRICK
SB32F
Érick Rivard est architecte associé (MOAQ) et designer urbain au Groupe A /
Annexe U de Québec. Spécialisé dans la gestion des paysages bâtis, son rôle
d’expert est reconnu dans plusieurs secteurs de l’aménagement dont les
milieux universitaires et divers paliers gouvernementaux. Il est
administrateur à la Commission de la Capitale Nationale du Québec, membre
de la Commission d’urbanisme de la Ville de Québec et enseigne sur une
base régulière à l’École d’architecture de l’Université Laval. En 2012, il a
dirigé la rédaction du Guide en design urbain et en aménagement des
paysages : Mieux intervenir dans les territoires de la grande région de
Québec. (Translation to come)
RIVARD GILLES
SB06F
Monsieur Rivard détient un baccalauréat en génie civil de l’Université Laval
et une maîtrise en ressources hydriques de l’Université d’Alberta à
Edmonton, avec spécialisation en génie municipal et en ressources
hydriques. Il cumule plus de 33 années d'expérience dans les études de
réseaux, de gestion des eaux et de modélisation pour des études de réseaux
spécifiques et des projets de gestion des ressources hydriques. Il a occupé
depuis sa graduation des postes de responsabilité croissante dans plusieurs
firmes importantes de génie conseil dont SNC Lavalin et Dessau, où il
agissait jusqu’à octobre 2000 à titre de directeur pour le service de gestion
des ressources hydriques et d’études de réseaux urbains. Il a fondé en 2000
la firme Aquapraxis inc., qui se spécialisait en hydrologie urbaine et en
modélisation de réseaux. Après un passage à partir de 2010 chez Genivar
(maintenant WSP) et Dessau (maintenant Stantec), M. Rivard est depuis le
début 2015 associé et Vice-Président, hydrologie urbaine, chez Lasalle | NHC
inc. (Translation to come)
ROMERO CLARA
SB22E
Clara is an Architect and Senior Urban Designer at SvN with over eight years
of experience in projects ranging from large-scale, mixed-use master
planning to site planning for cultural institutions, residential and office
buildings, and mixed-use developments. Clara has developed an expertise in
conveying best practice planning, urban design and built form principles
within municipal guideline documents, including authoring the Vaughan
Metropolitan Centre Built Form Guidelines for the City of Vaughan and the
Downtown Hamilton Tall Buildings Guidelines for the City of Hamilton.
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 58
Clara’s recent work at SvN includes development of neighbourhood
framework plans and design guidelines for six focus areas along the Eglinton
Avenue corridor, as well as development of the public realm and streetscape
plan for the EglintonConnects Study. Clara also developed three
redevelopment scenarios based on varying intensities of public
infrastructure investment, complete with design guidelines, for the South of
Eastern Economic and Urban Design Study. Clara’s skills as architect and
urbanist provide her with a keen ability to inter-focus on site details and the
greater context of city-building.
ROCHETTE MAXIME
SF17F
Maxime Rochette, stagiaire en architecture, est coordonnateur du projet de
recherche Habiter le nord québécois : Mobiliser, comprendre, imaginer
(CRSH, 2015-2020). Il termine actuellement sa Maîtrise scientifique en
design urbain, à l’École d’architecture de l’Université Laval, dont l’essai
traite de la morphogenèse et de la morphologie est villages inuit du Nunavik,
au Québec. De plus, avec le Groupe Habitats+Cultures, il participe au projet
Habiter au nord du 49è parallèle (FSC, 2014-16) qui vise à offrir des outils de
visualisation pour l'aménagement durable des territoires des communautés
innues de la Côte-Nord. (Translation to come)
ROUILLÉ PASCALE
SB06F
Pascale Rouillé, Urbaniste, M. Urb
Urbaniste, directrice du département aménagement chez VINCI
CONSULTANTS depuis 2011. Titulaire d’une Maitrise en urbanisme et
aménagement du territoire réalisée conjointement à l’Institut d’Urbanisme
de Paris et à l’Université de Montréal. Membre de l’Office Professionnel de
qualification des Urbanistes en France et de l’Ordre des Urbanistes du
Québec. Membre du comité de Révision du guide de gestion des eaux
pluviales du CERIU et du Sous-Comité Promotion et diffusion sur la gestion
durable des eaux pluviales de Réseau Environnement. Dans ce cadre, elle
s’est spécialisée en intégration de la gestion durable des eaux de pluie dans
les opérations d’aménagement et les documents d’urbanisme. Elle travaille
sur la gestion durable des eaux pluviales et la réalisation des activités
suivantes : analyse et prospective territoriale, conception urbaine, animation
et concertation. Ses champs d’intervention sont l’aménagement du territoire,
le développement économique, le transport et les déplacements, l’habitat et
le cadre de vie ainsi que le patrimoine et les ressources naturelles.
(Translation to come)
SAINT-CYR PIERRE
PLENARY
Mr. St-Cyr has a Bachelor's Degree in Urban Studies from Concordia
University and a Master's Degree in Urban Planning from Université de
Montréal's Institut d’urbanisme.
For more than 30 years, he has been specializing in urban redevelopment
operations. He first worked as a city planner for various municipalities,
including the City of Montréal. Then, in the private sector, he represented
property owners (the Angus project for CP Rail), architecture and urban
planning firms (HOK in Toronto), paramunicipal agencies (the Société du
Havre de Montréal), institutional investors (SITQ/CDPQ), and engineering and
construction firms (SNC-Lavalin).
On the international level, his practice brought him to the Middle East, North
Africa, and Asia. Mr. St-Cyr is currently involved in the development of
Université de Montréal's Outremont Campus. He is a member of the Board
of Directors of Vivre en Ville and of the Council for Canadian Urbanism.
SAINTE-MARIE PIERRE
SANTO AMANDA
SB02E
With 12 years’ experience in the urban planning and development industry,
Amanda has been with Waterfront Toronto for 8 years. As the Director of
Development Approvals, she is responsible for managing a variety of
municipal and development approvals on Toronto’s waterfront ranging from
negotiating development related agreements to area wide Precinct Planning
to Zoning by-laws and Plans of Subdivisions. Amongst other projects in the
Waterfront, she is currently leading the Villiers Island Precinct Plan and is
co-leading with the City, the Port Lands Acceleration Initiatives, including the
Port Lands Framework Plan.
SAVARD CHRISTIAN
SB01F
Christian Savard est directeur général de Vivre en Ville depuis 2006. Son
travail et son implication dans le débat public l’ont amené à diriger la
rédaction de nombreuses publications (livres, mémoires, études et articles)
sur les enjeux de mobilité durable et d’urbanisme. Il est fréquemment
sollicité par différentes instances des secteurs privé, public et associatif sur
nombre d’enjeux dans le cadre de comités de réflexion ou de l'élaboration de
politiques et programmes.
Titulaire d’une maîtrise en aménagement du territoire et développement
régional, il s’est spécialisé dans les domaines des transports, de l’urbanisme
et du design urbain, tout en développant une expertise dans la gestion
d’organisations non gouvernementales. (Translation to come)
SCHERRER FRANCK
SB13F
Franck Scherrer, professeur titulaire et directeur de l’École d’urbanisme et
d’architecture de paysage. Ses recherches portent principalement sur trois
champs : les services urbains en réseau (eau urbaine et transports) sous
l’angle des relations entre techniques et territoires urbains comme de celui
de leur évolution contemporaine (ville post réseau, nouvelles politiques de
mobilité, adaptation au changement climatique…).
SEASONS MARK
AT09E, SB14E
Mark Seasons PhD, FCIP, RPP is a full professor with the School of Planning
at the University of Waterloo. Before joining the School in 1998, Seasons was
a professional planner for 18 years and worked in urban and regional
planning agencies in Ontario, Alberta and New Zealand. Seasons has
delivered graduate courses on program and plan evaluation at Carleton
University (MA-Public Administration program) and at the University of
Waterloo. His work on urban and regional plan evaluation is cited regularly
and has appeared in numerous peer-reviewed journals (e.g. Journal of the
American Planning Association). Seasons is a past president of the Canadian
Institute of Planners (CIP), and he is president of the Association of Canadian
University Planning Programs (ACUPP).
SIMARD JEAN-PHILIPPE
SB32F
Jean-Philippe Simard est designer urbain (candidat à la M.Sc.DU Université
Laval), urbaniste stagiaire et co-fondateur de l’Atelier Le Banc s.e.n.c. Axée
sur le projet urbain, son expertise porte tant sur la planification et la
requalification des milieux de vie et des espaces publics que sur la
conception et la mise en oeuvre de projets d’aménagement temporaires.
Depuis 2013, avec ses collègues, il multiplie les interventions éphémères
dans l’espace public et contribue à l’émergence d’un nouveau champ
d’expertise en urbanisme. (Translation to come)
SB44F
Titulaire d’un Baccalauréat en génie, d’une maîtrise en urbanisme ainsi que
d’un MBA, Pierre Sainte-Marie est au service de la Ville de Montréal depuis
1987. Depuis, Il s’occupe de dossiers liés à l’urbanisme et au développement
économique. Il fût notamment responsable de l’élaboration du Plan
d’urbanisme de la Ville de Montréal de 2004. (Translation to come)
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
SMITH CONNOR
AS03E
SMITH FRÉDÉRIC
E05F
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 59
SONEGO JILL
SB09E
Jill is a planner with extensive experience in policy planning. She has worked
in both the public and private sectors in Alberta and Ontario. Jill has been
involved in multiple developer-funded Area Structure Plans with The City of
Calgary and recently led the creation and approval of the 1,000,000 ha
Providence Area Structure Plan. This project involved working with a diverse
group of stakeholders and included The City’s first ever engagement with a
First Nation on a planning project. Jill has also worked as a heritage planner
and urban designer in both Calgary and Toronto. In 2016, Jill will be leading
the development of two policy plans to intensify existing areas where a light
rail transit line will be constructed. Jill is a graduate of the Master of Planning
Program at Ryerson University.
STANLEY ROLLIN
SB16E
General Manager, Planning, Development and Assessment, City of Calgary,
Alberta
Rollin Stanley has worked in four major metro areas in North America, in
urban, suburban and rural environments and distressed and booming urban
areas. For The City of Calgary, he manages a portfolio including planning,
development, permitting, inspections and property and business
assessment. The Calgary Herald reported he was “the right person to
reinvigorate the planning approval process” and his joining The City was seen
as a “clear indication Calgary is achieving success in the goal to be a magnet
for global talent.”
Previously he worked in the suburbs of Washington DC, transforming the face
of a predominately suburban county by creating opportunities around subway
stations for higher density. The transformation is one of the biggest in the
nation and is helping to put the county on a firm financial footing. In St. Louis,
he worked closely with the Mayor to help turnaround the city that lost over
500,000 people in 50 years. Working in Toronto for 21 years, he was
instrumental in negotiating development throughout the downtown and in
transforming the entertainment district.
STARKMAN JOE
SB03E
Joe became a partner at Knightsbridge January of 1992, having left his
position of partner in a downtown architectural firm, where his firm was
fortunate enough to have had some historic commissions, including the
restoration, renovations and additions to the Banff Springs Hotel, Chateau
Lake Louise and the Empress Hotel in Victoria, B.C. In the late 1980’s and
early 1990’s. Joe served as the firm’s Project Manager on both the Chateau
Lake Louise and Empress projects. Upon joining Knightsbridge, Joe got
quickly involved in the design and front end marketing of the company.
Currently, Joe does the concept design for all of Knightsbridge’s projects and
works on the marketing, financing and day-to-day operations of the company.
Joe led Knightsbridge in developing Calgary’s first Transit Oriented
Development (TOD) site which has sold over 700 residential units in 4 high
rise towers on Calgary’s northwest LRT line. Joe is currently the CEO and
President of Knightsbridge.
STEELL TARA
SB46E
integrate the public realm, landscape, architecture and infrastructure.
Michael is passionate about creating great places, and prepares exemplar
design quality and deliverable solutions for both private and public sector
clients.
STRICKER-TALBOT MIKI
AT06E
Miki Stricker-Talbot is a Recreation Officer with Responsible Hospitality
Edmonton (RHE). She advances policies, programs and strategies to support
the late night economy. RHE is the City of Edmonton office responsible for
policy development that supports safety and vibrancy in the late night
economy by bringing a nighttime lens to all aspects of the City’s policies,
services and programs. Miki has worked for the City of Toronto’s Special
Events Office, served as Director of the Edmonton International Fringe
Theatre Festival, and was the founder and co-producer of the Calgary
International Fringe Theatre Festival. Miki has provided expertise to the
Canadian Tourism Human Resources Council to develop international
competency standards for the emerit Certified Event Management
Professional program, and is the only Canadian serving on the RHI Sociable
City Guide for College Communities Project Advisory Team. Miki is a recipient
of the Alberta Centennial Medal, and was recently recognized as a “Top 40
Under 40” by Avenue Magazine.
SULLIVAN MICHAEL
AS03E, AT10E
Michael is a community and environmental planner with over 20 years
experience gained in both the public and private sectors, working in Ontario,
Manitoba, Alberta, Nunavut and Newfoundland & Labrador. His expertise is
in climate adaptation, community engagement and impact assessment. A
Registered Professional Planner (Ontario) and Member of the Canadian
Institute of Planners (CIP), Michael is passionate that planners should lead
community adaptation efforts to our changing climate.
Michael is the Chair of CIP's Climate Change Sub-Committee and an active
member of the National Adaptation Working Group that is hosting this event.
In his day job, Michael is the Manager of Planning for the Township of
Wainfleet, located in the Niagara region of Ontario. Michael was also very
proud to be selected to be a Team Member in the Canadian Institute of
Planners’ Building Capacity for Community Climate Change Adaptation
Planning in Nunavut project (2008-2010), where he and his partner worked in
Arviat, Nunavut over a period of 16 months.
SWANEPOEL LOURETTE
AT03E
SWEET PAMELA
SB08E, SB14E
Pamela is Senior Vice President at FOTENN and is well known and highly
respected in the Ottawa and Canadian planning community. She has over 40
years of extensive experience in land use planning, policy development,
project management and public consultation. She recently sat on the Board
of Directors for the Ottawa International Airport for 10 years and is currently
on the Board of Ottawa Public Library. Her personal goal is to assist the
Library Board build a new Central Library.
Tara Steell is a Development Manager, Planning for Brookfield Residential,
she is responsible for overseeing and managing company lands from
inception to entitlement. Tara is an RPP and member with APPI. Before
transitioning to land development, Tara worked in consulting where she was
involved with and lead both private and public sector projects.
STOTT MICHAEL
SB47E
Michael Stott is the Director of Planning + Design at FOTENN. Michael has
over 16 years of professional experience in Canada, Central Asia, the United
Kingdom and across the Middle East where he has added value to a diverse
range of project types. He specializes in working with and leading multidisciplinary teams on complex sites to develop solutions that seamlessly
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 60
TALBOT ÉTIENNE
E05F
Étienne Talbot est le directeur du développement et de la promotion à la
Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec depuis novembre 2013.
Auparavant, il a été directeur du siège social canadien d'Opération Nez rouge
où il a dirigé l'équipe permanente de soutien aux 110 organisations bénévoles
à travers le pays. Par la suite, il a été directeur du Bureau du développement
touristique et des grands événements de la Ville de Québec. Ce service
municipal assure la coordination des programmes de soutien financier et
logistiques offerts par la Ville aux promoteurs d'événements. C'est
également ce bureau qui a la responsabilité de promouvoir la destination
auprès de l'industrie cinématographique et télévisuelle et d'accueillir les
équipes lors de leurs tournages à Québec.
À la Commission, il assure la responsabilité de la gestion et de la mise en
marché des propriétés exploitées par la Commission, telles que le domaine
Cataraqui, l’Observatoire de la Capitale, le programme Découvrir la capitale
nationale, les divers lieux en location dans les parcs et espaces verts, la
production théâtrale Les Trésors de la capitale et le programme d’édition de
la Commission. Il est aussi responsable de l’équipe du site archéologique
Cartier-Roberval et de son programme d’interprétation et est également
directeur de l'équipe chargée de la recherche d'une nouvelle vocation pour
les Nouvelles-Casernes. (Translation to come)
TAM KATINA
SB45E
Katina Tam is an Environmental Program Specialist with the Environmental
Services Department of The City of Red Deer, Alberta. She is the project
manager responsible for developing the 2016 Water Conservation, Efficiency
and Productivity (CEP) Plan, as directed by the Alberta Urban Municipalities
Association and the Government of Alberta. The plan provides a long-term,
achievable and proactive strategy that The City can implement to reduce
water waste and improve resource efficiency in Red Deer. Katina has a
Master of Science in Integrated Water Resources Management from McGill
University. She previously interned at the Centre of Expertise for Waters
(CREW) at the James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, Scotland, where she wrote
water policy papers as requested by the Scottish Government.
TANG JOYCE
SB16E
Joyce Tang, BES, MLA, CSLA, RPP, MCIP
Senior Planner, Planning, Development and Assessment, City of Calgary,
Alberta
Joyce Tang is a landscape architect and planner who is passionate about the
connection between the environment (both natural and built) and the
physiological health of people. Her Bachelor of Environmental Science in
Urban and Regional Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture
prompted her to publish research that found a positive relationship between
the physiological health of seniors and viewing a garden. This educational
foundation has shaped her career in planning and landscape architecture.
Joyce has previously worked for over 10 years in the private sector on a wide
range of projects from developing master plans to detailed design and
construction drawings for open spaces, plazas and parks and in the public
sector. In her current role, she is a senior planner at the City of Calgary and
is the project manager of the Nose Creek Area Structure Plan, a pilot project
developing a master plan focused on health.
TARANU ALEXANDRU
AS01E, SB14E, SB38E
Alex is an urbanist, urban designer and architect with extensive experience
in Canada and abroad working in consulting and government offices on a wide
variety of projects. His professional experience includes downtown
revitalization, urbanization of suburban areas, sustainable and transitoriented development, urban design review, heritage integration and project
management.
Alex is a strong advocate for sustainable and healthy urbanism, founder and
director of the Council for Canadian Urbanism (CanU), of the Ontario
Professional Planner’s Institute Urban Design Working Group. He is frequent
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
presenter at professional conferences, lecturer and guest critic at
universities and colleges and member of Ottawa’s Urban Design review
panel. Alex is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute of Planners and received the
OPPI Award in 2007 for his activity for the planning profession.
TAWFIK NERMINE
SB45E
TODERIAN BRENT
SB49E
TURCOTTE ERIC
AS01E, SB19E
Eric Turcotte is one of Canada’s most respected urban designers and a
Partner at Urban Strategies with over 20 years of professional experience in
Canada, the United States and Europe. His areas of expertise include large
scale institutional and corporate master plans, downtown revitalization
plans, redevelopment of inner city neighbourhoods, and urban design
guidelines. Eric has worked with the University of Ottawa for a number of
years on its award-winning Campus Master Plan and the integration of the
planned LRT into their campus while maximizing the development potential
around the investment. He has also worked on various projects with
University of Waterloo, Queen’s University, and University of Minnesota.
Eric’s approach emphasizes the importance of balancing built form and open
space in creating rich, healthy and sustainable environments, and many of
his projects have been honoured with awards for their overall quality.
VACHON GENEVIÈVE
SF17F, SB32F
Geneviève Vachon, architecte (MOAQ), enseigne le design urbain et
l’architecture à l’École d’architecture de l’Université Laval. Avec ses
collègues du Groupe Habitats + Cultures (H+C) et plusieurs partenaires dont
des organismes et communautés inuit et innus, elle dirige le projet de
recherche Habiter le nord québécois : Mobiliser, comprendre, imaginer
(CRSH 2015-2020) sur l’habitat autochtone nordique. Avec ses collègues du
Groupe Interdisciplinaire de Recherche sur les Banlieues (GIRBa), elle
orchestre des démarches participatives d’aménagement et réalise différents
projets de recherche qui s’intéressent notamment à l’adaptation des milieux
urbains aux changements climatiques. (Translation to come)
VADEBONCOEUR NATHAN
SB35E
Canada has a wealth of scientific, technical and planning expertise that can
make our communities word-leaders in environmental risk management.
Dr. Vadeboncoeur works hard to make this vision a reality by connecting
municipalities with the data and expertise needed to solve risk problems. He
helps build resilient communities by connecting scientific research and the
knowledge capital of the academic, NGO and private sectors with on-theground community-level issues. This includes developing coastal flood
impact models and facilitating the integration of results into local
government planning processes, serving as a lead author of a federal science
assessment, leading studies on cognitive and behavioural responses to risk,
and on the implications of climate change for First Nations.
VANA PETER
SB04E
Peter Vana is a register professional planner with more than 35 years’
experience in urban and rural municipal planning, and within the public and
private sectors. Peter is currently the General Manager of Development
Services for Parkland County and responsible for the areas of Planning and
Development, Economic Development and Tourism, Environment and
Community Sustainability and Intelligent Communities. The areas of
responsibility contained within this portfolio provides a unique opportunity to
oversee key elements in shaping the future integrated growth for Parkland
County.
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PAGE 61
VANDEZANDE RICHARD
SB36E
Richard graduated from University of Waterloo with a Honours Co-op
Bachelor of Environmental Studies in Urban and Regional Planning. He also
graduated with a Master of Public Administration from the University of
Western Ontario. Richard is a Registered Professional Planner and a
Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners.
Richard has extensive public and private sector planning experience. For the
past 2 ½ years Richard has been with the City of Markham, serving as the
Manager of Growth Management and Secondary Plans with particular
emphasis on the development of the Future Urban Areas designated in the
new City of Markham Official Plan.
In his role as Manager of Growth Management and Secondary Plans, Richard
manages a multi-disciplinary Staff and Consulting Team responsible for
developing a Conceptual Master Plan for the north Markham Future Urban
Area. The Team works with a variety of stakeholders to create a compact,
complete and sustainable community in north Markham.
VANSTONE LINDSAY
VARGAS JUAN
STU01
Shonda has managed several recent complex redevelopment projects in
Toronto including the three-time award-winning Eglinton Connects, a
planning and urban design study that seeks to leverage the Province of
Ontario’s investment and delivery of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT to facilitate
a unified corridor of regional significance, connect the varied neighbourhoods
found along its length, and redesign the street to function in a balanced way.
From 2010-2012, Shonda was the Project Manager and Urban Designer for
the Alexandra Park Revitalization for Toronto Community Housing
Corporation (CIP Award for Planning Excellence), creating a master plan to
accommodate 473 refurbished TCHC units, 333 new, replaced TCHC units
and 1540 new market units. Shonda steered the project through the OPA and
Rezoning process and developed the accompanying Urban Design
Guidelines. The project required extensive consultation through the iterative
study process, with the community and a City Team represented by over
twenty members across City Divisions.
E05F
Juan Vargas est le directeur de l’aménagement et de l’architecture à la
Commission de la capitale nationale du Québec depuis janvier 2011. Il
supporte avec son équipe la mission de la Commission visant à
l'embellissement de la capitale et à conseiller le gouvernement en matière
d'aménagement de cette dernière. À cet effet, la Commission œuvre à la
mise en valeur des accès de la capitale, à l'aménagement du littoral et à la
mise en valeur par la lumière de son patrimoine distinctif, entre autres.
Titulaire d’une maîtrise en gestion de projets de l’UQAM, d’un baccalauréat
en architecture de l’Université de Montréal, il est également membre de
l’Ordre des architectes du Québec. Fort d’une expérience diversifiée, il a
exercé pendant près de dix ans en pratique privée avant de se tourner vers
la gestion de projet, notamment à la Société immobilière du Québec où il y a
occupé différents postes, dont celui de directeur de l’architecture et de
l’ingénierie. Il a également œuvré dans le domaine de la santé avec la
réalisation d’un important portefeuille de projets. Résolument engagé dans
la mise en œuvre d’une approche multidisciplinaire dans la conception des
projets publics, il prône à la Commission une démarche où la qualité de la
réflexion doit mener à la qualité du geste. (Translation to come)
VERMETTE JEAN-PHILIPPE
Columbia and Ontario. Her current work focuses on the interrelationship
between socio-economics, urban design and infrastructure investments.
Shonda is currently managing the development of the Downtown Hamilton
Tall Buildings Guidelines Study for the City of Hamilton, and co- leading the
Dundas Connects Plan examining the integration of housing, transportation
and community design along the 17 km Dundas Street Corridor in the City of
Mississauga.
AT02F
Jean-Philippe Vermette est diplômé de la maîtrise en sciences de
l'environnement à l'UQAM et il a participé activement à un comité consultatif
d’urbanisme et à des coalitions en plus de siéger sur plusieurs instances
administratives ou de consultation pour des ONG, des conseils administratifs
et d’experts. Il s'active aujourd'hui à revitaliser la ville par ses idées et ses
actions en collaboration avec nombre d'agents de changement qui mettent
en chantier, jour après jour, une ville verte, solidaire et nourricière. En plus
d’être directeur général du Carrefour alimentaire Centre-Sud et conseiller
stratégique pour la Corporation de gestion des marchés publics de Montréal,
il est enseigne à l’UQAM le cours Système agroalimentaire: Transformations,
débats et perspectives de même que fondateur de l’École d'été sur
l'agriculture urbaine à la même université. (Translation to come)
VONHAUSEN MICHAEL
SB14E
WANG SHONDA
SB22E
WILKINSON ELORA
SB26E
Elora Wilkinson is 23 years old with a Bachelors of Community Design from
Dalhousie. She currently works with Halifax’s Urban Design Team, and has
worked with a local consulting firm for 2 years prior. Elora is hoping to be a
certified MCIP by April 2016.
WILSON MIKE
SB10E
Mike Wilson, BA (Hons), M.Plan, MCIP, RPP - Senior Planner – Urban Design
– City of Victoria
Mike is a Senior Planner in the City’s Development Services Division. Joining
the City in 2009, Mike has been involved in many aspects of the development
process including the review of rezoning and development permit
applications, negotiation of legal agreements, overseeing the Advisory
Design Panel and various special projects.
Mike has previously worked with the City of Vancouver where he assisted in
long range planning in the Central Area Planning Division and large site
rezonings in the Major Projects Group. Mike holds a Masters of Planning from
Dalhousie University and a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) from the University of
Victoria.
WIWJORRA LOTHAR
AT01E
Lothar joined the City of Calgary as Senior Urban Designer in the Citywide
Policy & Integration Division. He is instrumental in implementing the City
Council direction of Urban Design Excellence. Prior to coming to Calgary,
Lothar worked as Consultant for the State of Brandenburg, Germany, for
creating a financial program to kick-start innovative economic, cultural and
environmental projects and as regional manager for several “innovation
clusters’ around Berlin.
From 1997-1999 he worked for Aplin&Martin Consultants Ltd. in Surrey,
British Columbia. From 1986-1996 he was Urban Design Manager for the
Grontmij Group in Germany. From 1983 to 1985 he was a senior management
trainee as City Architect for the Province of Lower Saxony. He holds a Masters
Degree in Urban Design from the University Dortmund, Germany, and a
degree in City Architecture. Lothar comes from Bremen, Germany.
Shonda is Lead of Urban Design at SvN, with twenty years of experience
leading community development and urban regeneration projects in British
Accent on Planning CIP / OUQ 2016 Conference
www.accent2016.ca
PAGE 62
SURVOL
AT A GLANCE
OUVERTURE - OPENING DAY
MARDI 5 JUILLET / TUESDAY JULY 5
JOUR 1 - DAY 1
MERCREDI 6 JUILLET / WEDNESDAY JULY 6
6:30 - 7:00
7:00 - 7:30
Ouverture de l’inscription / Registration Desk Open
7:30 - 8:00
8:00 - 8:30
Petit-déjeuner / Breakfast
Ouverture de l’inscription / Registration Desk Open
8:30 - 9:00
Ouverture du congrès / Conference opening
9:00 - 9:30
Plénière avec panel d’urbanistes
Plenary with Planners Panel
9:30 - 10:00
10:00 - 10:30
10:30 - 11:00
Pause / Break
11:00 - 11:30
1er Bloc de sessions
SB01F-SB02E-SB03E-SB04E-SB05F
SB06F-SB07E-SB08E-SB09E-SB10E
1st Session Block
11:30 - 12:00
EE01F/E
AS01E
EE02F/E
AS03E
12:00 - 12:30
Déjeuner / Luncheon
Nomination des Fellows / Fellows Induction
Prix de la relève en urbanisme
Young Planners Award
12:30 - 13:00
13:00 - 13:30
13:30 - 14:00
AT01E
14:30 - 15:00
15:00 - 15:30
15:30 - 16:00
16:00 - 16:30
16:30 - 17:00
PSB
GENERAL
ASSEMBLY
AT02F
e
2e Bloc de sessions 2 Bloc de sessions
(Ateliers)
SB11E-SB12F-SB13F
SB14E-SB15E-SB16E
AT03E-AT04E
2nd Session Block
AT05E-AT06E
Pause / Break
2nd Session Block
(Workshop)
3e Bloc de sessions
SB17F-SB18F-SB19E
SB20E-SB21F-SB22E
3rd Session Block
17:30 - 18:00
18:00 - 18:30
18:30 - 19:00
19:00 - 19:30
19:30 - 20:00
20:00 - 20:30
20:30 - et plus
Réception de bienvenue
Welcome Reception
(Le Parlementaire)
SOIRÉE LIBRE
17:00 - 17:30
EE03
Brique par Brique:
Bâtir les initiatives nationale de l’ICU
CIP’s Building Blocks:
National Planning Initiatives
Réunion des anciens
Alumni Reception
(Bar Allegro - Hilton / Allegro Bar - Hilton)
NSCAD-TUNS-DAL School of Planning
École supérieure d’aménagement du territoire et de
développement régional — ÉSAD – Laval University
Queens University
McGill's School of Urban Planning
University of British Columbia – SCARP
University of Manitoba
School of Environmental Planning at
the University of Northern British Columbia
Dîner découverte à l’île d’Orléans
Discovery Dinner on the Île d’Orléans
(Vignoble Saint-Petronille / Saint-Petronille Vineyard)
FREE EVENING
14:00 - 14:30
SURVOL
AT A GLANCE
JOUR 2 - DAY 2
JEUDI 7 JUILLET / THURSDAY JULY 7
JOUR 3 - DAY 3
VENDREDI 8 JUILLET / FRIDAY JULY 8
6:30 - 7:00
7:00 - 7:30
7:30 - 8:00
8:00 - 8:30
Ouverture de l’inscription / Registration Desk Open
Petit-déjeuner / Breakfast
Assemblée générale annuelle de l’ICU
CIP General Assembly
Petit-déjeuner
Breakfast
8:30 - 9:00
11:00 - 11:30
11:30 - 12:00
12:00 - 12:30
12:30 - 13:00
13:00 - 13:30
Conférencier invité / Keynote Speaker
Jean Haëtjens
Pause / Break
Conférencier invité / Keynote Speaker
Phil Enquist
4e Bloc de sessions
SB23F-SB24F-SB25F-SB26E
SB28E-SB29F-SB30F-SB31E
SB50E
4th Session Block
Pause / Break
Déjeuner / Luncheon
Prix d’excellence en urbanisme / Plan Canada
Planning Excellence / Plan Canada
13:30 - 14:00
14:00 - 14:30
14:30 - 15:00
15:00 - 15:30
15:30 - 16:00
16:00 - 16:30
16:30 - 17:00
17:00 - 17:30
17:30 - 18:00
5e Bloc de sessions
SB32F-SB33F-SB34F e
5 Bloc de sessions
SB35E-SB36E-SB37E
(Ateliers)
SB51E-SB52E
5th Session Block
AT07F-AT09E
Pause / Break
5th Session Block
(Workshops)
6e Bloc de sessions
SB38E-SB39F-SB40E
SB41E-SB42F-STU01
6th Session Block
Rassemblement CanU
CanU Gathering
18:00 - 18:30
18:30 - 19:00
19:00 - 19:30
19:30 - 20:00
20:00 - 20:30
20:30 - et plus
OUQ General Assembly
Conférencier invité / Keynote Speaker
Anthony Townsend
10:00 - 10:30
10:30 - 11:00
Assemblée générale annuelle de l’OUQ
Remises de bourses étudiantes / Student Scholarship Winners
9:00 - 9:30
9:30 - 10:00
Ouverture de l’inscription / Registration Desk Open
Dîner principal
Main Dinner
(Musée de la civilisation)
Remises de prix / Awards
EE04
EE05
EE06
7e Bloc de sessions
SB43F-SB44F-SB45E-SB46E
SB47E-SB48F-SB49E-SB53F
7th Session Block
Fin du congrès / End of Conference

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