2015 - Musée Marmottan Monet

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2015 - Musée Marmottan Monet
Musée
Marmottan
Monet
September 10th
2015
February 7th
2016
Press contact :
Claudine Colin Communication
Christelle Maureau
28, rue de Sévigné – F-75004 Paris
Tél : +33 (0)1 42 72 60 01
[email protected]
www.claudinecolin.com
Manet, Renoir, Cézanne, Van Gogh,
Bonnard, Vuillard, Vallotton, Matisse...
Chefs-d’œuvre de la collection Arthur et Hedy Hahnloser
VILLA FLORA
Pierre Bonnard, Débarcadère (ou l’embarcadère) de Cannes, 1928-1934 © Hahnloser / Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo : Reto Pedrini, Zürich
A time of Enchantment
conte nts
03
I – Press Release
04
I I – Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler,
their house, their collection
07
I II – Tour of the exhibition
25
I V – Timeline. The main dates concerning
the collection and its owners
28
V – Publications
30
V I – The curatorial team
31
V II - Visuals available for the press
33
V III – The musée Marmottan Monet
37
I X – Practical informations
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
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I
pr e ss r e le ase
The Museum Marmottan Monet, a museum of collectors par excellence, will present from
September 10th 2015 to Februay 7th 2016 the most prestigious private collection of the
Swiss couple Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser. For the first time in France, the masterpieces
of this ensemble are shown. 75 masterpieces of Pierre Bonnard, Paul Cézanne, Giovanni
Giacometti, Ferdinand Hodler, Aristide Maillol, Édouard Manet, Henri-Charles Manguin,
Pierre-Albert Marquet, Henri Matisse, Odilon Redon, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Félix-Édouard
Vallotton, Vincent van Gogh and Édouard Vuillard illustrate the story of this couple, two
passionated collectors of painting, drawing and sculpture, which they enthusiastically
collected during their life together, from 1905 to Arthur’s death in 1936.
Living for art. Collecting. Such was the raison d’être of the couple formed by Hedy Bühler
When the museum was opened in
Winterthur, Villa Flora also became a
rendezvous for art and artists. Gathered
around the Maillol bronze Été (1910) in the
garden of the villa are Hedy HahnloserBühler and the artist Kerr-Xavier Roussel
seated on the ground, next to Hedy the
painter Henri Manguin with his wife
Jeanne (standing). Between them
is Richard Bühler, Hedy’s favorite cousin
and himself a passionate collector.
On the extreme right, the man of the
house, Arthur Hahnloser.
© Archives Villa Flora.
and the ophthalmologist Arthur Hahnloser. Faithful to Hedy’s maxim of “living with our
times,” this Swiss duo looked to the art of the day, assembling works by Nabis and Fauve
movements. Friendships soon sprung up between painters and art lovers, and they regularly came together at Arthur and Hedy’s residence in Winterthur, the Villa Flora. The
couple’s house became a place of encounter, exchange, and creation, both a haven and
a studio. The portraits of the Hahnloser-Bühlers and the canvases executed at Villa Flora,
which bear witness to those happy days, formed the core of the family collection. Over
thirty years, the walls of the home became covered with paintings. Each room, and even
the bathroom with its accumulation of still lifes, contains its share of artworks.
The exhibition offers a large selection of rare masterpieces such as La Blanche et la
Noire (1913) and Le chapeau violet (1907) by Vallotton, Effet de glace (or Le Tub) (1909)
and Le Débarcadère (l’embarcadère) de Cannes (1934) by Bonnard, Le semeur (1888)
by Van Gogh, Amazone (1883) by Manet, Portrait de l’artiste (1877-1878) by Cézanne,
Nice, cahier noir (1918) by Matisse, La partie de dames à Amfréville (1906) by Vuillard
and Les anémones (1912) by Redon. Organized in different monographic sections, the
exhibition illustrates the relation of the main artists of the twenty century to Arthur and
Hedy Hahnloser. It recalls the story of one of the most engaged and passionated couple
at the begining of the century.
The descendants of Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser have decided to reveal this outstanding
collection in Paris for the first time at the former townhouse of Paul Marmottan, which, for
these few months, will be home to these exceptional works.
Curators :
Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath
Curator, Villa Flora,
Winterthur
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Marianne Mathieu
Deputy Director, Head of Collections,
Musée Marmottan Monet
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II
Henri Manguin, La Sieste or
Le Rocking-chair, Jeanne,
1905, © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo
Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Henri Matisse, Femme assise
devant la fenêtre ouverte, 1919,
Private collection, Villa Flora,
Winterthur © Private collection,
Villa Flora, Winterthur. Photo
Reto Pedrini, Zürich
arthur and hedy hahnloser - bühler,
their house , their collection
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser have created, between 1905 and 1936, an exceptional collection, made mainly of artworks by Bonnard, Vallotton and Vuillard. Major pieces of Odilon
Redon, Van Gogh, Cézanne and Renoir, but also of Matisse, Manguin and Marquet define
the chronological limits of this set. However, the exhibition of the museum Marmottan
Monet doesn’t have for unique goal to highlight the works themselves, shown for the first
time in Paris. This exhibition is also the opportunity to discover this Swiss couple and the
environment around their collection at Winterthur, the Villa Flora, with its unique atmosphere and history. Collectors home by nature, the museum Marmottan Monet welcomes
another collectors home, while Monet, symbolic figure of Impressionism movement welcomes Post-Impressionnist artists.
In 1898, Hedy Buhler (1873-1952) purchased the Villa Flora. Just after her wedding, she moved in this conventional house, near the old town of Winterthur, with her husband Arthur
Hahnloser (1870-1936). Their collection will grow, year after year, in this unique place. In
1907-1908, in collaboration with the architects of Winterthur Robert Rittmeyer and Walter
Furrer, the couple creates a custom-made living decorated with elegance and an attention
given to each detail. In 1916, Rittmeyer created a lovely garden before conceiving in 1926
for the house a large room with overhead lighting.
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The Villa Flora
Hedy Bühler was the first to be enchanted by the Villa Flora, which in those
days was located on the edge of Winterthur old town. In 1898 she used part of
her inheritance to purchase it and, newly married to Arthur Hahnloser, moved
to Tösstalstrasse. She liked the simplicity of the house, which, for her, stood
apart so pleasantly from the then popular opulent “mini-castle” style of the
mansions with their often oppressive atmosphere. The “Flora,” with its clear
and simple architectural design, was liberatingly different. At an early stage
she discovered in it a potential for change, and the location where she could
unfurl her creative nature. Over the decades, Villa Flora changed from being a
tradesman’s dwelling, which is how it had been built by the carpenter Heinrich
Heider in 1846, to a house for the presentation of the constantly growing collection of Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler.
Some black-and-white photographs from the archive convey an impression of
Villa Flora and its special atmosphere. There are exterior views of the house,
whose architecture was protean: from a simple cube, it was extended in 1926
by the addition of a gallery room and veranda into a “collectors’ mansion”
without losing its special cachet in the process. Other photographs take us
into the garden, which to this day is preserved and looked after, its geometric
layout oriented toward the two large Aristide Maillol sculptures Été (1910) and
Pomone (1910).
View of the Villa Flora around
1900. © Archives Villa Flora
Photographer Willy Maywald
took this picture of Hedy
Hahnloser-Bühler at the Villa
Flora in 1943-44
© Archives Villa Flora
u a rt h u r
a n d h e dy h a h n lo s e r - b ü h l e r , t h e i r hou s e , t h e i r co l l e ct i on
Firstly, Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser look at the Swiss artists such as Giovanni Giacometti and
Ferdinand Hodler. From their on, they start to purchase masterpieces, guided by their strong
instinct. Through the influence of the painter Felix Vallotton, who lives in Paris and from who
they bought some paintings since 1908, they soon look at the art scene of the capital. Enthusiastic for Bonnard work, but also for Vuillard paintings and Maillol sculptures, they are also
looking for Nabis paintings, considered by themselves as the « Prophets of a new painting ».
The couple often become friends with the artists that they collect and buy directly the
artworks from them , following a studio visit. They also buy from great galleries owners
and art dealers such as Eugène Druet and Ambroise Vollard. Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser
are always looking for major pieces of the artist career.
Therefore, you can find in this collection artworks by Henri Manguin and Albert Marquet,
Van Gogh and Paul Cézanne or Odilon Redon. Also, later on, they will collect works by
Henri Matisse with a preference for the large formats.
In 1980, the descendents of the collectors create a foundation, the Hahnloser / Jaeggli
Stiftung foundation, to preserve their inheritance. Some donations from like the Semeur
de Van Gogh or La Blanche et la Noire by Vallotton join the Foundation collection and integrate exhibitions presented at the Museum Villa Flora between 1995 and 2014.
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Hedy Hahnloser- Bühler,
aged around twenty-seven
years old, in the garden
of the Villa Flora.
© Archives Villa Flora
Arthur Hahnloser, aged
around thirty, posing in the
garden of the Villa Flora.
© Archives Villa Flora
Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler
Arthur Hahnloser
Hedy Bühler was born in Winterthur in 1873. Her pronounced interest in things artistic made itself known
at an early stage. Brought up in a strict, conservative
middle-class household, however, she needed to work
hard to persuade her parents to let her train as a painter in Gauting near Munich. In the Villa Flora estate
there are a few pictures by the young Hedy, which, in
their muted tones are geared to the landscape painting of the nineteenth century. While still a student, she
realized that while she had a certain talent, this did not
suffice to feel the pulse of the age and to respond to
it with an interpretation of her own. She changed to
applied arts, setting up a workshop in the Flora, and
designed textiles such as tablecloths, cushion covers,
and toys, things which are still convincingly fresh and
original today. Her creative bent also made her receptive to other people’s artistic statements, and predestined her to sensitive and understanding encounters
with important artists of her day. She met with them
not just as a collector, but also as a connoisseur and
intermediary, and not least as a friend.
Arthur Hahnloser was born in 1870, also in Winterthur, and was
trained as an oculist. The couple married in 1898, and an interest in
art and in the goings-on in the art world formed a common bond
between them from early on. To start with, though, Arthur Hahnloser
set up an ophthalmic clinic in Villa Flora, and Hedy assisted at operations. In was only when the private clinic was set up on the Lindberg in Winterthur in 1908 that the occupants of the “Flora” had the
chance to devote more time to their collecting activities and rearrange the rooms so that they could be used to present what was
now a growing number of pictures. Arthur now saw his medical qualifications as providing a livelihood, while his real passion was for
art, to which he and his wife were committed in numerous ways.
Villa Flora was an open, hospitable house. Every Tuesday, a group
of young art lovers gathered around the table in the salon to drink
black coffee. They discussed the latest developments in art and determined to break down the old rigid structures in their own city. This
commitment led to a “palace revolution” at the Kunstverein. The old
guard were swept away and replaced by the representatives of the
new cosmopolitans. It was from this circle that the most important
stimuli emerged for the Kunstmuseum, built by the Winterthur architects Robert Rittmeyer and Walter Furrer, and opened in 1916.
The Hahnloser family in
around 1902–03, photographed by Hermann Linck.
From left to right: Hans,
Hedy, Lisa, and Arthur.
© Archives Villa Flora
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III
tour of the e x hibition
The exhibition of the Museum Marmottan Monet offers a rare opportunity to see masterpieces
such as La blanche et la noire (1913) et Le chapeau violet (1907) de Vallotton, Effet de glace
(1909) et L’Embarcadère de Cannes (1928-1934) de Bonnard, Le semeur (1888) de Van Gogh,
Amazone (1883) de Manet, Portrait de l’artiste (1877-1878) de Cézanne, Nice, cahier noir (1918)
de Matisse, La partie de dames à Amfreville (1906) de Vuillard et Les anémones (1912) de Redon
at the same time. Organized in monographic sections, it recalls the relation between the main
artists of the XX century with Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser. The exhibition tells the unique story
of one of the most engaged and passionated couples of the century.
Both from Winterthur, near Zurich, Switzerland, the ophthalmologist Arthur Hahnloser and
his wife Hedy Bühler, moved into the family property, the Villa Flora, shortly after their marriage in 1898. Inspired by Hedy, the couple became passionate collectors of modern art and,
in the years between 1905 and Arthur’s death in 1936, put together a remarkable ensemble,
which has been displayed in their home ever since. Their interest began with Swiss painters
like Giovanni Giacometti and Ferdinand Hodler, but the French-based Nabis and Fauves –
Félix Vallotton, Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, Aristide Maillol, Henri Manguin, Albert Marquet
and Henri Matisse – soon become their great favourites. While the couple paid regular visits
to major Parisian galleries, they preferred direct relations with the artists and, at the latter’s
recommendations, they also started to acquire work by influential predecessors. In addition
to living artists, they thus collected a small number of pieces by Van Gogh, Manet, Renoir,
Cézanne, and Redon, forming a distinctive ensemble at the heart of their collection. As the
advisers and, above all, friends of Arthur and Hedy, the Nabis and Fauves were regular guests
at the Villa Flora. A place of leisure, discussion and shared ideas, the Hahnloser home sometimes became an artists’ studio as well. Alongside the other masterpieces featured in this
show, portraits of Arthur, Hedy and their family, as well as views of the villa, painted by their
artist friends, stand as testimony to their committed patronage and to an existence in which
art and life were one.
1
The Hahnlosers and Giovanni Giacometti (1868-1933)
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser met Giovanni Giacometti (the father of Alberto and Diego) in 1907
and that year they visited him in his home village of Stampa, in the Val Bregaglia (Bergell Tal),
in southern Graubünden. In their substantial correspondence with the painter artistic questions are seen to be just as important as personal matters and family events. The couple’s first
acquisitions show the acuity of their taste and artistic sense, in that the works they chose were
always ones in which Giacometti was breaking free of his models – principally Van Gogh and
Giovanni Segantini – to develop his own, eminently personal brand of Post-Impressionism.The
Hahnloser’s were fascinated by this artist, probably because of the way he combined a keen
sense of contemporary reality and an interest in the Parisian art scene with strong attachment
to his home village, to the rural world where he lived and found inspiration.
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Giovanni Giacometti,
Sonnenbeschienene Häuser in Stampa, 1912,
private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur © private collection,
VillaFlora, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser paid another visit to Giacometti’s
studio in Stampa in 1919. There they discovered this painting
of village houses in the glowing autumn light. The work is
characteristic of Giacometti’s art, in which the inspiration of
his familiar world is expressed through an extensive knowledge of the artistic trends of the day. It was this combination
of authenticity and the sense of modernity that fascinated the
Hahnlosers.
2 The Hahnlosers and Ferdinand Hodler (1853-1918)
Hans Hahnloser, the son of
Arthur and Hedy, about to
embark on the study of art
history (he was later professor
in Bern), c. 1916. He is sitting in
a room with striped wallpaper
typical of Villa Flora, with a
tablecloth designed by Hedy
Hahnloser-Bühler herself, and
the pictures hung one above
the other, here Ferdinand
Hodler and Wilhelm Gimmi.
© Archives Villa Flora
Ferdinand Hodler, Bildnis
Giulia Leonardi, Italienerin,
1910. Private collection,
Switzerland © Gerhard
Howald, Kirchlindach
Living as they did in Winterthur, it was natural for Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser to start their collection with Swiss artists. They learned about Ferdinand Hodler from the painter Giovanni
Giacometti in 1907, and paid him a visit in his studio in Geneva that same year. Hodler was a controversial figure at the time, especially in Switzerland, where people found his singular manner
disconcerting. That the Hahnlosers were soon the owners of a number of representative works
such as Le Cerisier and Le Massif de la Jungfrau vu de Mürren, most of them bought directly
from Hodler himself, gives an idea of their open-minded, alert approach to art. Although their relations with Swiss artists waned somewhat due to their growing interest in the Parisian art scene,
Hodler had a lasting influence on their perception of art. As Hedy later recalled, “[...] it was the
first time we had experienced this [...] this irrepressible need to see the world through the eyes
of a master. As we journeyed along Lake Geneva, we kept seeing those little trees of Hodler’s.”
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Ferdinand Hodler, Der Kirschbaum, c. 1906,
Ferdinand Hodler, Das Jungfraumassiv
private collection, Switzerland
von Mürren aus, 1911,
© Gerhard Howald, Kirchlindach
Hahnloser /Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
This painting was the Hahnlosers’ first pur-
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
chase from Ferdinand Hodler, chosen the mo-
Between 1909 and 1914 Hodler made frequent trips to
ment they saw it in his studio in Geneva. The
Mürren, in the Bernese Oberland. He was fascinated by its
blossoming tree, evoking youth and the emer-
mountain landscapes, and tried to recapture theme in a
gence of life, is a recurrent motif during the
suite of fourteen paintings. Le Massif de la Jungfrau vu
artist’s Symbolist period. The Hahnlosers set
de Mürren reflects his heroic and monumental vision of
great store by this work, which they liked to
nature, and typifies his ability to capture its grandeur and
think of as the foundation of their collection,
diversity with a few essential outlines. The Hahnlosers trav-
even though they had already acquired pieces
elled to Mürren in 1912 and bought the painting directly
by other Swiss painters.
from the artist.
The Hahnlosers and Félix Vallotton (1865-1925)
Such was Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser’s enthusiasm for the work they saw when visiting the
Paris studio of Félix Vallotton (who had taken French nationality) in 1908 that they immediately bought his canvas Baigneuse de face. Their considerable correspondence chronicles
the growth of a deep friendship, especially with Hedy. Vallotton’s distinctive stylisation, from
the enigmatic juxtapositions of figures in works like La Blanche et la Noire to the chromatic
boldness of landscapes like L’Estérel et la baie de Cannes, made a lasting impression on the
Hahnlosers and, over the years, works from all the artist’s different periods and in every
medium entered the Villa Flora. Vallotton was also a valued, judicious adviser. Hedy’s advocacy of her friend’s sometimes challenging work was unstinting, and culminated with the
publication of her major monograph Vallotton et ses amis, in 1936. This stands as a spiritual
testament and monument to their mutual artistic and human esteem.
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Félix Vallotton, Hedy Hahnloser, 1908,
Félix Vallotton,
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur,
Le Docteur Arthur Hahnloser, 1909
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
In the picture Hedy Hahnloser, Vallotton depicts the lady
No less austere is the portrait of the man of
of the house in a high-necked damask blouse as a serious
the house, painted in frontal pose: Le Docteur
lady of her class. Characteristic of Vallotton is the concen-
Arthur Hahnloser, whose hands, placed one
tration of color on the nuanced gray-purple chord, which
above the other, are sensitively drawn, as is
stylizes the picture and gives it a hint of modernity.
the face with the carefully twirled moustache.
Félix Vallotton, Les Enfants Hahnloser, 1912
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Hedy Hahnloser commissioned this portrait of her children Lisa and Hans in 1912. Executed in Winterthur,
Vallotton’s subtly composed painting shows them playing draughts, their absorption allowing him to
study them freely. The characterisation of the children is indicated by the subtle division of roles (the
young girl is standing by her brother, who is sitting comfortably in a chair; she is active, he is thoughtful), but is also established by the orchestration of the colours, based on the contrasting white and black
of their clothes. Equally important is the relation between the children and their surroundings: if the
representation of the room is minimal, Vallotton has discreetly quoted himself by including his own
Vue d’Honfleur, matin (1910), which also features in the exhibition.
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In his room of the Villa Flora we
can see Les Enfants Hahnloser
by Félix Vallotton, circa 1912
© Archives Villa Flora
Félix Vallotton, Les Enfants
Hahnloser, 1912 © Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Félix Vallotton, Baigneuse de face, 1907
Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur © Collection particulière, Villa Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser saw this painting on the occasion of their first visit to Vallotton’s Paris studio, and
were struck by the originality and boldness of its expression. They bought it at once and hung it at the Villa
Flora. Only then did they realise just how far its stylised yet blunt representation of the female nude was from
the taste of their visitors, who were still attached to the canons of classical beauty upheld by the Academy.
The drawing room of the Villa
Flora. On the walls, left, Der
Kirschbaum by Ferdinand Hodler
and, right, Baigneuse de face by
Félix Vallotton, 1908 © Archives
Villa Flora
Félix Vallotton, Baigneuse de
face, 1907
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Félix Vallotton, L’Estérel et la baie de Cannes, 1925
Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur
© Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Vallotton travelled frequently to the South of France and on several occasions was a guest at Arthur and Hedy
Hahnloser’s residence in Cannes. The sun-soaked colours there inspired a number of serene, beautiful landscapes,
as his palette responded to the Mediterranean light. The strip of ochre land in the foreground here stands out
almost like a silhouette against the greenish-blue sea contained by the Massif de l’Estérel. A tiny red sail enlivens
the scene. The Hahnlosers bought this painting from Druet, in Paris, in 1927, two years after the artist’s death.
Might it have reminded them of the intense moments they had spent with him in Cannes?
Félix Vallotton, La Blanche et la Noire, 1913,
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers acquired this monumental painting from Galerie Druet, Paris, in 1914. By bringing together on
his canvas a naked, white-skinned woman lying on a bed and a Black woman sitting next to her, Vallotton was
continuing a tradition that went from Titian’s Venus of Urbino to Manet’s Olympia, while breaking with the
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iconography of his predecessors. Where the women’s roles – servant and mistress – are clearly defined in the
two earlier paintings, here they are uncertain. La Blanche et la Noire is not only Vallotton’s masterpiece, but
also a key piece in the collection of Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser. Provocative in its day, the painting shows their
courage. The Hahnlosers hung it in the library of the Villa Flora, which proved a fitting space.
Félix Vallotton, Le Chapeau violet, 1907
Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur
© Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
It was through the artist’s brother, the gallerist
Paul Vallotton, based in Lausanne, that the Hahnlosers acquired this painting, previously held
in a Russian private collection. Like L’Espagnole
and L’Anglaise, it belongs to a series of female
likenesses that he himself described as “semiportraits.” In fact, nothing here tells us that the
person was known to the painter, or was a model.
Vallotton was trying to create a type. He seems
more interested in displaying his painterly
boldness than in producing a real portrait of
a woman.
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Félix Vallotton, Baigneuse en chemise,
circa 1893
© Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Vallotton gave this little painting to his friend Hedy
Hahnloser for Christmas in 1908. Still following the
Nabi principle of decorative flatness, it makes a perfect extension of Baigneuse de face, the collectors’
first purchase. This Baigneuse en chemise is a preparatory study in oils for one of the figures of the
famous Bain au soir d’été, which caused a scandal
in Paris.
Félix Vallotton, Viande et œufs, 1918
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
In his still lifes Vallotton often indulged his taste for
the decorative. However, this painting of “Meat and
Eggs” cannot be limited to aesthetic concerns: bloody
hunks of meat appear in several works painted by
the artist during the First World War. The inclusion of
this work in the Hahnloser collection shows how
important they felt it was to look beyond pure visual
delight and embrace all the different facets of a
painter’s work.
4
The Hahnlosers and Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947)
Arthur and Hedy bought their first Bonnard painting from the Bernheim-Jeune gallery in
1911. By the time they met him, in 1916, they were already the owners of a score of works.
Bonnard later stayed at the Villa Flora when visiting Winterthur for the inaugural exhibition
at the Kunstmuseum. It was the beginning of a rewarding friendship, further deepened by
the Hahnlosers’ summers in Cannes, where their residence was not far from Le Bosquet,
Bonnard’s home in Le Cannet. Over the years, Bonnard’s paintings of interiors, still lifes, figures, and landscapes came to form a distinct collection at the Villa Flora. This included two
atmospheric indoor scenes, Le Thé and La Carafe provençale, inspired by the painter’s familiar surroundings. Pictures of shy young women turning away from the beholder, as in Effet
de glace and Le Tub, display all the subtleties of Bonnard’s art, his poetry, his melancholy and
his pictorial refinement. Landscapes like Les Faunes and Le Débarcadère de Cannes, executed in the South of France, show Bonnard to be both continuing and surpassing the Impressionist concern with light, as a painter who abolishes traditional perspective and places all
the visual data on the plane surface of the painting, the better to stimulate the mobility of the
beholder’s gaze.
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Pierre Bonnard, Les Faunes, 1905
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
In this monumental, deliberately decorative landscape,
which anticipates his big mural compositions, Bonnard
explores the full range of his expressive possibilities,
leading beholders on a journey around the canvas, a
“visual adventure” in keeping with his ideas. Les
Faunes flouts the laws of traditional perspective. The
Hahnlosers bought this work at Galerie Druet in 1916. It
occupies an entire wall of the Villa Flora, fitting harmoniously into the room.
Pierre Bonnard, Le Pot provençal, 1930
Private collection, Switzerland © Prolith AG, Urtenen, Markus
Mühlheim
One day, Hedy Hahnloser offered Bonnard a luminous
bouquet of irises and marigolds. He put it in a Provençal pot and painted it. Visiting her friend in Le Cannet
some time later, Hedy realised that he had represented
the flowers in their withered state. He explained that
this was precisely what had fascinated him in the subject, because what he was trying to make visible in his
paintings was the ephemeral nature of things and the
passing of time. Bonnard’s work occupies the interval
between abandon to the present moment and the
memory that this moment rouses. It confirms his conviction that art can suspend time.
Pierre Bonnard, Le Thé, 1917
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
This painting came into the collection of Arthur and
Hedy Hahnloser via Arthur’s brother, Emil Hahnloser.
The eye is immediately drawn to the woman in the
jaunty blue hat, the shape and colour of which contrast
with the outfits of the women friends being served tea
Marthe, the painter’s companion, in her red dress. It realised only later that the artist had introduced his mistress and model into this little social gathering, taking
her figure as a medium for a daring bit of painterly experiment. The artist mentions this work in a letter to
Hedy: “I well remember that hat, which is outrageously
blue, but very accurate.”
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Pierre Bonnard, Effet de glace or Le Tub, 1909
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers bought this painting from BernheimJeune in Lausanne in 1915, thereby enriching their collection with one of Bonnard’s key works of the period. This
was when he was exploring the mirror theme, which enabled him to play with traditional conceptions of space.
Placed at an angle here, the object introduces an imbalance into the painting while forcing the viewer to shift
their viewpoint. By placing his model not in front of but
in the mirror, Bonnard creates a “picture within the picture” and plays on the registers of being and appearing.
Pierre Bonnard, Débarcadère (or L’Embarcadère) de Cannes, 1928-1934
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers acquired this canvas, vibrant with the light of the South, in 1929, directly from the artist. However, Bonnard was not satisfied and reworked the painting it in the studio, adding the yellow structure on the left
edge. Only then did he feel it was complete. Bonnard deliberately delayed putting his canvases on stretchers so
as to extend the time he had to retouch them. The gestation process was a long one. The yellow walkway bestows
a golden glow on the ensemble, balancing the composition.
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Pierre Bonnard, Débarcadère (or L’Embarcadère)
de Cannes, 1928-1934
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers acquired this canvas, vibrant with
the light of the South, in 1929, directly from the artist.
However, Bonnard was not satisfied and reworked the
painting it in the studio, adding the yellow structure
on the left edge. Only then did he feel it was complete.
Bonnard deliberately delayed putting his canvases on
stretchers so as to extend the time he had to retouch
them. The gestation process was a long one. The yellow
walkway bestows a golden glow on the ensemble,
balancing the composition.
5
The Hahnlosers and Édouard Vuillard (1868-1940)
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser first saw Vuillard’s paintings at the Bernheim-Jeune gallery, early
in their career as collectors. Deterred, however, by the high prices asked for the canvases of
this discreet, taciturn painter who was a close friend of Bonnard and, especially, Vallotton,
they began with his lithographs, a medium in which he excelled, notably as a contributor to
La Revue blanche. Hedy admired “the poetry of intimacy” exuded by his works. Unlike Bonnard
and Vallotton, Vuillard was difficult to approach. The Hahnlosers acquired several works from
Bernheim-Jeune in Paris, but also in Lausanne from the gallery’s representative there, Paul
Vallotton, brother of the painter Félix. One of the works bought from him was the large-format
La Partie de dames à Amfréville. In 1919 Hedy travelled to Paris with her husband, to meet
Vuillard and commission a family portrait. While this painting was never made, the couple did
enrich their collection with some superb works from the painter’s youth, such as Les Roses
rouges and Nu dans le salon rayé.
Édouard Vuillard, Nu dans le salon rayé, circa 1905
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Executed with swathes of colour in the decorative
style characteristic of the Nabi aesthetic, this oil on
board is dedicated to the sculptor Georges Lacombe,
who belonged to Vuillard’s narrow circle of friends.
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser bought it in around 1918
at Galerie Druet. This is one of the few nudes by Vuillard
in their collection. The artist, who disliked using professional models, took little interest in representing
the human body. Here, the nude fits neatly into the
room, the decoration of which itself harmonises with
the wallpapered interiors of the Villa Flora.
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Édouard Vuillard, Roses rouges et étoffes
sur une table, 1900-1901
Private collection, Villa Flora Winterhur © Private collection,
Villa Flora, Winterhur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers bought this work at the BernheimJeune gallery, Lausanne, in 1918. It fitted perfectly into
their collection, which was rich in poetically resonant
still lifes. The painting shows how deeply Vuillard
had assimilated the poetry of Odilon Redon, and the
skill with which he handled allusion and suggestion,
as understood by Mallarmé. If he put the red roses in
a vase decorated with a mosaic of delicate tones, his
aim was above all to create a composition with magical resonance. In this painting, still shaped by the Nabi aesthetic, Vuillard shares Bonnard and Vallotton’s interest
in Japanese art, in which the principle of central perspective is set aside in favour of multiple viewpoints that
stimulate mobility of the gaze.
6
The Hahnlosers and Odilon Redon (1840-1916)
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser identified
Odilon Redon as a precursor whose mysterious work had inspired the dominant
painters in their collection: Pierre Bonnard,
Félix Vallotton and Édouard Vuillard. His
works too occupy a choice position at
the Villa Flora. Hedy was drawn to the
“mystic charm” of Redon’s art. The couple
began with an interest in the drawings
and prints in black and white for which the
artist was renowned. With his dark, fantastical visions Redon turned his back on
Impressionism and invented a way of expressing the unconscious long before
Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler at
the Villa Flora photographed
by Willy Maywald in 1943–44.
On the walls, three works
by Odilon Redon
© Archives Villa Flora
Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, made it the subject of his pioneering
research. Redon did not start using colour
until his mature works, where it is suggestive and incandescent. The Hahnlosers acquired a number of highly significant works of his, including Le Bateau rouge and Le Rêve. Their admiration
for the artist was confirmed when they met him at his Parisian studio in 1913. Their contribution
to the Redon retrospective organised at the Kunstmuseum, Winterthur, in 1919, shortly after
Redon’s death, was decisive.
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Odilon Redon, Le Rêve, circa 1908
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The works of Odilon Redon quickly became a prominent part
of Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser’s collection. Once again, it was
their artist friends who brought the painter to their attention.
Bonnard and Vuillard considered his work to be of decisive
importance. The collectors went to meet him in Paris in 1913
and subsequently acquired Le Rêve from the dealer Jos Hessel.
This mysterious composition was nevertheless reworked by
the artist, who heightened the plastic presence of the flowers. It may be that the idea of combining the female profile
and garland of flowers came from a painting by Millet, whom
Redon greatly admired.
Odilon Redon, Le Bateau rouge, circa 1910
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers met Redon in 1913, when they visited him at
his Parisian studio. They were impressed both by his personality and by the “mystical charm” of his work. Le Bateau
rouge makes the beholder conscious of that mysterious dimension, conveyed here by the symbols of the soul evoked
by the painter. It shows Redon as a magician of colour, a quality that greatly inspired Bonnard and Vuillard and fascinated
the Hahnlosers.
Odilon Redon, Les Anémones, circa 1912
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser probably saw the still life Les
Anémones in Redon’s Parisian studio, when they visited in
1913. They purchased the work directly from the artist. Here
he deploys all the magic of his colours. The black, chalice-like
bowl seems to hover over the table, which is no more than
suggested. The bouquet assembles red, blue and white
anemones which, with the leaves, constitute a rounded form.
The precise rendering of the flowers attests Redon’s interest in botany, whereas the abstract ground made up
of interlocking shapes in hazy mauve, yellow and orange betrays his poetic inclinations. Seeing such a composition, we can see why Redon was nicknamed “the Mallarmé of painting.” The Hahnloser collection is notable for a remarkable number of still lifes, reflecting their highly developed artistic sensibility and unusually
bold approach..
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7
The Hahnlosers and the great precursors: Cézanne (1839-1906),
Van Gogh (1853-1890), Manet (1832-1883) and Renoir (1841-1919)
For Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser, evoking the historical background shaping the main artists
in their collection was always a key concern. From the start, Giovanni Giacometti had spoken
of the importance of Cézanne, whose work evinced a modern conception of painting that
broke radically with the academic conventions of the day. One remarkable aspect of the
Hahnloser collection is that it also includes works – like Les Toits – that are important for our
understanding of this artist’s development. Other important works to enter the collection included L’Amazone by Manet and Le Semeur by Van Gogh. Hedy was passionate about the
Dutch artist and her 1912 trip to The Hague and Amsterdam, following in his footsteps,
became a veritable initiation. In 1920, at Hedy and Arthur’s request, their son Hans acquired
a number of major works by Van Gogh. Hedy was aware, nevertheless, that these paintings
by the great predecessors were not the core of the collection. “Though we considered their
works indispensable if our collection was to be complete, contrary to what has too often
been assumed or stated, they were never either its core or its starting point. In any case, we
should not have been able to afford such an extension.”
Paul Cézanne, Portrait de l’artiste, 1877-1878
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
In his self-portrait, the painter, aged thirty-six, depicts himself as older than he actually is. As with his other models, he
does not attempt to make a psychological study, let alone to
embellish his personal reality. Here, Cézanne is the patient
model for his own artistic research: always ready. The small
self-portrait in the Hahnloser collection is, in itself, ample
evidence of the way Cézanne assembled his coloured brushstrokes, as if in a mosaic, using them to create the elements
in his composition.
Paul Cézanne, Plaine provençale, 1883-1885
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
At first, Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser bought only Cézanne’s
works on paper. By the time they decided to acquire canvases, his prices had risen steeply. At the end of the war,
they kept the seven pictures sent to them by the dealer Ambroise Vollard. This canvas, Plaine provençale, illustrates the
mature style of the Master of Aix. The visual data recorded
after nature underwent a process of reflection in the studio,
to emerge as an autonomous plastic reality.
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Vincent Van Gogh, Le Semeur, 1888
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For Hedy Hahnloser, Van Gogh was an “intermediary between the sensorial worlds of the North and the South.”
In around 1912 the couple bought several works from the painter’s early period, but Le Semeur entered the collection only later, by indirect channels. This admirable painting from 1888 was purchased in 1920 by Hans Hahnloser
(the collectors’ son) at an auction in Amsterdam, and entered the collection of Emil Hahnloser, Arthur’s brother, a
rich businessman based in Egypt who was also a patron of the arts. At his death in 1940 several remarkable works
he possessed entered the collection of Arthur and Hedy.
Edouard Manet,
Amazone, 1883
Paul and Verena Hahnloser
in the green salon at the
Villa Flora. On the walls,
Intérieur, le chien Black et
bouquet de lilas (1908) by
Pierre Bonnard (rear) and
Amazone by Édouard Manet
(right) (cat. 2). On the desk in
the foreground, sculptures by
Pierre-Auguste Renoir.
Édouard Manet, Amazone, 1882
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Handled freely like a sketch, this canvas is one of Manet’s last works. It depicts a proud and confident female figure,
her slender figure dressed in a black suit and top hat. The Amazon figure appears several times in Manet’s work.
According to Hedy Hahnloser, the model for this Amazone was Henriette Chabot, the daughter of a bookseller
friend of the painter’s. The couple bought this painting in order to show how Manet had influenced Vallotton, and
to place their collection in a historical perspective.
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Auguste Renoir, Bouquet de dahlias, 1918
Private collection, Villa Flora Winterhur © Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterhur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
More than any other Impressionist artist, Renoir was a master of the
still life. Freedom of touch combined with an almost incandescent
exaltation of colour. Seeing a late still life such as Bouquet de
dahlias, it is easy to understand the passion felt for this painter by
the Hahnlosers (and many other collectors in Winterthur). It was only
late in the day that they themselves acquired some marvellous canvases by Renoir, especially small-format pieces. The artist was much
in demand on the international market, and in order to find more or
less affordable works at Vollard or Durand-Ruel, they once again
sought the help of their precious advisers Manguin and Vallotton.
Renoir was also a significant figure for the couple because of his
influence on Bonnard and Vuillard.
8
The Hahnlosers and the Fauves: Matisse (1869–1954),
Manguin (1874–1949), Marquet (1875–1947)
It was through their friend Henri Manguin, who also gave them some important paintings of his
own, that the Hahnlosers got to know Henri Matisse and Albert Marquet. This was the beginning
of a stimulating friendship, especially with Matisse, and one that would grow in the South of
France, where the two artists spent most of their time. The Hahnlosers met Marquet in his Paris
studio in 1913 and bought a number of representative works. Matisse, Manguin and Marquet
were all students of the Symbolist Gustave Moreau. In 1905 they had caused a sensation at the
Salon d’Automne with the bright, pure colours of their paintings, for which they were nicknamed
“Fauves” (wild beasts). They saw themselves as uncompromising innovators, for whom violent
contrasts between primary colours were the base of their artistic credo. However, when Arthur
and Hedy Hahnloser began collecting their works they had already left the narrow circle of the
Fauve group and were moving in more individual directions. The collectors first saw Matisse’s
work in Paris in 1911, buying, to begin with, numerous works on paper, before moving on to paintings and sculptures – mainly small-format pieces: prices were already high – in 1919. These works,
exhibited at Bernheim-Jeune, show the more intimate side of Matisse’s first years in Nice.
Henri Matisse, Nice, cahier noir, 1918
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
The Hahnlosers waited a long time before acquiring their first paintings by Matisse. Like Nice, cahier noir, these were mainly smallformat pieces. Before that, they concentrated essentially on drawings
and prints. Once again, it was their artist friends who made them
aware of Matisse’s importance. The purchase of a house in Cannes
brought them closer to the painter who, since 1917, had spent most
of the year in the South of France. This geographical proximity intensified their friendship.
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Henri Manguin, La Flora, Winterthur, 1912
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Like several other paintings that Henri Manguin offered
Arthur and Hedy Hahnloser, this one was directly inspired by the collectors’ home in Winterthur, la Villa
Flora, which the artist affectionately called “La Flora.”
With his wife Jeanne, he was a frequent beneficiary of
the couple’s cordial hospitality. With its intense colours,
this work conveys the unique ensemble formed by the
house and its garden, whose original appearance has
been preserved over the decades.
Henri Manguin, Le Thé à la Flora, 1912
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
During the First World War, Henri Manguin and his wife
Jeanne took refuge in Francophone Switzerland. There
they made numerous trips to Winterthur to see Arthur
and Hedy Hahnloser at the Villa Flora. The painter sometimes spent several days in a row there, responding to
the harmonious family life of his friends and the charm
of their home with his richly coloured paintings. Here,
Hedy is shown deep in her book, her elbow resting on
a garden table, with Jeanne sitting opposite her. Around
the two women, the garden of the Villa Flora is just as
we can still see it today, with its luxuriant flowers, its
roses and white bench.
Henri Manguin, Aloès à Cassis, 1912
Private collection, Switzerland © Gerhard Howald, Kirchlindach
In spring 1914, Arthur Hahnloser came back to Winterthur with Aloès à Cassis, which he had acquired when
visiting Manguin’s studio in Paris. The work is a homage
to the South of France, a region well known and appreciated by the Hahnlosers, who made frequent stays in
Cannes. Manguin himself travelled regularly to SaintTropez, where he rented a villa and met up with his artist
friends. He painted the agaves and rocky coasts several
times. His enthusiasm for Mediterranean landscapes
was shared with several fellow artists, such as Georges
Braque and Othon Friesz.
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Albert Marquet, Le Port de Saint-Tropez, 1914
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur, © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Fascinated, like many other artists of his generation, by the landscapes of the South of France, Marquet
spent the summer of 1905 in Saint-Tropez. This setting particularly inspired the Fauves. The elevated viewpoint, preferably afforded by a hotel room nearby, is characteristic of Marquet’s painting. The Hahnlosers
acquired Le Port de Saint-Tropez in 1914 at Galerie Weill, Paris. The year before they had paid a visit to the
artist in his studio, on which occasion they bought mainly works on paper. To these they soon added works
typical of his great creative period around 1910, which evince the stimulating influence of his exchanges
with his Fauve friends.
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IV
time line . the m a in date s conce r ning
the collection a nd its ow ne rs
1858
Johann Heinrich Bühler, the paternal grandfather
of Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler, owner of a spinning
mill, acquires the Villa Flora. On the land stand
a neoclassical house and a small wooden building.
1862
An eastern wing is added to the main building of
the Villa Flora and a new functional building replaces
the small wooden structure.
1870
Arthur and Hedy choose the architects Robert
Rittmeyer and Walter Furrer to modernize and
reorganize the Villa Flora.
August. The Hahnlosers buy a Selbstbildnis
by Giovanni Giacometti.
October. The Hahnlosers acquire Der Kirschbaum and
a study for Empfindung (c. 1901) during their first visit
to the studio of Ferdinand Hodler. These are the first
Hodlers to enter the collection.
1908
1873
May. The Hahnlosers make their first trip to Paris.
They tour the galleries where they will soon become
habitués (Druet, Durand-Ruel, Vollard, etc.), never
failing to enrich their collection whenever they come
to the city. Acquisition of Baigneuse de face by
Félix Vallotton after a visit to his studio. The couple
commissions him to paint a portrait of Hedy, which he
does in September during his first stay at the Villa Flora.
February 5. Hedy Bühler is born into a Protestant
family of textile producers.
December. Acquisition of Dahlias et raisins
by Giacometti.
1896
1909
Arthur completes his medical studies and becomes
an ophthalmologist.
Hedy suffers pulmonary tuberculosis.
1898
In Paris, Vallotton buys a first Pierre Bonnard for the
Hahnlosers, L’Orage à Vernouillet (1908), then their
first works by Édouard Vuillard, Coin d’atelier, and
Kerr-Xavier Roussel, Silène, ivre sur l’âne (1906).
April 13. Arthur Hahnloser is born into a Catholic
family of cotton merchants. He is the third of four boys
and will be the only member of the family to choose
medicine rather than a career in commerce.
Hedy acquires the Villa Flora, which her grandfather
had been using as a commercial facility.
October 25. Marriage of Arthur and Hedy after an
engagement of several years. The couple moves into
the Villa Flora. Arthur sets up an ophthalmology clinic
there and Hedy creates a workshop for her crafts
products (furnishing fabrics, blankets, cushions, etc.).
1899
December 13. Birth of Hedy and Arthur’s son, Hans.
February. Giacometti gives Hedy Piatto d’uva.
Purchase of Nu dans la chambre rouge (1897), Les
Chalands, bords de Seine (1901), and Place Clichy (1901)
by Vallotton, who gives them Baigneuse en chemise.
1910
February. Purchase of Pommes et bol (1888) by Paul
Gauguin.
August 19. Birth of their daughter, Lisa.
April. Passing through Paris, the Hahnlosers meet and
befriend Henri Manguin. They buy his Nu sous les
arbres, Jeanne (1905) and Nature morte aux faisans
bleus.
1905
Summer. Purchase of Hodler’s Bildnis Giulia Leonardi,
Italienerin.
Hedy and Arthur purchase their first artworks, mainly
by Swiss artists.
October
1901
The first Revolutionskaffees are held at the Villa Flora.
These weekly meetings bring together artists,
intellectuals, and notables from Winterthur.
1907
Arthur’s ophthalmology clinic leaves the Villa Flora
while Hedy expands her crafts workshops.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
First visit by Manguin, accompanied by his family, to
the Villa Flora, where, among other works, he paints
Les Enfants Hans et Lisa Hahnloser.
December. Death of Paul, Arthur’s brother, who had
taken up the reins of the family business. He is
succeeded by his younger brother, Emil, who, inspired
by Arthur and Hedy, starts collecting works of
contemporary art.
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u timeline
1911
Hedy’s health deteriorates.
Les Anémones, and Orphée (c. 1885). Other Redons are
acquired from his gallery, along with works by Bonnard.
Spring. During a stay in Paris the couple acquires
several Vallottons after visiting the artist’s studio,
including Femme au chapeau de paille (1909), Liseuse
au torse nu (1910), and Hortensias (1910). Arthur and
Hedy also buy an Albert Marquet, Notre-Dame de
Paris (1908), from Druet, and their first Pierre-Auguste
Renoir, Fillette au chapeau (c. 1890), from Vollard,
as well as several Bonnards.
1914
June. Manguin and Vallotton buy on the Hahnlosers’
behalf Marchande de fruits or La Fruitière (c. 1900) by
Renoir at the Henry Bernstein sale at the Hôtel Drouot.
August. The Manguins stay at Villa Flora; Henri paints
several canvases, including Madame Arthur Hahnloser
en robe violette, which enriches the collection.
Successive purchases of five works by Hodler, first
in Munich from Thannhauser: Mutter und Kind (1889),
Wettertanne (c. 1883), then from the artist’s studio:
Der Mönch im Frühlicht (1911), Der Mönch im Mittagslicht
(1911), and Das Jungfraumassiv von Mürren.
Acquisition of Effet de glace or Le Tub by Bonnard.
1912
February. On Manguin’s advice, they buy from Vollard
La Joueuse de tambourin (1909) and Torse de femme
nue (c. 1900) by Renoir, whose prices are starting
to climb steeply.
Spring. Discovery of the work of Aristide Maillol
at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris.
Acquisition at Druet of Nu à la lampe and Intérieur,
le chien Black et bouquet de lilas (1908) by Bonnard,
La Mandoliniste, la petite Marie (1912) and Femme
endormie, petite Marie (1911) by Manguin, and
La Charrette, Plat de fruits (1911) and La Maison
du coin (1911) by Vallotton.
Acquisition at Bernheim-Jeune Vue de Saint-Tropez
or L’Allée (1909), La Seine à Vernon or Paysage gris
de rivière (1911), Les Oranges or Le Compotier
aux oranges, and Nature morte à la figue (1912)
by Bonnard.
March. In Munich Arthur buys the watercolor Nature
morte aux melons (1900–06) by Paul Cézanne. He then
stays in Paris, visits Manguin and acquires his Aloès
à Cassis, but also several Bonnards, notably Les
Coquelicots (1909), for his brother’s collection.
1915
1916
January. The city of Winterthur inaugurates its new
Kunstmuseum, the culmination of numerous efforts
by Arthur and his cousin Richard Bühler, who put in a
great deal of work elaborating and constituting the
collections and organizing temporary exhibitions. They
will remain closely involved in the life of the museum.
The collection acquires several Bonnards, including
La Carafe provençale (Marthe Bonnard et son chien
Ubu) and Nu à la toque or Nu au chapeau, Les Faunes,
plus two Hodlers including Selbstbildnis (1916),
as well as works by Redon, Renoir, van Gogh, and
Maillol (Pomone [1910] and Été [1910]).
Autumn. The Hahnlosers finally meet Bonnard,
who is staying at the Villa Flora for the inauguration
of the exhibition of contemporary French painting
at the Kunstmuseum in Winterthur.
1917
Paysage avec figure (1910–11) joins other works
by Renoir in the collection.
Acquisition of several Renoirs at Durand-Ruel.
1919
June 15–20. Manguin stays at the Villa Flora where
he paints, among other pieces, “La Flora” Winterthur
and Le Thé à la Flora, Winterthur.
The collection adds seven Matisses, including
Nice, cahier noir (cat. 70), and three new Vuillards,
among them La Partie de dames à Amfreville (cat. 60),
five Cézannes, including Plaine provençale, and
a Giacometti: Stampa autonno (c. 1912).
Summer. Hedy, whose health remains fragile, loses
her mother. She sinks into depression.
Autumn. The couple acquires several canvases
by Vincent van Gogh, including Place des voitures.
1913
January 10. The collection acquires its first three
Maillols, including Léda (c. 1900–02).
February–March. Vallotton paints Les Enfants
Hahnloser while staying at the Villa Flora.
Summer. In Paris again, Arthur and Hedy make several
purchases including La Blanche et la Noire by Vallotton.
September–October. Odilon Redon receives Hedy in
his studio and she buys from him: Bouquet de fleurs
des champs (c. 1910), Le Grand Vase turquoise,
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Autumn. Back in Paris, the Hahnlosers meet Georges
Rouault and buy four works from him. They also meet
Vuillard for the first time. During their stay they further
enrich their collection (Renoir, Redon, Honoré
Daumier, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, etc.).
1920
January. Amazone by Édouard Manet enhances
the collection.
Spring. During another stay in Paris, the Hahnlosers
make numerous purchases in the studios of their artist
friends and in galleries (drawings by Eugène Delacroix
and Vallotton, canvases by Toulouse-Lautrec and
Rouault).
Press Kit
26
u timeline
May. Hans Hahnloser is mandated by his parents
and his uncle Emil to attend the Enthoven sale
in Amsterdam. He buys six van Goghs, including
Le Semeur for Emil’s collection.
1930
1921
Hedy starts work on a book about Vallotton.
During one of the Hahnlosers’ visits to Paris, Bonnard
paints a Portrait de Hedy Hahnloser. On this occasion
and again during an autumn visit the couple enriches
its collection with works by Vallotton, Manguin,
Matisse, and Edgar Degas.
Le Pot provençal is purchased directly from Bonnard.
1931
1932–33
Purchase of several Bonnards: Nature morte
à la casserole (1930–32), Nature morte aux pommes
or Le Buffet (1930–33), and Les Régates (circa 1932).
1922
1933
First winter in Cannes, in the footsteps of Bonnard.
September. Maillol spends several days at the Villa Flora.
1923
1936
The Hahnlosers acquire the Villa Pauline on the
Croisette in Cannes, moving in a few months later.
They invite artist friends, notably Bonnard and
Vallotton, just as they did at the Villa Flora. They now
spend winter and part of the spring in Cannes but
continue to make short stays in Paris as well
as traveling further afield.
Hedy publishes her monograph on Vallotton.
1924
Bonnard gives the Hahnlosers Promenade en mer,
a painting based on sketches made during their
maritime excursions together.
1926–27
After the death of Vallotton, many of his works are
put up for sale. The Hahnlosers buy a large number,
including Viande et oeufs and L’Estérel et la baie
de Cannes.
May 17. Death of Arthur. The couple stops actively
collecting art.
After 1940
After various incidents along the way, the collection
of Emil Hahnloser, who died in 1940, is united with
those of his brother and sister-in-law, who played
an important role in its creation by offering shrewd
advice, putting him in contact with artists, and buying
on his behalf. This collection included Le Semeur
by Van Gogh, Mont Chevallier à Cannes by Vuillard,
and Le Thé by Bonnard.
1952
May 7. Death of Hedy.
1980
1928
Members of the Hahnloser family create
the Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung.
Arthur travels to Paris where he acquires engravings
by Bonnard, Maillol, and Rouault, as well as drawings
by Manet, Auguste Rodin, and Renoir.
1995
Reception at the Villa Flora of a work by Maillol
commissioned by the Hahnlosers in 1911: Vénus
au grand collier (1928).
1929
Arthur travels extensively: to Paris (buys three bronzes
and several lithographs by Matisse); to the Basque
Country with Bonnard; to Germany, with Hedy (two
bronzes and a canvas by Renoir, and drawings by
Cézanne); and to the United States.
Acquisition of Débarcadère (ou l’embarcadère)
de Cannes from Bonnard, who nevertheless keeps
it in his studio.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Certain rooms of the Villa Flora are opened to visitors.
From 1995 to 2014 it hosts twenty-four exhibitions,
all of them popular successes.
2014
April. Temporary closure of the Villa Flora.
2015–16
The collection travels and is exhibited in Europe
for the first time.
September 10, 2015–February 7, 2016.
Exhibition of the masterpieces from the Villa Flora
at the Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris.
Press Kit
27
V
1
public ations
Publications
Exhibition catalog
Published jointly by Marmottan Monet Museum and Hazan Editions.
Size: 22 x 28,5 cm / 175 pages / Price: 29 euros / ISBN: 978 2 7541 0843 0
Authors :
- Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath,
PhD and Art Historian - Curator, Villa Flora
- Margrit Hahnloser-Ingold
- Robert Steiner-Jäggli †,
Honorary President of the Fondation Hahnloser-Jaeggli
Hors Série Connaissance des Arts n°684
44 pages / Price: 9,50 € / ISBN: 978 2 7580 0639 0
Vallotton – Manguin – Hahnloser. Correspondances 1908-1928
Editions : La Bibliothèque des Arts (September 19th 2013) / ISBN : 978-2-88453-174-0
Authors : Margrit Hahnloser-Ingold and Valérie Sauterel
Important and original contribution to art history, this new correspondence completes the book published in 2013 : La collection Arthur et Hedy Hahnloser. By chance,
the Hahnloser had different friendships with the artists of the postimpressionist and
nabie period. Most of them became close friends of the couple, like for instance Felix
Vallotton and Henri Manguin.
2
Educational workshops
Age: from 7 – 15 years old / Duration: 1h15 (thematic tour and workshop) / Price:
9€/per child / Student tarif: 7€/per child / Foreign langage tarif (English, Spanish,
German and Italian): 9,5€/per child / Information and reservations: Manon Paineau
Tel : +33(0)1 44 96 50 41 – [email protected]
On Wednesdays and during school holidays, or during the school year with the school,
children can discover the exhibiton «La toilette. Naissance de ‘lintime. The invention
of privacy» and the museum and its collections by attending educational workshops
“Les P’tits Marmottan”.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
28
u pu b l i c at ion s
3Filmography
VILLA FLORA | ses Collectionneurs, ses Artistes
Germany, 2015 / 78 min. / Réalisation: Nathalie David / Music: Vladislav Sendeski /
Research and production: Nathalie David, Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath and Daniel
Koep / © 2015 PITCHOUN PRODUCTION | HAMBURGER KUNSTHALLE
This movie tells the story of Hedy and Arthur Hahnloser through a sery of interviews of
the family members and other important figures of the foundation Jaeggli / Hahnloser.
Hans Robert Hahnloser voice-off, son of the collectors couple, guide us through their
story, by telling us different anecdotes and by underlining their passion for art and
artists sometime unknown at their time. Also, he mentions their important friendship
with Nabis artists and their contribution to the cultural scene of Winterthur.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
29
VI
the cur ator ial te a m
Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath
Curator of the Villa Flora, Winterthur
Curator of the Villa Flora, Winterthur, Doctor in philosophy and art historian, Angelika Affentranger-Kirchrath
has worked as a curator and art critic, especially for
the Neue Zürcher Zeitung (Nouvelle Gazette de Zurich)
and has published numerous texts in specialized magazines but also some monographs about artists of the
XX and XXI centuries (Alexej von Jawlensky, Georges
Rouault, Franz Gertsch, Rémy Markowitsch, etc.). Firstly, curator of the Kunsthalle
de Winterthur, she is also invited by different museums in Switzerland, Germany
and France to curate some specific exhibitions. Since 2008, she is also the curator
of the Villa Flora de Winterthur, and conceive the different temporary exhibitions.
Marianne Mathieu
Deputy director, in charge of collections at Musée Marmottan Monet
She has curated patrimonial exhibitions for over ten
years in France and abroad. She curated « Renoir /
Renoir » (2008), at the Cinémathèque française (Paris)
and at Bunkamura (Tokyo) ; « Raoul et Jean Dufy,
complicité et rupture » (2011), « Berthe Morisot » (2012)
at musée Marmottan Monet, « Le jardin de Monet
à Giverny » at The National Gallery of Victoria,
Melbourne (2013), « Les Impressionnistes en privé,
cent chefs-d’oeuvre de collections particulières » (2014) at musée Marmottan Monet,
« Le néo-impressionnisme, de la lumière à la couleur » (2014-2015) at Abeno Harukas
Art Museum (Osaka, Japon) and at Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and « Impression, soleil levant. L’histoire vraie du chef-d’oeuvre de Claude Monet » (2014-2015)
at musée Marmottan Monet.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
30
VII
visuals available for the press
Captions and copyright
These visuals are available for
the press in the unique setting
of the promotion for the exhibition
Villa Flora. A time of Enchantment
at the Musée Marmottan Monet,
from September 10th 2015 to
February 7th 2016.
Captions and credits are
required. The museum’s name,
the title of the exhibition and
the dates should be given in any
article containing these visuals.
Most of the artworks in this
document are protected by
a copyright. Please contact
directly the institutions below:
1 - ADAGP
Contact: Claire Niguet,
in charge of the copyright
[email protected]
T. +33 (0)1 43 59 09 79
Pierre Bonnard – Le Débarcadère (ou
l’embarcadère) de Cannes – 1928-1934 – Oil
on canvas, 43,5 x 56,5 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Bonnard artworks, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Pierre Bonnard – Effet de glace or Le tub
1909 – Oil on canvas, 73 x 84,5 cm – Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Bonnard artworks,
an authorization request must be adressed
to ADAGP
Pierre Bonnard – Le Thé – 1917 – Oil on canvas,
66 x 79,5 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Bonnard artworks,
an authorization request must be adressed
to ADAGP
Pierre Bonnard – La Carafe provençale
(Marthe Bonnard et son chien Ubu) – 1915
Oil on canvas, 63 x 65 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Bonnard artworks, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Pierre Bonnard – Les Faunes – circa 1905
Oil on canvas, 129 x 146 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Bonnard artworks, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Paul Cézanne – Portrait de l’artiste
Paul Cézanne – Plaine provençale – 1883-1885
Oil on canvas, 58,5 x 81 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Paul Cézanne – Groupe de maisons
Giovanni Giacometti – Dahlias et raisins
(les toits) – 1876-1877 – Oil on canvas,
50 x 60 cm – Private collection, Villa Flora,
Winterthur – © Private collection, Villa Flora,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
1908 – Oil on canvas, 50,7 x 61,3 cm – Private
collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur – © Private
collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto
Pedrini, Zürich
2 – MATISSE ARTWORKS
IMAGES
Artworks by Matisse are not
free of rights.
Process: for any reproduction
of artworks by Matisse,
a request must be adressed
to Matisse inheritors to:
[email protected]
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
1877-1878 – Oil on canvas, 25,5 x 19 cm
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Press Kit
31
u visuals available for the press
Vincent van Gogh – Le Semeur – 1888 – Oil
on canvas, 72 x 91,5 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Vincent van Gogh – La Fête du 14 juillet
à Paris – 1886 – Oil on canvas, 44 x 39 cm
Collection particulière, Villa Flora, Winterthur
© Collection particulière, Villa Flora, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Ferdinand Hodler – Le Massif de la Jungfrau
Ferdinand Hodler – Le Lac Léman avec les
Edouard Manet – Amazone – 1883 – Oil on
canvas, 114 x 86 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Henri Manguin – « La Flora », Winterthur – 1912
Henri Manguin – La Sieste ou Le Rocking-chair,
Albert Marquet – La Fête nationale au Havre
Henri Matisse – Nice, cahier noir – 1918
Jeanne – 1905 – Oil on canvas, 89 x 117 cm
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo
Reto Pedrini, Zürich – For any reproduction of
Manguin artworks, an authorization request
must be adressed to ADAGP
1906 ?-1913 – Oil on canvas, 65 x 81 cm
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo
Reto Pedrini, Zürich – For any reproduction of
Marquet artworks, an authorization request
must be adressed to ADAGP
Oil on canvas, 33 x 40,7 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of artworks by Matisse, a
request must be adressed to Matisse inheritors
to : [email protected]
Henri Matisse – Odalisque debout – Circa
Odilon Redon – Les Anémones – Circa 1912
Pastel on paper and board, 54 x 73 cm
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Odilon Redon – Le Rêve – Circa 1908 – Oil on
canvas, 73 x 54 cm – Winterthur, Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Alpes savoyardes – Circa 1905 – Oil on canvas,
60 x 80 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
1918-1919 – Oil on canvas, 43 x 25 cm – Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of artworks by Matisse, a
request must be adressed to Matisse inheritors
to : [email protected]
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
vu depuis Mürren – 1911 – Oil on canvas,
72 x 91 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo
Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Oil on canvas, 76 x 96 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
For any reproduction of Manguin artworks, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Press Kit
32
u visuals available for the press
Odilon Redon – Le Bateau rouge – Circa 1910
Oil on canvas, 54 x 73 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Pierre-Auguste Renoir – Bouquet de dahlias
1918 – Oil on canvas, 64 x 52 cm – Private
collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur – © PRivate
collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto
Pedrini, Zürich
Félix Vallotton – Le Docteur Arthur Hahnloser
Félix Vallotton – Hedy Hahnloser – 1908
Félix Vallotton – Les Enfants Hahnloser
Félix Vallotton – Le Chapeau violet – 1907
Oil on canvas, 81 x 62,5 cm – Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
1912 – Oil on canvas, 145 x 116 cm – Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Oil on canvas, 81 x 65,5 cm – Private collection,
Villa Flora, Winterthur – © Private collection, Villa
Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Félix Vallotton – La Blanche et la Noire
Félix Vallotton – L’Estérel et la baie de
Édouard Vuillard – Nu dans le salon rayé
1913 – Oil on canvas, 114 x 147 cm – Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Cannes – 1925 – Oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm
Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur
© Private collection, Villa Flora, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Circa 1905 – Oil on canvas, 43,5 x 49,5 cm
Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur
© Hahnloser/Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur.
Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Édouard Vuillard – Roses rouges et étoffes
Édouard Vuillard – Le Vase bleu – Circa 1932
sur une table – 1900-1901 – Oil on board,
56 x 66 cm – Private collection, Villa Flora,
Winterthur – © Private collection, Villa Flora,
Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Oil on board, 35 x 27 cm – Private collection,
Villa Flora, Winterthur – © Private collection, Villa
Flora, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
1909 – Oil on canvas, 80 x 62,3 cm – Hahnloser/
Jaeggli Stiftung, Winterthur – © Hahnloser/Jaeggli
Stiftung, Winterthur. Photo Reto Pedrini, Zürich
Press Kit
33
u visuals available for the press
In the garden of the Villa Flora, from left to right:
Hedy Hahnloser and Henri Manguin, Kerr-Xavier
Roussel, Richard Bühler, Jeanne Manguin and
Arthur Hahnloser, gathered around the Maillol
bronze Été (1910) © Archives Villa Flora
View of the Villa Flora circa 1900. On the
balcony, Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler wairing a white
dress – © Archives Villa Flora
Hedy Hahnloser in the Villa Flora in 1943-1944
Photo Willy Maywald – © Archives Villa Flora
For any reproduction of this picture, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler in the garden of the Villa
Flora, circa 1900 – © Archives Villa Flora
Arthur Hahnloser in the garden of the Villa Flora,
circa 1900 – © Archives Villa Flora
The Hahnloser family in around 1902–03, photo­
graphed by Hermann Linck. From left to right: Hans,
Hedy, Lisa, and Arthur – © Archives Villa Flora
Hans Hahnloser, the son of Arthur and Hedy,
sitting in a room with striped wallpaper typical
of Villa Flora, with pictures hung one above
the other, here Ferdinand Hodler and Wilhelm
Gimmi, circa 1916 – © Archives Villa Flora
In this room of the Villa Flora we can see
Le Repos des modèles and Les Enfants Hans
et Lisa Hahnloser, by Félix Vallotton, circa 1912
© Archives Villa Flora
The drawing room of the Villa Flora. On the
walls, left Der Kirschbaum by Ferdinand Hodler
and La Baigneuse de face by Félix Vallotton
© Archives Villa Flora
Hedy Hahnloser-Bühler at the Villa Flora
photographed by Willy Maywald in 1943–44.
On the walls, three works by Odilon Redon
Photo Willy Maywald – © Archives Villa Flora
For any reproduction of this picture, an
authorization request must be adressed to ADAGP
Paul and Verena Hahnloser in the green salon at the
Villa Flora. On the walls Intérieur, le chien Black et
bouquet de lilas (1908) by Pierre Bonnard (rear) and
Amazone by Édouard Manet (right). On the desk in
the foreground, sculptures by Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Circa 1922 – © Archives Villa Flora.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
34
VIII
the musé e m a r mot ta n monet
The musée
Marmottan Monet
In 1882, Jules Marmottan (1829-1883), director of the coal mining company Bruay brought in
the sixteenth arrondissement of Paris, the former hunting lodge of the Duke of Valmy. At his
death in 1883, his son Paul (1856-1932) inherited it. He embellished and enlarged for forty
years to make the mansion on rue Louis Boilly a showcase for the collections of medieval
and Renaissance art joined by his father’s and his own works and art objects, a testimony of
his passion for the First French Empire period.
At his death in 1932, Paul Marmottan bequeathed to the Académie des Beaux-Arts, his home
and integrated its collections to make the Marmottan Museum.The institution opened to the
public on June 21, 1934. From 1938, donations and bequests succeeded to double the museum’s
collections and open into Impressionism.
In 1940, Victorine Donop Monchy (1863-1958) offered the paintings of her father, Dr. George
Bellio (1832-1894), doctor and collector of the Impressionists which, he had acquired in the
1870’s. Eleven paintings by Morisot Renoir, Pissarro, Sisley and Monet (first and foremost :
Impression, Sunrise (1872) came to Marmottan. Meaning that it was Victorine Donop Monchy
who founded the Impressionist collection in the institution.
In 1966, Michel Monet (1879-1966), the last direct descendant of Claude Monet, introduced his
inheritance to the Musée Marmottan. Paintings by Monet and his friends, a substantial amount
of correspondence and a variety of resources previously spread between the master›s house
in Giverny and his son, in Sorel-Moussel join the Marmottan. One hundred paintings of the
leader of Impressionism are given tracing his career from 1880 until his death in 1926.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
35
u the
m u s é e m a r mot ta n mon e t
Views of Normandy, Creuse, noon, London and Norway demonstrate the passion of the
landscape painter. A rare set of large lilies that remained unpublished in the lifetime of the
artist add to the lagacy of the museum. Michel Monet’s contribution means that the Marmottan
now hosts the world›s largest collection of works by Claude Monet.
The year after the centenary of the death of Berthe Morisot in 1996, the grandchildren of the
artist and their wives, Denis (1908-1984) and Annie Rouart (1921-1993) alongside Julien (19011994) and Thérèse Rouart (1898-1996) bequeathed twenty five works and some fifty graphic
works of the first Impressionist painter. Their collection also includes works by Poussin,
Delacroix, Corot, Manet, Gauguin, Renoir, Odilon Redon... Equally important, other collections, such as illuminations of Daniel Wildenstein (1917-2001), joined the museum.
Over the years, the home of Jules and Paul Marmottan has become the most important place
for Impressionism. In 2014, the museum wanted to redeploy its collections and to honor this
dual identity.The dining room of the mansion is the first highlight of the tour. Bas-reliefs, especially the bronze table byThomire and furniture by Jacob Desmalter recall the original decor
of Paul Marmottan when he was in residence. The Impressionist and modern paintings that
are presented – paintings by Caillebotte, Renoir, Morisot, Gauguin and Chagall – are from
diverse collections and illustrate the key role of collectors in the history of the institution.
Carmontelle gouaches, paintings by Bidault and Vernet, Pajou Fabre, Gérard, Chaudet
Reisener, sculptures by Bartolini and school of Canova adorn the parlors of Paul Marmottan
and his room is where you can see the bed of Napoléon Ier au Palais Impérial de Bordeaux.
Around his desk by Pierre-Antoine Bellangé, we discover an exceptional collection of paintings by Louis-Leopold Boilly.
The world›s largest collection of works by Claude Monet comes in a space-designed by architect and former museum director Jacques Carlu. Excavated under the garden between 1966
and 1970, this spacious and modern gallery permanently present alongside Impression,
Sunrise, the most beautiful collection of artworks bequeathed by Michael Monet.
In 2014, two new rooms furnished in the former outbuildings of the mansion and the first
floor of the house were open to the public.They now host the works of Berthe Morisot and
the Denis and Anne Rouart foundation.
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
36
IX
pr actic al infor m ations
Address
2, rue Louis-Boilly
75016 Paris
Website
www.marmottan.fr
Access
Métro : La Muette – Line 9
RER : Boulainvilliers – Line C
Bus : 32, 63, 22, 52, P.C.
Days and opening times
Open Tuesday to Sunday
from 10am until 6pm
Thursday evenings until 9pm
Closed on Mondays, December 25th,
January 1st and May 1st
Prices
Full Price : 11 €
Reduced Price : 6,5 €
Under 7 years old : free
Group bookings
Christine Lecca – Tel : 01 44 96 50 83
Educational services
Manon Paineau – Tel : 01 44 96 50 41
Audioguide
Available in French and English: 3 €
Shop
Open the same hours and days
as the museum
Tel : 01 44 96 50 46
[email protected]
Musée Marmottan Monet – Villa Flora – A time of Enchantment
Press Kit
37

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