presents - ePressPack

Commentaires

Transcription

presents - ePressPack
ARTISTS
FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS
SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO
PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL
JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE
HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN
FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY KEITH HARING JEFF
KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES
FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ
RAOUL DUFY
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO
KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN
COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE
HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN
FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY KEITH HARING JEFF
KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES
FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR
DALI
RAOUL DUFY
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO
PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL
JEAN COCTEAU
ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ
RAOUL DUFY
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ
MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS
LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY KEITH
HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN
PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU
COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY
ROBERT
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE
JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES FRANCIS BACON BALTHUS LIU BOLIN FERNANDO BOTERO
MARC CHAGALL JEAN COCTEAU
ROBERT COMBAS SALVADOR DALÍ RAOUL DUFY
KEITH HARING JEFF KOONS DAVID
HOCKNEY RENÉ MAGRITTE HENRI MATISSE JOAN MIRÓ PABLO PICASSO KEES VAN DONGEN PIERRE SOULAGES REVEALED
presents
TRAVELLING EXHIBITION IN SOFITEL PROPERTIES ALL AROUND THE WORLD
Sofitel Paris Arc de Triomphe
14 Rue Beaujon, 75008 Paris, France
+331 53 89 50 50
Sofitel New York
45 West 44th Street, New York, NY 10036
(+1) 212/354-8844
Sofitel Budapest Chain Bridge
Szechenyi Istvan ter 2, 1051 Budapest, Hungary
+36 1 2351234
Sofitel Los Angeles at Beverly Hills
8555 Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90048
(+1) 310/278-5444
Sofitel London Saint James
6 Waterloo Place, SW1Y 4AN London, United Kingdom
+44 20 7747 2200
Sofitel Washington DC Lafayette Square
806 15th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20005
(+1)202/730-8800
Sofitel Legend The Grand Amsterdam
Oudezijds Voorburgwal 197, 1012 EX Amsterdam, Netherlands
+31 20 555 31 11
Sofitel Chicago Water Tower
20 East Chestnut Street, 60611 Chicago
(+1) 312/324-4000
Sofitel Munich Bayerpost
Bayerstraße 12, 80335 München, Germany
+49 89 599480
Sofitel Montreal Golden Mile
1155 Rue Sherbrooke, West Montreal, Quebec - H3A 2N3
(+1) 514/285-9000
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Olivier Widmaier Picasso,
for his time and contribution on this magnifique project
Xavier Louyot and Sabine Labrosse
Marketing Europe, Middle East and Africa Accor Luxury & Upscale Brands
All the General managers and their teams :
Mrs Véronique Claude, Sofitel Paris Arc de Triomphe
Mr Philippe Godard, Sofitel Chain Bridge Budapest
Mr Nicolas Pesty, Sofitel London Saint James
Mr Remco Groenhuijzen, Sofitel Legend The Grand Amsterdam
Mr Robert-Jan Woltering, Sofitel Munich Bayerpost
Charlotte Thouvard and Olivier Vernus
Global Communications and Partnerships Accor Luxury and Upscale brands
Olivier Royant, Editor-in-Chief, « Paris Match »
Agnès Vergez, Director, Photo Development, Lagardère-Active
Marc Brincourt, Photo Editor
Caroline Mangez, News Editor
Michel Maïquez, Art Director
Yvo Chorne, Photo Archive Director
Karyn Bauer, Editorial Assistant
Thanks to the entire « Paris Match » editorial staff, especially
the photographers, who, since the magazine was founded in 1949, have continually worked to reveal the souls
of humanity’s visionaries, evoking their unique spirits.
This catalog was produced under the direction of Olivier Royant, with editing by Caroline Mangez, assisted by Karyn Bauer and further assistance from Marc Brincourt, Heidi Ellison, Severine Fedelich,
Tania Lucio, Imen Mellaz and Pascale Sarfati, Edith Serero. This 28-page guide, produced by « Paris Match » for Sofitel, is not for sale.
« REVEALED » BY SOFITEL PAR XAVIER LOUYOT
Xavier Louyot
Senior Vice-President
Marketing Europe,
Middle East, Africa
Accor
Luxury & Upscale Brands
Cover
C an n es Film Fes t ival, 19 56.
Pablo Pica s s o an d Hen r i - Ge orge s Cl ouzot
c e l ebrat e t h e Spec ial Ju r y Pri ze awarde d
to Clou zot ’s movie « Le Mystè re P i casso » .
P h ot o Jac k Garofalo/ M ichou Si mon
En couverture
Fest iva l d e Ca nnes, 19 56.
Pab lo Pic a s so et Henr i-Ge orge s C l ou zot
fêtent le Pr ix s p éc ia l d u jur y attri bu é au fi l m
« Le mys tère P ic a s so » , tou rn é par ce de rn i e r.
New Yor k , 2008 . Je ff Koons’ palette.
P h ot o Hu ber t Fan t h omme
New Yor k , 2008 . Le nua nci e r de Jeff Koon s.
As an international ambassador of French elegance, Sofitel is celebrating fifty years of
success and cultural ties. In over forty countries around the world – with audacity and passion – Sofitel
associates the finest of local culture with the French touch, timeless and contemporary.
Alongside artists, designers, writers and photographers, with the exhibition Revealed, Sofitel provides a behind-the-scenes look at those magic moments when inspiration and creation are born.
This exhibition takes an intimate look at the world’s greatest modern artists at work as they reveal
themselves to the photographer: from Picasso to Dali, Chagall to Jeff Koons, Miro to Matisse, Botero to
Bacon, Cocteau to Hockney.
We are honored to have collaborated on this exhibition with Olivier Widmaier Picasso, who chose
the 30 photos from the collection of Paris Match, the most famous of French magazines.
Our partnership with Olivier is particularly poignant as Revealed, launched throughout the North
American branches of Sofitel in June 2014, now crosses the Atlantic for the reopening of the Picasso
Museum in Paris, devoted to the life and work of his grandfather.
I invite you to join us at Revealed, and to take a moment to celebrate this expressive collection
honoring modern masters.
Welcome to Sofitel.
Ambassadeur de l’élégance française à l’international, Sofitel célèbre cinquante années
de succès et de liens avec la culture. Dans plus de quarante pays à travers le monde - et toujours avec
audace et passion -, Sofitel fait résonner avec le meilleur de la culture locale cette French touch si intemporelle et moderne.
Sofitel collabore avec artistes, créateurs, écrivains et photographes, et vous ouvre avec l’exposition
« Revealed » grand les portes des coulisses de ces moments magiques où naissent inspiration et création.
Cette exposition pose un regard intime sur le travail des plus grands artistes contemporains, tels
qu’ils se sont révélés aux photographes. De Picasso à Dalí, de Chagall à Jeff Koons, de Miró à Matisse, de
Botero à Bacon, de Cocteau à Hockney.
Nous sommes honorés d’avoir collaboré, à l’occasion de cette exposition, avec Olivier Widmaier Picasso qui a choisi les 30 clichés de la collection de « Paris Match », le plus célèbre des magazines français.
Notre partenariat avec Olivier est d’autant plus poignant que « Revealed », lancée en juin 2014 dans les
adresses Sofitel d’Amérique du Nord, traverse aujourd’hui l’Atlantique à l’occasion de la réouverture du
Musée Picasso à Paris, dédié à la vie et l’oeuvre de son grand-père.
Je vous invite à nous rejoindre autour de « Revealed », à prendre le temps de découvrir cette sélection
pertinente, hommage aux maîtres du modernisme.
Bienvenue chez Sofitel.
FROM HUMAN TO DIVINE
DE L'HUMAIN AU DIVIN
PAR OLIVIER WIDMAIER PICASSO
Pa r i s, 2 013. Ol i v i e r Wi d ma i e r P i c a sso
a t h o m e, i n f ro n t o f « Ma r i e -Th é rè s e i n
a Re d B e re t a n d Fu r Co l l a r » ( 19 37 ) .
On h i s c o m p u t e r s c re e n , t h e c ove r o f
h i s b o o k : « P i c a s s o, p o r t ra i t i n t i m e » ,
A l b i n M i c h e l /A r t e Ed i t i o n s.
Ph o t o Hu b e r t Fa n t h o m m e
a r t w o r k/œu v re : © s u c c e s s i o n P i c a s s o, 2 014
Ol i v i e r Wi d m a i e r P i c a sso, c h ez l u i à Pa r i s,
d eva n t « Ma r i e -T h é rè se a u b é ret ro u g e
et a u c o l d e fo u r r u re » ( 19 37 ) . S u r l 'é c ra n
d e l 'o rd i n a te u r, l a c o u ve r t u re d e
so n l i v re : « Pi c a sso, p o r t ra i t i n t i m e » ,
é d . A l b i n M i c h e l /A r te é d i t i o n s.
An artist’s studio is a reflection of his soul. A sacred, secret place where his talent is expressed
and genius revealed. This is where a painter keeps not only his tubes, brushes and canvases, but also his
thoughts, memories, doubts, worries and certainties. My grandfather, Pablo Picasso, was always in his
studio. His enormous body of work testifies to the fact that he spent the majority of his life there. “I am
going to work,” he would say, leaving those at the table fully aware that they would have no part in that
private moment. A few photographers, however, had that privilege. The renowned French magazine
« Paris Match » won the trust of those who captured through their lenses the actions, and occasionally
the expressions of some of the 20th-century’s greatest artists at work.
Those fleeting moments will never be repeated. The exhibition “Revealed,” presented by Sofitel,
features thirty photographs, thirty unique testimonies from « Paris Match »’s extraordinary archives.
I was given the opportunity to make the selection and to assist in the presentation, affording me another
chance to try to understand the creative process, what happens between the hand and the canvas, the
spirit and the place, the proof and the final print, the human and the divine.
L’atelier d’un artiste est le miroir de son âme. Lieu sacré, secret, où s’accomplit le talent,
se révèle le génie. Un peintre y pose ses tubes, ses pinceaux, ses toiles, ses pensées, ses souvenirs, ses
doutes, ses inquiétudes, ses certitudes aussi. Mon grand-père Pablo Picasso s’y réfugiait sans cesse.
Le gigantisme de son œuvre en témoigne : il a passé l’essentiel de sa vie dans un atelier. « Je vais
travailler », disait-il, laissant à table une assistance qui savait qu’elle resterait écartée de ce moment
intime. Quelques photographes eurent le privilège de le partager. Le célèbre magazine français
« Paris Match » a su s’attacher la confiance de ceux qui, dans l’objectif, ont su capter le geste, le regard
parfois, des plus grands artistes du XXe siècle en pleine création.
Moments instantanés, jamais répétés. Présentée par Sofitel, l’exposition « Revealed » nous offre
trente images extraites de l’extraordinaire photothèque de « Paris Match », trente témoignages
uniques. La chance qui m’a été donnée de les sélectionner et d’en accompagner la présentation est
une tentative pour comprendre, de nouveau, comment naît une œuvre, de la main à la toile,
entre l’esprit et le lieu. Entre preuve et épreuve. Entre l’humain et le divin.
PABLO PICASSO
La C a l i f o r n i e, 19 5 7. Ig n o r i n g t h e l e n s
a i m e d a t h i m b y h i s f r i e n d , g re a t
p h o t o g ra p h e r Da v i d Do u g l a s Du n c a n ,
Pa b l o d e vo u re d a s o l e w h o s e b o n e w o u l d b e
c a r ve d i n t o c l a y t o b e c o m e a s c u l p t u re.
Ph o t o Da v i d Do u g l a s Du n c a n
L a Ca l i fo r n i e, 19 5 7. In d i f fé re n t à l ’o b je c t i f
d e so n a m i , l e g ra n d p h oto g ra p h e
Dav i d Do u g l a s Du n c a n , Pa b l o d évo re u n e
so l e d o n t l ’a rête se ra e n su i te m o u l é e d a n s
l ’a rg i l e et d ev i e n d ra u n e œ u v re.
Olivier Widmaier Picasso studied law and works as a producer and advisor for audiovisual media in Paris as well as a license developer with numerous
artists including the name and works of his grandfather Pablo Picasso. He recently coproduced and hosted TV documentaries about contemporary art
and opera, and portraits of major creators in fashion, design, photography, architecture and music. His mother, Maya, is the daughter of Pablo Picasso and
Marie-Thérèse Walter. Adapted from his book (soon to be translated in english) his TV documentary "Picasso, the Legacy", will be broadcast worldwide.
Olivier Widmaier Picasso, « rapprocheur de talents », comme il se définit lui-même, juriste de formation, est producteur et conseil en audiovisuel. Il a
­développé des licences importantes autour du nom et de l’œuvre de son grand-père et d’autres personnalités. Il a récemment participé à la production et à
la ­présentation de documentaires sur l’art contemporain , l’Opéra ainsi que de portraits de grands créateurs de la mode, du design, de la photographie, de
l­’architecture et de la musique. Il est le fils de Maya Picasso (mariée à Pierre Widmaier), elle-même fille de Pablo et de Marie-Thérèse Walter. Un documentaire
de télévision : « Picasso, l’inventaire d’une vie », bientôt diffusé dans le monde entier, a été adapté de son livre.
STYLE
“My studio is wherever I am”, said Pablo
Picasso. In 1955, with his final companion, Jacqueline,
he settled into a luxurious early-20th-century villa,
« La Californie », surrounded by a flourishing garden, in Cannes.
His sizable family’s countless children and pets were all
welcome, with one caveat: don’t touch anything. The disorder
of the living room/studio was illusory. Nothing was there by
chance, whether it was clothing, newspapers, violins, found
objects, or old and current works. They were all part of Picasso’s
world of inspiration, infiltrating every aspect of his daily life.
Always thinking, the artist had just to stand to begin working,
often during the night. Jacqueline made sure that nothing would
interrupt him, cutting the phone line and closing the doors on
her illustrious husband, who would become the world’s most
photographed man, ahead of Einstein and Gandhi. Picasso
himself carefully controlled which images of his private life were
exposed to the light of day.
« Mon atelier, c’est là où je suis », dit Pablo Picasso. En 1955,
il s’installe à Cannes avec Jacqueline, sa dernière compagne,
dans une somptueuse bâtisse 1900 entourée d’un luxuriant
jardin, rebaptisée « La Californie ». Les chiens, les enfants de sa
grande tribu, sont les bienvenus. Seule loi impérative : ne toucher
à rien. Car le désordre, dans la vaste salle de séjour aménagée
en atelier, n’est que relatif. Vêtements, journaux, mandolines,
objets glanés, œuvres du passé, du présent, rien ne s’accumule
par hasard. L’univers inspiré de Picasso s’étend partout dans sa
vie quotidienne. En perpétuelle gestation, l’artiste n’a plus qu’à
se lever pour travailler, souvent la nuit. Jacqueline veille à ce que
rien ne vienne l’interrompre. Elle coupe la sonnerie du téléphone,
referme les portes sur cet homme illustre qui, avant Einstein et
Gandhi, sera le plus photographié au monde. Car Picasso contrôle
les images de son intimité qu’il expose au grand jour.
PABLO PICASSO
In t h e s t u dio of t h e villa La Cal i forni e
in Can n es, 19 6 0. P ic as s o wi th hi s future wi fe,
Ja cqu elin e Roqu e, playing wi th the i r dal mati an.
P h ot o An dré Sar t res
1 9 6 0 , d a ns l’a telier d e la vi l l a La C al i forn i e,
à C a nnes. P ic a s so en c ompagn i e de Jacqu e l i n e Roqu e,
s a fut ure ép ouse, joue ave c son dal mati e n .
MODEL
Th e y l o o k l i ke a n o r m a l c o u p l e
wa l ki n g b y t h e p o r t i n S a i n t-Tro p e z .
On Ma rc h 2 , 19 61, i n t o t a l s e c re c y,
P i c a s s o, 79, m a r r i e d 35 - ye a r- o l d
Ja c q u e l i n e Ro q u e. S h e c a l l e d h i m
Mo n s e i g n e u r o r Ma s t e r a n d u s e d
t h e f o r m a l f o r m o f a d d re s s w h e n
s p e a ki n g t o h i m i n p u b l i c . Th e f i r s t
t h i n g h e n o t i c e d a b o u t t h i s yo u n g
s h o p a s s i s t a n t wa s h e r s p h i n x- l i ke
p ro f i l e. S h e w o u l d b e c o m e h i s m o d e l
f o r h u n d re d s o f p o r t ra i t s, d ra w i n g s
a n d s t u d i e s, a n d re m a i n e d h i s pa r t n e r
u n t i l t h e e n d o f h i s l i f e.
Ph o t o A n d ré S a r t re s
C ’e st u n c o u p l e p re sq u e c o m m e
l e s a u t re s q u i se p ro m è n e su r l e p o r t
d e S a i n t-Tro p ez . A 79 a n s, l e
2 m a r s 19 61, d a n s l e p l u s g ra n d se c ret ,
Pa b l o v i e n t d ’é p o u se r Ja c q u e l i n e
Ro q u e, 35 a n s...
El l e l ’a p p e l l e « Mo n se i g n e u r » ,
« m o n Ma î t re » , n e l e t u to i e ja m a i s e n
p u b l i c . L a p re m i è re c h o se
q u e Pi c a sso a re m a rq u é e c h ez c et te
je u n e ve n d e u se, c ’e st so n p rof i l
d e sp h i n x . El l e se ra so n m o d è l e p o u r
d e s c e n t a i n e s d e p o r t ra i t s, d e
d e ssi n s et d ’ét u d e s et l ’a c c o m pa g n e ra
ju sq u ’à l a f i n d e sa v i e.
T he Val l auri s s tud i o, 195 4 .
Pab l o P i cas s o and hi s mo d el .
Ni neteen years o l d , s he was
ex tremel y s hy and l o o ked l i ke Bri g i tte
Bard o t. Her name was S y l vette Dav i d ,
and s he l i ved i n Val l auri s, where s he
p o s ed fro m ti me to ti me fo r P i cas s o.
Al tho ug h he o ffered to pay her, s he
refus ed , feari ng he mi g ht then as k
her to und res s. He eventual l y o ffered
her o ne o f the 4 0 p o rtrai ts, pai nti ng s,
and d rawi ng s he mad e o f her over a
three-mo nth p eri o d . S everal years
l ater, i n a fi nanci al b i nd , s he s o l d
i t to an Ameri can co l l ecto r fo r “10
mi l l i o n o l d francs,” us i ng the mo ney
to pay fo r an apartment i n Pari s.
Pho to : Franço i s Pag ès
L’atelier de Vallauris, 1954.
Pablo Picasso et son modèl Elle a 19
ans, est timide à l’extrême et, ressemble
à Brigitte Bardot. Elle s’appelle Sylvette
David, vit à Vallauris, pose de temps
en temps dans l’atelier de Picasso. Elle
refuse de se faire payer de peur qu’il
ne lui demande de se dénuder. Sur la
quarantaine d’œuvres qu’il réalisera
d’elle en trois mois, l’artiste lui en offre
une. Quelques années plus tard, dans
une passe difficile, Sylvette la vend à
un collectionneur américain pour « dix
millions d’anciens francs » avec lesquels
elle s’achète un appartement à Paris.
“I don’t look, I find.” In his strangely deformed portraits, the features of Picasso’s
subjects are often barely visible, even though they are the women he loved.
Everything that happened to him made its way into his work. “To my sadness, and
perhaps to my joy, my work is shaped by my love affairs”, he once said. Picasso never
kept the lovers who became his models (or vice versa) a secret. Among them were
Fernande, Olga, Marie-Thérèse, Dora, Françoise and Jacqueline. He could be cruel,
occasionally reading aloud love letters from a previous relationship to his current lover
or painting a former lover in the clothing of the new one. These women nourished his
work; he gave them children and married a few of them, offering them something of
great value: his name.
« Je ne cherche pas, je trouve. » Dans ces extraordinaires portraits étrangement
déformés qui jalonnent l’œuvre de Picasso, on ne reconnaît pas toujours le modèle.
Ce sont pourtant ceux de femmes aimées. Tout ce qui lui arrive dans la vie résonne
dans son art. « Pour mon malheur et pour ma joie peut-être, je place les choses selon
mes amours », confie-t-il ainsi à un ami. Picasso n’a jamais fait mystère de ses amours
devenues ses modèles ou inversement : Fernande, Olga, Marie-Thérèse, Dora, Françoise,
Jacqueline… Il se montre parfois cruel, lisant à l’une les lettres tendres de celle qui l’a
précédée, représentant cette autre, sur une toile, dans le corsage de la première. Elles
nourrissent son œuvre, il leur fait des enfants, en épouse certaines, leur offrant
son nom : le plus cher du monde.
PROCESS
“ The artist must look at everything as if he were seeing it
for the first time. ” Just a few months before his death, Henri
Matisse, the leading Fauvist painter, continued, despite his
debilitating illness, to transform light into a rainbow, shut up
in his hilltop apartment in the former Hôtel Regina, with its
magnificent view of the city of Nice. Bedridden for years, the
now 85-year-old master of Modernism, known for his scandalous use of pure, violent colors, was barely able to work. Under
the halo of a lamp attached to a cross, he continued to carve religious motifs on his bedroom wall. Unable to hold a paintbrush,
he resorted to cutting up paper and pinning the cutouts to the
wall. “Scissors”, he said, “can be more evocative than pencils.”
He had already used this technique to create the ornement for
the interior of the Rosaire Chapel in Vence, his unparalleled
20th-century religious masterpiece.
« L’artiste doit voir toutes choses comme s’il les voyait pour la
première fois. » Dans quelques mois Henri Matisse va mourir…
Réfugié dans ses appartements de l’ancien hôtel Régina avec
sa vue magnifique sur la ville de Nice, le chef de file du fauvisme
continue malgré sa longue maladie à décomposer la lumière en
arc-en-ciel. Agé de 85 ans, ce maître du modernisme, dont les
tableaux aux couleurs pures et violentes posées en aplat sur les
toiles font scandale, ne peut pratiquement plus travailler. Cloué
au lit depuis des années, sous la lumière d’une lampe de chevet accrochée à une croix, il continue à graver sur ses murs des
motifs religieux. Incapable de tenir un pinceau, il fait des découpages qu’il punaise au mur. « Les ciseaux, dit-il, peuvent acquérir
plus de sensibilité que le crayon. » C’est ainsi que Matisse a conçu
son chef-d’œuvre, la chapelle du Rosaire de Vence, un monument
d’art sacré unique au monde.
HENRI MATISSE
Ni c e, 19 5 0. Ma t i s s e i n b e d .
Ph o t o Wa l t e r C a ro n e
Ni c e, 19 5 0. Ma t i sse d a n s so n l i t .
CREATION
“I am not an abstract artist; I am a nature lover.” The spirit of Joan Miró’s studio can be found in the braided
palm leaves of the sun: a dual symbol of the solar cult and the artist’s love of nature. Miró would think about a
painting, sometimes for weeks, before putting it on canvas. Then an unchanging ritual would begin. He would
position his easel in the studio, alongside a stand where he aligned each brush next to color-filled cups. He
would then choose one and look at it for some time, as if casting a spell, or conversing with it. Then he would
paint, sometimes for 12-hour stretches, without stopping. Finally, after crushing the gouache in his hand, he
would look at the work, for days if necessary, before finishing it with a precise, rapid stroke.
« Je ne suis pas un abstrait, mais un amoureux de la nature. » L’âme de l’atelier de Joan Miró, c’est ce soleil de
palmes tressées : double symbole de son culte solaire et de son amour de la nature. Miró mûrit en lui ses tableaux,
parfois pendant des semaines avant d’attaquer la toile. Commence alors un rituel immuable. Le Catalan place son
chevalet dans l’axe de l’atelier, approche une sorte de pupitre où chaque pinceau à sa place, derrière des coupelles
remplies de couleurs. Il en choisit un, le regarde longuement, comme pour l’ensorceler, entamer le dialogue. Et il
peint, parfois douze heures d’affilée, sans s’arrêter. Ecrasant d’abord la gouache à la main, il contemple l’œuvre,
pendant des jours s’il le faut, avant de l’achever d’un trait précis, rapide.
“Painting is a small part of my personality.” The scene is surreal. Dalí the genius is extravagant, theatrical.
The perfect curves of his notorious moustache echo the curves of the horn on that day’s model: a rhinoceros
admiring a masterpiece by Vermeer. Claiming “cosmic powers” and “fantastic-paranoid inspiration”, this
Catalan painter put his life on stage, superimposing on the canvas his influences and his internal paradoxes.
One morning in 1917, on the advice of Miró, the first to laud his talents, the young Dalí knocked on the door of
Picasso’s Paris studio and said, “Master, I am coming to see you even before I go to the Louvre.” Picasso was
a father figure to Dalí. “He fed and housed me,” said Dalí with emotion. Behind his eccentricities, Dalí had a
visionary spirit informed by the baroque. “I wouldn’t trade my character with that of any god.”
JOAN MIRÓ
Ma j o rc a , S pa i n , 19 62 . M i ró, 69,
i n h i s s t u d i o.
Ph o t o To n y S a u l n i e r
Il e d e Ma jo rq u e, Espa g n e, 19 62 .
M i ró, 69 a n s, d a n s so n a te l i e r.
SALVADOR DALÍ
Vi n c e n n e s Zo o, n e a r Pa r i s, 19 55.
Da l í a n d a r h i n o c e ro s w i t h a f u l l - s i z e d
re p ro d u c t i o n o f Ve r m e e r ’s « La De n t e l l i è re ».
Ph o t o Ma n u e l Li t ra n
Zo o d e Vi n c e n n e s, p rè s d e Pa r i s, 19 55.
Da l í et u n r h i n o c é ro s d eva n t l a re p ro d u c t i o n
g ra n d e u r n a t u re d e « L a d e n te l l i è re »
d e Ve r m e e r.
« La peinture est une toute petite partie de ma personnalité. » La scène est surréaliste. Et Dalí le génie,
extravagant, théâtral. Sa fameuse moustache aux courbes parfaites ressemble à la corne de son modèle du jour :
un rhinocéros contemplant un chef-d’œuvre de Vermeer. Revendiquant une « puissance cosmique » et une
« inspiration fantastico-paranoïaque », toute sa vie, ce peintre, catalan lui aussi, se met en scène, et superpose
sur ses toiles les influences qui le nourrissent, les paradoxes qui l’habitent. Un matin de 1917, sur les conseils de
Miró, le premier à vanter ses talents, le jeune Dalí frappe à la porte de l’atelier parisien de Picasso. « Maître, je
viens vous voir avant d’aller au Louvre. » Il le considère comme un père. « Il m’a nourri, logé », racontait-il avec
émotion. Derrière ses excentricités, Dalí a un esprit visionnaire à la logique « baroque ». «Je n’aurais échangé mon
personnage avec celui d’aucun dieu. »
STUDIO
“Painting is the most
beautiful of lies.” At the
Bateau Lavoir, Van Dongen’s
studio was separated from
Picasso’s by one floor. And
it was with Picasso’s first
girlfriend, Fernande Olivier,
that he began to paint. After
having earned a living as
a circus wrestler during
the Roaring Twenties, Van
Dongen became a portrait
painter for Parisian high
society. This Dutch painter
came to France in search of
light and found glory. In his
studio, sitting straight as a
paintbrush in front of his
easel, a woolen cap on his
head, he looked like a prince.
At the end of his life, however,
he had only one remaining
companion: his pipe.
“My work requires no effort from viewers.” In the religious silence of Jeff Koons’ clinical, all-white New York
studio, an army of assistants, surrounded by a multitude of computers, labors away, throwing aluminum,
acrylic and plastic at canvases. Koons himself only “distributes energies.” He keeps office hours, 8:30 am to
5:30 pm, but doesn’t produce much. His deceptively innocent-looking balloon pieces, which sell for a fortune,
can be interpreted in any number of ways. At the age of eight, Koons was already exhibiting reproductions of
classical paintings in his father’s shop. Although he paints effigies of Hulk and Popeye, he collects works by
Manet, Dalí, Poussin and Courbet.
« Mon travail n’exige aucun effort de la part de ceux qui le regardent. » Dans le silence religieux de son
« studio » new-yorkais où bourdonnent des escouades d’assistants, Koons n’exécute pas, il « distribue les
énergies ». Blanc, clinique, le lieu abrite une armée d’ordinateurs et ces petites mains qui jettent sur ses toiles
les aluminiums, acryliques, plastiques... Koons va à son atelier, aux horaires de bureau, de 8 h 30 à 17 h 30, mais
produit peu. Faussement innocentes, gonflées, ses œuvres s’arrachent à prix d’or et se lisent au premier, au
deuxième et même au dixième degré. Il peint Hulk et Popeye, mais collectionne Manet, Dalí, Poussin et Courbet.
JEFF KOONS
New Yor k , 2008 . Jef f Koo ns i n hi s Che l se a studi o.
P h ot o Hu ber t Fan t h omme
New Yor k , 2008 . Jeff Koon s dan s son ate l i e r du qu arti e r de C h e l se a.
« La peinture est le plus
beau des mensonges. » Au
Bateau-Lavoir, un étage
seulement sépare le premier
atelier de Van Dongen de
celui de Picasso. C’est avec
la première compagne de ce
dernier, Fernande Olivier, qu’il
commence à peindre. Après
avoir été lutteur de foire en
ces Années folles, Van Dongen
devient le portraitiste du
Tout-Paris. Venu en France
chercher la lumière, ce
Hollandais y trouve la gloire.
Dans son atelier, campé
devant son chevalet, toque de
laine vissée sur le crâne, droit
comme un pinceau, il a l’air
d’un prince. Pourtant, à la fin
de sa vie, il ne lui reste qu’une
seule compagne : sa pipe.
KEES VAN DONGEN
Pari s, 195 9. Kees van Do ng en i n hi s
cathed ral -s tud i o o n Rue d e Co urcel l es.
Pho to René Vi tal
Pa ris, 1959, Ke e s Va n Donge n d a ns son
a te lie r ca thé d ra le d e la rue d e Cource lle s.
CELESTIAL
“What will my ceiling look like? A bouquet of flowers.” Marc
Chagall had just finished working on the stained-glass windows
of a synagogue in Jerusalem when André Malraux, then French
Minister of Culture, asked him to provide the Paris Opera House
with a ceiling worthy of the majestic Palais Garnier. At first, this
controversial project, which set traditionalists against modernists, terrified the painter. “I was troubled, touched, moved…
I doubted day and night.” In the end, however, the Poet of Paris
began working, in utter secrecy and with great passion, on this
celebration of the performing arts. A bouquet of wildflowers was
always placed next to his canvas, a way of ensuring the painting
could stand up to the beauty of nature. The final touch: smearing the paint with his fingers – an inimitable signature. Over
the course of a year, these splashes of color, representing the
best-known operas and ballets, from “Aïda ” to “Swan Lake ”,
would turn into a magnificent fresco that fit the dome perfectly.
Chagall had created a colorful hymn to the performing arts and
set it spinning in the Parisian sky.
« A quoi ressemblera mon plafond ? A un bouquet de fleurs. »
Marc Chagall vient de terminer les vitraux d’une synagogue à
Jérusalem lorsque André Malraux, ministre français de la Culture,
le sollicite pour donner à l’Opéra de Paris un plafond digne de ce
nom. Au départ, ce projet provocateur qui oppose les partisans de
la tradition aux progressistes, effraie le peintre. « J’étais troublé,
touché, ému.… Je doutais jour et nuit. » Mais, dans le plus grand
secret, le poète de Paris va finalement se lancer, se livrant avec
passion à une véritable célébration du spectacle. A côté de sa
toile tendue il pose systématiquement un bouquet de fleurs des
champs, histoire de voir si le tableau tient le coup face à la nature.
Touche finale : à même les doigts, il étale la peinture. Une signature
inimitable. En une année, les taches de couleur ainsi jetées, retraçant les plus célèbres opéras, d’ «Aïda » au « Lac des Cygnes », se
transforment en une fresque gigantesque épousant à merveille
la coupole. Un hymne à la danse et à l’art, un plafond de couleurs
tournoyantes au-dessus de Paris.
MARC CHAGALL
Par i s, 1 9 64 . Ch agal l pai n t i n g Moz ar t ’s an ge l . A pe r son al f r i e n d
of t h e pai n t e r, I z i s was t h e on l y ph ot ograph e r au t h or i z e d t o doc u m e n t
h i s c re at i on , f rom be gi n n i n g t o e n d. Par i s 1 9 64 .
P h ot o I z i s
Paris, 1 9 64 . C h ag all pe ig n an t l’an g e d e Moz art . Am i pe rso n n e l
d u pe in t re, I z is se ra le se u l au to risé à s u iv re so n œ u v re, pas à pas, d e pu is
s a co n ce pt io n ju sq u ’à s a ré alis at io n .
CONTEMPLATION
“Cocteau’s last poem, a
masterpiece.” Like Matisse in
Vence, Jean Cocteau wanted
to have his own chapel. This
eclectic magician with the
hands of a bird-catcher chose
the humble and neglected
chapel of Villefranche-surMer on the Cote d’Azur,
a place he loved and that
inspired him. The dusty old
structure, dating from the
14th century, was being used
to store the local fishermen’s
nets. With his paintbrush,
he offered them a “poem” in
pictures: five frescos telling
the life story of Peter, patron
saint of fishermen. For this
dream-walker, “his” chapel
was a gift, the most important work of his life.
"Le dernier poème de
Cocteau, l’œuvre de sa vie."
Comme Matisse à Vence,
Jean Cocteau voulait « son »
église. Ce magicien éclectique
aux mains d’oiseleur choisit
l’humble chapelle désaffectée
de Villefranche-sur-Mer, sur
cette terre de rêve qui l'inspire,
la Côte d’Azur. L’édifice poussiéreux datant du XIVe siècle
sert surtout de remise pour
les filets des pêcheurs locaux.
Avec son pinceau, il leur offre
un « poème » en images avec
cinq fresques racontant la vie
de saint Pierre, patron des
pêcheurs. Pour ce promeneur
des rêves, cette chapelle est
un cadeau, l’œuvre la plus
importante de sa vie.
JEAN COCTEAU
Villefra nche- sur- Mer, 1957.
Coctea u with his fresco a t the
cha pel of Sa int- P ierre- des- Pêcheurs.
P hoto René Vita l
Vi l l efranche-sur-Mer, 1957.
Coc teau au pi ed d e sa fresq ue,
chapel l e Sai nt-Pi erre-d es-Pêcheur.
“Everything is based on love, the love of love, the beauty of things, the encounter with divinity.”
“He’s an observer. Everything he sees amazes him”, said his wife, Setsuko. Balthus was born in Paris in 1908
to an art historian father and a mother who was a painter. The self-taught artist loved cats, young girls, Japan,
and secrecy. His confessions were as rare as his paintings: he produced only 350 during his very long lifetime.
Working 11-hour a day until he was 92 years old, Balthus was known for working on five paintings at once,
sometimes taking as long as 10 years to finish them. His favorite tool was a mirror, which gave him a fresh view
of the composition in reverse.
« Tout est basé sur l’amour, l’amour de l’amour, la beauté des choses, la rencontre avec la divinité. »
« C’est un observateur. Pour lui, chaque regard est un émerveillement », disait Setsuko, son épouse. Né à Paris
en 1908 d’un père historien d’art et d’une mère peintre, Balthus l’autodidacte aimait les chats, les très jeunes
filles, le Japon et le secret. Mais ses confidences sont aussi rares que ses toiles : seulement 350 au cours d’une
très longue vie. Travaillant onze heures par jour jusqu’à ses 92 ans, il pouvait mener de front la réalisation de cinq
toiles différentes, et mettre dix ans à les terminer. Son outil de prédilection : le miroir, pour mieux regarder sa
composition, à l’envers, d’un œil nouveau.
BALTHUS
Rom e, 1 9 9 6. B al t h u s an d h i s wi f e,
S e t su ko, l ook i n g at h i s wor k i n an e x h i bi t i on
at t h e Val e n t i n o Ac ade m y.
P h ot o Al varo Can ovas
Ro m e, 1 9 9 6. Balt h u s, et so n é po u se
S et s u ko, co n te m plan t so n œ u v re ex po sé e
à l’acad é m ie Vale n t in o.
VOLUME
Everything looks big to Fernando Botero. Very big. Adept at
painting frescos, he brings monumentality to his works by
manipulating the size and proportions of his subjects. One
example is the painting of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI in
which they are portrayed as fairytale giants. He is surprised
when he is asked why his subjects are so big. “My subjects,
big ? No, they are voluminous, magical, sensual”, he says. When
he is seen in the company of the French royal couple in his
painting, the magnifying effect works beautifully. While Their
Royal Majesties appear to be looking out toward the horizon, the
painter keep an eye on them. When working in his studio,
Botero examines his work with a mirror. The critical scrutiny
he gives it echoes the way he treats his painting : “Every two or
three years”, he says, “I question what I have painted and start
all over again.”
Fernando Botero voit les choses en grand. En très grand. Acquis
à l’esprit des fresques, il confère à ses œuvres une certaine
monumentalité en jouant sur la taille et les proportions des sujets
qu’il peint. Ainsi représente-t-il dans ce tableau une MarieAntoinette et un Louis XVI qui rappellent les géants des contes.
Lorsqu’on demande à l’artiste pourquoi ces personnages sont
si gros, ce dernier s’étonne : « Gros, mes personnages ? Non, ils ont
du volume, c’est magique, c’est sensuel. » A le voir ainsi, entouré du
célèbre couple royal, l’effet de loupe est réussi. Leurs Majestés ont
beau scruter un horizon lointain, l’artiste, lui, les tient à l’œil.
Botero, dans son atelier, veille sur sa création à l’aide d’un miroir.
Le regard sévère qu’il adresse à son reflet fait écho à la manière dont
il traite son œuvre : « Tous les deux ou trois ans, je remets en
question ce que j’ai peint et je recommence tout. »
FERNANDO BOTERO
Pari s, 1 9 9 0 . Fe rnan d o B o t e ro i n h i s s t u d i o
on Ru e d u Drag o n.
Pho to Man ue l L i tran
Par is, 1 9 9 0 . Fe r n an d o Bote ro d a n s so n a te l i e r
de la r u e d u Drag on .
VISION
Three seated men, three tormented enchanters, caught in the
frantic whirlwind of the 1980s. Keith Haring, with his boyish
face and nerdy glasses, went overnight from chalk-tagging the
New York subway to being the darling of the city’s underground
art scene. A popular, committed artist, his hieroglyphics have
become cultural references. Outlined in black and drawn in single
strokes, his naive silhouettes jump out from explosively colorful
backgrounds and exude a communicative energy. Condemned by
AIDS, Haring painted with urgency, on everything, everywhere,
and died at 31. Obsessed by death, Francis Bacon lived by night,
slowly destroying himself and sometimes the painting he had
made during the day. A late bloomer, the unclassifiable English
painter never took an art class. He felt compelled to paint after a
visit to a Picasso exhibition in 1929. For the next 50 years, Bacon,
obsessed with the vision of his own decomposition, would flay his
subjects on the canvas. Looking at the world through his round
glasses, David Hockney refused to embrace “decorative and
meaningless” abstraction and instead made distorted portraits,
reinterpreting Picasso’s Cubism, but it was his poolside California
paintings that made him famous. Each painting by this young
priest of Pop Art became iconic. At the age of 76, Hockney still
paints, but often on an iPad, in a dark suit.
Trois hommes assis, trois enchanteurs écorchés, pris dans le
tourbillon trépidant des années 1980. Avec son visage poupin et ses
lunettes d’informaticien, Keith Haring passe, du jour au lendemain,
des rames du métro qu’il décore à la craie au statut de chouchou de
l’underground new-yorkais. Créateur populaire, engagé, il impose
ses hiéroglyphes à notre époque. Détourées de noir et dessinées d’un
seul trait, ses silhouettes naïves qui sautent, sur fond de couleurs
pétaradantes, dégagent une énergie communicative. Condamné
par le sida, Haring peint dans l’urgence, sur tout, partout, et meurt
à 31 ans. Obsédé par la mort, Francis Bacon vit la nuit, dans la
destruction de lui-même et parfois d’une œuvre qui s’accomplit le
jour. Géant tardif, inclassable, cet Anglais n’a jamais suivi de cours.
La peinture s’impose à lui au détour d’une exposition de Picasso, en
1929. Pendant un demi-siècle, Bacon, rongé par la vision de sa propre
décomposition, écorche le corps humain sur des toiles. A travers
ses lunettes rondes, David Hockney refuse d’égarer son regard dans
les méandres de l’abstraction pure, « décorative et sans contenu »
et réalise des portraits de personnages distordus, réinterprétant
le cubisme de Picasso. Ce sont ces paysages californiens qui le
rendent illustre. Chaque tableau de ce jeune prêtre du Pop Art devient une icône. A 76 ans, il peint encore, sur iPad mais en costume
sombre.
KEITH HARING
New York, 198 9. Keith Ha ring
in his studio.
Photo Ya nn Ga mblin
New York, 198 9. Kei th Hari ng
d ans son atel i er.
FRANCIS BACON
Par i s, 1 9 77. Fran c i s B ac on at
an e x h i bi t i on of h i s pai n t i n gs
at t h e G al e r i e Cl au de B e r n ard.
P h ot o Cl au de Az ou l ay
Paris, 1 9 77. Fran cis Baco n lo rs
d ’ u n e ex po s it io n d e se s to ile s à
la g ale rie C lau d e Be rn ard .
DAVID HOCKNEY
En gl an d, 1 9 70 . Davi d Hoc k n e y
i n a Tu dor-st yl e roc k i n g c h ai r.
P h ot o Jac k G arofal o
An g lete rre, 1 9 70 . Dav id Ho ckn ey
d ans u n ro ckin g - ch air m o d è le Tu d o r.
EVANESCENCE
“In my work, I become immersed in my surroundings.”
Liu Bolin has only one thing to say: “freedom.” Modern China is
moving forward. In 2005, backhoes arrived and destroyed Bolin’s
studio. He reacted to the shock with his first original creation,
painting himself alone amid the rubble, blending into the crushed
roof, alone against the system, invisible. His signature style was
born. The controversial message of this rebellious performer
enveloped by his paintings is a subtle one: who would arrest a
disappearing man?
« Dans mon œuvre, l’environnement s’empare de moi ».
Liu Bolin n’a qu’un mot à la bouche, « liberté ». La Chine nouvelle
avance, les pelleteuses débarquent, son vieil atelier est rasé en 2005.
Il réplique au choc par sa première création personnelle : lui, peint
parmi les gravats. Il se confond avec le toit détruit, seul contre
le système, invisible. La signature de l’artiste est née.
Le message de ce performeur rebelle qui se met en scène
à coup de pinceau est subtil : qui arrêterait un homme se contentant
de disparaître ?
LIU BOLIN
Brussels, 2 013. Liu Bolin blends into a reproduction
of Eugene Dela croix’s revolutiona r y “Libert y Guiding the People”.
Photo Virginie C la vières
B ruxel l es, 2 013. Li u B ol i n fondu dans une reprod uc ti on d e « La l i berté
gui dant l e peupl e », œ uvre révol uti onnai re d’Eugène Del acroi x.
“Black is the color of snow.” His first drawing was a sheet
of paper slashed with black: a snowy landscape. When as a child he
entered the church in Conques, Pierre Soulages had a vision :
he would become a painter. His intense fondness for black,
he says, comes from his childhood. From leafless black trees,
wet with rain. “Black”, he says, “ is the affirmation of all contrasts”.
Later in his career, he developed “beyond black” paintings,
focusing on the light reflected by the illumination of a black
surface. When a viewer looks at one of his paintings,
a mysterious current passes between them.
« Le noir, c’est la couleur de la neige. » Son premier dessin,
une feuille de papier balafrée de noir : un paysage de neige. Lorsqu’il
pénètre, enfant, dans l’église de Conques, Pierre Soulages
sait, comme dans une illumination, qu’il deviendra peintre. Son goût
profond du noir, il le tient, dit-il, de son enfance. De ces arbres noirs,
sans feuilles, mouillés de pluies. « Le noir, dit-il, c’est l’affirmation de
tous les contrastes. » Il crée même l’« outrenoir », la lumière réfléchie
par l’illumination de la surface de couleur noire. Entre l’œuvre
et celui qui la regarde, le mystère passe.
PIERRE SOULAGES
2 002 . P ierre Soula ges in his studio.
Photo Hubert Fa nthomme
2 002 . Pi erre Soul ages dans son atel i er.
REVEALED
PABLO PICASSO
PABLO PICASSO
HENRI MATISSE
SALVADOR DALÍ
JOAN MIRÓ
KEES VAN DONGEN
RENÉ MAGRITTE
JEAN COCTEAU
RAOUL DUFY
MARC CHAGALL
PIERRE SOULAGES
FERNANDO BOTERO
KEITH HARING
FRANCIS BACON
DAVID HOCKNEY
BALTHUS
ROBERT COMBAS
JEFF KOONS
LIU BOLIN

Documents pareils