Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services

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Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services
Francophone Affairs Secretariat (GNWT)
Community Consultation on the
Strategic Plan on French Language
Communications and Services
Facilitator’s Report
1
Table of contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................................... 1
Background ........................................................................................................................... 4
Context for consultations .......................................................................................................................... 4
Approach and methodology .................................................................................................. 5
Context setting and information sharing .................................................................................................. 5
Discussion on the active offer ................................................................................................................... 6
Prioritizing programs and services ............................................................................................................ 6
Findings................................................................................................................................. 8
Overarching observations ......................................................................................................................... 8
Community summaries ........................................................................................................ 17
Fort Smith................................................................................................................................................ 17
Inuvik ....................................................................................................................................................... 20
Yellowknife .............................................................................................................................................. 24
Hay River ................................................................................................................................................. 28
Annex A
Community multi-voting summary tables
2
3
Executive Summary
In response to the Supreme Court of Canada Decision direction with respect to the implementation of
the NWT Official Languages Act, the GNWT has taken a number of steps, including the establishment of
the Francophone Affairs Secretariat (Secretariat) and the development of a strategic plan on French
language communications and services. The strategic plan was developed in partnership with the
Fédération franco-ténoise (FFT).
As part of the implementation of the strategic plan tabled in the Legislative Assembly by the Minister
responsible for Official Languages in October 2012, the Secretariat and the FFT undertook face-to-face
consultation meetings in the “four significant demand communities” of the NWT (Yellowknife, Fort
Smith, Inuvik and Hay River). In all, 87 residents participated in these meetings. The consultations were
also intended to assist the GNWT departments in completing their own assessments and confirming
priority areas for improved French-language service offerings.
The objectives of the consultations were:
•
•
•
•
To inform people about the strategic plan,
To provide an overview of the types of services the GNWT provides the public,
To listen and better understand the priorities of each community, and
To initiate a dialogue with the communities regarding the GNWT’s French-language
communications and services.
Each consultation meeting lasted between 2 and 2.5 hours and followed a similar structure to ensure
consistency. The consultations followed a three-part format: Context setting and information sharing
about the strategic plan, followed by a high-level discussion on the characteristics of an active offer of
services in French, and concluding with a multi-voting exercise to prioritize services to target for
improved French-language communications and services.
The consultations were a positive and productive exercise that has both validated some of the GNWT’s
key planning principles and provided valuable new insight. This report includes three levels of analysis:
•
•
•
Overarching observations, including trends across communities and key regional differences
Community summaries
Voting tabulation tables (Annex A)
Taken together, these provide GNWT departments with a rich source of information to further refine
their implementation plans, and maximize the impact of the time and resources they are dedicating to
implementing the strategic plan and ensure they target outcomes that will be meaningful to NWT
francophones and their communities.
1
Some highlights of the report include:
•
The consultations generally validated the GNWT’s implementation priorities for improved
French-language communications in four departments: Health and Social Services (HSS), Justice,
Education Culture and Employment (ECE) and Transportation.
•
Front-line health-care services were by far the highest priority in every community, with
community health centers, Stanton Territorial Health Authority, public health and specialized
services standing out as key priorities in this area. Services that related to the education and
well-being of children were also consistently among the most highly-rated programs and
services in the four communities.
•
The consultation results also validated the strategic plan’s focus on improving the active offer in
situations where individuals were dealing with an emergency or were likely to require
confidentiality. In addition, feedback received seems to indicate that people also expect an
active offer in situations that were dealing with very technical or legal language (e.g.
Department of Finance forms) or where they were feeling socially or economically vulnerable or
at a disadvantage (e.g. legal aid, social housing).
•
A pro-active and visible invitation to request services in French was perhaps the most frequently
mentioned aspect of the active offer. Signage, verbal welcomes, bilingual signatures and
voicemails were all mentioned as an important signal to the public and in most cases,
participants found these signals lacking in GNWT departments they engaged with. Participants
were often quick to point out that this initial reception must be backed up by quality and
capacity or it will be quickly be discounted as false pretense. For example, on the question of
bilingual signage and documents, the quality of translation gives a signal to clients as to the
commitment to providing service in French.
•
This is not to say that there is an expectation that everyone they encounter at the front lines of
GNWT service should be able to provide service in French. In fact, the majority of participants
took a rather pragmatic view of the active offer, saying what mattered was a confident,
courteous responses and a timely referral when required. When these qualities are there,
participants indicated they were more willing to accept a referral or follow up.
•
Many of the people consulted made a strong link between the quality of French-language
services and the GNWT’s approach to recruiting, staffing, using and supporting French-speaking
employees. In every community, people indicated that they knew or were aware of
francophones working in GNWT departments but that this was not promoted or used
effectively. Many participants noted that simply making people aware of the fact that there are
French-speaking staff members available would be an improvement (e.g. pins, signage, etc.)
2
•
Overall, there were far more similarities among the opinions expressed in the different
communities than there were differences. Where there were differences, they seemed to be
driven either by the size of the community (e.g. smaller communities were generally more open
to alternative options to access services) and the economic and social drivers in that community
(e.g. tourism in Fort Smith, energy programs in Inuvik).
Some issues raised in these consultations are complex and will require more examination. Overall,
however, the consultations crystalized some relatively straightforward advice to government about some
achievable improvements that would be very meaningful and appreciated by the francophone
community. These include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Providing consistent, quality French signage and greeting protocols;
Ensuring staff at key points of service are well-equipped to greet and refer francophones
courteously and efficiently;
identifying and supporting existing French-speaking staff so they can play a bigger role in Frenchlanguage service delivery;
promoting services that are already available in French and inviting francophones to use them;
ensuring timely access to French documents, forms and web content;
demonstrating an effort to actively recruit francophone candidates into key service positions;
and,
Demonstrating a commitment to receive and address complaints.
3
Background
Context for consultations
As a result of the Supreme Court of Canada Decision of March 2009, the GNWT was required to
implement the orders issued by Justice M.T. Moreau in 2006 and modified by the NWT Court of Appeal
in 2008 with respect to the implementation of the NWT Official Languages Act, and to work in
collaboration with the francophone community of the NWT in doing so.
In responding to this obligation, the GNWT has taken a number of steps, including the establishment of
the Francophone Affairs Secretariat (Secretariat) and the development of a strategic plan on French
language communications and services. The strategic plan was developed in partnership with the
Federation franco-ténoise (FFT). The significance of this collaboration has been underlined by
representatives of both the FFT and the GNWT.
In September 2012, the GNWT approved the strategic plan and in October 2012, the Minister responsible
for Official Languages tabled the document at the Legislative Assembly. The overarching goals of the
strategic plan are:
•
•
•
To develop and expand partnerships to ensure ongoing consultation on best delivery of French
language services,
To create a GNWT culture that seamlessly incorporates French language services and
accessibility, and
To ensure progressive reviews of service delivery and resources to best meet the needs of the
French community.
As part of their commitment to implement the strategic plan, the Secretariat and the FFT undertook
face-to-face consultation meetings in the “four significant demand communities” of the NWT. In all, 87
residents participated in these consultations:
•
•
•
•
Fort Smith on Nov. 9, 2013 (31 participants),
Inuvik on Jan. 25, 2014 (7 participants),
Yellowknife on Feb. 1, 2014 (40 participants), and
Hay River on Feb. 8, 2014 (9 participants).
These consultations were also intended to assist the GNWT departments in completing their own
assessments and confirming priority areas for improved French-language service offerings. The
objectives of the consultations were:
•
•
•
•
To inform people about the strategic plan,
To provide an overview of the types of services the GNWT provides the public,
To listen and better understand the priorities of each community, and
To initiate a dialogue with the communities regarding the GNWT’s French-language
communications and services.
4
Approach and methodology
Each consultation meeting lasted between 2 and 2.5 hours and followed a similar structure to ensure
consistency. The consultations followed a three-part format:
1.
2.
3.
Context setting and information sharing
Discussion on the active offer
Discussion and multi-voting on priority programs and services
Context setting and information sharing
The meetings opened with a brief introduction and welcoming remarks by Benoît Boutin, Executive
Director of the Francophone Affairs Secretariat, and Léo-Paul Provencher, Executive Director of the FFT.
Both Mr. Boutin and Mr. Provencher emphasize the collaborative nature of the strategic plan’s
development and implementation, as well as the consultation exercise.
In opening remarks provided by Mr. Boutin and the facilitator, participants were also provided some
details to help clarify the scope of the consultation, notably:
•
•
•
•
The consultation outcomes will be communicated to the GNWT and departments, and will be
considered in combination with a range of other internal assessment and planning exercises to
further refine implementation plans and prioritize areas for action.
The consultation exercise is not intended to be scientific or mathematical in nature, but rather
to identify trends and gather feedback. The results will be analyzed and reported on a
community-by-community basis. An overarching analysis of trends and themes will also be
prepared and will identify notable similarities and differences among communities.
While participants were welcome to share their thoughts on any services they wished, the
consultations were only intended to focus on communications and services provided by the
GNWT, not municipal or federal government departments or agencies.
The issue of French-language education services was not part of this consultation process.
Following opening remarks, the facilitator delivered a brief presentation summarizing the background of
the strategic plan, the main elements of the plan and how the nature of the changes was intended to
help generate in the delivery of French-language communications and services.
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Discussion on the active offer
The facilitator then engaged the group in an initial discussion to explore the question of the active offer.
The Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services defines the active offer as follows:
“An active offer is a greeting that informs the member of the public that they may
communicate in either French or English. Its purpose is to ensure that an individual feels
comfortable expressing himself or herself in either language when seeking a service. An
active offer can take the form of a sign, a personal greeting or a message. In those contexts
where urgent or highly confidential matters are likely to arise, the person who seeks such
services in French can easily access it or know it is available with an active offer.”
In a plenary format, participants were asked to explore this concept and share their thoughts on what
the key characteristics of an active offer are. To generate dialogue and concrete input on these
characteristics, the facilitator used probing questions such as:
“How would you describe a situation where there is a good active offer? What does that look or feel
like?” “What gaps do you see in the active offer in your community?”
Prioritizing programs and services
In order to have a productive and concrete discussion on priority services in a limited timeframe, the
group was presented with a sample list of programs and services in 15 different departments and
agencies of the GNWT. These were posted on large flipcharts in bilingual format and provided in bilingual
participant hand-outs that included basic descriptions of each program/service.
The facilitator took the time to briefly review the list with participants and explain that these were not all
the services or even the most popular services of each department, but rather a list to help illustrate the
range of services provided by the GNWT. As the same lists were being reviewed, participants were given
the opportunity to add services they or their family had used or felt should be on the list for
consideration. Any new programs or services suggested were added, and the knowledge of participants
and the Secretariat representatives were used to identify an appropriate name to identify the program,
taking care not to unnecessarily alter or influence the input provided by the participant. Additions are
noted in the words used by participants in the voting tables (Annex A).
Participants were then asked to “vote” to show their priorities using coloured dots as follows:
•
•
•
Each person received 10 red dots to vote for programs/services where they wanted to see
improved French-language service over the next two years (2014-2015 to 2015-2016)
Each person received 10 yellow dots to vote for programs/services where they wanted to see
improved French-language service in the two following years (2016-2017 to 2017-2018)
Each person received 10 blue dots to vote for programs/services where they wanted to see
improved French-language service in the following years
6
Participants were cautioned not to use their votes to indicate where they would like to see enhanced
services to the public overall or to indicate the need for new programs or increased funding for Frenchlanguage participants or organizations. They were asked to focus their votes on where they wanted to
see improvement of French-language communications and service for existing programs and services so
they would be more equitable with the access provided in English.
While participants were not required to use all their dots, they were told that they could only use one
dot per program/service to ensure that the views of any one individual were not over represented.
(Note: this clarification was not provided in Fort Smith and may have influenced the results of the voting
process somewhat.) Participants were also told that they could engage with other participants during this
exercise.
Following the multi-vote, the facilitator briefly checked in with participants to reflect on the results and
to seek some insight into their choices. (Note: due to a late start in Fort Smith, this debrief did not take
place.)
Detailed voting tables for each community are provided in Annex A. For rating purposes, each red dot
was valued at three points, each yellow dot at 2 points and each blue dot at 1 point. Totals were then
calculated for each program and service, and total ratings were used to group services into three
categories: highest priorities, secondary priorities, and other priorities.
It is important to note that the voting process was not intended to be mathematical or scientific, but
rather illustrative of relative priorities. The tables are simply presented as a way of capturing what
appeared on flipcharts for the purposes of accurately recording input. The vote count was only used to
gauge priorities within each community and was not used for a summative calculation (i.e. percentages
or other mathematical representations) for the four communities together.
Finally, all participants were encouraged to take a feedback form and provide any additional comments
or clarifications to the facilitator in writing in the weeks following the consultation. Only one submission
was received and that input is reflected in this report.
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Findings
This report includes three types of analyses for these consultations:
1.
2.
3.
Overarching observations, including trends across communities and key regional differences
Community summaries
Voting tabulation tables (Annex A)
Taken together, these provide the GNWT with a rich source of information to validate and refine its
implementation plans and target its resources and investments to better address the immediate
interests of significant demand communities.
Overarching observations
Though the attendance at consultations varied by community, the community members present were
very engaged in the exercise. Many indicated that they appreciated the opportunity to learn about the
strategic plan and to provide their feedback.
Consultations validated key aspects of the GNWT’s approach to implementing the
strategic plan
The consultations generally validated the GNWT’s implementation priorities for improved Frenchlanguage communications and services in a few important ways.
The four departments targeted for implementation priorities were all noted as offering some high
priority programs. These are Health and Social Services (HSS), Justice, Education Culture and
Employment (ECE) and Transportation.
Further, the consultations also validated the strategic plan’s focus on improving the active offer in
situations where individuals are in an emergency situation or require confidentiality. Beyond just urgency
and confidentiality, however, the consultations revealed that the active offer may be linked more
broadly to situations where individuals feel vulnerable or at a disadvantage. For example, communities
prioritized services such as:
o
o
o
o
o
o
Services for individuals who are in financial difficulty (e.g. legal aid, social housing,
community counselling for addictions)
Court services
Workplace injury reporting and processes
Forms and application processes that are technical or have legal/financial implications
Emergency measures (MACA)
Human Rights Commission
The GNWT’s focus on bilingual signage, websites, greetings, forms and documents was supported as an
important aspect of the active offer.
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The active offer must start with signage and
“Hello/Bonjour”, but it can’t end there
A pro-active and visible invitation to request services in
French was perhaps the most frequently mentioned aspect
of the active offer. Signage, verbal welcomes, bilingual
signatures and voicemails were all mentioned as an
important signal to the public and in most cases, participants
found these signals lacking in GNWT departments they
engaged with.
Participants were often quick to point out that this initial
reception must be of a quality to show a true commitment
and capacity or it will be quickly be discounted as false
pretense. This is not to say that there is an expectation that
everyone they encounter at the front lines of GNWT service
should be able to provide service in French. In fact, the
majority of participants took a rather pragmatic view of the
active offer, saying what mattered was a confident,
courteous responses and a timely referral when required.
When these qualities are there, participants indicated they
were more willing to accept a referral or follow up.
On the question of bilingual signage and documents a few
important points came up repeatedly. The quality of
translation gives a signal to clients as to the commitment to
providing service in French. In a follow up email to the
facilitator, one Yellowknife participant explained:
« Que ce soit visible le
service en français et que la
personne qui le donne soit
identifié. Qu’on ait pas
besoin de le chercher, et ce
dès qu’on rentre dans
l’établissement où le service
est offert. Que ce soit rapide
et non pas qu’on vous rappel
demain pour le service ne
français. » - Yellowknife
You should be able to see that
service in French is available. The
person providing the service should
be identified. You shouldn’t have to
go looking for it. It should be
available the moment you walk
through the front door. You
shouldn’t have to wait or have
someone call you back the next day
when service in French is available.
“Considérant les diverses définitions possibles de ce qu’est l’offre active, il y a, à
mon sens, un élément essentiel : que ce qui est fait en français soit BIEN fait, de
qualité, sans faute de français, avec une expertise appropriée qui peut d’ailleurs se
trouver déjà dans la communauté."
Considering all the possible definitions of active offer, I’d say there’s one key thing:
Anything that is in French should be done PROPERLY and be good quality, and there
shouldn’t be any mistakes. We need the right expertise, and that expertise is already
available in the community.
Many participants mentioned they were looking for signage that provides specific information such as
the names of staff who can provide services in French and when they were available.
9
One participant in Inuvik suggested:
"Disons que c’est trois jours par semaine ou si c’est un service itinérant, que ce soit
clairement indiqué pour que le public sache que le service n’est pas nécessairement
toujours disponible mais qu’il y a un moment où il est disponible et que si on le
demande on peut l’avoir. "
Advertise when the services are available so that people will know. Let’s say it’s three
days a week, or it’s an itinerant service, indicate that clearly so that the public knows that
the services isn’t always available, but that there are times when it is available and if they
ask for it, they can get it.
Participants also frequently mentioned how much they would appreciate it if staff who speak French
were easy to identify either though a name tag or pin.
Timeliness was also considered key to the active offer. Participants were willing to be referred to another
person or to access their services differently, but they were clearly wary of having to come back later or
wait extended periods of time to get the same service an anglophone gets immediately. Some said when
this happens they feel like they have to switch to English to get timely service, even if they are less
comfortable in that language. One participants in Hay River explained:
"Les anglophones arrivent et ils ont tout de suite le service parce que c’est en
anglais, mais nous c’est 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, il faut toujours attendre
pour avoir les services dans notre langue. Parfois je trouve ça un peu injuste."
Anglophones show up and get served right away because it’s in English. But we have to
wait five, 10 or even 15 minutes. We always have to wait to get served in our language. I
find that a bit unfair sometimes.
The availability of forms in French was noted by many participants as a basic element of an active offer;
however, one participant in Yellowknife added they that would greatly appreciate the ability to selfidentify on forms as an individual who would like to be communicated with in French so that this could
be noted on their file and used for future communication with them.
When developing the active offer, participants found half measures or excuses frustrating. If a service is
to be provided in French, it should be done properly, they explained. Examples given were website pages
that are “coming soon” or “under construction” for months, or services that are supposed to be
available, but when asked, the designated person is away or the position is vacant.
Timely and visible access to French documents was identified as an aspect of the active offer –
particularly in Yellowknife, where a participant gave the example of New Brunswick where French
versions of documents are issued at the same time as English versions.
10
Health-care services are clearly the highest priority
Front-line health-care services were by far the highest
priority in every community, with community health centers,
Stanton Territorial Health Authority, public health and
specialized services standing out as key priorities in this area.
Participants also tended to use health as their primary
example when discussing the active offer and had the
strongest reactions to the lack of an active offer.
«La santé. C’est là qu’il faut
commencer. » - Inuvik
It has to start with health.
Participants who spoke about access to health-care services
in French often used very personal examples to illustrate the stress that can be created by a lack of
access to these services in one’s maternal language. Parents spoke about worries of arriving at the
emergency room with their child and not being able to find the right words to explain themselves. One
man in Inuvik talked about needing a knee replacement and considering getting the procedure in Québec
because while he speaks English well enough, his wife does not and he is concerned about her ability to
communicate with the medical staff caring for him here in the NWT. Another participant in Yellowknife
mentioned to the facilitator in a side conversation that she would consider leaving the NWT when she
was ready to start a family because she would be concerned she couldn’t have French-speaking support
for her pregnancy and delivery.
Services that involve education and the wellbeing of children are also fundamental
Services that related to the education and well-being of
children were consistently among the most highly rated
programs and services in the four communities. This was
reflected in the prioritization of both ECE services, as well
as child-focused services provided by HSS (e.g. specialists
for special learning needs, child protection) and Municipal
and Community Affairs (e.g. Active After School).
Though participants were aware that K-12 education
services were not the subject of this consultation, these
were still mentioned both directly and peripherally in
every group. In Fort Smith, one parent made the link to all
the parts of the education system that were not related
to teaching such as signage and how people are greeted
at schools and other education offices.
The issue of related health and social service supports to
children and families was also prioritized in most groups,
but in different ways.
11
«Le dépistage précoce ce fait
tout en anglais. Mes enfants
ne parlaient pas encore
beaucoup anglais quand ils
ont pris ces tests-là. Il y avait
des problèmes
d’interprétation. »
- Yellowknife
Early identification is all done in
English. Those tests were all in
English when my kids, who are
Francophones, took them. They
had problems understanding
the questions.
In Fort Smith a participant mentioned the need to provide “support for the teachers so that they have
the coaching and the curriculum support that their English-stream counterparts have and also the
educational assistance and resources that the children have goes beyond their teachers.”
In Yellowknife, one mother shared her experience of having her French-speaking children go through
their kindergarten screening in English, and a local teacher made an impassioned plea for access to
French-speaking professionals to evaluate students with potential learning challenges:
" C’est vraiment problématique parce que les enfants ne sont pas capable de faire
les évaluations à cause de la barrières langagières. L’interprétation des résultats
c’est problématique aussi. Les données sont faussées parce que les enfants ne sont
tout simplement pas capable de faire ces évaluations, particulièrement quand on
évalue leurs habilités langagières ou de lecture. Les recommandations sont
nébuleuses. (…) C’est écrit dans les directives ministérielles que c’est un droit de
tous les enfants d’avoir accès à l’éducation, ça ne veut pas juste dire avoir accès à
l’école, mais aussi aux services pédagogiques spécialisés. "
It’s a real problem because children can’t do the tests on account of the language barrier.
There’s also a problem when it comes to interpreting the results. The data are skewed
because children simply cannot do the tests, particularly when you’re assessing their
language or reading skills. The recommendations are vague. (…) The departmental
directives say that every child has the right to an education. That doesn’t mean simply
being able to go to school, but also having access to specialized educational services.
Some participants indicated they thought there were francophone professionals within the system
providing these types of services for adults in Yellowknife.
French-language information and services in tourism is also a high priority
Services related to tourism emerged as a primary or secondary priority in most communities. Often
people indicated that both welcome signage and tourism information provide a sense of the “character”
of the territory with respect to its openness to French and French-speaking residents. In the multi-voting
exercise, ITI’s campgrounds and campground reservation services received many votes, though often as
a third-level (blue) priority. In some cases, people provided examples of French-speaking friends and
family members who visited the territory, while others made a link between tourism and recruitment of
people to move to the territory.
12
Other service areas to note
While they did not stand out as top priorities, there are a few
other service areas that should be noted.
•
•
•
•
Programs that offer grants to not-for-profit
organizations were often identified as a priority.
« Si tu veux attirer des gens
When the facilitator sought to clarify this priority,
ici si ils peuvent faire de la
participants confirmed that they were looking for
business en français, ça
better communications about these programs in
aiderait. » - Hay River
French and the ability to apply and communicate with
If you want to get people to come
government about them in French (as opposed to
here,
it would help if they could do
simply wanting to see more money provided to
business in French.
Francophone organizations).
In both Hay River and Fort Smith, participants
prioritized services to small businesses as an
important access point where individuals need to be comfortable communicating with
government in their language.
Elections NWT was prioritized in every community, but often as a second or third-level priority.
The NWT Arts Council and other arts-related programs were also often identified as a second or
third-level priority.
There is openness to alternative delivery mechanisms
Participants in the smaller communities expressed openness to alternative ways to access Frenchlanguage services and even recognition that this might be the best or only way to provide that service in
some cases.
«You learn over time who is
there that can help you, but if
I didn’t know I might be
hesitant to ask.” »
- Fort Smith
In Fort Smith, for example, some participants indicated that
it seemed unrealistic to expect all government
departments in Fort Smith to offer all manner of services in
French. One man said: “You might get dispatched to
Yellowknife if you ‘press 2’, but at least you could talk to
someone in French. (…) If it’s not a service that can is
delivered by phone and you need an actual person you
could create a Skype situation where at least you can talk
to someone face-to-face, like an e-teller.” Another woman
concluded that it may even be a better solution to have
quick access to a person over the phone or Skype than to
try and keep a local position filled.
In Inuvik, however, participants noted that the loss of the Health phone line took away one bilingual
resource that francophone residents there did use to access health information in French.
13
To provide the services, you need the people
A significant trend that emerged in all groups was the importance of ensuring that there are bilingual
people ready and able to provide services. This discussion raised a number of different concerns and
recommendations.
•
•
In most communities, people indicated that there are French-speaking staff in many GNWT
offices, but that they are either not identified or not encouraged or supported in providing
services in French. Many participants indicated that this was a key place to start. Participants
would often mention that they knew someone in one department and would go to them for
assistance, but that this was informal and they had learned about it through word-of-mouth.
For some, it was important to designate positions as bilingual, for others it was more a matter of
finding ways to advertise and recruit more bilingual people into key services. This was a
particularly important point in Yellowknife. The following comments were made by participant
at this session:
"J’aimerais ajouter qu’il doit y avoir un ’offre active de recrutement
bilingue, parce que si on veut offrir des services bilingues il faut avoir
les effectifs."
Also they should make an active effort to recruit bilingual people. You have
to have the people if you want to offer bilingual services.
•
•
•
In Inuvik, participants made a connection to finding ways to encourage local students who had
gone through immersion to come back and fill some of these key positions.
In some of the smaller communities, there was definitely a sense that the GNWT was not as
open to French and that speaking French at work was not something that was encouraged. In
Hay River, one participant explained that this had been actively discouraged in the past.
Some participants pointed out that the active offer was not only about what French-speaking
staff know and do; it is about the attitude and approach of all staff, regardless of their language.
They said that if all staff know what the expectations are and how they can help promote
French-language services, it would make a noticeable difference to staff and clients
14
There is scepticism that there will be any change
Though participants indicated that they appreciated being
consulted and actively participated in the discussions, they
also expressed frustration that they had seen little
progress so far. They also shared their scepticism that
there would be any noticeable improvement in the near
future.
They were looking for the GNWT to start actively
promoting the availability of services in French and
encouraging people to ask for it. At the same time,
participants in Yellowknife, and to a somewhat lesser
extent in other communities, emphasized the importance
of francophones always requesting services in French and
submitting a complaint when it is not available. Some
expressed frustration with complaints submitted in the
past that seemed to go nowhere.
A number of participants in different groups made the
point that an active offer will be largely driven by “active
demand”. This call to action was made most strongly by
participants in Yellowknife who urged each other to
consistently request their services in French (rather than
switching to English when the service is not easily
available) and register a complaint when the service is not
available, so that it is noted and recorded.
« Dans le plan stratégique
c’est une responsabilité du
ministère d’évaluer quel
sont ses ressources
humaines bilingue… on en
parle depuis 2010. C’est une
préoccupation pour moi et
qu’on me dise qu’on n’a pas
encore cette information. »
- Inuvik
In the strategic plan the
departments have a
responsibility to evaluate the
bilingual human resources it
already has… we’ve been talking
about it since 2010. It is a
concern to me if I am being told
that we don’t have that
information yet.
One participant said:
"Tant qu’on ne fera pas les demande de service et qu’on se présente et parler
uniquement en français et ne pas changer à l’anglais… Ça prend notre engagement
aussi. Si on ne le fait pas on ne peut pas s’en attendre de voir du changement."
If we don’t ask for those services and we don’t speak in French and we switch to English…
We also have to be committed to it. If we don’t do it, we can’t expect to see things change.
15
Trends among communites are far stronger than differences
Overall, there were far more similarities among the opinions expressed in the different communities
than there were differences. Some of the differences that were noted include:
•
•
•
Expectations with respect to the active offer were slightly more modest in smaller
communities. Participants more readily suggested alternate service delivery models that did
not involve immediate in-person service. This expectation was generally higher in
Yellowknife.
Overall, the participants in the smaller communities seemed to observe little or no evidence
of the active offer of French language services by GNWT departments at this time. They
were also more likely to talk about personal knowledge of individual staff in departments
who spoke French.
Not surprisingly, the location and current political and economic concerns of communities
seemed to play a role in their priorities. For example,
o In Inuvik, the current energy crisis led to a more interest in seeing information on
energy conservation programs offered by ENR.
o Access to specialized evaluation services in French for children was a significant
priority in Yellowknife where educators and families would be able to readily
observe these services being provided in English. This may not be the case in
smaller communities where access to these services may also be more limited in
English.
o Services for tourists were ranked much more highly in Fort Smith than any other
community, which is likely reflective of its proximity to the Alberta border and to
Wood Buffalo National Park.
Observations related to communications and consultation with the community
Participants seemed to appreciate the consultation exercise overall and left with a much stronger
understanding of both the strategic plan and the range of services offered by the GNWT.
Nonetheless, some participants expressed concerns with the methodology and the fact that only a
sample list of services was provided for voting, rather than the full inventory. Some suggested the GNWT
pursue additional consultation and surveys, possibly using online tools.
Taking this concern into account, it is important to acknowledge that the prioritization results can only
really show themes and trends, and should not be taken as an exhaustive ranking exercise of all possible
services.
16
Community summaries
Fort Smith
The Fort Smith consultation session was the first of four sessions. It was held at the Northern Lights
Museum on November 9, 2013.
In all, 31 members of the community attended. Participants showed strong interest, asked questions and
actively engaged in the discussion and prioritization exercise. As there was a mix of French-language
speakers and anglophones (many who were parents of children in the immersion program), a bilingual
format was used for the discussion and the French-speakers in the room generally provided their
comments in English to ensure the entire group could understand.
Many participants in Fort Smith were the parents of children in the local French-immersion program.
They indicated that education is the key service they require. They feel strongly that French-language
services in education don’t stop at curriculum and teachers, they include the entire “bureaucracy” of
education (e.g. how people are greeted at the school, the language of signage and other documents and
administrative support to the school and teachers). One parent explained that a French-language
education doesn’t just happen in the classroom; it includes a child’s entire experience at school and in
the community. It includes how they experience their government every day. Children need to get the
message that “I can use my French outside the class” and to be motivated to use their language in their
daily lives.
Some participants also expressed a strong interest in having French-language early childhood education
services available in Fort Smith (i.e. daycare).
Discussion on the active offer
•
•
•
•
One person explained that an active offer goes beyond a bilingual greeting; it means you don’t sense
panic in the person serving you when you say “bonjour”.
Participants noted that at the health centre in Fort Smith, the active offer is represented by one
person whom most people know. This provides comfort; however, her responsibilities are much
broader than offering services in French. It was noted that in emergencies or when someone is in
crisis, they need immediate access to someone who speaks their language. That person needs the
flexibility to be able to deal with these situations immediately. It was also noted that in urgent cases,
or when confidentiality is required, it is important to have direct access to the professional you need
(i.e. doctor, nurse) rather than going through an intermediary. One participant noted that the local
hospital is making progress in getting more nurses and doctors who speak French.
Participants said it isn’t enough to simply direct people to a document to read when they have
questions, particularly when dealing with a complex subject or long documents.
It was suggested that it could be useful to have someone designated as a point person to facilitate
access to French-language services in the community, but this person needs to be given the time,
17
•
•
information and resources to play this role. Right now, people do this off the side of their desk and
are known only by word of mouth.
It was considered important to have signage at the airport and when driving into town to let people
know they can get government services in French and how to access these services. There should
also be a capacity to provide services to tourists and visitors in French by phone and in person.
Some participants indicated that it seems unrealistic to expect all government departments in Fort
Smith to offer all manner of services in French. In some cases, it might mean being connected with
someone in Yellowknife by phone, or by Skype. One person concluded that it may even be a better
solution to have quick access to a person over the phone or Skype than to try and keep a local
position filled.
Priorities
Top rankings were given to:
•
•
•
•
Programs that related to children and schools, such as
o MACA Active After School Program
o ECE Early Childhood Development Program
o ECE Certification of Teachers in the NWT
ITI Visitor Information Services
Legal Aid
Community Health Centres
The second tier of ranking included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Emergency measures (added to the list by participants under MACA)
Elections NWT
Employment training, resume writing, etc. (added to the list by participants under ECE)
Camping and campground reservations service
Child protection
Community counselling program
Family violence resources
Medical travel (added by participants under HSS)
Public health (added by participants under HSS)
Highway conditions and weight restrictions
Due to a late start, there was no time available to debrief with the group on these results.
18
Sample quotes
“I understand that you’re not here to talk about education but it strikes me that it’s about embedding
the French language in the life of the Northwest Territories and it’s really hard not to talk about
education if you are talking about that. I wonder if we could talk a little bit about how what you’re
talking about tonight is paralleled in the education system. In that you mention signage for instance. We
have a wonderful French immersion program and it’s flourishing… it’s on the road, but we need to take it
to the next level now. And that includes having bilingual washroom door signs. I don’t know that the
school secretary has to be able to speak French to greet all the phone calls she receives.”
“Even within the federal government and the territorial government, both of them will answer the
phone in both languages but then if you ever say ‘bonjour’ 99% of the time they panic and they put you
on hold and tell you in English I have to find someone who speaks French to get back to you.”
“We are a small community; we associate the offer with a person. If I call the health centre, I know that
99% of the time Marie-Christine will answer and I can talk to her in French. If I didn’t know that or if I just
moved to town and didn’t know Marie-Christine, I wouldn’t know and think that there is a French lady
that works at the health centre who can help me. You learn over time who is there that can help you, but
if I didn’t know I might be a little bit hesitant to ask.”
“I don’t want to be stuck with someone who says, ‘Oh, here… I can give you all the services in English if
you want, but if you need it in French here are some papers you can read. I want to deal with a person.”
“Even if there was one person who speaks French that you could contact in the community and they can
facilitate whatever you need or the question you have. They could navigate and help you get the
information you need. But that means you need to know that person is there, as soon as you get into
town.”
“Si tu vas à l’hôpital puis c’est pour quelque chose d’urgent ou confidentiel avec qui tu vas parler? La
secrétaire est une bonne personne pour de l’aide, mais ce n’est pas égal à la personne qui donne le
service. Il faut être capable de parler avec un docteur ou une infirmière en français. ”
TRANSLATION: If you go to the hospital and you want to talk to someone about something
urgent or confidential, the secretary’s a good person to go to for help. But it’s not the same as
the person who’s providing the service. You have to be able to speak with the doctor or a nurse in
French.
19
Inuvik
The Inuvik consultation session was held at the Community Centre on January 25, 2014. This was a
smaller group of seven (7) residents that included members of the local francophone association,
government employees and teachers. Participants attributed the low turnout to the recent departure of
two families in the community and a number of other activities taking place in the community that day.
The consultation took place entirely in French.
Participants appreciated being asked about their priorities, but said they remained skeptical about seeing
any real improvements as a result. They also expressed some concern with such a small group and
stressed the importance of follow ups like surveys and online tools. Additional resource materials and
questionnaires were provided and participants were strongly encouraged to have friends and colleagues
provide their input via fax or email before February 15 to have it reflected in the reporting; however, no
additional forms were submitted.
Discussion on the active offer
The following are some key points made by participants during this discussion:
•
•
•
•
•
•
It is really important to make it clear that French-services are available at the point of entry into
a service. Signage and bilingual greetings/messages are key, but they need to be backed up with
reliable service access. It is not always necessary for the first point of contact to be able to speak
French, but they should know what to do right away and be at ease doing it.
The GNWT should identify and make better use of existing bilingual staff (francophone and
French-speaking). You can’t force people to offer services in French, but you can create bilingual
positions, support French-speaking staff in developing their language skills, and clearly
communicate who the French-speaking resources are both internally and to the public so they
can be accessed. It was noted that French-speaking employees can’t be simply placed in an
entirely English-speaking environment without any support because they will feel isolated.
One person suggested that it would be helpful to have 2-3 GNWT staff designated to assist
francophones in finding information and accessing services across government. This suggestion
seemed to have support from the group, though the point was made that this couldn’t just be a
referral service, these individuals would need to be able to actively accompany people in some
cases to interpret, etc.
The GNWT could make use of volunteers to provide French-language supports in the community
and offer these people training to accompany people who need assistance.
Participants expressed frustration with the length of time it is taking to see change given how
long it has been since the court decision and the development of the strategic plan. One
participant indicated that the HR assessments should be done already. There was some
scepticism that this consultation would result in any noticeable improvements.
Active offer is the opposite of “random offer” or “offer by chance”, which how they see things
happening currently. The offer needs to be intentional and systematic. This means planned,
communicated and evaluated.
20
•
•
•
Someone needs to be responsible for coordinating French-language communications and
services in the community. They need to plan, provide orientation and provide leadership across
the system.
There have to be designated bilingual positions.
There needs to be more of a sense of openness to French within the GNWT in Inuvik than what
people feel right now.
Priority services
Health, social services and justice were the focus, particularly in stressful situations. Participants said
there is no sense right now in Inuvik that a person can even request these services in French.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The heaviest focus by far was on front line health-care services. Participants indicated that there was
really no evidence of an active offer in Inuvik right now. They said there is no signage and little or no
communication with the public about how to access health care services in French.
One man talked about the fact that he needs a knee replacement and that he is considering getting
the procedure in Québec because, while he speaks English well enough, his wife does not and he is
concerned about her ability to communicate with the medical staff caring for him here in the NWT.
A mother shared her fears about what would happen if she had to go to the emergency room with
her daughter and couldn’t find the words she needed to communicate with the medical staff in
English.
Another participant shared a story about how they had called to get their health card and when they
pressed ‘2’ for French, they were looped back to the English introduction. While this had happened
some time ago, it had left an impression about the GNWT’s commitment to French-language service.
One participant indicated there is a local francophone who relies on social assistance and social
housing and comes to the francophone cultural association for help to navigate the system, which is
not the role of their association.
The group discussed the perceived challenge of getting court services in French and some thought
that there may have been a case where court proceedings had been cancelled or delayed due to lack
of French-speaking jury members or judge.
Participants were quite open to accessing some services through alternative means, but noted that
the loss of the Health phone line took away one bilingual resource that francophone residents there
did use to access health information in French.
Participants also added “access to health services when travelling outside the NWT” to the list of HSS
services and it ranked as a second-tier priority in the voting exercise.
Other priority areas identified in the voting process were:
•
•
•
•
•
Early childhood program
Teacher certification
Career opportunities – Applying for a GNWT job
Visitor information services
Human Rights Commission
21
•
•
•
•
•
•
Social housing
Finance forms and permits
GNWT signage (Public Works)
ENR communications and services related to energy efficiency programs in French (in discussion, this
was related to the energy challenges Inuvik is facing right now).
Funding programs in general received quite a few votes (for youth, NGO, business)
Department of Transportation services
Sample quotes
“Je sais qu’il y en a des fonctionnaires francophones qui travaillent seulement en anglais, mais est ce que
leur français pourrait être utilisé aussi? "
TRANSLATION: I know there are francophone public servants who work exclusively in English, but
could their French also be used?
“On a deux ou trois étudiants qui vont finir en immersion cette année. Si on pouvait leur trouver une job
d’été, ils commenceraient à connaitre le milieu avant d’aller à l’université. C’est une motivation pour eux
de revenir ici travailler. »
TRANSLATION: We have two or three immersion students who will be finishing school this year. If
we could find them a summer job, they would get familiar with this environment before they go
to university. It would be great motivation for them to come back to work here.
"Les ministères ne peuvent pas obliger des employées de travailler en français, mais ils peuvent designer
des postes bilingues et offrir des incitatifs."
TRANSLATION : The departments can’t force their employees to work in French, but they could
design bilingual positions and offer incentives.
"Il y a un défi d’avoir un seul individu qui est destiné à offrir le service en français. Avec ses collègues, si
on ne leur parle pas du plan stratégique ou des obligations qu’il y a, là il peut être frileux un peu pour
utiliser sa langue."
TRANSLATION : There is a challenge to having a single individual designated to offer a service in
French. If their colleagues aren’t aware of the strategic plan or its obligations, these individuals
may be a bit nervous about using their language at work.
"Le signal vocal est important, mais si tu commences à leur parler en français et ils ne savent que ça… Il
faut qu’il y ait une capacité de suivi, sinon ça devient très caricatural. Ce n’est pas ça le sens de l’offre
active. "
TRANSLATION: That verbal cue is important, but if you start to talk to someone in French and
that’s all they know how to say… There has to be an ability to follow through, otherwise it
become a just a caricature. That is not the meaning of active offer.
22
"Au niveau de l’urgence surtout je pense qu’il devrait toujours y avoir une personne qui parle en français.
S’il arrive quelque chose à ma fille et je suis seule, en état de panique je cherche mes mots en anglais. Si
j’appelle pour avoir une information rapide, on devrait pouvoir avoir quelqu’un qui parle français tout de
suite."
TRANSLATION: I think at emergency there should always be someone who can speak French. In
my case, if something happened to my daughter and I was alone, in a state of panic, I would be
searching for the right words in English. If I call to get information quickly, I should be able to get
someone who can speak in French right away.
23
Yellowknife
The Yellowknife consultation session was held in the auditorium of the Prince of Wales Northern
Heritage Centre on February 1st, 2014. In all, 40 people participated in the consultation and the group
was highly engaged on the topic and seemed to appreciate the opportunity to provide input. The group
included members of local francophone not-for-profit organizations, educators, local business people
and government employees. The consultation took place entirely in French.
Discussion of the active offer
This was an issue of significant interest for Yellowknife participants. They expressed quite a bit of
frustration with the active offer provided by the GNWT at this time. Due to the size of the group,
participants were divided into three smaller working groups to discuss this issue and report back.
Interestingly, the groups identified fairly similar issues in their discussions, notably:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The service needs to appear open and receptive to French requests (signage, reception,
websites, etc.) Many people felt that the current French offering is cosmetic at best and leads
those who can communicate in English to simply switch to English to ensure they get the
information they need and in a reasonable timeframe. Things like poor translation and poor
front line communications decreases their confidence that there is any real commitment or
depth to the French-language service.
A number of participants said that government reports and documents should be made
available in French in a timely way. Other jurisdictions do this and should provide a good model
for the GNWT (i.e. New Brunswick).
For urgent and confidential services, French-language service must be provided in person and in
an appropriate timeframe. This doesn’t only mean someone who can speak French, but
someone who is properly trained in the subject matter and has all the terminology they need.
They need to feel comfortable offering the service in French.
While some participants said that they wanted access to French-language services throughout
the system, many others indicated that a quality French-language reception and effective/timely
referral services could be adequate if done properly.
Active offer means actively marketing and promoting the availability of French-language services
to make sure people are aware and ask for the service.
The timeliness of services was important to participants in Yellowknife. For example, they one
person said it should not take longer to get a from processed because a person chooses to fill it
out in French.
In a follow up email, one participant suggested that the GNWT and FFT agree on a more detailed
definition of the active offer, otherwise, there is too much room for interpretation and
misunderstandings.
24
Priority services
The multi-voting process revealed a range of interests in the group, though a few program areas stood
out quite strongly as common priorities:
•
•
•
Stanton Territorial Health Authority was the highest priority with more than half of all
participants rating it as a top priority. Community health care centres also rated quite high.
Interestingly, however, two service areas added to the service list by participants were among
those that garnered the highest priority ratings:
o One participant added “Services spécialisés d’évaluation pédagogique” (Specialized
educational assessment services) to the list of services under Health and Social Services,
explaining there was an unacceptable lack of access to diagnostic services for children
with learning challenges. Subsequently, more than half of the participants voted for this
service as a top priority.
o “Promotion and recruitment” was added under the Department of Human Resources
and was also ranked as a top level priority by more than half of the participants. There
was a significant amount of discussion on this point. Participants felt strongly that the
GNWT is not doing enough to recruit francophones.
Other services that received high ratings:
o Grants to not-for-profits for special projects (the facilitator confirmed in the debrief that
this was not simply a request for more money for francophone groups, but rather a
desire to have the program provide application and grant information in French).
o Submit a claim for workplace compensation with WSCC.
o MACA’s Active After School program.
o Access to court services in French (i.e. French trial) was added by the group and was
ranked highly by several participants.
o Early childhood program.
Most participants said they found the choices were straightforward for them (easy to decide what to
prioritize). Some participants indicated, however, that it was challenging to do this exercise and feel
confident in their priority selection when they did not have the full list of GNWT services to the public.
One participant noted in a follow up email that some services that already exist in French were not
mentioned. For example, the Conseil de développement économique des TNO offers services in
partnership with ITI et ECE:
•
•
•
Employment services for ECE in Yellowknife and the South Slave
Maintenance of some external economic development websites for ITI
Promotion of the NWT as a place to live, work, visit or invest such as Come Make Your Mark /
“Faites le saut” and “Destination Canada”.
25
Other points
•
•
•
•
Participants said it is important to communicate the value of French-language service within the
GNWT so that English-speaking staff understand the role they can play and francophone staff can
feel valued and welcome as part of the solution.
A number of participants raised and reinforced the point that an active offer will be driven by “active
demand”. Participants urged each other to consistently request their services in French (rather than
switching to English when the service is not easily available) and register a complaint when the
service is not available, so that it is noted and recorded.
Participants expressed some frustration with the pace of change in the GNWT and indicated they
hoped to see a stronger commitment and tangible results in the near future.
One participant made a few specific recommendations in a follow-up email with respect to
communications and consultation:
o The GNWT should conduct a survey of existing services to get a better idea of what the
francophone population actually wants because they felt the number of people at the
consultation was not representative enough.
o The full inventory of GNWT services should be communicated when it is available.
o A list of the current bilingual GNWT staff should be created and a way to identify oneself as
francophone should be available during the hiring process.
o A clear process should be provided for submitting a complaint to the Commissioner and
communicate it to the French community.
Sample quotes
"Il devrait y avoir une place sur tous les formulaires du gouvernement où on demande si tu veux qu’on
communique avec toi en français ou en anglais. Ça c’est la première place où demander. Après ça, ton
dossier serait marqué comme cette personne est francophone. "
TRANSLATION: There should be a spot on government forms where they ask if you want to be
served in English or French. They could do it there first. After that, they could put ‘Francophone’
on your file.
"Un sondage sur les services actuels devrait être mis en place afin d’avoir une meilleur idée de ce que la
population veut réellement."
TRANSLATION: A survey on existing services should be done to have a better idea of what people
really want.
"J’ai réalisé comment ignorante j’étais de tous les services qui sont offerts (par le GTNO)."
TRANSLATION: I realized just how much I didn’t know about all the services that are available
(from the GNWT).
26
"Il y avait une réclamation d’une des éducatrices de la garderie avait fait à WSCC et ils m’ont appelé pour
faire la traduction de son rapport qu’elle avait fait en français. Ça c‘était pas acceptable."
TRANSLATION: One of the daycare educators had put in a claim to the WSCC. They called me to
translate her report, which was all in French. That’s unacceptable.
"On pourrait faire deux offres d’emploi pour le même poste, une pour une personne bilingue et l’autre
pas. Il pourrait y avoir deux façons d’entrer pour le même poste. Si personne applique sur le poste
bilingue, ça va au moins faire une offre active de recrutement et on peut démonter qu’on a essayé."
TRANSLATION: You could have two job postings for the same position, one seeking a bilingual
person and the other not. There could be two ways to get in for the same job. If no one applies on
the bilingual position, at least they’d be making an effort to recruit [bilingual people]. It would
show they tried.
27
Hay River
The Hay River consultation session was held at École Boréale on February 8th, 2014. In all, nine (9)
people participated in the consultation. This was a smaller group, but nonetheless included
representatives from the local francophone association, educators, government employees and people
working in the private sector. There was one anglophone participant (a parent of a student at the school)
who took part in the first half of the discussion. The majority of the discussion took place in French with
translations provided as needed.
Discussion of the active offer
•
•
•
•
•
•
For this group, much of the active offer discussion focused on bilingual signage and greetings.
Participants were clear, however, that these things were only meaningful if they were supported
by meaningful follow through: either direct service or a timely referral.
At this time, participants’ perception is that there is little or no French signage in Hay River.
Participants generally agreed that it would be helpful to identify who the French-speaking
resources in a department are and to give them some visibility, either through signage, name
tags or some other identifier, so francophone clients would be aware of them and feel
comfortable asking for service in French. They indicated that currently, a person needs to know
who the francophone employees are and ask them directly. They also described the current use
of bilingual employees within departments as ad hoc.
Some participants emphasized that creating workplaces that are open to French is key to the
active offer. In Hay River, there is lingering unease that followed a situation in the past where an
employee with HSS had been reprimanded for speaking French at work. This situation has been
corrected and one participant indicated that the atmosphere had improved quite a bit, but
people still aren’t entirely at ease speaking French in the workplace even with clients.
To be able to provide an active offer, participants said the GNWT must also recruit and hire
bilingual staff and raise awareness internally of the importance and value of offering services in
French so these employees feel comfortable and supported.
For the active offer, participants thought that documents and websites should be available in
French as a standard. They noted that documents generally seemed to be available in French, at
least for health materials.
Priority services
Voting patterns were rather spread across programs in Hay River, though a few clear priorities did
emerge.
•
Health services were clearly a key priority, with the health card, local health centre and Stanton
Territorial Health Authority topping the list. Immunization services were also identified as a
secondary priority. Participants made a point of saying they are looking for an active offer of
services in health and an assurance that critical services will be available at all times in French
within reasonable wait times. Their primary interest in Stanton was related to accessing
specialists if they are needed.
28
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Participants had a lot to say about the challenge of engaging with the medical system when a
person is in pain or crisis. In particularly, they talked about the difficulty in finding the right
words in these situations and understanding what is being asked.
Most of the sample ECE programs also ranked quite highly, particularly the Early childhood
program. MACA’s Active After School program received similarly high ratings, indicating an
interest in programs focused on children.
In keeping with this theme, the Teacher Certification and Student Financial Assistance programs,
ranked as a secondary priorities.
Notably, Hay River participants seemed to place a high importance on arts and culture (Arts
Council, Northern Arts Festival, NWT Arts Program)
Forms and permits provided by the Department of Finance were also rated very highly.
Participants explained that when a person is dealing with complex forms that have legal
implications, it is important to be able to fill them out in one’s own language.
The Department of Transportation was identified for both drivers licenses and, as a secondary
concern, highway conditions and weight restrictions.
Other services that were identified as priorities in the voting process included:
o Fishing permits
o Applying for a GNWT job
o Internships – Northern Graduate Employment Program
o Court services
o Grants for non-profit organizations
o Community counselling programs
o NWTHC’s Contribution Assistance for Repairs and Enhancements (CARE)
While it was not prioritized by many people, one participant did note that he voted for
submitting a claim for a workplace injury (WSCC) because he had had a workplace accident and
would have preferred to go through that process in his own language. This highlighted the fact
that, until someone needs a service, they may not recognize its importance to them.
Sample quotes
"Y’a pas d’indication quand on rentre dans l’hôpital. Y’a rien pour dire ‘Ici on parle français’."
TRANSLATION: There isn’t any indication when you enter the hospital. There’s nothing that says
that French is spoken there.
"Ca dépend combien de temps ça prend, si c’est tout de suite pas grave, mais si c’est ‘revient dans une
heure’ c’est pas la même chose. "
TRANSLATION: It depends on how long it’s going to take. It’s okay if it’s right away. But if they
tell you to come back in an hour, that’s a whole different story.
"Même une petite épinglette qui dit ‘Bonjour’ ça aiderait."
TRANSLATION: Even a little pin that says ‘Bonjour’ would help.
29
"Avant on avait plus de friction ici quand on parlait en français au travail, mais maintenant ce n’est pas
aussi pire."
TRANSLATION: Before, there’d be more friction here if you spoke French at work, but now things
aren’t as bad.
"Électroniquement ça devrait être disponible tout de suite avec aucun problème (informations en
francais)."
TRANSLATION: (Information in French) should be available electronically right away without any
problem.
"Moi ça été assez facile de choisir. Je savais où mettre mes boutons. Surtout les rouges. J’ai visé
beaucoup la santé en premier."
TRANSLATION: It was pretty easy for me to decide. I knew where I wanted to put the round
stickers, especially the red ones. Health was pretty much my number one concern.
"Y’en a plusieurs personnes qui parlent en français à l’hôpital le jour, mais j’ai l’impression qu’en pleine
nuit, si tu vas aux urgences je ne suis pas certaine que ce ça va être facile. J’ai l’impression qu’il va falloir
attendre. Et expliquer quelque chose en anglais quand tu es malade et quand t’es un peu en panique ce
n’est pas aussi facile."
TRANSLATION: There are several people at the hospital during the day who can speak French.
But I feel as though if you went to the Emergency Department in the middle of the night, it
probably wouldn’t be all that easy. You can ask, but my guess is you’d have to wait. Plus,
explaining something in English when you’re sick and stressed isn’t easy.
"Disons que tu veux ouvrir un coffee shop. Servir ton café en anglais c’est pas pire, ça va. Mais ouvrir ta
business et essayer de se débrouiller pour faire toute ta paperasse pour ton entreprise en anglais… c’est
une autre affaire. C’est tout des formulaires légaux, c’est plus compliqué."
TRANSLATION: Say you want to open a coffee shop. Serving coffee in English is one thing. But
opening a business and trying to look after all the paperwork for it in English is a whole different
story. There are all those legal forms. It’s a lot harder.
"Mes amis et ma famille parlent pas anglais, donc s’il viennent ici, le kiosk à l’entrée des Territoires c’est
tout en anglais. Je pense que ça pourrait attirer des touristes d’offrir des informations en français."
TRANSLATION: My family and friends don’t speak English. If they were to come here, they’d see
that everything’s in English at the booth at the border. I think more tourists would come here if
they could get information in French.
30
Annex A
Community multi-voting summary tables
Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services
Fort Smith consultation – Multi-voting results (November 9, 2013)
Legend:
Highest priority rating
Secondary priority rating
Other notable priorities
Services added by participants are indicated by grey shading and *italics.
Commission de la sécurité au travail et de l’indemnisation des travailleurs (CSTIT)
Workers' Safety & Compensation Commission (WSCC)
Service
Rouge/red
1X 3pts = 3
Jaune/yellow
2X 2pts = 4
Bleu/blue
1X 1pt = 1
Soumettre une demande
d’indemnisation en cas d’accident en
milieu de travail
0
2X 2pts = 4
1X 1pt = 1
Inscrire une entreprise à
l’indemnisation des accidentés du
travail
0
0
1X 1pt = 1
Signaler les pratiques de travail
dangereuses
Report unsafe work practices
Total score
8
5
Submit a claim for workplace injury
compensation
1
Register a business for Workers’
Compensation coverage
Ministère des affaires autochtones et des relations intergouvernementales (MAARI)
Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR)
Service
Communications générales sur les
traités et l’autonomie
gouvernementale des Autochtones
des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (TNO)
General Communications about Treaties
and Aboriginal Self-government in the
NWT
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
3X 2pts = 6
Bleu/blue
2X 1pt = 2
Total score
8
Ministère des Affaires municipales et communautaires (MAMC)
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Licences d’exploitation des
0
2X 2pts = 4
commerces
Bleu/blue
1X 1pt = 1
5
Business Licenses
Location et achat de terres
1X 3pts = 3
0
1X 1pt = 1
Programme En forme après l’école
20X 3pts = 60
4X 2pts = 8
0
Services d’évaluation foncière
0
0
0
Emergency measures
10X 3pts = 30
2X2pts = 4
3X1pt = 3
* Sports and recreation
3X 3pts = 9
4X 2pts = 8
1X 1pt = 1
* Arctic Winter Games, etc.
1X 3pts = 3
3X 2pts = 6
2X 1pt = 2
* Get Active Program
1X 3pts = 3
3 X 2pts = 6
1X 1pt = 1
* Volunteer recognition
0
2 X 2pts = 4
0
* KidSport
1 X 3pts = 3
2 X 2pts = 4
0
Rouge/red
9X 3pts = 27
Jaune/yellow
1X 2pts = 2
Bleu/blue
0
Tribunal d’arbitrage des droits de la
personne
0
3X 2pts = 6
1X 1pt = 1
Commission des droits de la personne
1X 3pts = 3
2X 2pts = 4
3 X 1pt = 3
Visites guidées de l’Assemblée
législative
0
2X 2pts = 4
2 X 1pt = 2
3X 3pts = 9
2X 2pts = 4
5 X 1pt = 5
Leasing and Purchasing Land
Active After School Program
Assessment Services
Total score
4
68
0
37
18
11
10
4
7
Assemblée législative
Legislative Assembly
Service
Élections TNO
Elections NWT
Human Rights Adjudication Panel
Human Rights Commission
Legislative Assembly Tours
* Legislative services (i.e. information to
the public about what goes on in the
Legislature)
* One person chose to place a red sticker on the department as a whole.
Total score
29
7
10
6
18
Ministère de l’Éducation, de la Culture et de la Formation (MÉCF)
Department of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE)
Service
Rouge/red
1 X 3pts = 3
Jaune/yellow
2X 2pts = 4
Bleu/blue
2X 1pt = 2
Services à la petite enfance
21 X 3pts = 63
7 X 2pts = 14
2X 1pt = 2
Programme Enfants en santé
1 X 3pts = 3
2 X 2pts = 4
3X 1pt = 3
Certification des enseignants des TNO
18X 3pts = 54
6 X 2pts = 12
1X 1pt= 1
Programme d’aide financière aux
étudiants (AFE)
3X 3pts = 9
3 X 2pts = 6
0
Normes d’emploi
0
0
2X 1pt = 1
* Employment training and resume
writing
2 X 3pts = 6
7 X 2pts = 14
3X 1 pt = 3
Services d’éducation et de sensibilisation
du Centre du patrimoine septentrional
Prince-de-Galles
Museum Education and Outreach Services
Early Childhood Program
Healthy Children Initiative
Teacher Certification for the NWT
Student Financial Assistance Program
(SFA)
Employment Standards
Total score
9
79
10
67
15
2
23
Ministère de l’Environnement et des Ressources naturelles (MERN)
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR)
Service
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
1X 2pts = 2
Bleu/blue
0
Permis de pêche sportive
1 X 3pts = 3
4 X 2pts = 8
0
Permis de chasse
2 X 3pts = 6
0
0
Programme de recyclage des
contenants de boissons
4 X 3pts = 12
2 X 2pts = 4
0
Permis de coupe de bois
0
0
1X 1pt = 1
1
Programme de mesures incitatives
pour l’efficacité énergétique
0
0
1X 1pt = 1
1
Programme des technologies
d’énergie de remplacement
0
0
0
0
Programme d’aide à l’économie
d’énergie
0
0
2X 1 pt = 2
2
* Report a poacher
1 X 3pts = 3
1 X 2pts = 2
1X 1 pt = 1
* Spill reporting (post-devolution)
* Forest fire advisory and reporting
0
4X 3 pts = 12
0
1X 2 pts = 2
2X 1 pt = 2
2X 1 pt = 2
Collecte des déchets ménagers
dangereux
Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Event
Sport Fishing License
Hunting License
Beverage Container Program
Permit to Cut Wood
Total score
2
11
6
16
Energy Efficiency Incentive Program
Alternative Energy Technologies Program
Energy Conservation Program
6
2
15
Ministère de l’Exécutif
Department of Executive
Service
Fonds de stabilisation affecté aux
organisations non gouvernementales
(ONG)
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
0
Bleu/blue
0
0
6 X 2pts = 12
1X 1pt = 1
Total score
0
The NGO Stabilization Fund
Subventions aux organisations sans
but lucratif pour des projets spéciaux
Grants to Non-profit organization for
special Projects
13
Société d’habitation des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (SHTNO)
NWT Housing Corporation
Service
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
4X 2pts = 8
Bleu/blue
0
Logements sociaux
2X 3pts = 6
4X 2pts = 8
4X 1pt = 4
Programme de supplément au loyer
transitoire
0
3X 2pts = 6
1 X 1pt = 1
Contribution financière pour les
réparations et l’amélioration (CARE)
Contributing Assistance for Repairs &
Enhancements (CARE)
Public Housing
Transitional Rent Supplement Program
Total score
8
18
7
Ministère de l’Industrie, du Tourisme et de l’Investissement (MITI)
Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment (ITI)
Service
Rouge/red
4X 3pts = 12
Jaune/yellow
8X 2pts = 16
Bleu/blue
0
Bureau du cinéma
1 X 3pts = 3
2X 2pts = 4
0
Programme des arts des TNO
0
6X 2pts = 12
0
Programme d’appui aux
entrepreneurs et au développement
économique (PAEDE)
1X 3pts = 3
4 X 2pts = 8
0
Services d’information touristique
21X 3 pts = 63
0
1X 1pt = 1
64
4X 3 pts = 12
1X 2 pts = 2
0
14
Système de réservation des terrains
de camping
Campgrounds/Campground Reservation
System
Film Commission
NWT Arts Program
Total score
28
7
12
11
Support for Entrepreneurs and Economic
Development Policy (SEED)
Visitor Information Services
* Small business support
* Two people chose to place a red sticker on the department as a whole.
*Due to an oversight, the Department of Finance was not included in the Fort Smith voting process. This was corrected
in the following three consultations.*
Ministère de la Justice
Department of Justice
Service
Régie du logement des TNO
Rouge/red
1 X 3pts = 3
Jaune/yellow
2X 2pts = 4
Bleu/blue
0
Registre des sociétés
0
5 X 2pts = 10
0
Programme d’exécution des
ordonnances alimentaires
0
0
4X 1pt = 1
Aide juridique
12X 3pts = 36
1X 2pts = 2
0
Greffe du tribunal
0
0
2X 1 pt = 2
* Emergency protection orders
5 X 3pts = 15
0
2X 1 pt = 2
Rouge/red
2X 3pts = 6
Jaune/yellow
5X 2pts = 10
Bleu/blue
1X 1pt = 1
Stages : Programme d’emploi des
diplômés du Nord
3X 3pts = 9
1X 2pts = 2
2X 1pt = 2
Appels de nominations de personnel
0
1X 2pts = 2
4X 1pt = 4
Programme d’emploi d’été des
étudiants
3X 3pts = 9
4X 2pts = 8
1X 1pt = 1
NWT Rental Office
Corporate Registries
Maintenance Enforcement Program
Legal Aid
Court Registry
Total score
7
10
4
38
2
17
Ministère des Ressources humaines (MRH)
Department of Human Resources
Service
Perspectives de carrière : postuler
pour un emploi au GTNO
Career Opportunities – Applying for a
GNWT Job
Internships – Northern Graduate
Employment Program
Staffing Appeals
Summer Student Employment Program
Total score
17
13
6
18
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS)
Department of Health and Social Services (HSS)
Service
Certificat de naissance
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
2X 2pts = 4
Bleu/blue
1X 1pt = 1
Protection de l’enfance
7 X 3pts = 21
0
0
Lutte contre les maladies
transmissibles
2 X 3pts = 6
0
2X 1pt = 2
Programme de counseling
communautaire
7 X 3pts = 21
0
0
Centres de santé communautaires
19X 3pts = 57
1X 2pts = 2
1X 1pt= 1
Ressources concernant la violence
familiale
8X 3pts = 24
0
0
Carte d’assurance-maladie
0
2X 2pts = 4
1X 1pts = 1
Immunisation
2X 3pts = 6
0
0
Manuel d’information pour les
personnes âgées
1X 3pts = 3
0
1X 1pts = 1
* Medical travel
7X 3pts = 21
0
0
* Adoption commissionner
3X 3pts = 9
0
1X 1pt = 1
* Services for the aged and handicap
2X 3pts = 6
0
0
* Public health
8 X 3pts = 24
2 X 2pts = 4
1X 1pt = 1
Birth Certificate
Child Protection
Communicable Disease Control
Community Counselling Program
Community Health Centres
Family Violence Resources
Health Care Card
Immunization
Seniors’ Information Handbook
Total score
5
21
8
21
60
24
5
6
4
Hôpital territorial Stanton
Stanton Territorial Hospital
21
10
6
29
Ministère des Transports
Department of Transportation
Service
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
7X 2pts = 14
Bleu/blue
0
Renseignements sur les départs et
arrivées des vols
0
5X 2pts = 10
0
Conditions routières et limites de
poids des véhicules
7 X 3pts = 21
2X 2pts = 4
0
Rouge/red
0
Jaune/yellow
0
Bleu/blue
0
1X 3pts = 3
0
1X 1pt = 1
Permis de conduire
Driver Licensing
Flight arrival & departure information
Highway conditions and weight restriction
Total score
14
10
25
Ministère des Travaux publics et des Services (MTPS)
Department of Public Works and Services (PWS)
Service
Marchés publics
Government Procurement
Sécurité relative aux projets
mécaniques
Mechanical Safety
Total score
0
4
Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services
Inuvik – Multi-voting results (January 25, 2014)
Legend:
Highest priority rating
Secondary priority rating
Other notable priorities
Services added by participants are indicated by grey shading and *italics.
Commission de la sécurité au travail et de l’indemnisation des travailleurs (CSTIT)
Workers' Safety & Compensation Commission (WSCC)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
1X2pts=2
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Soumettre une demande
d’indemnisation en cas d’accident en
milieu de travail
1X2pts=2
1X1pt=1
3
Inscrire une entreprise à
l’indemnisation des accidentés du
travail
1X2pts=2
1X1pt=1
3
Signaler les pratiques de travail
dangereuses
Report unsafe work practices
Total score
3
Submit a claim for workplace injury
compensation
Register a business for Workers’
Compensation coverage
Ministère des affaires autochtones et des relations intergouvernementales (MAARI)
Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR)
Service
Communications générales sur les
traités et l’autonomie
gouvernementale des Autochtones
des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (TNO)
General Communications about Treaties
and Aboriginal Self-government in the
NWT
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
1X1pt= 1
Total score
1
Ministère des Affaires municipales et communautaires (MAMC)
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Licences d’exploitation des
1X2pts=2
Bleu/blue
commerces
Total score
2
Business Licenses
Location et achat de terres
1X2pts=2
Programme En forme après l’école
1X2pts=2
Services d’évaluation foncière
1X2pts=2
Subventions pour offrir des
programmes pour les jeunes
* SAO training
2X2pts=4
Leasing and Purchasing Land
Active After School Program
Assessment Services
2
2X1pt=2
4
2
2X1pt=2
6
1X1pt=1
1
Assemblée législative
Legislative Assembly
Service
Élections TNO
Elections NWT
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
Tribunal d’arbitrage des droits de la
personne
Jaune/yellow
1X2pts=2
Bleu/blue
Total score
5
1X2pts=2
2
2X3pts=4
13
Human Rights Adjudication Panel
Commission des droits de la personne
Human Rights Commission
3X3pts=9
Visites guidées de l’Assemblée
législative
Legislative Assembly Tours
* Bureau du greffier
Office of the Clerk
* Bibliothèque de l’Assemblée
Legislative Assembly Library
1X1pt=1
1
Ministère de l’Éducation, de la Culture et de la Formation (MÉCF)
Department of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Services d’éducation et de
sensibilisation du Centre du patrimoine
septentrional Prince-de-Galles
Bleu/blue
2X1pt=2
Total score
2
Museum Education and Outreach Services
Services à la petite enfance
Early Childhood Program
5X3pts=15
Programme Enfants en santé
Healthy Children Initiative
Certification des enseignants des TNO
Teacher Certification for the NWT
2X3pts=6
15
1X2pts=2
2
1X2pts=2
8
Programme d’aide financière aux
étudiants (AFE)
2X1pt=2
2
Student Financial Assistance Program
Normes d’emploi
1X3pts=3
2X1pt=2
5
* Programme des nominés
(immigration)
1X3pts=3
1X1pt=1
4
2X1pt=2
2
Employment Standards
Nominee program (immigration)
* Conseil des Arts (Musée)
(subventions aux artistes)
Arts Council (Museum) (grants to artists)
Ministère de l’Environnement et des Ressources naturelles (MERN)
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Collecte des déchets ménagers
dangereux
Bleu/blue
2X1pt=2
Total score
2
Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Event
Permis de pêche sportive
1X1pt=1
1
Permis de chasse
2X1pt=2
2
Sport Fishing License
Hunting License
Programme de recyclage des
contenants de boissons
1X2pts=2
2
Beverage Container Program
1X1pt=1
Permis de coupe de bois
Permit to Cut Wood
1
Programme de mesures incitatives
pour l’efficacité énergétique
2X2pts=4
4
Programme des technologies
d’énergie de remplacement
2X2pts=4
4
Programme d’aide à l’économie
d’énergie
2X2pts=4
4
Energy Efficiency Incentive Program
Alternative Energy Technologies Program
Energy Conservation Program
* Feux de forêt
Forest fires
Ministère de l’Exécutif
Department of Executive
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Fonds de stabilisation affecté aux
organisations non gouvernementales
(ONG)
Bleu/blue
3X1pt=3
Total score
3
The NGO Stabilization Fund
3X1pt=3
Subventions aux organisations sans
but lucratif pour des projets spéciaux
3
Grants to Non-profit organization for
special Projects
Société d’habitation des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (SHTNO)
NWT Housing Corporation
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
Contribution financière pour les
réparations et l’amélioration (CARE)
Contributing Assistance for Repairs &
Enhancements (CARE)
Logements sociaux
Public Housing
2X3pts=6
1X1pt=1
7
Programme de supplément au loyer
transitoire
Transitional Rent Supplement Program
Ministère de l’Industrie, du Tourisme et de l’Investissement (MITI)
Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment (ITI)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Système de réservation des terrains
de camping
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Total score
1
Campgrounds/Campground Reservation
System
Bureau du cinéma
Film Commission
Programme des arts des TNO
NWT Arts Program
Programme d’appui aux
entrepreneurs et au développement
économique (PAEDE)
1X3pts=3
Services d’information touristique
2X3pts=6
3
Support for Entrepreneurs and Economic
Development Policy (SEED)
Visitor Information Services
* Octroi de prêts aux entrepreneurs
Loans to entrepreneurs
2X1pt=2
1X2pts=2
8
2
Ministère des Finances
Department of Finance
Service
Formulaires ou permis concernant :
Les impots;
Les licences d’alcool;
L’inscription des fournisseurs et des clients;
L’inscription au depot direct
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
Jaune/yellow
2X2pts=4
Bleu/blue
Total score
7
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
2X2pts=4
Bleu/blue
Total score
4
Ministère de la Justice
Department of Justice
Service
Régie du logement des TNO
NWT Rental Office
Registre des sociétés
Corporate Registries
1X3pts=3
3
Programme d’exécution des
ordonnances alimentaires
1X1pt=1
1
1X1pt=1
5
Maintenance Enforcement Program
Aide juridique
2X2pts=4
Greffe du tribunal
1X2pts=2
2
* Commissaire d’assermentation
1X2pts=2
2
Legal Aid
Court Registry
Commissioner of Oaths
* Juge de paix
1X3pts
* Juges et jurys francophones (accès)
3Xpts=9
Justice of the Peace
Access to French judges and juries
3
1X2pts=2
11
Ministère des Ressources humaines (MRH)
Department of 3=9 Resources
Service
Perspectives de carrière : postuler
pour un emploi au GTNO
Rouge/red
3X3pts=9
Jaune/yellow
1X2pts=2
Bleu/blue
Total score
11
Career Opportunities – Applying for a
GNWT Job
Stages : Programme d’emploi des
diplômés du Nord
Internships – Northern Graduate
Employment Program
Appels de nominations de personnel
1X2pts=2
2
Programme d’emploi d’été des
étudiants
2X2pts=4
4
Staffing Appeals
Summer Student Employment Program
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS)
Department of Health and Social Services (HSS)
Service
Certificat de naissance
Birth Certificate
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
3
Protection de l’enfance
Child Protection
Lutte contre les maladies
transmissibles
Communicable Disease Control
Programme de counseling
communautaire
1X3pts=3
3
Centres de santé communautaires
5X3pts =15
15
Community Counselling Program
Community Health Centres
Ressources concernant la violence
familiale
Family Violence Resources
2X1pt=2
Carte d’assurance-maladie
Health Care Card
Immunisation
Immunization
1X3pts =3
3
1X1pt=1
Manuel d’information pour les
personnes âgées
2
1
Seniors’ Information Handbook
Hôpital territorial Stanton
2X3pts =6
* Medivac
* Aide pour accès aux services santé
hors territoire (ententes intergouvernementales)
2X3pts =6
2X3pts =6
Stanton Territorial Hospital
Assistance accessing health services when
outside the territory (intergovernmental
agreements)
6
1=1
1=1
7
7
Ministère des Transports
Department of Transportation
Service
Rouge/red
Permis de conduire
Driver Licensing
Jaune/yellow
2X2pts=4
Renseignements sur les départs et
arrivées des vols
1X2pts =2
Conditions routières et limites de
poids des véhicules
1X2pts =2
* Signalisation routière
2X2pts =4
Bleu/blue
Total score
4
2
Flight arrival & departure information
2=2
4
Highway conditions and weight restriction
Road signage
4
Ministère des Travaux publics et des Services (MTPS)
Department of Public Works and Services (PWS)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
Marchés publics
Government Procurement
Sécurité relative aux projets
mécaniques
Mechanical Safety
* Affichage GTNO
GNWT signage
3X3pts=9
9
Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services
Yellowknife – Multi-voting results (February 1, 2014)
Legend:
Highest priority rating
Secondary priority rating
Other notable priorities
Services added by participants are indicated by grey shading and *italics.
Commission de la sécurité au travail et de l’indemnisation des travailleurs (CSTIT)
Workers' Safety & Compensation Commission (WSCC)
Service
Rouge/red
8X3pts =24
Jaune/yellow
3X2pts=6
Soumettre une demande
d’indemnisation en cas d’accident en
milieu de travail
13X3pt=39
3X2pts=6
Inscrire une entreprise à
l’indemnisation des accidentés du
travail
2X3pts=6
1X2pts=2
Signaler les pratiques de travail
dangereuses
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Total score
31
Report unsafe work practices
45
Submit a claim for workplace injury
compensation
5X1pt=5
13
Register a business for Workers’
Compensation coverage
Ministère des affaires autochtones et des relations intergouvernementales (MAARI)
Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR)
Service
Jaune/yellow
3X2pts=6
Bleu/blue
2X1pt=2
Total score
11
Ministère des Affaires municipales et communautaires (MAMC)
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Licences d’exploitation des
7X3pts=21
3X2pts=6
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Total score
28
Communications générales sur les
traités et l’autonomie
gouvernementale des Autochtones
des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (TNO)
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
General Communications about Treaties
and Aboriginal Self-government in the
NWT
commerces
Business Licenses
Location et achat de terres
6X3pts=18
Programme En forme après l’école
9X3pts=27
Services d’évaluation foncière
3X3pts=9
Leasing and Purchasing Land
Active After School Program
Assessment Services
Assemblée législative
3X2pt=6
5X2pts=10
2X1pt=2
26
6X1pt=6
33
1X1pt=1
20
Legislative Assembly
Service
Rouge/red
6X3pts=18
Jaune/yellow
4X2pts=8
Tribunal d’arbitrage des droits de la
personne
6X3pts=18
5X2pts=10
28
Commission des droits de la personne
5X3pts=15
8X2pts=16
31
Visites guidées de l’Assemblée
législative
6X3pts=18
2X2pts=4
2X1pt=2
24
* Hansard
1X3pts=3
3X2pts=6
1X1pt=1
10
Élections TNO
Elections NWT
Bleu/blue
2X1pt=2
Total score
28
Human Rights Adjudication Panel
Human Rights Commission
Legislative Assembly Tours
Ministère de l’Éducation, de la Culture et de la Formation (MÉCF)
Department of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE)
Service
Rouge/red
6X3pts=18
Jaune/yellow
1X2pt=2
Services à la petite enfance
9X3pts=27
1X2pts=2
Programme Enfants en santé
4X3pts=12
2X2pts=4
Certification des enseignants des TNO
9X3pts=27
1X2pts=2
Programme d’aide financière aux
étudiants (AFE)
3X3pts=9
3X2pts=6
5X1pt=5
20
Normes d’emploi
4X3pts=12
1X2pts=2
2X1pt=2
16
* Programme des nominés
(immigration)
6X3pts=18
4X2pts=8
26
* Conseil des
6X3pts=18
4X2pts=8
26
* Soutien au revenu
5X3pts=15
2X2pts=4
19
Services d’éducation et de sensibilisation
du Centre du patrimoine septentrional
Prince-de-Galles
Museum Education and Outreach Services
Early Childhood Program
Healthy Children Initiative
Teacher Certification for the NWT
Bleu/blue
Total score
19
28
1X1pt=1
17
29
Student Financial Assistance Program
Employment Standards
Nominee program (immigration)
Arts Council
Income Support
Ministère de l’Environnement et des Ressources naturelles (MERN)
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
1X3pts=3
2X2pts=4
2X1pt=2
9
Permis de chasse
1X2pts=2
1X1pt=1
3
Programme de recyclage des
contenants de boissons
1X2pts=2
1X1pt=1
3
3X2pts=6
1X1pt=1
13
Collecte des déchets ménagers
dangereux
Total score
1
Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Event
Permis de pêche sportive
Sport Fishing License
Hunting License
Beverage Container Program
Permis de coupe de bois
Permit to Cut Wood
2X3pts=6
Programme de mesures incitatives
pour l’efficacité énergétique
6X2pts=12
12
Programme des technologies
d’énergie de remplacement
4X2pts=8
1X1pt=1
9
Programme d’aide à l’économie
d’énergie
6X2pts=12
4X1pt=4
16
Jaune/yellow
1X2pts=2
Bleu/blue
Energy Efficiency Incentive Program
Alternative Energy Technologies Program
Energy Conservation Program
Ministère de l’Exécutif
Department of Executive
Service
Fonds de stabilisation affecté aux
organisations non gouvernementales
(ONG)
Rouge/red
3X3pts=9
Total score
11
The NGO Stabilization Fund
Subventions aux organisations sans
but lucratif pour des projets spéciaux
Grants to Non-profit organization for
special Projects
15X3pts=45
4X1pt=4
49
Société d’habitation des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (SHTNO)
NWT Housing Corporation
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
4X3pts=12
2X2pts=4
3X1pt=3
19
2X2pts=4
1X1pt=1
5
Contribution financière pour les
réparations et l’amélioration (CARE)
Total score
1
Contributing Assistance for Repairs &
Enhancements (CARE)
Logements sociaux
Public Housing
Programme de supplément au loyer
transitoire
Transitional Rent Supplement Program
* Yellowknife Housing
1X3pts=3
3
Ministère de l’Industrie, du Tourisme et de l’Investissement (MITI)
Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment (ITI)
Service
Rouge/red
Système de réservation des terrains
de camping
Jaune/yellow
6X2pts=12
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Total score
13
1X2pts=2
4X1pt=4
6
1X1pt=1
31
4X1pt=4
17
Campgrounds/Campground Reservation
System
Bureau du cinéma
Film Commission
Programme des arts des TNO
10X3pts=30
Programme d’appui aux
entrepreneurs et au développement
économique (PAEDE)
3X3pts=9
2X2pts=4
Services d’information touristique
7X3pts=21
4X2pts=8
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
Jaune/yellow
8X2pts=16
NWT Arts Program
Support for Entrepreneurs and Economic
Development Policy (SEED)
Visitor Information Services
29
Ministère des Finances
Department of Finance
Service
Formulaires ou permis concernant :
Les impots;
Les licences d’alcool;
L’inscription des fournisseurs et des clients;
L’inscription au depot direct
* Surintendant des assurances
Superintendent of insurance
Bleu/blue
11X1pt=11
3X1pt=3
Total score
30
3
Ministère de la Justice
Department of Justice
Service
Régie du logement des TNO
NWT Rental Office
Rouge/red
5X3pts =15
Registre des sociétés
Corporate Registries
Jaune/yellow
7X2pts=14
Bleu/blue
1X1pt=1
Total score
20
2X2pts=4
2X1pt=2
6
Programme d’exécution des
ordonnances alimentaires
3X3pts=9
3X2pts=6
3X1pt=3
18
Aide juridique
6X3pts=18
3X2pts=6
2X1pt=2
26
Greffe du tribunal
2X3pts=6
* Services aux tribunaux (procès en
français)
10X3pts=30
4X2pts=8
2X1pt=2
40
* Services correctionnels
2X2pts=6
2X2pts=4
1X1pt=1
11
* Huissier
4X3pts=12
1X2pts=2
3X1pt=3
17
3X2pts=6
1X1pt=1
7
Jaune/yellow
7X2pts=14
Bleu/blue
2X1pt=2
2X2pts=4
2X1pt=2
6
3X1pt=3
3
1X1pt=1
12
Maintenance Enforcement Program
Legal Aid
Court Registry
6
Court Services (trial in French)
Correctional services
Sheriff
* Curatelle publique
Public trustee
Ministère des Ressources humaines (MRH)
Department of Human Resources
Service
Perspectives de carrière : postuler pour
un emploi au GTNO + DOTATION
Career Opportunities – Applying for a
GNWT Job
Rouge/red
4X3pts=12
Stages : Programme d’emploi des
diplômés du Nord
Total score
28
Internships – Northern Graduate
Employment Program
Appels de nominations de personnel
Staffing Appeals
Programme d’emploi d’été des
étudiants
1X3pts=3
* Promotion et Recrutement
22X3pts=66
4X2pts=8
Summer Student Employment Program
Promotion and recruitment
66
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS)
Department of Health and Social Services (HSS)
Service
Certificat de naissance
Birth Certificate
Rouge/red
2X3pts=6
Protection de l’enfance
Child Protection
Jaune/yellow
8X2pts=16
Bleu/blue
3X1pt=3
Total score
25
2X2pts=4
5X1pt=5
9
4X1pt=4
7
Lutte contre les maladies
transmissibles
1X3pts=3
Programme de counseling
communautaire
7X3pts=21
6X2pts=12
Centres de santé communautaires
17X3pts=51
2X2pts=4
2X1pt=2
57
Ressources concernant la violence
familiale
6X3pts=18
3X2pts=6
2X1pt=2
26
Carte d’assurance-maladie
4X3pts=12
6X2pts=12
4X1pt=4
28
Immunisation
5X3pts=15
1X2pts=2
17
Manuel d’information pour les
personnes âgées
2X3pts=6
1X2pts=2
8
Hôpital territorial Stanton
23X3pts=69
3X2pts=6
1X1pt=1
76
* Services specialisés d’évaluation
pédagogique
22X3pts=66
1X2pts=2
3X1pt=3
71
* Services d’adoption et de familles
d’accueil
2X3pts=6
4X2pts=8
Communicable Disease Control
33
Community Counselling Program
Community Health Centres
Family Violence Resources
Health Care Card
Immunization
Seniors’ Information Handbook
Stanton Territorial Hospital
Specialized educational assessment
services
Adoption services and foster famillies
14
Ministère des Transports
Department of Transportation
Service
Rouge/red
Permis de conduire
Driver Licensing
Renseignements sur les départs et
arrivées des vols
Jaune/yellow
8X2pts=16
Bleu/blue
Total score
16
1X2pts=2
2X1pt=2
3
1X2pts=2
5X1pt=5
16
Jaune/yellow
2X2pts=4
Bleu/blue
3X1pt=3
2X2pts=4
1X1pt=1
5
2X2pts=4
3X1pt=3
25
Flight arrival & departure information
Conditions routières et limites de
poids des véhicules
Highway conditions and weight restriction
* Signalisation routière
Road signage
3X3pts=9
Ministère des Travaux publics et des Services (MTPS)
Department of Public Works and Services (PWS)
Service
Marchés publics
Government Procurement
Rouge/red
1X3pts=3
Sécurité relative aux projets
mécaniques
Total score
10
Mechanical Safety
* Affichage gouvernementale
Government signage
6X3pts=18
Strategic Plan on French-language Communications and Services
Hay River – Multi-voting results (February 8, 2014)
Legend:
Highest priority rating
Secondary priority rating
Other notable priorities
Services added by participants are indicated by grey shading and *italics.
Commission de la sécurité au travail et de l’indemnisation des travailleurs (CSTIT)
Workers' Safety & Compensation Commission (WSCC)
Service
Signaler les pratiques de travail
dangereuses
Rouge/red
1 X 3pts = 3
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
3
Report unsafe work practices
Soumettre une demande
d’indemnisation en cas d’accident en
milieu de travail
Total score
1 X 3pts = 3
1 X 1pts = 1
4
Submit a claim for workplace injury
compensation
Inscrire une entreprise à
l’indemnisation des accidentés du
travail
Register a business for Workers’
Compensation coverage
Ministère des affaires autochtones et des relations intergouvernementales (MAARI)
Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations (DAAIR)
Service
Communications générales sur les
traités et l’autonomie
gouvernementale des Autochtones
des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (TNO)
General Communications about Treaties
and Aboriginal Self-government in the
NWT
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
Ministère des Affaires municipales et communautaires (MAMC)
Department of Municipal and Community Affairs (MACA)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Licences d’exploitation des
3 X 2pts = 6
commerces
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt = 1
Total score
7
1 X 1pt = 1
1
1 X 1pt = 1
8
Business Licenses
Location et achat de terres
Leasing and Purchasing Land
Programme En forme après l’école
Active After School Program
2 X 3pt = 6
1 X 2pt = 2
Services d’évaluation foncière
1 X 2pt = 2
2
* Appui aux jeunes athlètes (ex. Sport
North)
1 X 2pt = 2
2
Assessment Services
Support to young athletes (eg. Sport
North)
Assemblée législative
Legislative Assembly
Service
Élections TNO
Elections NWT
Rouge/red
1 X 3pt = 3
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt = 1
Total score
4
1 X 2pt = 2
1 X 1pt = 1
3
1 X 2pt = 2
1 X 1pt = 1
6
Tribunal d’arbitrage des droits de la
personne
Human Rights Adjudication Panel
Commission des droits de la personne
Human Rights Commission
Visites guidées de l’Assemblée
législative
Legislative Assembly Tours
1 X 3pt = 3
Ministère de l’Éducation, de la Culture et de la Formation (MÉCF)
Department of Education, Culture and Employment (ECE)
Service
Services d’éducation et de sensibilisation
du Centre du patrimoine septentrional
Prince-de-Galles
Museum Education and Outreach Services
Discussion note : includes the Arts Council
and assistance for artists
Services à la petite enfance
Early Childhood Program
Rouge/red
2 X 3pts = 6
Jaune/yellow
3 X 3pts = 9
Programme Enfants en santé
Healthy Children Initiative
Total score
6
2 X 1pt = 2
11
2 X 1pt = 2
2
1X2pt = 2
8
Programme d’aide financière aux
étudiants (AFE)
4 X 2pt = 8
8
Normes d’emploi
1 X 2pt = 2
2
Certification des enseignants des TNO
Teacher Certification for the NWT
2 X 3pts = 6
Bleu/blue
Student Financial Assistance Program
Employment Standards
* Northern Arts Festival
(recrutement et accueil des groupes
francophones)
1 X3pt = 3
1 X2pt = 2
2 X 1pt = 2
7
(Recruiting and receiving francophone
groups)
Ministère de l’Environnement et des Ressources naturelles (MERN)
Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
1X3pt = 3
1X2pt=2
1X1pt = 1
6
3X1pt = 3
3
1X1pt = 1
4
1X1pt = 1
1
1X1pt = 1
4
1X1pt = 1
1
Collecte des déchets ménagers
dangereux
Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Event
Permis de pêche sportive
Sport Fishing License
Permis de chasse
Hunting License
Programme de recyclage des
contenants de boissons
1X3pt = 3
Beverage Container Program
Permis de coupe de bois
Permit to Cut Wood
Programme de mesures incitatives
pour l’efficacité énergétique
Energy Efficiency Incentive Program
Programme des technologies
d’énergie de remplacement
1X3pt = 3
Alternative Energy Technologies Program
Programme d’aide à l’économie
d’énergie
Energy Conservation Program
* Fish and Wildlife services
(poaching, problem bears)
* Qualité des eaux
Water quality
1 X 2pt = 2
2
Ministère de l’Exécutif
Department of Executive
Service
Fonds de stabilisation affecté aux
organisations non gouvernementales
(ONG)
Rouge/red
1X3pt = 3
Jaune/yellow
1X2pt=2
Bleu/blue
Total score
5
2X3pt = 6
1X2pt=1
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
2 X 3pt = 6
3 X 2pt = 6
1 X 1pt = 1
13
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt = 1
Total score
7
2 X 1pt = 2
2
The NGO Stabilization Fund
Subventions aux organisations sans
but lucratif pour des projets spéciaux
7
Grants to Non-profit organization for
special Projects
Ministère des finances
Department of Finance
Service
Formulaires ou permis concernant :
• les impôts;
• les licences d’alcool
• l’inscription des fournisseurs
et des clients
• l’inscription au dépôt direct
Forms and permits for the purposes of:
•
Taxation
•
Liquor licensing
•
Vendor/customer set up
•
Direct deposit set up
Société d’habitation des Territoires du Nord-Ouest (SHTNO)
NWT Housing Corporation
Service
Contribution financière pour les
réparations et l’amélioration (CARE)
Rouge/red
2 X 3pts = 6
Jaune/yellow
Contributing Assistance for Repairs &
Enhancements (CARE)
Logements sociaux
Public Housing
Programme de supplément au loyer
transitoire
Transitional Rent Supplement Program
1 X 2pts = 2
2
Ministère de l’Industrie, du Tourisme et de l’Investissement (MITI)
Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment (ITI)
Service
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
Système de réservation des terrains
de camping
Bleu/blue
3 X 1pt = 3
Total score
3
1 X 1pt = 1
1
Campgrounds/Campground Reservation
System
Bureau du cinéma
Film Commission
Programme des arts des TNO
2 X 3pts = 6
6
Programme d’appui aux
entrepreneurs et au développement
économique (PAEDE)
1 X 3pts = 3
3
Services d’information touristique
1 X 3pts = 3
1 X 2pts = 2
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
NWT Arts Program
Support for Entrepreneurs and Economic
Development Policy (SEED)
Visitor Information Services
5
Ministère de la Justice
Department of Justice
Service
Bleu/blue
Total score
Régie du logement des TNO
NWT Rental Office
Registre des sociétés
Corporate Registries
1 X 3pt = 3
3
Programme d’exécution des
ordonnances alimentaires
1 X2pt = 2
Aide juridique
1 X2pt = 2
2
Maintenance Enforcement Program
Legal Aid
Greffe du tribunal
1 X 3pt = 3
3
* Services du tribunal
(Court services – process, etc.)
2 X 3pt = 6
6
Court Registry
Ministère des Ressources humaines (MRH)
Department of Human Resources
Service
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt = 1
Total score
10
3 X 1pt = 3
6
Appels de nominations de personnel
1 X 1pt = 1
1
Programme d’emploi d’été des
étudiants
2 X 1pt = 2
2
Perspectives de carrière : postuler
pour un emploi au GTNO
Rouge/red
3 X 3pts = 9
Jaune/yellow
Career Opportunities – Applying for a
GNWT Job
Stages : Programme d’emploi des
diplômés du Nord
1 X 3pt = 3
Internships – Northern Graduate
Employment Program
Staffing Appeals
Summer Student Employment Program
* Services de ressources humaines
aux employés du GTNO
1 X 3pts = 3
1 X 2pts = 2
5
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux (MSSS)
Department of Health and Social Services (HSS)
Service
Certificat de naissance
Rouge/red
Jaune/yellow
1 X 2pts = 2
Protection de l’enfance
1 X 2pts = 2
2
Lutte contre les maladies
transmissibles
2 X 2pts = 2
4
Birth Certificate
Child Protection
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt = 1
Total score
3
Communicable Disease Control
Programme de counseling
communautaire
3 X 3pts = 9
9
Centres de santé communautaires
4 X 3pts =12
1 X 1pt = 1
13
Ressources concernant la violence
familiale
1 X 3pts = 3
1 X 1pt = 1
4
Carte d’assurance-maladie
4 X 3pts =12
Immunisation
2 X 3pts = 6
Community Counselling Program
Community Health Centres
Family Violence Resources
Health Care Card
Immunization
1 X 2pts = 2
14
6
1 X 1pt = 1
Manuel d’information pour les
personnes âgées
1
Seniors’ Information Handbook
Hôpital territorial Stanton
Stanton Territorial Hospital
4 X 3pts =12
12
Ministère des Transports
Department of Transportation
Service
Permis de conduire
Driver Licensing
Rouge/red
3 X 3pts = 9
Renseignements sur les départs et
arrivées des vols
1 X 3pts = 3
Conditions routières et limites de
poids des véhicules
1 X 3pts = 3
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
1 X 1pt =1
Total score
10
3
Flight arrival & departure information
3 X 1pt = 3
6
2 X 1pt = 2
2
Jaune/yellow
Bleu/blue
Total score
1 X 2pts = 2
2 X 1pt = 2
4
1 X 1pt = 1
1
Highway conditions and weight restriction
NOTE: Routes de glace?
*Highway patrols (weight, speed,
etc.)
Ministère des Travaux publics et des Services (MTPS)
Department of Public Works and Services (PWS)
Service
Rouge/red
Marchés publics
Government Procurement
Sécurité relative aux projets
mécaniques
Mechanical Safety
* Affichage gouvernemental
Government signage
* Améliorations aux édifices des
GTNO
GNWT building improvements

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