Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine

Commentaires

Transcription

Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine
Contemporary Reviews in Cardiovascular Medicine
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
Part 2 of a 2-Part Review: Clinical Vascular Disease in the Elderly
Jason C. Kovacic, MD, PhD; Pedro Moreno, MD; Elizabeth G. Nabel, MD;
Vladimir Hachinski, MD, DSc; Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD
You must remember this,
A kiss is just a kiss,
A sigh is just a sigh,
The fundamental things apply,
As time goes by.
—“As Time Goes By,” by Herman Hupfeld,
Casablanca (1942)1
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
In addition, increased vascular calcification and a generalized
stiffening of the arterial tree lead to increased arterial wave
reflectance, increased systolic blood pressure, decreased diastolic blood pressure, and a widened pulse pressure.
An interesting aspect of vascular biology in which significant inroads have been made is our understanding of pulse
wave velocity, which is partly a consequence and partly a
cause of the elderly vascular phenotype. In the healthy human
arterial tree, the arterial pulse wave is reflected back toward
the heart from branch points and other structures in the
peripheral circulation, with the reflected wave arriving back
at the aortic root during diastole. In older people, the
stiffening of the vasculature results in higher forward and
reflected pulse wave velocities, with the reflected wave
arriving back at the aortic root in late systole, leading to an
augmentation of the late systolic pressure (Figure 1).3 This
age-related shift of the reflected wave from diastole into late
systole leads to an increased systolic workload for the heart,
decreased coronary perfusion during diastole, and the transmission of higher pressures to end organs such as the brain
and kidneys.3 Therefore, stiffening of the vasculature is
directly implicated in ventricular hypertrophy, renal impairment, and cerebrovascular events, and a significant body of
evidence attests to an independent relationship between
increased pulse wave velocity and both adverse cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality.3,4 However, potentially
because of the lack of specific treatment options and the
interdependence of pulse wave velocity with systolic blood
pressure, at the current time the measurement of these
parameters has not yet penetrated widely into routine clinical
practice.
Important changes occurring in the vessel wall that appear
causally related to arterial stiffening include increased calcium deposition, increased collagen content and crosslinking, increased elastin fragmentation, and decreased elastin content (Figure 2).3,5 We explore several of these
phenomena in greater detail below.
T
he increasing prevalence of older-age people in our
society represents the culmination of centuries of medical, scientific, and social endeavors. At least in Western
society, now relatively freed from pestilence, abject poverty,
gross malnutrition, and polluted water and food sources, an
increasing proportion of the population can expect to make it
to old age. However, although US age-adjusted death rates
from cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and
stroke continue to fall, a disproportionate number of people
who reach old age (⬇80% of people aged ⱖ80 years) suffer
from these diseases.1a
In this 2-part review, we consider important pathobiological changes that occur with aging in the cardiovascular
system, exploring promising areas of recent scientific progress and novel insights that may be translatable into targeted
clinical strategies to help to alleviate the excess morbidity and
mortality imposed by cardiovascular disease in the elderly. In
this second installment, we focus specifically on vascular
disease states of the elderly, including systolic hypertension,
vascular calcification, and dementia, and we review relevant
basic and clinical discoveries that further elucidate these
conditions.
Hardening of the Arteries: Calcification,
Glycosylation, and the Vasculature in Old Age
The Elderly Vascular Phenotype
Aging is associated with various changes in the vascular
system at differing structural and functional levels. At the
macroscopic level, an increase in arterial lumen size and
arterial wall thickening, mainly of the intima, are observed.2
From the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (J.C.K., P.M., V.F.); Brigham and
Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (E.G.N.); Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
(V.H.); Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (V.F.); and Centro Nacional
de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares, Madrid, Spain (V.F.).
This is part 2 of a 2-part review. Part 1 appeared in the April 19, 2011 issue of Circulation.
Correspondence to Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1030, New York, NY 10029. E-mail
[email protected]
(Circulation. 2011;123:1900-1910.)
© 2011 American Heart Association, Inc.
Circulation is available at http://circ.ahajournals.org
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.009118
1900
Kovacic et al
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
1901
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
Figure 1. Aortic waveforms derived from radial artery tonometry. The yellow line represents summation waveforms of an outward traveling (green line) and backward traveling (red line). A, An aortic waveform from a 39-year-old man with normal blood pressure and normal aortic pulse wave velocity of 7.6 m/s. The backward traveling waveform arrives at the end of systole and contributes to the small
rise in pressure at the incisura (green vertical line) when the aortic valve closes. This mostly diastolic pressure contribution aids in coronary perfusion. B, A 64-year-old woman with an elevated aortic pulse wave velocity of 11.3 m/s has a backward traveling wave that
arrives earlier in systole, contributing to an increased systolic pressure. Note also the greater amplitude of the backward-traveling wave
on the right side. Reproduced and adapted from Lim and Townsend3 with permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2009, W.B./Saunders CO.
Altered Calcium Handling With Age: The
Calcification Paradox
Vascular calcification has been recognized for over a century,6 and calcification occurring specifically in the coronary
arteries was first recognized at least 50 years ago.7 Although
the severity of coronary artery calcification is related to the
overall burden of atherosclerotic plaque, the relationship
between coronary calcification and plaque biology is complex, with postmortem studies indicating that the degree of
calcification is greatest for acute and healed plaque ruptures,
least for plaque erosion, and intermediate for stable plaques.8
Although it is common to speak simply of vascular calcification or coronary calcification, it is important to recognize
that this is an oversimplification arising from the insensitivity
Figure 2. Summary of the multiple known causes of increased
arterial stiffness. AGE indicates advanced glycation end product;
M␾, macrophage; I-CAM, intercellular adhesion molecule; MMP,
matrix metalloproteinase; TGF-␤, transforming growth factor-␤;
and VSMCs, vascular smooth muscle cells. Adapted and modified from Zieman et al5 with permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2005, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
of noninvasive imaging modalities, such as computed tomographic scanning, and that calcification may occur independently in the vascular intimal or medial layers (Figure 3).9,10
Nevertheless, although there is little, if any, relationship
between the extent of overall coronary calcification and the
degree of luminal stenosis,11 coronary calcification is recognized as in independent predictor of cardiovascular events12
and mortality.13
Highlighting the paradigm that the cell, organ, and organism age in an interdependent fashion, a surprisingly robust
inverse relationship exists between vascular calcification and
the degree of bone mineralization. Expressed in other terms,
vascular calcification is associated with reduced bone mineral
density, referred to as the calcification paradox.10 Although
our understanding of this paradox remains incomplete, a
number of proteins have been identified that exert multiple
effects on bone formation and resorption and the vasculature.14 Rodent models have clarified that 1 of these proteins,
osteoprotegerin, is likely to play a key role in the calcification
paradox, with osteoprotegerin genetic knockout mice displaying a severe decrease in bone density and extensive medial
vascular calcification.15 In support of the calcification paradox, the administration of bisphosphonate therapy to increase
bone mass may, at least in dialysis-dependent or older
patients, inhibit vascular calcification.16 –18 A further corollary is that, although the effect of statins on vascular calcification is controversial,10 a recent meta-analysis has demonstrated that they exert a modest positive effect on hip bone
mineral density.19
The importance of the calcification paradox is underscored
by studies of the klotho gene (Clotho being a goddess from
ancient Greek mythology responsible for spinning the thread
of human life). Mutation of the murine klotho gene results in
a syndrome resembling human aging, including reduced
1902
Circulation
May 3, 2011
Figure 3. Summary of major differences
between intimal and medial vascular calcification. VSMCs indicates vascular
smooth muscle cells. Reproduced and
adapted from Persy and D’Haese10 with
permission of the publisher. Copyright ©
2009, Elsevier.
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
lifespan, infertility, skin atrophy, emphysema, and, importantly, arteriosclerosis with extensive medial vascular calcium deposition and concurrent osteoporosis.20 Further work
now suggests that klotho may be an upstream regulator of
systemic phosphate homeostasis.21 Clinically, a functional
variant of klotho (termed KL-VS) that is prevalent in the
general population (frequency 0.157) is an independent risk
factor for occult coronary artery disease,22 and is associated
with reduced lifespan in homozygous carriers.23
Cellular Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification
Several insights regarding the origins of vascular calcification
have emerged recently. Consistent with the fact that vascular
calcification is prominent with end-stage chronic renal disease, vascular smooth muscle cells exposed to elevated
phosphate levels show a dose-dependent increase in calcium
deposition, with vascular smooth muscle cells adopting an
osteoblast-like phenotype and expressing osteogenic markers.24 –26 Perivascular stem/progenitor cells (pericytes) also
likely contribute to vascular calcification. In regard to these
ubiquitous subendothelial cells,27 it was discovered in the
1980s that pericytes differentiate into osteoprogenitor cells
and participate in cranial bone formation.28 Several years
later, it was noted that pericyte-like cells were capable of
osteoblastic differentiation and likely contributed to arterial
calcification during the atherosclerotic process.29 Emerging
data now suggest that pericytes may be closely related to
mesenchymal stromal cells (also referred to as mesenchymal
stem cells).27 It remains to be clarified whether the dysfunction and/or depletion of this stem cell–related pool of pericytes is involved in the aging of the vasculature or age-related
diseases, such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (see
part 1 of this review).
As a new paradigm, cellular phenotypic switching of
endothelial cells to become osteoblasts and chondrocytes may
also contribute to vascular calcification.30 This may arise via
endothelial to mesenchymal transition, a well-described pro-
cess in other organs and during embryonic development
whereby endothelial cells undergo a series of molecular and
phenotypic rearrangements to become mesenchymal cells.27
This possibility was investigated with the use of samples
from humans suffering fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva,
a condition with widespread heterotopic and vascular ossification due to a gain-of-function genetic mutation.30 In this
study, Medici et al30 provided extensive evidence of an
endothelial origin of vascular osteoblasts and chondrocytes.
Although it remains to be shown whether endothelial phenotypic switching is responsible for vascular calcification in
people without this genetic mutation, this study lays the
foundation for a wider exploration of the role of endothelial
to mesenchymal cellular transition in the aging adult
vasculature.
Glycosylation and Altered Elastin-Collagen
Balance Contribute to Hardening of the Arteries
In parallel with arterial calcification, alterations in the elastincollagen balance also contribute to the generalized hardening
of conduit arteries with age. Although somewhat imperfect,
the arterial elasticity model proposed by Roach and Burton31
in 1957 is useful for conceptualizing the role of these
proteins.32 According to this model, in healthy arteries at low
arterial pressures and with minimal circumferential arterial
stretch, vascular wall stress is borne by elastin. As pressure
and stretch increase, gradually unfolding collagen fibers
assume an increasing proportion of the tension, and the vessel
becomes progressively stiffer, therefore preventing overdistension at very high pressures.31,32 However, with aging the
elastic lamellae undergo fragmentation and thinning,33 leading to an increase in the ratio of collagen to elastin and a
gradual transfer of mechanical load to collagen, which is 100
to 1000 times stiffer than elastin.32 Possible causes of this
fragmentation are mechanical (fatigue failure)34 or enzymatic,
with the latter being driven by matrix metalloproteinases33
Kovacic et al
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
and possibly regulated by upstream transforming growth
factor-␤ activity.35
The accumulation of advanced glycation end products
(AGEs) is also implicated in the loss of vascular elasticity.
The formation of AGEs occurs because of the nonenzymatic
reaction of glucose with proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids,
leading to a heterogeneous group of poorly characterized
products that are linked by a complicated network.36 –38 The
AGEs act directly to induce cross-linking of proteins, such as
collagen, and AGE-linked collagen is stiffer and less amenable to normal turnover, resulting in an accumulation of
structurally dysfunctional collagen molecules with age.5,39
Similarly, elastin in human aortic tissue is also susceptible to
glycation.40 As a demonstration of the synergy between the
aging of the vasculature and the individual, AGE accumulation is linked to multiple age-related pathologies, including
oxidative stress,41 progenitor cell (dys)function,42 and endothelial43 and nonvascular cell apoptosis.44 Correspondingly, a
link between oxidative stress, AGEs, and chronic disease has
been demonstrated in rodents, with a reduction of AGE levels
by decreased oral intake or pharmacotherapy leading to
reduced age-associated renal and cardiovascular disease.45
Endothelial Dysfunction in the Elderly Vasculature
Endothelial dysfunction is an additional phenomenon implicated in arterial stiffening, with elderly patients, even in the
absence of cardiovascular disease or its risk factors, exhibiting impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation.46 – 47 Furthermore, endothelial dysfunction is an important step in
atherosclerotic plaque development and is itself a marker of
future cardiac events.48
Multiple factors contribute to impaired endothelial function in the elderly. Of note, the receptor for AGEs, termed
RAGE, is expressed by endothelial cells.49 The binding of
AGEs to endothelial RAGE, or other AGE-endothelial interactions, may interfere with multiple aspects of endothelial
functioning by increasing adhesion molecule expression and
inflammatory cell transmigration,50,51 weakening intercellular
contacts and increasing vascular permeability,52,53 and impairing endothelial function via quenching of nitric oxide
(NO).54 Impaired NO signaling is likely to be a pivotal
component of endothelial dysfunction in the elderly. In
addition to quenching by AGEs, an age-associated increase in
the production of endothelial reactive oxygen species further
quenches and diminishes bioavailable NO and leads to the
formation of reactive nitrogen species.47,55–57 In addition,
upregulated arginase activity in the elderly vasculature reduces the availability of L-arginine, the NO synthase precursor, culminating in decreased NO activity and impaired
endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity.57–59 Finally, sirtuin (SIRT)-1, which exerts broadly protective antiaging
effects, as discussed in the first part of this review, promotes
endothelium-dependent vascular function by activating endothelial NO synthase.60
In summary, hardening of the arteries, itself a cardiovascular risk factor, results from numerous age-related pathobiological derangements, including alterations in calcium handling, stem cell function, AGE deposition, and endothelial
dysfunction. The phenomenon of hardening of the arteries
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
1903
neatly encapsulates the overriding theme of this review,
which is that aging is the culmination of the complex
interactions of multiple dysfunctional systems.
Anemia, Thromboembolism, and Risk of
Death in the Elderly: A Delicate Balance
An association between old age and anemia has been recognized for decades.61 Potential causes of anemia in the elderly
are multiple and include chronic disease, poor nutrition, renal
insufficiency, polypharmacy, blood loss, and inadequate bone
marrow synthetic capacity.62 In turn, anemia is associated
with a surprising range of age-associated diseases, including
cardiovascular disease,63 Alzheimer disease and cognitive
impairment,64,65 physical dysfunction,65 depressive symptoms,65 and mortality.65,66 However, whether these associations indicate causality remains unclear.61 Indeed, although
some have suggested that anemia in the elderly is a public
health crisis,62 others have suggested that, at least in certain
scenarios, such as the anemia of chronic disease, a mild
anemic response may represent a beneficial physiological
adaptation.67,68 Although scant data exist for the elderly
population, it is noteworthy that multiple clinical trials of
erythropoietin therapy (and its derivatives) have indicated
that although a higher, nonanemic hemoglobin level may lead
to improved quality of life, this may come at the price of
increased mortality.69,70
Of relevance, cardiovascular fitness is related to whole
blood viscosity.71 Although there is little change in whole
blood viscosity with age,72 other important changes occur that
affect the overall hemorheologic profile. Thus, plasma fibrinogen increases significantly with advancing age,73 whereas,
as mentioned, hemoglobin, red blood cell count, and platelet
count decline.72 Although decreased mobility is likely a major
factor, elevated fibrinogen levels may be linked to the
increased incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in the elderly.74 Concurrently, decreased
hemoglobin and red blood cell counts result in a reduced
oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood in the elderly, which
may decrease tissue oxygenation. As mentioned previously,
altered pulse wave reflectance leads to decreased diastolic
myocardial perfusion in older persons. However, when decreased diastolic myocardial perfusion is combined with
decreased hemoglobin levels and reduced tissue oxygenation,
multiple adverse factors are clearly at play, and may result in
an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand in the
elderly heart and other organs. Nevertheless, although it is
prudent to address concurrent and associated conditions such
as iron deficiency and gastrointestinal blood loss, there are
little data to support artificially correcting mild to moderate
anemia in minimally symptomatic elderly persons.
Alzheimer Disease: Evidence for a
Vascular Contribution
It is estimated that at least 24.3 million people worldwide
suffer from dementia. In parallel with the aging epidemic (see
part 1 of this review), the number of people affected by
dementia is projected to double every 20 years to 81.1 million
by 2040.75 Compounding this problem, dementia is a partic-
1904
Circulation
May 3, 2011
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
ularly disabling condition, with a tremendous negative impact
on patients and their caregivers.
References to dementia-like states date back to almost the
beginnings of recorded history. More than 40 centuries ago,
ancient Egyptians were aware that old age could be accompanied by a major memory disorder.76 In 1907, Dr Alois
Alzheimer published his seminal description of the condition
that now bears his name.77,78 This first case description was of
a 51-year-old woman, in which the postmortem findings
suggested vascular involvement: “The larger vascular tissues
show arteriosclerotic change. … There is no infiltration of the
vessels, however, a growth appears on the endothelia, in some
places also a proliferation of vessels.”77,78 Consistent with Dr
Alzheimer’s observations that aging is the complex end result
of the interplay between aging cells, organs, and systems, a
burgeoning amount of data now implicates the aging vasculature in the evolution and pathology of Alzheimer and other
neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence has indicated a
strong association between Alzheimer disease and numerous
cardiovascular risk factors, including atherosclerosis,79 hypertension during midlife,80 dyslipidemia/hypercholesterolemia,81,82 diabetes mellitus,83 smoking,84 and impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity.85 Although these data
are compelling, unraveling the mechanisms for the putative
contributions of these cardiovascular risk factors to Alzheimer disease is proving to be challenging.86
Small-Vessel Pathology, Aging, and
Alzheimer Disease
The cerebral blood vessels and circulation undergo profound
age-related changes. Endothelial cells become elongated with
reduced mitochondrial content, and capillaries in the cerebral
cortex and hippocampus are reduced in number and have
thickened and fibrotic basement membranes.87,88 Indeed,
these features are seen in small vessels throughout the elderly
vasculature and in conjunction with other changes such as
perivascular fibrosis, replacement of vascular smooth muscle
cells89 by fibrohyaline material, and small-vessel atrophy, are
termed small-vessel disease.90 Other pathobiological changes,
including increased tortuosity and decreased elasticity,91
when combined with small-vessel disease, ultimately lead to
deranged microcirculatory and cerebral blood flow regulation, reduced cerebral perfusion, and increased susceptibility
to neurological insults.
Apart from being a normal (albeit detrimental) aspect of
aging, small-vessel disease is closely related to the development of Alzheimer disease90,92 and is also implicated in other
neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson disease93,94
and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL).95 As
shown in Figure 4,96 the microvascular changes that occur
with Alzheimer disease may be striking and significantly
more marked than those seen with normal aging. Deposition
of the amyloid ␤ protein in the brain (amyloid plaques) and
cerebral vessels (amyloid angiopathy) is a hallmark of this
condition, with the latter being a major contributor to advanced small-vessel disease. Studies in which rodent models
of Alzheimer disease are used have revealed that overexpression of the amyloid ␤ precursor protein has profound effects
Figure 4. Pathological features of cortical microvessels in Alzheimer disease. Top, Atrophied and fragmented vessels in close
proximity to amyloid deposits from a patient with Alzheimer disease. Bottom, Typical capillary appearance from normal brain.
Bars⫽25 ␮m. Reproduced from Bailey et al96 with permission of
the publisher. Copyright © 2004, W.S. Maney & Son Ltd.
on cerebral blood flow regulation. Importantly, one of the
earliest derangements seen in mice that overexpress amyloid
␤ precursor protein is endothelial dysfunction with loss of
cerebral autoregulation.97–99
Later in the disease process, vascular leakage and compromise of the blood-brain barrier exacerbate the pathology of
Alzheimer disease. It is hypothesized that compromise of the
blood-brain barrier disrupts the transport of nutrients, proteins, vitamins, and electrolytes,100 leading to a failure of
clearance100 as well as enhanced deposition96 of amyloid ␤
protein. In human postmortem samples, breakdown of the
blood-brain barrier was associated with leakage of plasma
proteins into the microvessel wall.92 Similarly, animal models
of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate that reduced levels of
endothelial tight junction proteins lead to disruption of the
blood–spinal cord barrier, culminating in spinal cord hypoperfusion and microhemorrhages.101
Multiple Contributions of Cardiovascular Risk
Factors to Alzheimer Disease and Dementia
It is likely that the contributions of the multiple vascular and
nonvascular risk factors to the evolution of Alzheimer disease
are significantly more intricate than outlined above. For
example, other factors, such as caloric restriction and SIRT1,
as described in the first part of this review, may play a
protective role. Furthermore, studies in diabetics have shown
that, although their risk of developing Alzheimer disease is
increased, if anything, these patients paradoxically exhibit a
decreased burden of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary
Kovacic et al
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
1905
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
Figure 5. Factors that may be associated with
cognitive impairment and dementia. Blood vessels
are shown in red. Some processes may contribute
directly to loss of cortical and hippocampal volume
and cognitive decline. Others may contribute to
white matter abnormalities or stroke, thereby contributing somewhat more indirectly to overall cognitive impairment. Reproduced from Fotuhi et al102
with permission of the publisher. Copyright ©
2009, Nature Publishing Group.
tangles.86 Although controversial, multiple diabetes-specific
factors may be involved that are largely independent of
amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, such as an
increase in small-vessel disease, inflammation, neuronal
AGE accumulation, and/or oxidative stress.86 Therefore, although amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles remain
the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease, other pathologies may
compound the primary disease process and increase overall
dementia severity.96
Indeed, multiple vascular and nonvascular factors are now
thought to be associated with cognitive impairment and
dementia (Figure 5),102 and, in particular, it would appear that
the contribution of vascular disease has previously been
grossly underestimated. Although it is recognized that dementia resulting from multiple cerebrovascular infarcts, often
termed multi-infarct dementia, may mimic and coexist with
Alzheimer disease, a more intimate and potentially causal
relationship between these conditions likely exists. So-called
silent strokes occur 5 to 10 times more frequently than
clinical strokes. However, these subclinical strokes are not
silent; they result in delayed reaction times and cognitive
impairment, mainly of executive function (the ability to plan,
multitask, and problem solve).103–105 Furthermore, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer diseases may interact and synergize
via an amyloid connection. Thus, it is known that cerebral
amyloid angiopathy is a significant cause of cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly,106 and that vascular smooth muscle cell
loss89 may be associated with vessel rupture and lobar
hemorrhage in Alzheimer disease patients.100,106,107 Reinforcing the connection between cerebrovascular and Alzheimer
diseases, rodent models have demonstrated that, although a
cerebral infarct in the presence of amyloid expands in size
and displays increased inflammation, control animals show
infarct shrinkage and an attenuated inflammatory response.108
The paradigm that clinical dementia is due to multiple
vascular and nonvascular insults, occurring and interacting at
multiple physiological levels, is consistent with the theme of
this review, which is that aging and age-related diseases
represent the end result of the dynamic interplay between cell,
organ, system, and organism. Importantly, with the advent of
clinical imaging of amyloid and activated microglia in humans, the door may soon be opened for preventative and
acute treatments with anti-inflammatory and antiamyloid
agents that may be tailored and timed for maximal clinical
effect.
Inflammaging (and Anti-Inflammaging)
An often recurring subtheme of this review is that age-related
perturbations in immune functionality and the inflammatory
response likely mediate the elderly cardiovascular phenotype.
1906
Circulation
May 3, 2011
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
Age-related immune/inflammatory changes already discussed
include reduced leukocyte telomere length, altered binding of
inflammatory cells to the vasculature, and bone marrow stem
cell depletion or exhaustion. In addition, multiple other
immune-related changes also have been reported in the
elderly.109 –111 Encapsulating these changes, Franceschi et
al112 coined the term inflammaging, arguing that a global
reduction in the ability to cope with a variety of stressors and
a concomitant increase in inflammation (inflammaging) are
hallmarks of the aging process. This concept is supported by
multiple lines of evidence, including that global tests of
systemic inflammatory status, such as C-reactive protein and
erythrocyte sedimentation rate, increase with age.113 To add
to the complexity of this situation, it has become apparent that
the aging immune system also exhibits concurrent immunodeficiency.110 –111 On reflection, this paradox is evident clinically because, whereas older persons are more susceptible to
infection,114 they are also more prone to a number of
immune-mediated conditions, such as psoriasis115 and myasthenia gravis.116 Of the little that is currently understood of
these opposing systems, inflammaging is thought to be
mediated by the upregulation of a range of circulating
proinflammatory cytokines.111,117 On the other hand, the
immunodeficiency of old age, dubbed anti-inflammaging,111
potentially involves several primary immune perturbations,
including reduced lymphocyte number and function118 –120
and an age-related activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary
axis with increased cortisol production.111
The possible effects of these contradictory immune perturbations on atherothrombotic disease and the vasculature
remain to be investigated. Nevertheless, examples of disorders in which inflammaging might be operative are readily
envisaged. For example, arterial restenosis after vascular
injury is dependent on proinflammatory cytokines,121,122 and
it would seem intuitive that an age-related increase in
cytokine production may mediate the enhanced restenosis
seen in older individuals.123 Looking ahead, we anticipate a
greatly increased interest in the interactions between the
immune system and the vasculature, and we keenly await
further insights regarding the double-edged sword of inflammaging and anti-inflammaging.
Timing of a Healthy Death: The Art of
Cardiovascular Disease Treatment in
the Elderly
Aging is not a disease, and, eventually, even healthy human
organisms must die of something. The numerous age-related
events explored in this review, such as telomere attrition,
DNA damage, progerin protein accumulation, and cellular
senescence, serve to biologically confirm what we already
know: Aging is inevitable. Rather than preventing aging, as
clinicians our goal must be to facilitate living healthier for a
longer time (also known as adult vigor,124 healthy aging,125
successful aging,126 disability-free life expectancy,127 and
healthy life expectancy128). In addition, and as proposed by
Fries,124 this may include the compression of morbidity into
a brief period at the very end of life.
Although much of this review is devoted to current and
potential means to prolong healthy years of life, there are very
real cost-benefit implications of aggressively treating vascular disease in the very elderly, who may soon die of
something else. Apart from futility, the burdening of a very
old person with needless medications to reduce cardiovascular risk may detract from quality of life. However, very real
challenges are faced in determining at what point an individual ceases to have adult vigor and is faced with mounting
morbidity and looming death. This arises primarily because
the timing of a healthy death is reliant on 2 subjective
assessments: length of life remaining and level of functioning.125 Furthermore, an acceptable level of functioning for
one patient may be entirely unacceptable for another. These
issues complicate the management of elderly individuals and
challenge clinical investigations into healthy aging.125,128 In
reality, there are few objective data to guide clinicians in
deciding when likely survival and functioning are such that a
more conservative approach is in the patient’s best interest.125
This decision remains in the realm of the art of medicine, and
must take into account patient and family preferences and a
raft of physical, biological, pathological, social, ethical,
cultural, practical, and other factors. Although the aggressive
treatment of risk factors in the elderly is important and
generally underutilized, the fact that humans are mortal must
always be borne in mind.
Is Age an Independent Cardiovascular
Risk Factor?
One of the core axioms of clinical medicine is that primary
prevention is always better than secondary treatment. Primary
prevention is possible for many of the traditional risk factors
known to be associated with atherothrombotic disease (obesity, smoking, hypertension, sedentary lifestyle, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia), but is aging as a risk factor
also amenable to primary prevention? Although it is impossible to avoid growing old, a careful reconsideration of prior
studies and emerging new data lend significant support to the
concept that the cardiovascular risk associated with aging
may actually be due to the summed effects of prolonged
exposure to other modifiable risk factors. In other words, age
itself may not be a potent risk factor for cardiovascular
disease; rather, the heightened likelihood of atherothrombotic
disease with advanced age may at least partially represent the
accrued effects of other modifiable risk factors on the
cardiovascular system throughout life.129,130 At the current
time, the precise extent of this effect is unknown, and it
remains a challenging epidemiological question to address.
Nevertheless, for future generations, and even those currently
in their youth or middle age, this suggests that the perceived
effects of age on the cardiovascular system may be mitigated
by healthy lifestyle choices and the early treatment of
modifiable risk factors. The importance of this assertion
cannot be overstated, and is a poignant reminder that as
clinicians we must not be idle as we wait for the scientific
advances discussed in this review to be translated into
convenient and efficacious clinical interventions. Rather, the
best possible current management strategy for cardiovascular
disease in the elderly remains the aggressive treatment of
traditional risk factors throughout the ages.
Kovacic et al
Conclusion
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
In a particularly astute comment, Keith Richards (from the
musical group the Rolling Stones) once said, “Getting older is
a fascinating thing. The older you get, the older you want to
get.”130a Although perhaps few individuals would actually
wish to become old, at a biological level, a certain amount of
truth applies to this statement. The multiple age-related
events, pathologies, and disease states that occur in the aging
vascular system, when considered as a whole, provide strong
evidence to suggest that aging is a global and dynamic
process, contemporaneously affecting virtually every physiological system in a complex and overlapping interplay of
actions and downstream effects. Thus, as one diseased cell or
organ places further strain on another, age appears to beget
further aging, and, in a fashion, “the older you get, the older
you want to get.”
The data presented in this review offer reason for optimism
that we may be approaching a more sophisticated understanding of the aging process. In time, despite the complexities of
the systems involved, it is hoped that these scientific advances might lead to novel therapies to treat age-related
diseases. Already, multiple clinical trials investigating the
safety of a number of promising novel agents are under way.
Nevertheless, at the present time, for those who have already
successfully arrived at what might be considered an elderly
age, the implementation of a multidisciplinary and guidelinedriven team approach to identify at-risk individuals and to
then provide education, counseling, and effective treatment is
perhaps the most effective way to reduce the cardiovascular
disease burden while concurrently averting drug-induced side
effects.131 While waiting patiently for new treatment breakthroughs, clinicians must guard against any reluctance to
intervene in the elderly, because many conventional therapeutics, such as statin therapy132,133 and drug therapy for
hypertension,134,135 remain powerfully efficacious in older
persons.
An encouraging example is that of heart failure. More than
half a century ago, in the 1950s, the mean age of onset of
heart failure in the Framingham cohort was 57 years; by the
1980s this had increased to 76 years.136 We know that heart
disease and stroke are largely preventable137,138 and that
cerebrovascular disease contributes to Alzheimer disease.85– 89 Can we prevent or delay brain failure as we have
heart failure? We must begin trying now, because our health
and well-being depend on it.
Disclosures
None.
References
1. Hupfeld H. “As time goes by.” http://www.reelclassics.com/Movies/
Casablanca/astimegoesby-lyrics.htm. Accessed March 30, 2011.
1a.Heart disease and stroke statistics: 2010 update. American Heart Association. http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier⫽
1200026. Accessed November 7, 2010.
2. Virmani R, Avolio AP, Mergner WJ, Robinowitz M, Herderick EE,
Cornhill JF, Guo SY, Liu TH, Ou DY, O’Rourke M. Effect of aging on
aortic morphology in populations with high and low prevalence of
hypertension and atherosclerosis: comparison between occidental and
Chinese communities. Am J Pathol. 1991;139:1119 –1129.
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
1907
3. Lim MA, Townsend RR. Arterial compliance in the elderly: its effect on
blood pressure measurement and cardiovascular outcomes. Clin Geriatr
Med. 2009;25:191–205.
4. Vlachopoulos C, Aznaouridis K, Stefanadis C. Prediction of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality with arterial stiffness: a systematic
review and meta-analysis. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:1318 –1327.
5. Zieman SJ, Melenovsky V, Kass DA. Mechanisms, pathophysiology,
and therapy of arterial stiffness. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2005;
25:932–943.
6. Mönckeberg JG. Über die reine mediaverkalkung der extremitätenarterien und ihr verhalten zur arteriosklerose. Virchows Arch Pathol Anat.
1903:171.
7. Blankenhorn DH, Stern D. Calcification of the coronary arteries. Am J
Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med. 1959;81:772–777.
8. Burke AP, Taylor A, Farb A, Malcom GT, Virmani R. Coronary calcification: insights from sudden coronary death victims. Z Kardiol. 2000;
89:49 –53.
9. Shroff RC, Shanahan CM. The vascular biology of calcification. Semin
Dial. 2007;20:103–109.
10. Persy V, D’Haese P. Vascular calcification and bone disease: the calcification paradox. Trends Mol Med. 2009;15:405– 416.
11. Sangiorgi G, Rumberger JA, Severson A, Edwards WD, Gregoire J,
Fitzpatrick LA, Schwartz RS. Arterial calcification and not lumen stenosis is highly correlated with atherosclerotic plaque burden in humans:
a histologic study of 723 coronary artery segments using nondecalcifying methodology. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998;31:126 –133.
12. Arad Y, Goodman KJ, Roth M, Newstein D, Guerci AD. Coronary
calcification, coronary disease risk factors, C-reactive protein, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events: the St. Francis Heart Study.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;46:158 –165.
13. Budoff MJ, Shaw LJ, Liu ST, Weinstein SR, Mosler TP, Tseng PH,
Flores FR, Callister TQ, Raggi P, Berman DS. Long-term prognosis
associated with coronary calcification: observations from a registry of
25,253 patients. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007;49:1860 –1870.
14. Moreno PR. Calcium deposition in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques:
pathophysiologic mechanisms and potential implications in the acute
coronary syndromes. In: Fuster V, ed. Assessing and Modifying the
Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque. Armonk, NY: Futura Publishing Co;
2002.
15. Bucay N, Sarosi I, Dunstan CR, Morony S, Tarpley J, Capparelli C,
Scully S, Tan HL, Xu W, Lacey DL, Boyle WJ, Simonet WS.
Osteoprotegerin-deficient mice develop early onset osteoporosis and
arterial calcification. Genes Dev. 1998;12:1260 –1268.
16. Hashiba H, Aizawa S, Tamura K, Kogo H. Inhibition of the progression
of aortic calcification by etidronate treatment in hemodialysis patients:
long-term effects. Ther Apher Dial. 2006;10:59 – 64.
17. Nitta K, Akiba T, Suzuki K, Uchida K, Watanabe R, Majima K, Aoki T,
Nihei H. Effects of cyclic intermittent etidronate therapy on coronary
artery calcification in patients receiving long-term hemodialysis. Am J
Kidney Dis. 2004;44:680 – 688.
18. Elmariah S, Delaney JA, O’Brien KD, Budoff MJ, Vogel-Claussen J,
Fuster V, Kronmal RA, Halperin JL. Bisphosphonate use and prevalence
of valvular and vascular calcification in women: MESA (The MultiEthnic Study of Atherosclerosis). J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;56:
1752–1759.
19. Uzzan B, Cohen R, Nicolas P, Cucherat M, Perret GY. Effects of statins
on bone mineral density: a meta-analysis of clinical studies. Bone.
2007;40:1581–1587.
20. Kuro-o M, Matsumura Y, Aizawa H, Kawaguchi H, Suga T, Utsugi T,
Ohyama Y, Kurabayashi M, Kaname T, Kume E, Iwasaki H, Iida A,
Shiraki-Iida T, Nishikawa S, Nagai R, Nabeshima YI. Mutation of the
mouse klotho gene leads to a syndrome resembling ageing. Nature.
1997;390:45–51.
21. Razzaque MS. FGF23-mediated regulation of systemic phosphate
homeostasis: is Klotho an essential player? Am J Physiol. 2009;296:
F470 –F476.
22. Arking DE, Becker DM, Yanek LR, Fallin D, Judge DP, Moy TF,
Becker LC, Dietz HC. KLOTHO allele status and the risk of early-onset
occult coronary artery disease. Am J Hum Genet. 2003;72:1154 –1161.
23. Arking DE, Krebsova A, Macek M Sr, Macek M Jr, Arking A, Mian IS,
Fried L, Hamosh A, Dey S, McIntosh I, Dietz HC. Association of human
aging with a functional variant of klotho. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A.
2002;99:856 – 861.
24. Giachelli CM. Vascular calcification: in vitro evidence for the role of
inorganic phosphate. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003;14:S300 –S304.
1908
Circulation
May 3, 2011
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
25. Ganesh SK, Stack AG, Levin NW, Hulbert-Shearon T, Port FK. Association of elevated serum PO(4), Ca x PO(4) product, and parathyroid
hormone with cardiac mortality risk in chronic hemodialysis patients.
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2001;12:2131–2138.
26. Goodman WG, Goldin J, Kuizon BD, Yoon C, Gales B, Sider D, Wang
Y, Chung J, Emerick A, Greaser L, Elashoff RM, Salusky IB. Coronaryartery calcification in young adults with end-stage renal disease who are
undergoing dialysis. N Engl J Med. 2000;342:1478 –1483.
27. Kovacic JC, Boehm M. Resident vascular progenitor cells: an emerging
role for non-terminally differentiated vessel-resident cells in vascular
biology. Stem Cell Res. 2009;2:2–15.
28. Sato K, Urist MR. Induced regeneration of calvaria by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in dogs. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1985;197:
301–311.
29. Bostrom K, Watson KE, Horn S, Wortham C, Herman IM, Demer LL.
Bone morphogenetic protein expression in human atherosclerotic
lesions. J Clin Invest. 1993;91:1800 –1809.
30. Medici D, Shore EM, Lounev VY, Kaplan FS, Kalluri R, Olsen BR.
Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem-like cells.
Nat Med. 2010;16:1400 –1406.
31. Roach MR, Burton AC. The reason for the shape of the distensibility
curves of arteries. Can J Biochem Physiol. 1957;35:681– 690.
32. Greenwald SE. Ageing of the conduit arteries. J Pathol. 2007;211:
157–172.
33. Li Z, Froehlich J, Galis ZS, Lakatta EG. Increased expression of matrix
metalloproteinase-2 in the thickened intima of aged rats. Hypertension.
1999;33:116 –123.
34. O’Rourke MF. Pulsatile arterial haemodynamics in hypertension. Aust N
Z J Med. 1976;6:40 – 48.
35. Risinger GM Jr, Updike DL, Bullen EC, Tomasek JJ, Howard EW.
TGF-beta suppresses the upregulation of MMP-2 by vascular smooth
muscle cells in response to PDGF-BB. Am J Physiol. 2010;298:
C191–C201.
36. Goh SY, Cooper ME. The role of advanced glycation end products in
progression and complications of diabetes. J Clin Endocrinol Metab.
2008;93:1143–1152.
37. Sensi M, Pricci F, Andreani D, Di Mario U. Advanced nonenzymatic
glycation endproducts (AGE): their relevance to aging and the pathogenesis of late diabetic complications. Diabetes Res. 1991;16:1–9.
38. Rojas A, Morales MA. Advanced glycation and endothelial functions: a
link towards vascular complications in diabetes. Life Sci. 2004;76:
715–730.
39. Verzijl N, DeGroot J, Thorpe SR, Bank RA, Shaw JN, Lyons TJ,
Bijlsma JW, Lafeber FP, Baynes JW, TeKoppele JM. Effect of collagen
turnover on the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. J Biol
Chem. 2000;275:39027–39031.
40. Konova E, Baydanoff S, Atanasova M, Velkova A. Age-related changes
in the glycation of human aortic elastin. Exp Gerontol. 2004;39:
249 –254.
41. Yamagishi S, Nakamura K, Matsui T, Ueda S, Fukami K, Okuda S.
Agents that block advanced glycation end product (AGE)-RAGE
(receptor for AGEs)-oxidative stress system: a novel therapeutic strategy
for diabetic vascular complications. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2008;
17:983–996.
42. Scheubel RJ, Kahrstedt S, Weber H, Holtz J, Friedrich I, Borgermann J,
Silber RE, Simm A. Depression of progenitor cell function by advanced
glycation endproducts (AGEs): potential relevance for impaired angiogenesis in advanced age and diabetes. Exp Gerontol. 2006;41:540 –548.
43. Xiang M, Yang M, Zhou C, Liu J, Li W, Qian Z. Crocetin prevents
AGEs-induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis. Pharmacol Res.
2006;54:268 –274.
44. Mercer N, Ahmed H, Etcheverry SB, Vasta GR, Cortizo AM. Regulation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) receptors and apoptosis
by AGEs in osteoblast-like cells. Mol Cell Biochem. 2007;306:87–94.
45. Vlassara H, Uribarri J, Ferrucci L, Cai W, Torreggiani M, Post JB,
Zheng F, Striker GE. Identifying advanced glycation end products as a
major source of oxidants in aging: implications for the management
and/or prevention of reduced renal function in elderly persons. Semin
Nephrol. 2009;29:594 – 603.
46. Yavuz BB, Yavuz B, Sener DD, Cankurtaran M, Halil M, Ulger Z, Nazli
N, Kabakci G, Aytemir K, Tokgozoglu L, Oto A, Ariogul S. Advanced
age is associated with endothelial dysfunction in healthy elderly
subjects. Gerontology. 2008;54:153–156.
47. Donato AJ, Eskurza I, Silver AE, Levy AS, Pierce GL, Gates PE, Seals
DR. Direct evidence of endothelial oxidative stress with aging in
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
humans: relation to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and
upregulation of nuclear factor-kappaB. Circ Res. 2007;100:1659 –1666.
Schachinger V, Britten MB, Zeiher AM. Prognostic impact of coronary
vasodilator dysfunction on adverse long-term outcome of coronary heart
disease. Circulation. 2000;101:1899 –1906.
Brett J, Schmidt AM, Yan SD, Zou YS, Weidman E, Pinsky D,
Nowygrod R, Neeper M, Przysiecki C, Shaw A, et al. Survey of the
distribution of a newly characterized receptor for advanced glycation
end products in tissues. Am J Pathol. 1993;143:1699 –1712.
Giri R, Shen Y, Stins M, Du Yan S, Schmidt AM, Stern D, Kim KS,
Zlokovic B, Kalra VK. ␤-Amyloid-induced migration of monocytes
across human brain endothelial cells involves RAGE and PECAM-1.
Am J Physiol. 2000;279:C1772–C1781.
Kunt T, Forst T, Harzer O, Buchert G, Pfutzner A, Lobig M, Zschabitz
A, Stofft E, Engelbach M, Beyer J. The influence of advanced glycation
endproducts (AGE) on the expression of human endothelial adhesion
molecules. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 1998;106:183–188.
Svensjo E, Cyrino F, Michoud E, Ruggiero D, Bouskela E, Wiernsperger N. Vascular permeability increase as induced by histamine or
bradykinin is enhanced by advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). J
Diabetes Complicat. 1999;13:187–190.
Otero K, Martinez F, Beltran A, Gonzalez D, Herrera B, Quintero G,
Delgado R, Rojas A. Albumin-derived advanced glycation end-products
trigger the disruption of the vascular endothelial cadherin complex in
cultured human and murine endothelial cells. Biochem J. 2001;359:
567–574.
Bucala R, Tracey KJ, Cerami A. Advanced glycosylation products
quench nitric oxide and mediate defective endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in experimental diabetes. J Clin Invest. 1991;87:432– 438.
Newaz MA, Yousefipour Z, Oyekan A. Oxidative stress-associated
vascular aging is xanthine oxidase-dependent but not NAD(P)H
oxidase-dependent. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2006;48:88 –94.
Ungvari Z, Orosz Z, Labinskyy N, Rivera A, Xiangmin Z, Smith K,
Csiszar A. Increased mitochondrial H2O2 production promotes endothelial NF-kappaB activation in aged rat arteries. Am J Physiol. 2007;
293:H37–H47.
Santhanam L, Christianson DW, Nyhan D, Berkowitz DE. Arginase and
vascular aging. J Appl Physiol. 2008;105:1632–1642.
Berkowitz DE, White R, Li D, Minhas KM, Cernetich A, Kim S, Burke
S, Shoukas AA, Nyhan D, Champion HC, Hare JM. Arginase reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels. Circulation. 2003;108:
2000 –2006.
Kim JH, Bugaj LJ, Oh YJ, Bivalacqua TJ, Ryoo S, Soucy KG, Santhanam L, Webb A, Camara A, Sikka G, Nyhan D, Shoukas AA, Ilies M,
Christianson DW, Champion HC, Berkowitz DE. Arginase inhibition
restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and
vascular stiffness in old rats. J Appl Physiol. 2009;107:1249 –1257.
Mattagajasingh I, Kim CS, Naqvi A, Yamamori T, Hoffman TA, Jung
SB, DeRicco J, Kasuno K, Irani K. SIRT1 promotes endotheliumdependent vascular relaxation by activating endothelial nitric oxide
synthase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007;104:14855–14860.
Paltiel O, Clarfield AM. Anemia in elderly people: risk marker or risk
factor? CMAJ. 2009;181:129 –130.
Guralnik JM, Ershler WB, Schrier SL, Picozzi VJ. Anemia in the
elderly: a public health crisis in hematology. Hematology Am Soc
Hematol Educ Program. 2005;5:28 –32.
Sarnak MJ, Tighiouart H, Manjunath G, MacLeod B, Griffith J, Salem
D, Levey AS. Anemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the
Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. J Am Coll Cardiol.
2002;40:27–33.
Beard CM, Kokmen E, O’Brien PC, Ania BJ, Melton LJ III. Risk of
Alzheimer’s disease among elderly patients with anemia:
population-based investigations in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Ann
Epidemiol. 1997;7:219 –224.
den Elzen WP, Willems JM, Westendorp RG, de Craen AJ, Assendelft
WJ, Gussekloo J. Effect of anemia and comorbidity on functional status
and mortality in old age: results from the Leiden 85-Plus Study. CMAJ.
2009;181:151–157.
Ezekowitz JA, McAlister FA, Armstrong PW. Anemia is common in
heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes: insights from a
cohort of 12 065 patients with new-onset heart failure. Circulation.
2003;107:223–225.
Zarychanski R, Houston DS. Anemia of chronic disease: a harmful
disorder or an adaptive, beneficial response? CMAJ. 2008;179:333–337.
Kovacic et al
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
68. Kovacic JC. Further aspects of anemia, heart failure, and erythropoietin.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;45:1549 –1550.
69. Bohlius J, Schmidlin K, Brillant C, Schwarzer G, Trelle S, Seidenfeld J,
Zwahlen M, Clarke M, Weingart O, Kluge S, Piper M, Rades D,
Steensma DP, Djulbegovic B, Fey MF, Ray-Coquard I, Machtay M,
Moebus V, Thomas G, Untch M, Schumacher M, Egger M, Engert A.
Recombinant human erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and mortality in
patients with cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised trials. Lancet. 2009;
373:1532–1542.
70. Phrommintikul A, Haas SJ, Elsik M, Krum H. Mortality and target
haemoglobin concentrations in anaemic patients with chronic kidney
disease treated with erythropoietin: a meta-analysis. Lancet. 2007;369:
381–388.
71. Telford RD, Kovacic JC, Skinner SL, Hobbs JB, Hahn AG, Cunningham
RB. Resting whole blood viscosity of elite rowers is related to performance. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1994;68:470 – 476.
72. Coppola L, Caserta F, De Lucia D, Guastafierro S, Grassia A, Coppola
A, Marfella R, Varricchio M. Blood viscosity and aging. Arch Gerontol
Geriatr. 2000;31:35– 42.
73. Tracy RP, Bovill EG, Fried LP, Heiss G, Lee MH, Polak JF, Psaty BM,
Savage PJ. The distribution of coagulation factors VII and VIII and
fibrinogen in adults over 65 years: results from the Cardiovascular
Health Study. Ann Epidemiol. 1992;2:509 –519.
74. Silverstein MD, Heit JA, Mohr DN, Petterson TM, O’Fallon WM,
Melton LJ III. Trends in the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and
pulmonary embolism: a 25-year population-based study. Arch Intern
Med. 1998;158:585–593.
75. Ferri CP, Prince M, Brayne C, Brodaty H, Fratiglioni L, Ganguli M, Hall
K, Hasegawa K, Hendrie H, Huang Y, Jorm A, Mathers C, Menezes PR,
Rimmer E, Scazufca M. Global prevalence of dementia: a Delphi consensus study. Lancet. 2005;366:2112–2117.
76. Boller F, Bick K, Duyckaerts C. They have shaped Alzheimer disease:
the protagonists, well known and less well known. Cortex. 2007;43:
565–569.
77. Alzheimer A. Üer eine eigenartige Erkankung der Hirnrinde. Allgemeine
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie und Psychisch-Gerichtliche Medizin. 1907;
64:146 –148.
78. Alzheimer A, Stelzmann RA, Schnitzlein HN, Murtagh FR. An English
translation of Alzheimer’s 1907 paper, “Uber eine eigenartige
Erkankung der Hirnrinde.” Clin Anat. 1995;8:429 – 431.
79. Hofman A, Ott A, Breteler MM, Bots ML, Slooter AJ, van Harskamp F,
van Duijn CN, Van Broeckhoven C, Grobbee DE. Atherosclerosis,
apolipoprotein E, and prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
in the Rotterdam Study. Lancet. 1997;349:151–154.
80. Kennelly SP, Lawlor BA, Kenny RA. Blood pressure and the risk for
dementia: a double edged sword. Ageing Res Rev. 2009;8:61–70.
81. Kivipelto M, Helkala EL, Hanninen T, Laakso MP, Hallikainen M,
Alhainen K, Soininen H, Tuomilehto J, Nissinen A. Midlife vascular
risk factors and late-life mild cognitive impairment: a population-based
study. Neurology. 2001;56:1683–1689.
82. Chandra V, Pandav R. Gene-environment interaction in Alzheimer’s
disease: a potential role for cholesterol. Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17:
225–232.
83. Ott A, Stolk RP, van Harskamp F, Pols HA, Hofman A, Breteler MM.
Diabetes mellitus and the risk of dementia: the Rotterdam Study. Neurology. 1999;53:1937–1942.
84. Ott A, Slooter AJ, Hofman A, van Harskamp F, Witteman JC, Van
Broeckhoven C, van Duijn CM, Breteler MM. Smoking and risk of
dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in a population-based cohort study:
the Rotterdam Study. Lancet. 1998;351:1840 –1843.
85. Dede DS, Yavuz B, Yavuz BB, Cankurtaran M, Halil M, Ulger Z,
Cankurtaran ES, Aytemir K, Kabakci G, Ariogul S. Assessment of
endothelial function in Alzheimer’s disease: is Alzheimer’s disease a
vascular disease? J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007;55:1613–1617.
86. Kalaria RN. Neurodegenerative disease: diabetes, microvascular
pathology and Alzheimer disease. Nat Rev Neurol. 2009;5:305–306.
87. Farkas E, Luiten PG. Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and
Alzheimer’s disease. Prog Neurobiol. 2001;64:575– 611.
88. Iadecola C, Park L, Capone C. Threats to the mind: aging, amyloid, and
hypertension. Stroke. 2009;40:S40 –S44.
89. Kawai M, Kalaria RN, Cras P, Siedlak SL, Velasco ME, Shelton ER,
Chan HW, Greenberg BD, Perry G. Degeneration of vascular muscle
cells in cerebral amyloid angiopathy of Alzheimer disease. Brain Res.
1993;623:142–146.
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging
1909
90. Thompson CS, Hakim AM. Living beyond our physiological means:
small vessel disease of the brain is an expression of a systemic failure in
arteriolar function: a unifying hypothesis. Stroke. 2009;40:e322– e330.
91. Kalaria RN. Linking cerebrovascular defense mechanisms in brain
ageing and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2009;30:1512–1515.
92. Zipser BD, Johanson CE, Gonzalez L, Berzin TM, Tavares R, Hulette
CM, Vitek MP, Hovanesian V, Stopa EG. Microvascular injury and
blood-brain barrier leakage in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging.
2007;28:977–986.
93. Kortekaas R, Leenders KL, van Oostrom JC, Vaalburg W, Bart J,
Willemsen AT, Hendrikse NH. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in parkinsonian midbrain in vivo. Ann Neurol. 2005;57:176 –179.
94. Rektor I, Goldemund D, Sheardova K, Rektorova I, Michalkova Z,
Dufek M. Vascular pathology in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s
disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2009;15:24 –29.
95. Szpak GM, Lewandowska E, Wierzba-Bobrowicz T, Bertrand E,
Pasennik E, Mendel T, Stepien T, Leszczynska A, Rafalowska J. Small
cerebral vessel disease in familial amyloid and non-amyloid angiopathies: FAD-PS-1 (P117L) mutation and CADASIL: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. Folia Neuropathol. 2007;45:
192–204.
96. Bailey TL, Rivara CB, Rocher AB, Hof PR. The nature and effects of
cortical microvascular pathology in aging and Alzheimer’s disease.
Neurol Res. 2004;26:573–578. Web site: www.maney.co.uk/journals.ner.
97. Thomas T, Thomas G, McLendon C, Sutton T, Mullan M. ␤-Amyloidmediated vasoactivity and vascular endothelial damage. Nature. 1996;
380:168 –171.
98. Iadecola C, Zhang F, Niwa K, Eckman C, Turner SK, Fischer E,
Younkin S, Borchelt DR, Hsiao KK, Carlson GA. SOD1 rescues
cerebral endothelial dysfunction in mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein. Nat Neurosci. 1999;2:157–161.
99. Niwa K, Kazama K, Younkin L, Younkin SG, Carlson GA, Iadecola C.
Cerebrovascular autoregulation is profoundly impaired in mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein. Am J Physiol. 2002;283:
H315–H323.
100. Bell RD, Zlokovic BV. Neurovascular mechanisms and blood-brain
barrier disorder in Alzheimer’s disease. Acta Neuropathol. 2009;118:
103–113.
101. Zhong Z, Deane R, Ali Z, Parisi M, Shapovalov Y, O’Banion MK,
Stojanovic K, Sagare A, Boillee S, Cleveland DW, Zlokovic BV. ALScausing SOD1 mutants generate vascular changes prior to motor neuron
degeneration. Nat Neurosci. 2008;11:420 – 422.
102. Fotuhi M, Hachinski V, Whitehouse PJ. Changing perspectives
regarding late-life dementia. Nat Rev Neurol. 2009;5:649 – 658.
103. Elias MF, Sullivan LM, D’Agostino RB, Elias PK, Beiser A, Au R,
Seshadri S, DeCarli C, Wolf PA. Framingham stroke risk profile and
lowered cognitive performance. Stroke. 2004;35:404 – 409.
104. Leary MC, Saver JL. Annual incidence of first silent stroke in the United
States: a preliminary estimate. Cerebrovasc Dis. 2003;16:280 –285.
105. Vermeer SE, Longstreth WT Jr, Koudstaal PJ. Silent brain infarcts: a
systematic review. Lancet Neurol. 2007;6:611– 619.
106. Itoh Y, Yamada M, Hayakawa M, Otomo E, Miyatake T. Cerebral
amyloid angiopathy: a significant cause of cerebellar as well as lobar
cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly. J Neurol Sci. 1993;116:135–141.
107. Greenberg SM, Gurol ME, Rosand J, Smith EE. Amyloid angiopathyrelated vascular cognitive impairment. Stroke. 2004;35:2616 –2619.
108. Whitehead SN, Cheng G, Hachinski VC, Cechetto DF. Progressive
increase in infarct size, neuroinflammation, and cognitive deficits in the
presence of high levels of amyloid. Stroke. 2007;38:3245–3250.
109. Ahmad A, Banerjee S, Wang Z, Kong D, Majumdar AP, Sarkar FH.
Aging and inflammation: etiological culprits of cancer. Curr Aging Sci.
2009;2:174 –186.
110. Desai A, Grolleau-Julius A, Yung R. Leukocyte function in the aging
immune system. J Leukoc Biol. 2010;87:1001–1009.
111. Giunta S. Exploring the complex relations between inflammation and
aging (inflamm-aging): anti-inflamm-aging remodelling of inflammaging, from robustness to frailty. Inflamm Res. 2008;57:558 –563.
112. Franceschi C, Bonafe M, Valensin S, Olivieri F, De Luca M, Ottaviani
E, De Benedictis G. Inflamm-aging: an evolutionary perspective on
immunosenescence. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2000;908:244 –254.
113. Osei-Bimpong A, Meek JH, Lewis SM. ESR or CRP? A comparison of
their clinical utility. Hematology. 2007;12:353–357.
114. Gardner ID. The effect of aging on susceptibility to infection. Rev Infect
Dis. 1980;2:801– 810.
1910
Circulation
May 3, 2011
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
115. Smith AE, Kassab JY, Rowland Payne CM, Beer WE. Bimodality in age
of onset of psoriasis, in both patients and their relatives. Dermatology.
1993;186:181–186.
116. Lavrnic D, Jarebinski M, Rakocevic-Stojanovic V, Stevic Z, Lavrnic S,
Pavlovic S, Trikic R, Tripkovic I, Neskovic V, Apostolski S. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of myasthenia gravis in Belgrade,
Yugoslavia (1983–1992). Acta Neurol Scand. 1999;100:168 –174.
117. Fagiolo U, Cossarizza A, Scala E, Fanales-Belasio E, Ortolani C, Cozzi
E, Monti D, Franceschi C, Paganelli R. Increased cytokine production in
mononuclear cells of healthy elderly people. Eur J Immunol. 1993;23:
2375–2378.
118. Naylor K, Li G, Vallejo AN, Lee WW, Koetz K, Bryl E, Witkowski J,
Fulbright J, Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ. The influence of age on T cell
generation and TCR diversity. J Immunol. 2005;174:7446 –7452.
119. Goronzy JJ, Lee WW, Weyand CM. Aging and T-cell diversity. Exp
Gerontol. 2007;42:400 – 406.
120. Frasca D, Landin AM, Riley RL, Blomberg BB. Mechanisms for
decreased function of B cells in aged mice and humans. J Immunol.
2008;180:2741–2746.
121. Kovacic JC, Gupta R, Lee AC, Ma M, Fang F, Tolbert CN, Walts AD,
Beltran LE, San H, Chen G, St Hilaire C, Boehm M. Stat3-dependent
acute Rantes production in vascular smooth muscle cells modulates
inflammation following arterial injury in mice. J Clin Invest. 2010;120:
303–314.
122. Olive M, Mellad JA, Beltran LE, Ma M, Cimato T, Noguchi AC, San H,
Childs R, Kovacic JC, Boehm M. p21Cip1 modulates arterial wound
repair through the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in mice.
J Clin Invest. 2008;118:2050 –2061.
123. Gilbert J, Raboud J, Zinman B. Meta-analysis of the effect of diabetes
on restenosis rates among patients receiving coronary angioplasty
stenting. Diabetes Care. 2004;27:990 –994.
124. Fries JF. Aging, natural death, and the compression of morbidity. N Engl
J Med. 1980;303:130 –135.
125. Nusselder WJ, Peeters A. Successful aging: measuring the years lived
with functional loss. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006;60:448 – 455.
126. Kaplan MS, Huguet N, Orpana H, Feeny D, McFarland BH, Ross N.
Prevalence and factors associated with thriving in older adulthood: a
10-year population-based study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008;
63A:1097–1104.
127. Jagger C, Matthews R, Matthews F, Robinson T, Robine JM, Brayne C.
The burden of diseases on disability-free life expectancy in later life.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007;62A:408 – 414.
128. Stiefel MC, Perla RJ, Zell BL. A healthy bottom line: healthy life
expectancy as an outcome measure for health improvement efforts.
Milbank Q. 2010;88:30 –53.
129. Kannel WB, Vasan RS. Is age really a non-modifiable cardiovascular
risk factor? Am J Cardiol. 2009;104:1307–1310.
130. Sniderman AD, Furberg CD. Age as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lancet. 2008;371:1547–1549.
130a.Richards K. http://www.great-quotes.com/quote/1228785. Accessed
March 30, 2011.
131. Mason CM. Preventing coronary heart disease and stroke with
aggressive statin therapy in older adults using a team management
model. J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2009;21:47–53.
132. Alexander KP, Blazing MA, Rosenson RS, Hazard E, Aronow WS,
Smith SC Jr, Ohman EM. Management of hyperlipidemia in older
adults. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2009;14:49 –58.
133. Nair AP, Darrow B. Lipid management in the geriatric patient. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2009;38:185–206.
134. Beckett NS, Peters R, Fletcher AE, Staessen JA, Liu L, Dumitrascu D,
Stoyanovsky V, Antikainen RL, Nikitin Y, Anderson C, Belhani A,
Forette F, Rajkumar C, Thijs L, Banya W, Bulpitt CJ. Treatment of
hypertension in patients 80 years of age or older. N Engl J Med.
2008;358:1887–1898.
135. SHEP Cooperative Research Group. Prevention of stroke by antihypertensive drug treatment in older persons with isolated systolic hypertension: final results of the Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program
(SHEP). JAMA. 1991;265:3255–3264.
136. Ho KK, Anderson KM, Kannel WB, Grossman W, Levy D. Survival
after the onset of congestive heart failure in Framingham Heart Study
subjects. Circulation. 1993;88:107–115.
137. Chiuve SE, Rexrode KM, Spiegelman D, Logroscino G, Manson JE,
Rimm EB. Primary prevention of stroke by healthy lifestyle. Circulation. 2008;118:947–954.
138. Kahn R, Robertson RM, Smith R, Eddy D. The impact of prevention on
reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease. Circulation.
2008;118:576 –585.
KEY WORDS: aging 䡲 cardiovascular disease
risk factors 䡲 stem cells 䡲 vascular calcification
䡲
cardiovascular disease
Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging: Part 2 of a 2-Part Review: Clinical
Vascular Disease in the Elderly
Jason C. Kovacic, Pedro Moreno, Elizabeth G. Nabel, Vladimir Hachinski and Valentin Fuster
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on September 30, 2016
Circulation. 2011;123:1900-1910
doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.009118
Circulation is published by the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231
Copyright © 2011 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.
Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539
The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on the
World Wide Web at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/123/17/1900
Data Supplement (unedited) at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2016/04/13/123.17.1900.DC1.html
Permissions: Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published
in Circulation can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial
Office. Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located,
click Request Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about
this process is available in the Permissions and Rights Question and Answer document.
Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at:
http://www.lww.com/reprints
Subscriptions: Information about subscribing to Circulation is online at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/
Page 44
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
Seconde partie d’une synthèse en deux parties :
pathologie vasculaire clinique chez le sujet âgé
Jason C. Kovacic, MD, PhD ; Pedro Moreno, MD ; Elizabeth G. Nabel, MD ;
Vladimir Hachinski, MD, DSc ; Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD
Souviens-toi de ceci,
Un baiser est juste un baiser,
Un soupir juste un soupir,
Les fondamentaux s’appliquent,
Au fil du temps.
—« Au fil du temps » de Herman Hupfeld,
Casablanca (1942)1
La rigidification des artères : calcification,
glycation et appareil vasculaire du sujet âgé
Le phénotype de vieillissement vasculaire
L’avancée en âge entraîne diverses modifications structurales
et fonctionnelles de l’appareil vasculaire. A l’échelle macroscopique, cela se traduit par une augmentation de diamètre
de la lumière des artères et par un épaississement de leur
paroi qui porte principalement sur l’intima.2 De plus, l’augmentation des dépôts calciques et la rigidification généralisée
de l’arbre artériel ont pour effet d’augmenter la réflectivité de
l’onde de pouls ainsi que la pression artérielle systolique,
d’abaisser la pression diastolique et d’élargir la pression
pulsée.
Un aspect intéressant de la biologie vasculaire sur lequel
nos connaissances ont notablement progressé concerne la
vitesse de l’onde de pouls, qui est à la fois une conséquence et
une cause du phénotype de vieillissement vasculaire. Chez les
individus dont l’arbre artériel est sain, l’onde de pouls est
renvoyée vers le cœur à partir des embranchements et de
diverses autres structures artérielles périphériques, l’onde
réfléchie atteignant la racine aortique pendant la diastole.
Chez le sujet âgé, la plus grande rigidité des artères a pour
effet d’augmenter les vitesses des ondes antérograde et
réfléchie, de sorte que cette dernière atteint la racine de l’aorte
en fin de systole, ce qui entraîne l’élévation de la pression
télésystolique (Figure 1).3 Ce glissement lié à l’âge de l’onde
réfléchie de la diastole à la télésystole augmente le travail
systolique du cœur, diminue la perfusion coronaire pendant la
diastole et soumet les organes cibles tels que le cerveau et les
reins à des niveaux de pression plus élevés.3 C’est pourquoi
la rigidification des artères a une responsabilité directe
dans l’hypertrophie ventriculaire, l’insuffisance rénale et les
événements vasculaires cérébraux, un important faisceau
de données montrant qu’il existe un lien indépendant entre
l’accélération de la vitesse de l’onde de pouls et les risques
d’événement cardiovasculaire et de décès lié à toute cause.3,4
’augmentation du nombre de personnes âgées dans notre
société est, en fait, l’aboutissement de plusieurs siècles
d’avancées médicales, scientifiques et sociales. Dans les pays
occidentaux tout du moins, la quasi-disparition des grands
fléaux, de l’extrême pauvreté, de la malnutrition rampante,
des sources de pollution des aliments et de l’eau fait que,
désormais, une proportion croissante de la population peut
espérer atteindre un âge avancé. Néanmoins, bien que,
aux Etats-Unis, les taux de mortalité ajustés pour l’âge en
rapport avec les affections cardiovasculaires, les événements
coronaires et les accidents vasculaires cérébraux continuent
de diminuer, ces affections frappent encore un pourcentage
inacceptable d’individus parvenus à un âge avancé (soit
environ 80 % des sujets âgés de 80 ans ou plus).1a
Dans cet article de synthèse en deux parties, nous traitons
des importantes altérations biologiques dont l’appareil
cardiovasculaire est l’objet du fait du vieillissement et nous
examinons les aspects prometteurs des progrès scientifiques
récents et des connaissances nouvellement acquises qui sont
susceptibles de déboucher sur des stratégies cliniques ciblées à
même de réduire le lourd tribut payé par la population âgée
à la pathologie cardiovasculaire en termes de morbidité et
de mortalité excessives. Dans cette seconde partie, nous
nous intéresserons spécifiquement aux affections vasculaires
du sujet âgé, à savoir l’hypertension artérielle systolique, la
calcification des vaisseaux et les états de démence, ce qui nous
conduira à examiner les nouvelles données fondamentales et
cliniques qui ont fait progresser notre compréhension de ces
pathologies.
L
Institut Cardiovasculaire Zena and Michael A. Wiener, Faculté de Médecine du Mont Sinaï, New York, New York, Etats-Unis (J.C.K., P.M., V.F.) ;
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, Etats-Unis (E.G.N.) ; Département de Neurologie Clinique, Université de l’Ontario occidental,
London, Ontario, Canada (V.H.) ; Centre de Santé Cardiovasculaire Marie-Josée et Henry R. Kravis, Faculté de Médecine du Mont Sinaï, New York,
New York, Etats-Unis (V.F.) ; et Centre National d’Investigations Cardiovasculaires, Madrid, Espagne (V.F.).
Cet article constitue la seconde partie d’une synthèse en deux parties.
Correspondance : Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1030, New York, NY 10029, Etats-Unis.
E-mail : [email protected]
(Traduit de l’anglais : Cellular Senescence, Vascular Disease, and Aging. Part 2 of a 2-Part Review: Clinical Vascular Disease in the Elderly. Circulation.
2011;123:1900–1910.)
© 2012 Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Circulation est disponible sur http://circ.ahajournals.org
44
09:37:07:12:11
Page 44
Page 45
Kovacic et al
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
45
Figure 1. Courbes d’ondes de pression aortiques établies à partir des mesures tonométriques pratiquées au niveau de l’artère radiale. La
courbe en jaune est la sommation de l’onde antérograde (courbe en vert) et de l’onde réfléchie (courbe en rouge). A, Courbe d’onde de
pression aortique d’un homme de 39 ans présentant une pression artérielle normale et une onde de pouls aortique de vitesse normale
(7,6 m/s). L’onde de pouls réfléchie atteint l’aorte en fin de systole, provoquant une légère élévation de la pression au point de croisement
avec l’onde antérograde (ligne verticale en vert) au moment où la valve aortique se referme. Cette augmentation essentiellement diastolique
de la pression artérielle favorise la perfusion coronaire. B, Chez cette femme de 64 ans dont l’onde de pouls aortique est accélérée à 11,3 m/s,
l’onde réfléchie atteint l’aorte plus rapidement, pendant la systole, ce qui a pour effet d’augmenter la pression systolique. Noter également,
chez cette femme, l’amplitude plus élevée de l’onde réfléchie. Reproduit et adapté de Lim et de Townsend3 avec l’autorisation de l’éditeur.
Copyright © 2009, W.B./Saunders CO.
Malgré cela, peut-être en raison de l’absence d’option
thérapeutique ciblée et de l’interdépendance entre la vitesse de
l’onde de pouls et la pression artérielle systolique, la mesure
de ces paramètres n’est pas encore véritablement entrée dans
la pratique clinique courante.
Les importants remaniements dont sont l’objet les parois
des artères et qui semblent découler de la rigidification de
ces dernières consistent en des augmentations des dépôts
de calcium, de la teneur en collagène et en ses molécules
de pontage et de la fragmentation de l’élastine ainsi qu’en
une raréfaction de celle-ci (Figure 2).3,5 Plusieurs de ces
phénomènes sont examinés en détail ci-après.
Altération du métabolisme du calcium liée au
vieillissement : le « paradoxe du calcium »
Le phénomène de calcification des artères est connu depuis
plus d’un siècle,6 et cela fait au moins 50 ans que l’on a
découvert que ce processus intéresse également les artères
coronaires.7 Bien que la sévérité de cette calcification
coronaire soit en rapport avec la charge globale en plaques
d’athérosclérose, la relation entre la calcification coronaire et
la biologie des plaques est complexe ; des études post-mortem
ont, en effet, montré que les plaques en phase de rupture aiguë
ou en voie de cicatrisation sont celles qui donnent lieu aux
dépôts calciques les plus importants, que les plaques érodées
n’induisent qu’un processus de calcification minime et que
les plaques stables vont de pair avec des dépôts calciques de
degré intermédiaire.8 Bien que l’on ait coutume de parler
simplement de calcification vasculaire ou coronaire, il importe
de noter qu’il s’agit d’une simplification extrême qui tient
à l’absence de pouvoir de discrimination des techniques
d’imagerie non invasives telles que la tomodensitométrie,
car les dépôts calciques peuvent se constituer aussi bien dans
09:37:07:12:11
Page 45
Figure 2. Synopsis des causes connues d’augmentation de la
rigidité artérielle. PFAG : produits finals avancés de glycation ;
Mφ : macrophages ; I-CAM : molécule d’adhésion intercellulaire ;
MPM : métalloprotéases matricielles ; TGF-β : facteur de
croissance transformant β ; CMLV : cellules musculaires lisses
vasculaires. Adapté de Zieman et al5 avec l’autorisation de
l’éditeur. Copyright © 2005, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.
l’intima que dans la média des artères (Figure 3).9,10 Cela
étant, bien que le lien, s’il existe, entre la charge globale en
dépôts calciques coronaires et le degré de sténose artérielle
soit très faible,11 la calcification coronaire est néanmoins
reconnue comme un facteur de risque indépendant de
survenue d’événements cardiovasculaires12 et de décès.13
Le paradigme selon lequel cellules, organes et organisme
vieillissent de manière interdépendante est mis en lumière par
la relation inverse étonnamment puissante qui existe entre les
degrés de calcification vasculaire et de minéralisation osseuse.
En d’autres termes, la calcification des artères va de pair avec
Page 46
46
Circulation
Janvier 2012
Figure 3. Synthèse
des grandes
différences existant
entre les calcifications
vasculaires localisées
à l’intima et celles
siégeant au niveau de
la média. CMLV :
cellules musculaires
lisses vasculaires.
Reproduit et adapté de
Persy et de D’Haese10
avec l’autorisation de
l’éditeur. Copyright ©
2009, Elsevier.
une diminution de la densité minérale osseuse, cela réalisant
le « paradoxe du calcium ».10 Bien que les fondements de ce
paradoxe ne soient pas encore parfaitement élucidés, certaines
protéines ont été identifiées, dont on sait qu’elles exercent de
multiples effets sur la synthèse et la résorption osseuses ainsi
que sur les vaisseaux.14 Il ressort d’études sur les rongeurs que
l’une de ces protéines, l’ostéoprotégérine, joue vraisemblablement un rôle majeur dans le paradoxe du calcium, car les
souris dépourvues du gène de l’ostéoprotégérine présentent
une densité osseuse fortement diminuée ainsi que d’importants dépôts calciques dans la média de leurs artères.15
Le paradoxe du calcium est corroboré par le fait que
l’administration de bisphosphonates en vue d’augmenter la
masse osseuse semble à même de prévenir la calcification des
artères, tout au moins chez les patients dialysés et chez les
individus âgés.16–18 Un autre corollaire est que, bien que
l’effet exercé par les statines sur la calcification vasculaire soit
controversé,10 une récente méta-analyse a montré que ces
médicaments augmentent légèrement la densité minérale des
os de la hanche.19
L’importance du paradoxe du calcium est mise en lumière
par des études menées sur le gène klotho (dans la mythologie
de la Grèce antique, Clotho était une déesse qui était supposée
dérouler le fil de la vie des hommes). La mutation du gène
klotho murin est à l’origine d’un syndrome dont les caractéristiques rappellent celles du vieillissement humain ; il associe, en
effet, un raccourcissement de la durée de vie, une infertilité,
une atrophie cutanée, un emphysème et, surtout, une
artériosclérose marquée par d’importants dépôts calciques au
09:37:07:12:11
Page 46
niveau des médias vasculaires et par une ostéoporose
concomitante.20 Des travaux récents suggèrent que klotho
pourrait être un régulateur d’amont de l’homéostasie
systémique des phosphates.21 Cliniquement, un variant
fonctionnel de klotho (nommé KL-VS) qui est relativement
répandu dans la population générale (fréquence de 0,157) est
un facteur de risque indépendant de maladie coronaire
occulte22 et a pour effet de réduire l’espérance de vie des
individus porteurs homozygotes.23
Mécanismes cellulaires de la calcification vasculaire
Plusieurs découvertes ont récemment été faites quant aux
fondements de la calcification des artères. En accord avec
la grande fréquence de ce trouble chez les sujets atteints
d’insuffisance rénale chronique terminale, les cellules
musculaires lisses vasculaires exposées à des concentrations
élevées en phosphates présentent une augmentation dosedépendante de leur charge en calcium ; de plus, ces cellules
acquièrent un phénotype pseudo-ostéoblastique et expriment
des marqueurs ostéogéniques.24–26 Il semble que les cellules
souches périvasculaires (péricytes) jouent également un rôle
dans la calcification des vaisseaux. Dans le cadre des travaux
menés sur ces cellules sous-endothéliales ubiquitaires,27 on
a découvert dans les années 1980 que ces péricytes se
différencient en cellules ostéoprogénitrices et participent à la
formation des os du crâne.28 Plusieurs années après, il a été
établi que des cellules ayant l’aspect de péricytes ont la
capacité de se différencier en ostéoblastes et participent
vraisemblablement au processus de calcification artérielle
Page 47
Kovacic et al
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
associé à l’athérosclérose.29 Certaines données récentes
portent, par ailleurs, à penser que les péricytes seraient
étroitement apparentés aux cellules stromales mésenchymateuses (également appelées cellules souches mésenchymateuses).27 Il reste maintenant à déterminer si l’altération
et/ou l’épuisement de ce pool de péricytes apparentés aux
cellules souches joue un rôle dans le vieillissement de
l’appareil vasculaire ou dans les affections liées à l’âge telles
que le syndrome de Hutchinson-Gilford ou progéria (se
reporter à la première partie de cet article de synthèse).
En tant que nouveau concept, il est également possible que
la transformation phénotypique des cellules endothéliales en
ostéoblastes et en chondrocytes contribue à la calcification
vasculaire.30 Cela pourrait découler de la mutation des cellules
endothéliales en cellules mésenchymateuses, processus connu
pour s’opérer dans d’autres organes et au cours du développement embryonnaire et dans lequel les cellules endothéliales
subissent divers réarrangements moléculaires et phénotypiques qui les transforment en cellules mésenchymateuses.27
Cette éventualité a été explorée par l’examen d’échantillons
biopsiques émanant d’individus atteints de fibrodysplasie
ossifiante progressive (ou maladie de l’homme de pierre),
maladie donnant lieu à une vaste ostéogenèse hétérotopique
intéressant également les vaisseaux et qui résulte d’une
mutation génétique avec gain de fonction.30 Dans cette étude,
Medici et al30 ont apporté de solides preuves de l’origine
endothéliale de ces ostéoblastes et chondrocytes vasculaires.
Bien qu’il reste à établir si la transformation phénotypique
des cellules endothéliales est également à l’origine de la
calcification des artères chez les individus non porteurs de
cette mutation génétique, ce travail jette les bases d’une
exploration plus poussée du rôle joué par la transformation
des cellules endothéliales en cellules mésenchymateuses dans
le vieillissement de l’appareil vasculaire de l’adulte.
La glycation et la rupture de l’équilibre entre
élastine et collagène favorisent toutes deux la
rigidification des artères
Parallèlement au processus de calcification, la rupture de
l’équilibre entre élastine et collagène contribue également à la
rigidification généralisée des artères conductrices au cours
de l’avancée en âge. Bien qu’imparfait, le modèle d’élasticité
artérielle proposé par Roach et Burton31 en 1957 est utile pour
appréhender le rôle joué par ces protéines.32 Selon ce modèle,
dans le cas d’artères saines soumises à une faible pression
sanguine et à des forces circonférentielles minimes, c’est
l’élastine qui assure le maintien de la paroi artérielle. Si la
pression et les contraintes augmentent, les fibres de collagène
se déploient progressivement de manière à prendre une part
croissante dans la résistance à la déformation du vaisseau,
de sorte que celui-ci se rigidifie peu à peu pour s’opposer à
une distension excessive en cas de pression très élevée.31,32
Toutefois, avec l’âge, les fibres élastiques se fragmentent
et s’amenuisent,33 ce qui entraîne l’augmentation du rapport
collagène/élastine et le transfert progressif de la charge
mécanique au collagène, qui est 100 à 1 000 fois plus résistant
que l’élastine.32 Cette fragmentation de l’élastine peut résulter
d’une cause mécanique (rupture de fatigue)34 ou enzymatique,
cette dernière éventualité étant liée à l’action des métallo-
09:37:07:12:11
Page 47
47
protéases matricielles33 et peut-être régulée en amont par le
facteur de croissance transformant β.35
L’accumulation des produits finals de glycation avancée
(PFAG) a également été mise en cause dans la perte d’élasticité
des artères. La formation de ces PFAG découle d’une réaction
non enzymatique du glucose avec les protéines, les lipides et
les acides nucléiques, laquelle donne naissance à un ensemble
hétérogène de produits mal définis qui forment entre eux un
réseau complexe.36–38 Les PFAG sont directement à l’origine
de la formation de liaisons croisées au sein des protéines telles
que le collagène ; ce collagène lié aux PFAG est plus rigide
et échappe au processus de renouvellement normal, ce
qui aboutit à une accumulation de molécules de collagène
structuralement dysfonctionnelles avec l’avancée en âge.5,39
L’élastine du tissu aortique humain est, elle aussi, exposée à la
glycation.40 Témoignage de la synergie existant entre le
vieillissement de l’appareil vasculaire et celui de l’individu,
l’accumulation de PFAG est associée à de multiples troubles
liés à l’âge, dont le stress oxydatif,41 la (dys)fonction des
progéniteurs cellulaires42 et l’apoptose des cellules endothéliales43 et non vasculaires.44 En corollaire de cela, un lien a
été mis en évidence chez le rongeur entre le stress oxydatif, les
PFAG et la maladie chronique, car la diminution du taux
de PFAG consécutive à la réduction des apports ou à
l’administration d’un traitement médicamenteux a pour effet
d’abaisser l’incidence des troubles rénaux et cardiovasculaires
liés à l’âge.45
La dysfonction endothéliale du sujet âgé
La dysfonction endothéliale est un autre phénomène
contribuant à augmenter la rigidité des artères chez les
individus âgés, lesquels présentent une altération de la
vasodilatation dépendante de l’endothélium, même en
l’absence de trouble cardiovasculaire ou de facteur de risque
afférent.46–47 De plus, la dysfonction endothéliale constitue
une étape importante dans la formation des plaques d’athérosclérose et est elle-même prédictive de la survenue de futurs
événements cardiaques.48
De multiples facteurs contribuent à altérer la fonction
endothéliale chez le sujet âgé. Il convient notamment
d’observer que les récepteurs aux PFAG, auxquels a été donné
le nom de RAGE, sont exprimés par les cellules endothéliales.49 Il se pourrait que la liaison des PFAG aux RAGE
endothéliaux ou d’autres interactions entre les cellules
endothéliales et les PFAG perturbent de nombreux aspects du
fonctionnement endothélial en majorant l’expression des
molécules d’adhésion et l’afflux de cellules inflammatoires,50,51
en affaiblissant les contacts intercellulaires et en augmentant
la perméabilité des vaisseaux,52,53 mais aussi en réprimant la
synthèse du monoxyde d’azote (NO).54 L’altération de la
signalisation du NO semble être un facteur clé de la dysfonction endothéliale du sujet âgé. A l’inhibition exercée par les
PFAG vient s’ajouter celle découlant de l’augmentation de
la production endothéliale d’espèces réactives de l’oxygène
liée au vieillissement, qui diminue encore davantage la
biodisponibilité du NO et conduit à la formation d’espèces
réactives de l’azote.47,55–57 De plus, chez le sujet âgé, l’augmentation d’activité de l’arginase au sein des vaisseaux
diminue la disponibilité de la L-arginine, qui est le précurseur
Page 48
48
Circulation
Janvier 2012
de la NO synthétase, ce qui a pour effets de déprimer l’activité
du NO et de perturber la réactivité vasculaire sous la
dépendance de l’endothélium.57–59 Enfin, la sirtuine (SIRT) de
type 1, qui, comme cela a été exposé dans la première partie de
cet article de synthèse, exerce un effet anti-âge globalement
protecteur, soutient la fonction vasculaire médiée par
l’endothélium en activant la NO synthétase endothéliale.60
En résumé, l’augmentation de rigidité des artères, qui est en
soi un facteur de risque cardiovasculaire, résulte de multiples
troubles biologiques liés à l’âge, consistant, entre autre, en des
perturbations du métabolisme du calcium, de la fonction
des cellules souches, du dépôt de PFAG et de la fonction
endothéliale. Le phénomène de rigidification des artères
illustre parfaitement la notion clé traitée ici, qui est que le
vieillissement est l’aboutissement des interactions complexes
s’exerçant entre de multiples systèmes dysfonctionnels.
nombre d’hématies ont pour effet de réduire la capacité
sanguine de transport de l’oxygène chez l’individu âgé, ce qui
tend à diminuer l’oxygénation des tissus. Comme cela a déjà
été mentionné, chez un tel sujet, l’altération de la réflectivité
de l’onde de pouls a pour conséquence une réduction de la
perfusion myocardique diastolique. Toutefois, lorsque ce
trouble s’accompagne d’une diminution du taux d’hémoglobine et d’une mauvaise oxygénation tissulaire, cela crée
de nombreux facteurs défavorables qui peuvent rompre
l’équilibre entre l’offre et la demande en oxygène tant au
niveau du cœur que des autres organes. Pour autant, s’il
apparaît prudent de traiter les éventuels troubles concomitants tels qu’une carence en fer ou des saignements
digestifs, il n’existe, en revanche, aucun argument clinique
solide justifiant de chercher à corriger artificiellement une
anémie légère à modérée chez un patient âgé qui ne présente
que des symptômes minimes.
Anémie, événements thromboemboliques
et risque de décès chez le sujet âgé :
un fragile équilibre
Maladie d’Alzheimer : les preuves de la
participation vasculaire
Le lien existant entre âge avancé et anémie est connu depuis des
décennies.61 L’anémie du sujet âgé relève de multiples causes,
comprenant notamment certaines maladies chroniques, les
carences alimentaires, l’insuffisance rénale, la polymédication,
les pertes sanguines et la diminution de l’activité hématopoïétique de la moelle osseuse.62 L’anémie est elle-même
associée à un nombre étonnant de pathologies liées à l’âge,
telles que certaines affections cardiovasculaires,63 la maladie
d’Alzheimer et les troubles cognitifs,64,65 certaines dysfonctions physiques,65 les symptômes dépressifs65 ou encore le
décès.65,66 Toutefois, on ignore, pour l’heure, si les liens
observés traduisent ou non des relations de causalité.61 En
effet, alors que certains assimilent l’anémie du sujet âgé à une
crise de santé publique,62 d’autres considèrent que, ne serait-ce
que dans certains contextes tels que les anémies des affections
chroniques, une légère anémie pourrait constituer une
adaptation physiologique bénéfique.67,68 Bien que nous ne
disposions que de données limitées dans la population âgée, il
y a lieu de souligner que les nombreux essais thérapeutiques
menés avec l’érythropoïétine (et ses dérivés) ont montré que,
même si l’augmentation du taux d’hémoglobine à un niveau
non anémique est à même d’améliorer la qualité de vie des
patients, cela risque d’être au prix d’une mortalité plus
importante.69,70
Il importe de noter que la santé cardiovasculaire est
corrélée avec la viscosité du sang total.71 Bien que celle-ci ne
varie quasiment pas avec l’âge,72 d’autres modifications
importantes se produisent, qui affectent le profil
hémorhéologique global. Ainsi, le taux de fibrinogène
plasmatique augmente notablement au cours du vieillissement,73 alors que, comme cela a déjà été mentionné, il y a
diminution progressive de l’hémoglobine et des taux
d’hématies et de plaquettes.72 En dépit du rôle majeur que joue
la réduction de la mobilité dans la survenue de thromboses
veineuses profondes et d’embolies pulmonaires chez le sujet
âgé, l’élévation du taux de fibrinogène pourrait également
concourir à augmenter l’incidence de ces événements.74
De leur côté, les diminutions du taux d’hémoglobine et du
On estime qu’au moins 24,3 millions d’individus de par le
monde sont atteints de démence. En parallèle à l’épidémie de
vieillissement (se reporter à la première partie de cet article de
synthèse), on prévoit, en outre, que le nombre de personnes
présentant un trouble démentiel devrait doubler tous les
20 ans pour atteindre 81,1 millions en 2040.75 Cela pose un
problème d’autant plus aigu que la démence est une affection
particulièrement invalidante, qui a un énorme impact négatif
sur les patients et sur les personnes qui assurent leurs soins.
La notion d’état démentiel remonte quasiment à l’aube de
l’histoire de l’humanité. Il y a plus de 40 siècles, les Egyptiens
avaient déjà intégré le fait que la vieillesse pouvait
s’accompagner d’une importante altération de la mémoire.76
C’est en 1907 que le Dr Alois Alzheimer publia sa description
séminale de l’affection qui porte aujourd’hui son nom.77,78
Cette première observation clinique portait sur une femme de
51 ans dont l’autopsie avait fourni des résultats en faveur
d’une participation vasculaire : « les pièces vasculaires de taille
supérieure présentent des lésions d’artériosclérose [. . .] Il n’y a
pas d’infiltration des vaisseaux, mais, néanmoins, on note un
processus expansif au niveau des assises endothéliales et, en
certains endroits, une prolifération de vaisseaux. »77,78 En
accord avec les observations du Dr Alzheimer selon lesquelles
le vieillissement est la résultante complexe de l’interaction
entre cellules, organes et appareils sénescents, un nombre
croissant de données met désormais en lumière le rôle que
joue le vieillissement vasculaire dans l’évolution et la physiopathologie de la maladie d’Alzheimer et des autres affections
neurodégénératives. Ces données montrent qu’il existe des
liens étroits entre la maladie d’Alzheimer et de nombreux
facteurs de risque cardiovasculaire, dont l’athérosclérose,79
l’hypertension artérielle en milieu de vie,80 les dyslipidémies
et l’hypercholestérolémie,81,82 le diabète,83 le tabagisme,84
ou encore l’altération de la vasodilatation médiée par
l’endothélium.85 Pour irréfutables que soient ces données,
il est extrêmement malaisé de déterminer les mécanismes
par lesquels ces facteurs de risque cardiovasculaire sont
susceptibles de contribuer à la maladie d’Alzheimer.86
09:37:07:12:11
Page 48
Page 49
Kovacic et al
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
49
Microangiopathie, vieillissement et maladie
d’Alzheimer
L’âge induit de profondes modifications des vaisseaux
sanguins et de la circulation au niveau cérébral. Les cellules
endothéliales s’étirent et s’appauvrissent en mitochondries
alors que les capillaires du cortex cérébral et de l’hippocampe
diminuent en nombre et présentent un épaississement et une
fibrose de leur membrane basale.87,88 De fait, chez le sujet âgé,
ces remaniements intéressent l’ensemble des microvaisseaux
et, ajoutés à d’autres modifications comprenant notamment
une atrophie de ces vaisseaux, une fibrose périvasculaire et un
remplacement des cellules musculaires lisses vasculaires par
une substance fibro-hyaline,89 réalisent un tableau désigné
sous le terme de microangiopathie.90 Lorsque, à ce trouble,
s’associent d’autres altérations biologiques, consistant en une
augmentation de la tortuosité des vaisseaux et une diminution
de leur élasticité,91 cela a pour effets de perturber la régulation
du flux sanguin microcirculatoire et cérébral, de diminuer la
perfusion cérébrale et d’augmenter la vulnérabilité du sujet à
l’égard des agressions neurologiques.
Bien qu’elle constitue un aspect normal (quoique néfaste)
du vieillissement, la microangiopathie est étroitement
impliquée dans le développement de la maladie
d’Alzheimer,90,92 tout comme dans celui d’autres affections
neurodégénératives telles que la maladie de Parkinson93,94 et le
syndrome baptisé CADASIL (pour cerebral autosomal
dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy ; artériopathie cérébrale autosomique
dominante avec infarctus sous-corticaux et leucoencéphalopathie).95 Comme l’illustre la Figure 4,96 les remaniements
microvasculaires qui surviennent dans la maladie d’Alzheimer
peuvent être beaucoup plus importants que ceux observés au
cours du vieillissement physiologique. Le dépôt de protéine
amyloïde β dans le cerveau (plaques amyloïdes) et dans les
vaisseaux cérébraux (angiopathie amyloïde) constitue un
élément clé de cette affection, l’accumulation intravasculaire
jouant un rôle majeur dans l’aggravation de la microangiopathie. Des études menées sur des modèles murins de maladie
d’Alzheimer ont établi que la surexpression du précurseur de
l’amyloïde β a de profonds effets sur la régulation du flux
sanguin cérébral. De fait, l’une des altérations les plus
précoces observées chez la souris surexprimant ce précurseur
est une dysfonction endothéliale avec perte de l’autorégulation cérébrale.97–99
A un stade plus avancé de la maladie, le processus
pathologique est aggravé par les fuites vasculaires et la
rupture de la barrière hémato-encéphalique. Il semblerait
que ce dernier événement perturbe le transport des nutriments, des protéines, des vitamines et des électrolytes,100
de sorte que, l’épuration de la protéine amyloïde β n’étant
dès lors plus assurée,100 celle-ci s’accumule encore plus
massivement.96 L’examen de pièces autopsiques humaines a
montré que la rupture de la barrière hémato-encéphalique
entraîne l’intrusion des protéines plasmatiques dans la
paroi des microvaisseaux.92 De même, des travaux sur des
modèles animaux de sclérose latérale amyotrophique
ont révélé que la diminution de la teneur endothéliale en
protéines de jonctions serrées provoque la rupture de
la barrière hémato-spinale, ce qui est responsable d’une
09:37:07:12:11
Page 49
Figure 4. Caractéristiques anatomopathologiques des
microvaisseaux corticaux dans la maladie d’Alzheimer. Cliché du
haut, Vaisseaux atrophiés et fragmentés au voisinage immédiat
des dépôts amyloïdes chez un patient alzheimérien. Cliché du
bas, Aspect typique des capillaires d’un cerveau normal. Barres
d’échelle = 25 µm. Reproduit de Bailey et al96 avec l’autorisation
de l’éditeur. Copyright © 2004, W.S. Maney & Son Ltd.
hypoperfusion et de microhémorragies de la moelle
épinière.101
Contributions multiples des facteurs de risque
cardiovasculaire à la maladie d’Alzheimer et
aux états de démence
Très certainement, les multiples contributions des facteurs
de risque vasculaire et autre à l’évolution de la maladie
d’Alzheimer sont plus complexes qu’il n’apparaît à la lecture
de ce qui précède. Ainsi, d’autres facteurs, tels que la restriction calorique et la SIRT1 dont il est traité dans la première
partie de cet article, pourraient jouer un rôle protecteur. De
plus, des études menées chez des patients diabétiques ont
montré que, bien que ces derniers soient exposés à un risque
majoré de maladie d’Alzheimer, ils présentent paradoxalement moins de plaques amyloïdes et d’enchevêtrements
neurofibrillaires.86 Bien que cette notion soit controversée, il
se pourrait que de nombreux facteurs propres au diabète et
n’ayant que peu de liens avec les plaques amyloïdes et les
enchevêtrements neurofibrillaires jouent également un rôle,
ces facteurs comprenant, entre autre, l’aggravation de la
microangiopathie, l’inflammation, l’accumulation neuronale
de PFAG et le stress oxydatif.86 Dès lors, bien que les plaques
amyloïdes et les enchevêtrements neurofibrillaires demeurent
les manifestations caractéristiques de la maladie d’Alzheimer,
il est possible que d’autres troubles contribuent au processus
pathologique premier en augmentant la sévérité globale de la
démence.96
Page 50
50
Circulation
Janvier 2012
Figure 5. Facteurs supposés
associés aux dysfonctions
cognitives et aux états de
démence. Les vaisseaux sanguins
sont figurés en noir (trait gras).
Certains processus peuvent être
directement responsables de
l’atrophie corticale et
hippocampique ainsi que de
l’altération cognitive. D’autres
peuvent entraîner des lésions de
la substance blanche ou un
accident vasculaire cérébral,
exerçant par la même un rôle plus
indirect dans l’installation de la
dysfonction cognitive globale.
Reproduit de Fotuhi et al102 avec
l’autorisation de l’éditeur.
Copyright © 2009, Nature
Publishing Group.
De fait, on pense aujourd’hui que de nombreux facteurs
vasculaires et autres contribuent à l’altération cognitive et
à l’installation d’un état de démence (Figure 5)102 ; en
particulier, il semblerait que le rôle joué par l’angiopathie ait
été jusqu’alors grandement sous-estimé. Bien qu’il soit établi
qu’une démence secondaire à des accidents vasculaires
cérébraux répétés (souvent appelée démence par infarctus
multiples) peut simuler une maladie d’Alzheimer et coexister
avec celle-ci, tout porte à croire qu’il existe entre ces deux
affections un lien plus étroit, qui pourrait même être de nature
causale. Les accidents vasculaires cérébraux dits « silencieux »
sont 5 à 10 fois plus fréquents que ceux ayant une traduction
clinique. Mais, en réalité, ces accidents vasculaires cérébraux
infracliniques ne sont pas silencieux ; ils sont responsables
d’un allongement du temps de réaction et de troubles cognitifs
intéressant essentiellement les fonctions exécutives (capacités
à planifier, à accomplir des tâches multiples et à résoudre des
problèmes).103–105 Il semblerait, en outre, qu’une interaction
synergique s’opère entre les événements vasculaires cérébraux
et la maladie d’Alzheimer par l’intermédiaire des dépôts
amyloïdes. On sait, en effet, que l’angiopathie amyloïde est
une importante cause d’hémorragie cérébrale chez le sujet
âgé106 et que la diminution du nombre des cellules musculaires
lisses vasculaires89 peut être cause de ruptures vasculaires et
d’hémorragies lobaires chez les patients alzheimériens.100,106,107
09:37:07:12:11
Page 50
A l’appui du lien supposé exister entre les événements
vasculaires cérébraux et la maladie d’Alzheimer, des modèles
murins ont montré que, en présence de dépôts amyloïdes, les
infarctus cérébraux sont plus étendus et présentent une plus
forte composante inflammatoire que ceux observés chez les
animaux témoins.108
Le paradigme stipulant que les états de démence cliniques
sont la conséquence de tout un ensemble d’agressions
vasculaires et autres, survenant et interférant entre elles à de
multiples niveaux physiologiques, est conforme à l’esprit du
présent article, qui est que le vieillissement et les pathologies
liées à l’âge représentent l’aboutissement de l’interaction
dynamique entre les cellules, les organes, les appareils et
l’organisme. Il importe d’observer ici que l’avènement de
l’imagerie clinique des dépôts amyloïdes et de l’activation de
la microglie chez l’Homme pourrait bientôt ouvrir la voie à
des traitements préventifs et aigus à visée anti-inflammatoire
et anti-amyloïde, ajustés en fonction du patient et dans le
temps de manière à obtenir l’effet clinique maximal.
L’« inflammaging » (et l’« anti-inflammaging »)
Une notion rémanente dans cet article de synthèse est que les
perturbations induites par le vieillissement au niveau de la
fonction immunitaire et de la réponse inflammatoire
déterminent très certainement le phénotype de sénescence
Page 51
Kovacic et al
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
cardiovasculaire. Les modifications des réponses immunitaires
et inflammatoires imputables à l’âge dont nous avons déjà
traité ici comprennent le raccourcissement des télomères
leucocytaires, l’altération de la fixation des cellules inflammatoires sur les vaisseaux et la raréfaction (ou l’épuisement)
des cellules souches médullaires. De multiples autres perturbations immunitaires ont toutefois été mises en évidence chez le
sujet âgé.109–111 Pour réunir ces troubles en une même entité,
Franceschi et al112 ont forgé le terme d’inflammaging, qui vise
à exprimer le fait que les deux caractéristiques fondamentales
du vieillissement sont la diminution globale de la capacité de
l’organisme à faire face aux agressions et l’augmentation concomitante des processus inflammatoires (« inflammaging »).
Cette vision des choses est confortée par de nombreuses
observations, dont le fait que les marqueurs globaux de l’inflammation systémique tels que la vitesse de sédimentation
érythrocytaire et le taux de C-réactive protéine augmentent
avec l’âge.113 Pour ajouter à la complexité du tableau, il est
aujourd’hui établi que le système immunitaire du sujet âgé
est également déprimé.110–111 En y réfléchissant, ce paradoxe
apparent se vérifie pleinement sur le plan clinique dans la
mesure où, s’il est démontré que les individus âgés sont plus
exposés aux infections,114 ils sont également plus enclins à
développer certaines affections immunitaires telles que le
psoriasis115 ou la myasthénie grave.116 De notre compréhension balbutiante de ces systèmes qui s’opposent, il ressort
que l’« inflammaging » découle vraisemblablement de
l’activation de toute une série de cytokines pro-inflammatoires
circulantes.111,117 De son côté, l’immunodéficience liée au
vieillissement, baptisée anti-inflammaging,111 pourrait résulter
de diverses altérations immunitaires majeures, dont la
diminution du nombre et de l’activité des lymphocytes118–120 et
l’activation de l’axe hypothalamo-hypophysaire conduisant
à une production plus importante de cortisol.111
Les possibles effets exercés par ces perturbations
immunitaires opposées sur la pathologie athérothrombotique
et la vascularisation demeurent à explorer. Néanmoins, on
a d’ores et déjà connaissance de troubles dans lesquels
l’« inflammaging » pourrait jouer un rôle. Ainsi, sachant que
les resténoses artérielles consécutives à une lésion vasculaire
sont médiées par les cytokines pro-inflammatoires,121,122 tout
porte à penser que l’augmentation de la production de
cytokines liée à l’âge est responsable de la tendance plus élevée
aux resténoses observée chez le sujet âgé.123 Dans le futur, il est
à prévoir que les interactions entre le système immunitaire
et l’appareil vasculaire soient l’objet d’une attention beaucoup
plus importante ; aussi sommes-nous impatients d’en
apprendre davantage sur cette épée à double tranchant que
constituent l’« inflammaging » et l’« anti-inflammaging ».
Fixer l’heure d’une mort en bonne santé :
l’art du traitement des pathologies
cardiovasculaires du sujet âgé
Le vieillissement n’est pas une maladie et, à terme, même les
êtres en bonne santé finissent par mourir de quelque chose.
Les nombreux phénomènes associés au vieillissement abordés
dans cet article de synthèse, dont l’attrition des télomères,
les lésions de l’ADN, l’accumulation de progérine et la
09:37:07:12:11
Page 51
51
sénescence cellulaire, sont la confirmation biologique de ce
que nous savions déjà : le vieillissement est inévitable. Plutôt
que de chercher à l’empêcher, notre objectif en tant que
cliniciens doit être de donner à nos patients les moyens de
mener une vie plus saine pendant plus longtemps (ce que
certains qualifient de « vigueur adulte »,124 de « vieillissement
en santé »,125 de « bien vieillir »,126 d’« espérance de vie sans
handicap »127 ou d’« espérance de vie en bonne santé »128). En
outre, et comme l’a proposé Fries,124 cela peut également
inclure la limitation de la maladie à une courte période en
toute fin de vie.
Bien que cet article porte pour une large part sur les moyens
existants et potentiels d’allonger les années de vie en bonne
santé, la prise en charge agressive de la pathologie vasculaire
du très grand vieillard a des implications bien réelles en termes
de rapport coût/efficacité, dans la mesure où le sujet en
question peut bientôt mourir de tout autre chose. Au-delà de
sa futilité, la démarche consistant à submerger un vieillard
de médicaments inutiles en vue de diminuer son risque
cardiovasculaire peut avoir un impact négatif sur sa qualité de
vie. Cela étant, il est une difficulté bien réelle, qui est de
déterminer à quel moment une personne perd sa « vigueur
adulte » et se trouve confrontée au poids grandissant de
la maladie et au spectre de la mort. La difficulté tient
essentiellement au fait que la notion de mort naturelle repose
sur 2 paramètres subjectifs : la durée de vie restante et le degré
de capacité fonctionnelle.125 De plus, ce qui, pour un individu,
constitue un degré de capacité fonctionnelle acceptable peut
être totalement inacceptable pour d’autres. Ces aspects
compliquent la prise en charge des personnes âgées et rendent
également plus ardues les études cliniques sur le vieillissement
en santé.125,128 En vérité, les médecins ne disposent que de peu
d’éléments objectifs pour déterminer si l’espérance de vie et
la capacité fonctionnelle d’un patient sont telles que, dans
l’intérêt de ce dernier, il y a lieu de s’en tenir à une approche
conservatrice.125 Cette décision relève du domaine de l’art de
la médecine et doit non seulement prendre en compte les
préférences du patient et de ses proches, mais aussi tout
un ensemble de facteurs physiques, biologiques, physiopathologiques, sociaux, éthiques, culturels, pratiques et autres.
Bien que la prise en charge énergique des facteurs de risque du
sujet âgé soit importante et généralement effectuée de manière
sous-optimale, il convient de toujours garder à l’esprit que
l’Homme est mortel.
L’âge est-il en lui-même un facteur de
risque cardiovasculaire ?
L’un des axiomes de base de la médecine clinique est que la
prévention primaire vaut toujours mieux qu’un traitement
secondaire. Une telle prévention primaire est envisageable
pour de nombreux facteurs de risque connus pour favoriser
les événements athérothrombotiques (à savoir l’obésité, le
tabagisme, l’hypertension artérielle, la sédentarité, le diabète
de type 2, les hyperlipidémies), mais est-elle également
applicable au vieillissement en considérant celui-ci comme un
facteur de risque ? Bien qu’il soit inéluctable de vieillir, un
réexamen attentif des études antérieures et des nouvelles
données conforte hautement la notion selon laquelle le risque
Page 52
52
Circulation
Janvier 2012
cardiovasculaire lié au vieillissement pourrait, en fait,
découler des effets cumulés d’une exposition prolongée à
d’autres facteurs de risque pouvant être corrigés. En d’autres
termes, l’âge n’est peut-être pas en lui-même un important
facteur de risque cardiovasculaire ; en revanche, l’augmentation du risque d’événement athérothrombotique au cours de
l’avancée en âge pourrait résulter, au moins en partie, des
effets conjugués d’autres facteurs de risque modifiables
s’exerçant sur l’appareil cardiovasculaire tout au long de la
vie.129,130 Pour l’heure, on ignore l’impact réel de cet effet,
lequel demeure une donnée épidémiologique très difficile à
appréhender. Cela étant, pour les générations futures et même
pour ceux qui sont actuellement au printemps ou à l’été
de leur vie, l’enseignement de tout cela est qu’il est possible
d’atténuer les effets perçus de l’âge sur l’appareil cardiovasculaire en adoptant un mode de vie sain et en intervenant
précocement sur les facteurs de risque modifiables. Toutefois,
l’importance de cette assertion ne doit pas être exagérée, cela
constituant pour nous autres médecins un puissant rappel
à ne pas demeurer inactifs en attendant que les progrès
scientifiques évoqués dans cet article trouvent leur application
dans des interventions cliniques efficaces et de mise en œuvre
aisée. En fait, pour l’heure, la meilleure manière de prendre en
charge la pathologie cardiovasculaire du sujet âgé demeure
le traitement agressif des facteurs de risque connus à tous les
âges de la vie.
Conclusion
Avec beaucoup d’esprit, Keith Richards (du groupe musical
les Rolling Stones) a déclaré un jour que « devenir vieux est
une chose fascinante. Plus on vieillit et plus on a envie
de vieillir ».130a Même s’il n’est pas certain que beaucoup de
personnes souhaitent réellement devenir vieilles, à l’échelon
biologique, ces paroles comportent une part de vérité.
Considérés dans leur globalité, les multiples événements,
troubles et états pathologiques liés à l’âge qui affectent
l’appareil vasculaire sont la preuve absolue que le vieillissement est un processus global et dynamique, qui touche
simultanément la quasi-totalité des systèmes physiologiques
par une intrication complexe d’actions et de réactions. Ainsi,
dès lors qu’une cellule ou un organe malade impose une
charge plus importante à un autre élément de l’organisme,
l’âge semble concourir au vieillissement, si bien que, d’une
certaine façon, « plus on vieillit et plus on a envie de vieillir ».
Les données présentées dans cet article de synthèse nous
donnent motif à l’optimisme, car elles tendent à montrer que
notre compréhension du processus de vieillissement est en
train de fortement progresser. Il est à espérer que, en dépit de
la complexité des systèmes concernés, ces progrès scientifiques
déboucheront un jour sur de nouveaux traitements des
pathologies liées à l’âge. Déjà, divers essais cliniques sont
en cours pour évaluer la tolérance de plusieurs nouveaux
médicaments prometteurs. Néanmoins, à ce jour, pour ceux
qui sont d’ores et déjà parvenus sans encombre à ce qu’il est
convenu d’appeler un âge avancé, la mise en œuvre d’une
approche multidisciplinaire fondée sur les recommandations
officielles afin d’identifier les individus à risque pour les
éduquer, les conseiller et les traiter de manière appropriée est
peut-être le moyen le plus efficace de réduire le poids
09:37:07:12:11
Page 52
des maladies cardiovasculaires tout en évitant les effets
indésirables d’origine médicamenteuse.131 Tout en attendant
patiemment les nouvelles avancées thérapeutiques, les
médecins ne doivent pas avoir d’hésitation à traiter leurs
patients âgés, car nombre de médicaments conventionnels tels
que les statines132,133 et les antihypertenseurs134,135 demeurent
puissamment efficaces chez ces sujets.
Un exemple encourageant est celui de l’insuffisance
cardiaque. Il y a plus d’un demi-siècle, dans les années 1950,
l’âge moyen de début de l’insuffisance cardiaque dans la
cohorte de Framingham était de 57 ans ; dans les années 1980,
il avait augmenté à 76 ans.136 Nous savons que la pathologie
cardiaque et l’accident vasculaire cérébral peuvent être en
grande partie prévenus137,138 et que les troubles vasculaires
cérébraux favorisent le développement de la maladie
d’Alzheimer.85–89 Nous est-il possible de prévenir ou de
retarder la détérioration vasculaire cérébrale comme nous
l’avons fait pour l’insuffisance cardiaque ? Nous devons nous
y essayer dès à présent, car notre santé et notre bien-être
en dépendent.
Déclarations
Néant.
Références
1. Hupfeld H. “As time goes by.” http://www.reelclassics.com/Movies/
Casablanca/astimegoesby-lyrics.htm. Accessed March 30, 2011.
1a. Heart disease and stroke statistics: 2010 update. American Heart
Association. http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=
1200026. Accessed November 7, 2010.
2. Virmani R, Avolio AP, Mergner WJ, Robinowitz M, Herderick EE,
Cornhill JF, Guo SY, Liu TH, Ou DY, O’Rourke M. Effect of aging on
aortic morphology in populations with high and low prevalence of
hypertension and atherosclerosis: comparison between occidental and
Chinese communities. Am J Pathol. 1991;139:1119–1129.
3. Lim MA, Townsend RR. Arterial compliance in the elderly: its effect
on blood pressure measurement and cardiovascular outcomes. Clin
Geriatr Med. 2009;25:191–205.
4. Vlachopoulos C, Aznaouridis K, Stefanadis C. Prediction of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality with arterial stiffness: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55:1318–1327.
5. Zieman SJ, Melenovsky V, Kass DA. Mechanisms, pathophysiology,
and therapy of arterial stiffness. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol.
2005;25:932–943.
6. Mönckeberg JG. Über die reine mediaverkalkung der extremitätenarterien und ihr verhalten zur arteriosklerose. Virchows Arch Pathol Anat.
1903:171.
7. Blankenhorn DH, Stern D. Calcification of the coronary arteries.
Am J Roentgenol Radium Ther Nucl Med. 1959;81:772–777.
8. Burke AP, Taylor A, Farb A, Malcom GT, Virmani R. Coronary calcification: insights from sudden coronary death victims. Z Kardiol.
2000;89:49–53.
9. Shroff RC, Shanahan CM. The vascular biology of calcification. Semin
Dial. 2007;20:103–109.
10. Persy V, D’Haese P. Vascular calcification and bone disease: the calcification paradox. Trends Mol Med. 2009;15:405–416.
11. Sangiorgi G, Rumberger JA, Severson A, Edwards WD, Gregoire J,
Fitzpatrick LA, Schwartz RS. Arterial calcification and not lumen
stenosis is highly correlated with atherosclerotic plaque burden in
humans: a histologic study of 723 coronary artery segments using
nondecalcifying methodology. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998;31:126–133.
12. Arad Y, Goodman KJ, Roth M, Newstein D, Guerci AD. Coronary
calcification, coronary disease risk factors, C-reactive protein, and
atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease events: the St. Francis Heart
Study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;46:158–165.
13. Budoff MJ, Shaw LJ, Liu ST, Weinstein SR, Mosler TP, Tseng PH,
Flores FR, Callister TQ, Raggi P, Berman DS. Long-term prognosis
Page 53
Kovacic et al
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
09:37:07:12:11
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
associated with coronary calcification: observations from a registry of
25,253 patients. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007;49:1860–1870.
Moreno PR. Calcium deposition in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques:
pathophysiologic mechanisms and potential implications in the acute
coronary syndromes. In: Fuster V, ed. Assessing and Modifying the
Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque. Armonk, NY: Futura Publishing Co;
2002.
Bucay N, Sarosi I, Dunstan CR, Morony S, Tarpley J, Capparelli C,
Scully S, Tan HL, Xu W, Lacey DL, Boyle WJ, Simonet WS.
Osteoprotegerin-deficient mice develop early onset osteoporosis and
arterial calcification. Genes Dev. 1998;12:1260–1268.
Hashiba H, Aizawa S, Tamura K, Kogo H. Inhibition of the progression
of aortic calcification by etidronate treatment in hemodialysis patients:
long-term effects. Ther Apher Dial. 2006;10:59–64.
Nitta K, Akiba T, Suzuki K, Uchida K, Watanabe R, Majima K, Aoki T,
Nihei H. Effects of cyclic intermittent etidronate therapy on coronary
artery calcification in patients receiving long-term hemodialysis. Am J
Kidney Dis. 2004;44:680–688.
Elmariah S, Delaney JA, O’Brien KD, Budoff MJ, Vogel-Claussen J,
Fuster V, Kronmal RA, Halperin JL. Bisphosphonate use and prevalence of valvular and vascular calcification in women: MESA (The
Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;56:
1752–1759.
Uzzan B, Cohen R, Nicolas P, Cucherat M, Perret GY. Effects of statins
on bone mineral density: a meta-analysis of clinical studies. Bone.
2007;40:1581–1587.
Kuro-o M, Matsumura Y, Aizawa H, Kawaguchi H, Suga T, Utsugi T,
Ohyama Y, Kurabayashi M, Kaname T, Kume E, Iwasaki H, Iida A,
Shiraki-Iida T, Nishikawa S, Nagai R, Nabeshima YI. Mutation of the
mouse klotho gene leads to a syndrome resembling ageing. Nature.
1997;390:45–51.
Razzaque MS. FGF23-mediated regulation of systemic phosphate
homeostasis: is Klotho an essential player? Am J Physiol. 2009;296:
F470–F476.
Arking DE, Becker DM, Yanek LR, Fallin D, Judge DP, Moy TF,
Becker LC, Dietz HC. KLOTHO allele status and the risk of early-onset
occult coronary artery disease. Am J Hum Genet. 2003;72:1154–1161.
Arking DE, Krebsova A, Macek M Sr, Macek M Jr, Arking A, Mian IS,
Fried L, Hamosh A, Dey S, McIntosh I, Dietz HC. Association of
human aging with a functional variant of klotho. Proc Natl Acad Sci
U S A. 2002;99:856–861.
Giachelli CM. Vascular calcification: in vitro evidence for the role of
inorganic phosphate. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003;14:S300 –S304.
Ganesh SK, Stack AG, Levin NW, Hulbert-Shearon T, Port FK. Association of elevated serum PO(4), Ca x PO(4) product, and parathyroid
hormone with cardiac mortality risk in chronic hemodialysis patients.
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2001;12:2131–2138.
Goodman WG, Goldin J, Kuizon BD, Yoon C, Gales B, Sider D, Wang
Y, Chung J, Emerick A, Greaser L, Elashoff RM, Salusky IB. Coronaryartery calcification in young adults with end-stage renal disease who are
undergoing dialysis. N Engl J Med. 2000;342:1478–1483.
Kovacic JC, Boehm M. Resident vascular progenitor cells: an emerging
role for non-terminally differentiated vessel-resident cells in vascular
biology. Stem Cell Res. 2009;2:2–15.
Sato K, Urist MR. Induced regeneration of calvaria by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in dogs. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1985;197:301–311.
Bostrom K, Watson KE, Horn S, Wortham C, Herman IM, Demer LL.
Bone morphogenetic protein expression in human atherosclerotic
lesions. J Clin Invest. 1993;91:1800–1809.
Medici D, Shore EM, Lounev VY, Kaplan FS, Kalluri R, Olsen BR.
Conversion of vascular endothelial cells into multipotent stem-like cells.
Nat Med. 2010;16:1400–1406.
Roach MR, Burton AC. The reason for the shape of the distensibility
curves of arteries. Can J Biochem Physiol. 1957;35:681–690.
Greenwald SE. Ageing of the conduit arteries. J Pathol. 2007;211:
157–172.
Li Z, Froehlich J, Galis ZS, Lakatta EG. Increased expression of matrix
metalloproteinase-2 in the thickened intima of aged rats. Hypertension.
1999;33:116–123.
O’Rourke MF. Pulsatile arterial haemodynamics in hypertension.
Aust N Z J Med. 1976;6:40–48.
Risinger GM Jr, Updike DL, Bullen EC, Tomasek JJ, Howard EW.
TGF-beta suppresses the upregulation of MMP-2 by vascular smooth
Page 53
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
53
muscle cells in response to PDGF-BB. Am J Physiol. 2010;298:
C191–C201.
Goh SY, Cooper ME. The role of advanced glycation end products in
progression and complications of diabetes. J Clin Endocrinol Metab.
2008;93:1143–1152.
Sensi M, Pricci F, Andreani D, Di Mario U. Advanced nonenzymatic
glycation endproducts (AGE): their relevance to aging and the
pathogenesis of late diabetic complications. Diabetes Res. 1991;16:
1–9.
Rojas A, Morales MA. Advanced glycation and endothelial functions:
a link towards vascular complications in diabetes. Life Sci. 2004;76:
715–730.
Verzijl N, DeGroot J, Thorpe SR, Bank RA, Shaw JN, Lyons TJ, Bijlsma
JW, Lafeber FP, Baynes JW, TeKoppele JM. Effect of collagen turnover
on the accumulation of advanced glycation end products. J Biol Chem.
2000;275:39027–39031.
Konova E, Baydanoff S, Atanasova M, Velkova A. Age-related changes
in the glycation of human aortic elastin. Exp Gerontol. 2004;39:249–254.
Yamagishi S, Nakamura K, Matsui T, Ueda S, Fukami K, Okuda S.
Agents that block advanced glycation end product (AGE)-RAGE
(receptor for AGEs)-oxidative stress system: a novel therapeutic strategy
for diabetic vascular complications. Expert Opin Investig Drugs.
2008;17:983–996.
Scheubel RJ, Kahrstedt S, Weber H, Holtz J, Friedrich I, Borgermann J,
Silber RE, Simm A. Depression of progenitor cell function by advanced
glycation endproducts (AGEs): potential relevance for impaired angiogenesis in advanced age and diabetes. Exp Gerontol. 2006;41:540–548.
Xiang M, Yang M, Zhou C, Liu J, Li W, Qian Z. Crocetin prevents
AGEs-induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis. Pharmacol Res.
2006;54:268–274.
Mercer N, Ahmed H, Etcheverry SB, Vasta GR, Cortizo AM. Regulation of advanced glycation end product (AGE) receptors and apoptosis
by AGEs in osteoblast-like cells. Mol Cell Biochem. 2007;306:87–94.
Vlassara H, Uribarri J, Ferrucci L, Cai W, Torreggiani M, Post JB,
Zheng F, Striker GE. Identifying advanced glycation end products as a
major source of oxidants in aging: implications for the management and/
or prevention of reduced renal function in elderly persons. Semin
Nephrol. 2009;29:594–603.
Yavuz BB, Yavuz B, Sener DD, Cankurtaran M, Halil M, Ulger Z, Nazli
N, Kabakci G, Aytemir K, Tokgozoglu L, Oto A, Ariogul S. Advanced
age is associated with endothelial dysfunction in healthy elderly subjects.
Gerontology. 2008;54:153–156.
Donato AJ, Eskurza I, Silver AE, Levy AS, Pierce GL, Gates PE, Seals
DR. Direct evidence of endothelial oxidative stress with aging in
humans: relation to impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and
upregulation of nuclear factor-kappaB. Circ Res. 2007;100:1659–1666.
Schachinger V, Britten MB, Zeiher AM. Prognostic impact of coronary
vasodilator dysfunction on adverse long-term outcome of coronary
heart disease. Circulation. 2000;101:1899–1906.
Brett J, Schmidt AM, Yan SD, Zou YS, Weidman E, Pinsky D,
Nowygrod R, Neeper M, Przysiecki C, Shaw A, et al. Survey of the
distribution of a newly characterized receptor for advanced glycation
end products in tissues. Am J Pathol. 1993;143:1699–1712.
Giri R, Shen Y, Stins M, Du Yan S, Schmidt AM, Stern D, Kim KS,
Zlokovic B, Kalra VK. β-Amyloid-induced migration of monocytes
across human brain endothelial cells involves RAGE and PECAM-1.
Am J Physiol. 2000;279:C1772–C1781.
Kunt T, Forst T, Harzer O, Buchert G, Pfutzner A, Lobig M, Zschabitz
A, Stofft E, Engelbach M, Beyer J. The influence of advanced glycation
endproducts (AGE) on the expression of human endothelial adhesion
molecules. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes. 1998;106:183–188.
Svensjo E, Cyrino F, Michoud E, Ruggiero D, Bouskela E, Wiernsperger
N. Vascular permeability increase as induced by histamine or bradykinin
is enhanced by advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). J Diabetes
Complicat. 1999;13:187–190.
Otero K, Martinez F, Beltran A, Gonzalez D, Herrera B, Quintero G,
Delgado R, Rojas A. Albumin-derived advanced glycation end-products
trigger the disruption of the vascular endothelial cadherin complex
in cultured human and murine endothelial cells. Biochem J. 2001;359:
567–574.
Bucala R, Tracey KJ, Cerami A. Advanced glycosylation products
quench nitric oxide and mediate defective endothelium-dependent
vasodilatation in experimental diabetes. J Clin Invest. 1991;87:432–438.
Page 54
54
Circulation
Janvier 2012
55. Newaz MA, Yousefipour Z, Oyekan A. Oxidative stress-associated
vascular aging is xanthine oxidase-dependent but not NAD(P)H
oxidase-dependent. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2006;48:88–94.
56. Ungvari Z, Orosz Z, Labinskyy N, Rivera A, Xiangmin Z, Smith K,
Csiszar A. Increased mitochondrial H2O2 production promotes endothelial NF-kappaB activation in aged rat arteries. Am J Physiol.
2007;293:H37–H47.
57. Santhanam L, Christianson DW, Nyhan D, Berkowitz DE. Arginase and
vascular aging. J Appl Physiol. 2008;105:1632–1642.
58. Berkowitz DE, White R, Li D, Minhas KM, Cernetich A, Kim S,
Burke S, Shoukas AA, Nyhan D, Champion HC, Hare JM. Arginase
reciprocally regulates nitric oxide synthase activity and contributes to
endothelial dysfunction in aging blood vessels. Circulation. 2003;108:
2000–2006.
59. Kim JH, Bugaj LJ, Oh YJ, Bivalacqua TJ, Ryoo S, Soucy KG,
Santhanam L, Webb A, Camara A, Sikka G, Nyhan D, Shoukas AA,
Ilies M, Christianson DW, Champion HC, Berkowitz DE. Arginase
inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction
and vascular stiffness in old rats. J Appl Physiol. 2009;107:1249–1257.
60. Mattagajasingh I, Kim CS, Naqvi A, Yamamori T, Hoffman TA, Jung
SB, DeRicco J, Kasuno K, Irani K. SIRT1 promotes endotheliumdependent vascular relaxation by activating endothelial nitric oxide
synthase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007;104:14855–14860.
61. Paltiel O, Clarfield AM. Anemia in elderly people: risk marker or risk
factor? CMAJ. 2009;181:129–130.
62. Guralnik JM, Ershler WB, Schrier SL, Picozzi VJ. Anemia in the elderly:
a public health crisis in hematology. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ
Program. 2005;5:28–32.
63. Sarnak MJ, Tighiouart H, Manjunath G, MacLeod B, Griffith J, Salem
D, Levey AS. Anemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in the
Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. J Am Coll Cardiol.
2002;40:27–33.
64. Beard CM, Kokmen E, O’Brien PC, Ania BJ, Melton LJ III. Risk of
Alzheimer’s disease among elderly patients with anemia: populationbased investigations in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Ann Epidemiol.
1997;7:219–224.
65. den Elzen WP, Willems JM, Westendorp RG, de Craen AJ, Assendelft
WJ, Gussekloo J. Effect of anemia and comorbidity on functional status
and mortality in old age: results from the Leiden 85-Plus Study. CMAJ.
2009;181:151–157.
66. Ezekowitz JA, McAlister FA, Armstrong PW. Anemia is common in
heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes: insights from a
cohort of 12 065 patients with new-onset heart failure. Circulation.
2003;107:223–225.
67. Zarychanski R, Houston DS. Anemia of chronic disease: a harmful
disorder or an adaptive, beneficial response? CMAJ. 2008;179:333–337.
68. Kovacic JC. Further aspects of anemia, heart failure, and erythropoietin.
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005;45:1549–1550.
69. Bohlius J, Schmidlin K, Brillant C, Schwarzer G, Trelle S, Seidenfeld J,
Zwahlen M, Clarke M, Weingart O, Kluge S, Piper M, Rades D,
Steensma DP, Djulbegovic B, Fey MF, Ray-Coquard I, Machtay M,
Moebus V, Thomas G, Untch M, Schumacher M, Egger M, Engert A.
Recombinant human erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and mortality in
patients with cancer: a meta-analysis of randomised trials. Lancet.
2009;373:1532–1542.
70. Phrommintikul A, Haas SJ, Elsik M, Krum H. Mortality and target
haemoglobin concentrations in anaemic patients with chronic kidney
disease treated with erythropoietin: a meta-analysis. Lancet. 2007;369:
381–388.
71. Telford RD, Kovacic JC, Skinner SL, Hobbs JB, Hahn AG,
Cunningham RB. Resting whole blood viscosity of elite rowers is related
to performance. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol. 1994;68:470–476.
72. Coppola L, Caserta F, De Lucia D, Guastafierro S, Grassia A, Coppola
A, Marfella R, Varricchio M. Blood viscosity and aging. Arch Gerontol
Geriatr. 2000;31:35–42.
73. Tracy RP, Bovill EG, Fried LP, Heiss G, Lee MH, Polak JF, Psaty BM,
Savage PJ. The distribution of coagulation factors VII and VIII and
fibrinogen in adults over 65 years: results from the Cardiovascular
Health Study. Ann Epidemiol. 1992;2:509–519.
74. Silverstein MD, Heit JA, Mohr DN, Petterson TM, O’Fallon WM,
Melton LJ III. Trends in the incidence of deep vein thrombosis and
pulmonary embolism: a 25-year population-based study. Arch Intern
Med. 1998;158:585–593.
09:37:07:12:11
Page 54
75. Ferri CP, Prince M, Brayne C, Brodaty H, Fratiglioni L, Ganguli M,
Hall K, Hasegawa K, Hendrie H, Huang Y, Jorm A, Mathers C,
Menezes PR, Rimmer E, Scazufca M. Global prevalence of dementia:
a Delphi consensus study. Lancet. 2005;366:2112–2117.
76. Boller F, Bick K, Duyckaerts C. They have shaped Alzheimer disease:
the protagonists, well known and less well known. Cortex. 2007;43:
565–569.
77. Alzheimer A.Ü er eine eigenartige Erkankung der Hirnrinde. Allgemeine
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie und Psychisch-Gerichtliche Medizin. 1907;64:
146–148.
78. Alzheimer A, Stelzmann RA, Schnitzlein HN, Murtagh FR. An English
translation of Alzheimer’s 1907 paper, “Uber eine eigenartige Erkankung
der Hirnrinde.” Clin Anat. 1995;8:429–431.
79. Hofman A, Ott A, Breteler MM, Bots ML, Slooter AJ, van Harskamp F,
van Duijn CN, Van Broeckhoven C, Grobbee DE. Atherosclerosis,
apolipoprotein E, and prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease
in the Rotterdam Study. Lancet. 1997;349:151–154.
80. Kennelly SP, Lawlor BA, Kenny RA. Blood pressure and the risk for
dementia: a double edged sword. Ageing Res Rev. 2009;8:61–70.
81. Kivipelto M, Helkala EL, Hanninen T, Laakso MP, Hallikainen M,
Alhainen K, Soininen H, Tuomilehto J, Nissinen A. Midlife vascular risk
factors and late-life mild cognitive impairment: a population-based
study. Neurology. 2001;56:1683–1689.
82. Chandra V, Pandav R. Gene-environment interaction in Alzheimer’s
disease: a potential role for cholesterol. Neuroepidemiology. 1998;17:
225–232.
83. Ott A, Stolk RP, van Harskamp F, Pols HA, Hofman A, Breteler MM.
Diabetes mellitus and the risk of dementia: the Rotterdam Study.
Neurology. 1999;53:1937–1942.
84. Ott A, Slooter AJ, Hofman A, van Harskamp F, Witteman JC, Van
Broeckhoven C, van Duijn CM, Breteler MM. Smoking and risk of
dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in a population-based cohort study:
the Rotterdam Study. Lancet. 1998;351:1840–1843.
85. Dede DS, Yavuz B, Yavuz BB, Cankurtaran M, Halil M, Ulger Z,
Cankurtaran ES, Aytemir K, Kabakci G, Ariogul S. Assessment of
endothelial function in Alzheimer’s disease: is Alzheimer’s disease a
vascular disease? J Am Geriatr Soc. 2007;55:1613–1617.
86. Kalaria RN. Neurodegenerative disease: diabetes, microvascular
pathology and Alzheimer disease. Nat Rev Neurol. 2009;5:305–306.
87. Farkas E, Luiten PG. Cerebral microvascular pathology in aging and
Alzheimer’s disease. Prog Neurobiol. 2001;64:575–611.
88. Iadecola C, Park L, Capone C. Threats to the mind: aging, amyloid, and
hypertension. Stroke. 2009;40:S40 –S44.
89. Kawai M, Kalaria RN, Cras P, Siedlak SL, Velasco ME, Shelton ER,
Chan HW, Greenberg BD, Perry G. Degeneration of vascular muscle
cells in cerebral amyloid angiopathy of Alzheimer disease. Brain Res.
1993;623:142–146.
90. Thompson CS, Hakim AM. Living beyond our physiological means:
small vessel disease of the brain is an expression of a systemic failure
inarteriolar function: a unifying hypothesis. Stroke. 2009;40:e322–e330.
91. Kalaria RN. Linking cerebrovascular defense mechanisms in brain ageing and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging. 2009;30:1512–1515.
92. Zipser BD, Johanson CE, Gonzalez L, Berzin TM, Tavares R, Hulette
CM, Vitek MP, Hovanesian V, Stopa EG. Microvascular injury and
blood-brain barrier leakage in Alzheimer’s disease. Neurobiol Aging.
2007;28:977–986.
93. Kortekaas R, Leenders KL, van Oostrom JC, Vaalburg W, Bart J,
Willemsen AT, Hendrikse NH. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction in
parkinsonian midbrain in vivo. Ann Neurol. 2005;57:176–179.
94. Rektor I, Goldemund D, Sheardova K, Rektorova I, Michalkova Z,
Dufek M. Vascular pathology in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s
disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2009;15:24–29.
95. Szpak GM, Lewandowska E, Wierzba-Bobrowicz T, Bertrand E,
Pasennik E, Mendel T, Stepien T, Leszczynska A, Rafalowska J. Small
cerebral vessel disease in familial amyloid and non-amyloid angiopathies: FAD-PS-1 (P117L) mutation and CADASIL: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. Folia Neuropathol. 2007;45:192–204.
96. Bailey TL, Rivara CB, Rocher AB, Hof PR. The nature and effects of
cortical microvascular pathology in aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Neurol Res. 2004;26:573–578. Web site: www.maney.co.uk/journals.ner.
97. Thomas T, Thomas G, McLendon C, Sutton T, Mullan M. β-Amyloidmediated vasoactivity and vascular endothelial damage. Nature.
1996;380:168–171.
Page 55
Kovacic et al
Sénescence cellulaire, pathologie vasculaire et vieillissement
98. Iadecola C, Zhang F, Niwa K, Eckman C, Turner SK, Fischer E,
Younkin S, Borchelt DR, Hsiao KK, Carlson GA. SOD1 rescues
cerebral endothelial dysfunction in mice overexpressing amyloid
precursor protein. Nat Neurosci. 1999;2:157–161.
99. Niwa K, Kazama K, Younkin L, Younkin SG, Carlson GA, Iadecola
C. Cerebrovascular autoregulation is profoundly impaired in mice
overexpressing amyloid precursor protein. Am J Physiol. 2002;283:
H315–H323.
100. Bell RD, Zlokovic BV. Neurovascular mechanisms and blood-brain
barrier disorder in Alzheimer’s disease. Acta Neuropathol. 2009;118:
103–113.
101. Zhong Z, Deane R, Ali Z, Parisi M, Shapovalov Y, O’Banion MK,
Stojanovic K, Sagare A, Boillee S, Cleveland DW, Zlokovic BV.
ALS-causing SOD1 mutants generate vascular changes prior to motor
neuron degeneration. Nat Neurosci. 2008;11:420–422.
102. Fotuhi M, Hachinski V, Whitehouse PJ. Changing perspectives
regarding late-life dementia. Nat Rev Neurol. 2009;5:649–658.
103. Elias MF, Sullivan LM, D’Agostino RB, Elias PK, Beiser A, Au R,
Seshadri S, DeCarli C, Wolf PA. Framingham stroke risk profile and
lowered cognitive performance. Stroke. 2004;35:404–409.
104. Leary MC, Saver JL. Annual incidence of first silent stroke in the
United States: a preliminary estimate. Cerebrovasc Dis. 2003;16:
280–285.
105. Vermeer SE, Longstreth WT Jr, Koudstaal PJ. Silent brain infarcts:
a systematic review. Lancet Neurol. 2007;6:611–619.
106. Itoh Y, Yamada M, Hayakawa M, Otomo E, Miyatake T. Cerebral
amyloid angiopathy: a significant cause of cerebellar as well as lobar
cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly. J Neurol Sci. 1993;116:135–141.
107. Greenberg SM, Gurol ME, Rosand J, Smith EE. Amyloid angiopathyrelated vascular cognitive impairment. Stroke. 2004;35:2616–2619.
108. Whitehead SN, Cheng G, Hachinski VC, Cechetto DF. Progressive
increase in infarct size, neuroinflammation, and cognitive deficits in the
presence of high levels of amyloid. Stroke. 2007;38:3245–3250.
109. Ahmad A, Banerjee S, Wang Z, Kong D, Majumdar AP, Sarkar FH.
Aging and inflammation: etiological culprits of cancer. Curr Aging Sci.
2009;2:174–186.
110. Desai A, Grolleau-Julius A, Yung R. Leukocyte function in the aging
immune system. J Leukoc Biol. 2010;87:1001–1009.
111. Giunta S. Exploring the complex relations between inflammation and
aging (inflamm-aging): anti-inflamm-aging remodelling of inflammaging, from robustness to frailty. Inflamm Res. 2008;57:558–563.
112. Franceschi C, Bonafe M, Valensin S, Olivieri F, De Luca M, Ottaviani
E, De Benedictis G. Inflamm-aging: an evolutionary perspective on
immunosenescence. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2000;908:244–254.
113. Osei-Bimpong A, Meek JH, Lewis SM. ESR or CRP? A comparison of
their clinical utility. Hematology. 2007;12:353–357.
114. Gardner ID. The effect of aging on susceptibility to infection. Rev Infect
Dis. 1980;2:801–810.
115. Smith AE, Kassab JY, Rowland Payne CM, Beer WE. Bimodality
in age of onset of psoriasis, in both patients and their relatives.
Dermatology. 1993;186:181–186.
116. Lavrnic D, Jarebinski M, Rakocevic-Stojanovic V, Stevic Z, Lavrnic S,
Pavlovic S, Trikic R, Tripkovic I, Neskovic V, Apostolski S. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of myasthenia gravis in
Belgrade, Yugoslavia (1983–1992). Acta Neurol Scand. 1999;100:
168–174.
117. Fagiolo U, Cossarizza A, Scala E, Fanales-Belasio E, Ortolani C, Cozzi
E, Monti D, Franceschi C, Paganelli R. Increased cytokine production
in mononuclear cells of healthy elderly people. Eur J Immunol.
1993;23:2375–2378.
118. Naylor K, Li G, Vallejo AN, Lee WW, Koetz K, Bryl E, Witkowski J,
Fulbright J, Weyand CM, Goronzy JJ. The influence of age on T cell
generation and TCR diversity. J Immunol. 2005;174:7446–7452.
119. Goronzy JJ, Lee WW, Weyand CM. Aging and T-cell diversity. Exp
Gerontol. 2007;42:400–406.
09:37:07:12:11
Page 55
55
120. Frasca D, Landin AM, Riley RL, Blomberg BB. Mechanisms for
decreased function of B cells in aged mice and humans. J Immunol.
2008;180:2741–2746.
121. Kovacic JC, Gupta R, Lee AC, Ma M, Fang F, Tolbert CN, Walts AD,
Beltran LE, San H, Chen G, St Hilaire C, Boehm M. Stat3-dependent
acute Rantes production in vascular smooth muscle cells modulates
inflammation following arterial injury in mice. J Clin Invest. 2010;120:
303–314.
122. Olive M, Mellad JA, Beltran LE, Ma M, Cimato T, Noguchi AC, San
H, Childs R, Kovacic JC, Boehm M. p21Cip1 modulates arterial wound
repair through the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in mice.
J Clin Invest. 2008;118:2050–2061.
123. Gilbert J, Raboud J, Zinman B. Meta-analysis of the effect of diabetes
on restenosis rates among patients receiving coronary angioplasty
stenting. Diabetes Care. 2004;27:990–994.
124. Fries JF. Aging, natural death, and the compression of morbidity.
N Engl J Med. 1980;303:130–135.
125. Nusselder WJ, Peeters A. Successful aging: measuring the years lived
with functional loss. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006;60:448–455.
126. Kaplan MS, Huguet N, Orpana H, Feeny D, McFarland BH, Ross N.
Prevalence and factors associated with thriving in older adulthood:
a 10-year population-based study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci.
2008;63A:1097–1104.
127. Jagger C, Matthews R, Matthews F, Robinson T, Robine JM, Brayne C.
The burden of diseases on disability-free life expectancy in later life.
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007;62A:408–414.
128. Stiefel MC, Perla RJ, Zell BL. A healthy bottom line: healthy life
expectancy as an outcome measure for health improvement efforts.
Milbank Q. 2010;88:30–53.
129. Kannel WB, Vasan RS. Is age really a non-modifiable cardiovascular
risk factor? Am J Cardiol. 2009;104:1307–1310.
130. Sniderman AD, Furberg CD. Age as a modifiable risk factor for
cardiovascular disease. Lancet. 2008;371:1547–1549.
130a. Richards K. http://www.great-quotes.com/quote/1228785. Accessed
March 30, 2011.
131. Mason CM. Preventing coronary heart disease and stroke with
aggressive statin therapy in older adults using a team management
model. J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2009;21:47–53.
132. Alexander KP, Blazing MA, Rosenson RS, Hazard E, Aronow WS,
Smith SC Jr, Ohman EM. Management of hyperlipidemia in older
adults. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2009;14:49–58.
133. Nair AP, Darrow B. Lipid management in the geriatric patient.
Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2009;38:185–206.
134. Beckett NS, Peters R, Fletcher AE, Staessen JA, Liu L, Dumitrascu D,
Stoyanovsky V, Antikainen RL, Nikitin Y, Anderson C, Belhani A,
Forette F, Rajkumar C, Thijs L, Banya W, Bulpitt CJ. Treatment of
hypertension in patients 80 years of age or older. N Engl J Med.
2008;358:1887–1898.
135. SHEP Cooperative Research Group. Prevention of stroke by antihypertensive drug treatment in older persons with isolated systolic
hypertension: final results of the Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly
Program (SHEP). JAMA. 1991;265:3255–3264.
136. Ho KK, Anderson KM, Kannel WB, Grossman W, Levy D. Survival
after the onset of congestive heart failure in Framingham Heart Study
subjects. Circulation. 1993;88:107–115.
137. Chiuve SE, Rexrode KM, Spiegelman D, Logroscino G, Manson JE,
Rimm EB. Primary prevention of stroke by healthy lifestyle. Circulation.
2008;118:947–954.
138. Kahn R, Robertson RM, Smith R, Eddy D. The impact of prevention
on reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease. Circulation. 2008;118:
576–585.
M  : vieillissement 䊏 maladie cardiovasculaire 䊏 facteurs de risque
cardiovasculaire 䊏 cellules souches 䊏 calcification vasculaire

Documents pareils