mother+father - Candice Breitz

Commentaires

Transcription

mother+father - Candice Breitz
CANDICE BREITZ
MOTHER + FATHER
XLI
MOTHER + FATHER
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 1
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 2
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 3
Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation
41st International Prize for Contemporary Art
2007
Fondation Prince Pierre de Monaco
XLIe Prix International d’Art Contemporain
2007
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 4
The International Prize for Contemporary Art, conferred for the first time in 1965,
has been organized by the Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation since 1983.
Since 2005, it has been awarded for a contemporary work of art created in the
course of the previous two years by an emerging artist and selected by the art jury
after consultation with international experts.
Le Prix International d’Art Contemporain de Monaco, attribué pour la première fois
en 1965, est organisé par la Fondation Prince Pierre depuis 1983.
Depuis 2005, il est désormais attribué à une oeuvre d’art contemporain, créée au
cours des deux années précédentes par un artiste émergent, et retenue par un
conseil artistique à l’issue d’une consultation internationale d’experts.
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 5
CANDICE BREITZ
MOTHER+FATHER
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 6
The International Prize for Contemporary Art, a prize awarded by the Prince Pierre of
Monaco Foundation, has now moved into its third year.
We are delighted to award the prize to the work entitled Mother+Father by Candice
Breitz, a South African artist who is based in Berlin.
The work was submitted for consideration by Björn Dahlström, a curator who divides
his time between Luxembourg and Tokyo, and then singled out by the jury of the
Foundation from over fifty submissions.
The list of cities and countries associated with the various artists participating in
this event bears witness to the international scope of the artistic activities represented by the Monaco International Prize for Contemporary Art, and demonstrates
the success of the new format within the artistic community.
It is the intention of the Foundation, and more particularly of the International Prize
for Contemporary Art, to further its artistic search in order to encompass emerging
creative forms and to foster such works by bringing them to the attention of the
widest audience possible.
H.R.H. The Princess of Hanover
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 7
Le Prix International d’Art Contemporain de la Fondation Prince Pierre de Monaco
inaugure sa troisième année.
Nous sommes heureux de primer l’œuvre Mother + Father de l’artiste sud-africaine
séjournant à Berlin: Candice Breitz.
Cette œuvre sélectionnée parmi plus d’une cinquantaine de propositions, par Björn
Dahlström, curateur séjournant entre Luxembourg et Tokyo, a été remarquée par le
jury de la Fondation.
Les noms des villes que font apparaître les acteurs de cet événement, les pays
qu’elles évoquent tracent ensemble une géographie d’activités artistiques qui
témoignent de la participation internationale du Prix d’Art Contemporain et de
l’écho que notre nouvelle formule rencontre auprès du milieu artistique.
C’est la volonté de La Fondation, et particulièrement du Prix International d’Art
Contemporain, d’élargir ses recherches artistiques au plus proche des créations les
plus émergentes, d’encourager leurs productions afin de porter à la connaissance
de plus grand nombre leur contenu.
S.A.R. La Princesse de Hanovre
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 8
PROPOS
A work of art sets the world in motion; sometimes propelling it, expelling and replacing it.
Breathing new life.
It bears within it a condition of infinite thoughts which render undecidable a single
choice which would fetter this movement while seeking to define it.
It contains no prerequisite to the notion of the inordinate.
The sole fixed feature of a work of art is the fantasy that it partakes of the permanence of an inscription tempting and attempting history, cutting through a time
within which it endeavours to initiate itself, driven by a plan to inform some other.
It is often constrained within its own paradoxes.
Overvalued as a fetish in the eyes of others, it seeks out more demanding spaces of
experience to activate the thoughts of those it accosts.
Far more than a promise of esthetics, much more than a metaphoric field of sensorial correspondences, it also proposes a manner of being an instrument giving
shape to life.
Such also is how it can be used.
It is unique by definition and the gaze that guides it towards the space of
questionings which it casts up reconstitutes its unity over and again while renewing its content.
It is entitled as much to the mystery of its apparitions as to the principle of uncertainty underlying its revealings.
All these demands imposed by a work of art permit the Monaco International
Prize for Contemporary Art to insist upon the nature of its decision: to recompense
a work and prompt it to run the risk of escorting our knowing as it crosses the divide
between esthetics and ethics.
Jean-Louis Froment
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 9
PROPOS
Une œuvre d’art met le monde en mouvement; parfois même le précipite, l’expulse,
le remplace.
L’inaugure.
Elle contient un état de pensées infinies qui rendent indécidable un choix unique
qui arrêterait ce mouvement tout en cherchant à le définir.
Elle n’a aucun préalable à l’idée de démesure.
Le seul point fixe d’une œuvre d’art, c’est le fantasme qu’elle a de la permanence
d’une inscription qui tente l’histoire; celle de franchir un temps auprès duquel elle
s’initie, animée par le projet d’en instruire un autre.
Elle est souvent contrainte à ses propres paradoxes.
Surestimée comme fétiche aux regards des autres elle cherche des espaces d’expérience plus exigeants pour activer la pensée de ceux qu’elle aborde.
Beaucoup plus qu’une promesse esthétique, beaucoup plus qu’un champ métaphorique de correspondances sensorielles, elle propose aussi une façon d’être un
outil qui donne une forme à la vie.
Tel est aussi son mode d’emploi.
Elle est unique par définition et l’usage du regard qui la guide vers l’espace des
questions qu’elle fait surgir, reconstitue à chaque fois son unité tout en renouvelant
ses contenus.
Elle a droit au mystère de ses apparitions tout autant qu’au principe d’incertitude
de ses monstrations.
Ce sont toutes ces exigences, que demande une oeuvre d’art, qui permettent au Prix
International d’Art Contemporain de Monaco d’insister sur la nature de son choix:
primer une œuvre et l’inciter à prendre le risque d’accompagner notre connaissance à franchir ce passage de l’esthétique à l’éthique.
Jean-Louis Froment
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:58 Uhr
Seite 10
10
T. J. DEMOS
(IN)VOLUNTARY ACTING:
THE ART OF CANDICE BREITZ
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
15:45 Uhr
Seite 11
You enter the space of a dark gallery and face an arc of six plasma screens. One
after the next, they begin to play clips from six Hollywood movies. Lead characters
appear on different screens and carry on as if in dialogue with one another: “You
worry about her going out with the wrong kind of guys,” commences Steve Martin
from Father of the Bride (1991), “the kind of guys who only want one thing...” “Sex,
sex, sex!” interjects Tony Danza from She’s Out of Control (1989), playing on a nearby
monitor, as Harvey Keitel from Imaginary Crimes (1994), and Donald Sutherland
from Ordinary People (1980) appear to listen, nervously, on still other monitors.
“And you know exactly what that one thing is,” Martin continues, “because it’s the
same thing you wanted when you were their age!”
So proceeds one part of Father, of Candice Breitz’s Mother + Father (2005), comprising two video installations presented in adjacent spaces (each with six channels),
which loop film segments featuring celebrities playing roles that enact pop-cultural representations of motherhood and fatherhood. With the backgrounds and
other characters blacked out, and the stars presented in short sequences removed
from their movies’ narratives, the piece offers intimate and psychologically charged
close-ups of neurotic mothers, tilting between self-pity, defensiveness, and hysterical breakdown; and angry and defensive fathers, obsessed with delaying their
daughters’ sexual blossoming. Breitz’s use of repetition in the editing process
subjects her characters to frequent bouts of twitching and stuttering, which
heighten the nervous energy. Effectively creating two new movies, both poignantly analytic and highly entertaining, Breitz has her characters perform a mode of
what she calls “involuntary acting,” brought about by her directorial intervention
that digitally reprograms her appropriations and displays them anew via a series
of synchronized video channels.1
Mother + Father correlate with Breitz’s Monuments, 2007, a cycle of large-scale
photographs portraying music fans, each image corresponding to devotees of a
particular performer or band, such as Iron Maiden, Britney Spears or The Grateful
Dead. Breitz found her subjects by advertising in German-language fanzines and
websites, then interviewed applicants on the basis of their passionate identifications, and finally brought selected participants together for group sessions in
Berlin with a professional photographer. In each collective portrait, the fans appear in groups of around twenty, set in different locations – chosen by Breitz with
input from the participants – that resonate with the styles of their particular subculture: the Marilyn Manson fans congregate in a gothic-styled hall decorated
with old sofas and burning candles; the Abba enthusiasts are portrayed on an allwhite set redolent of new wave glitz. While the titles appear to celebrate the musicians (e.g. Grateful Dead Monument, Berlin, September 2007), the photographs
also form so many monuments to the pictured fans, brought together by Breitz’s
choreography.
Although there are certainly clear differences between the two projects – Mother + Father present movie stars on plasma displays, the Monuments are photo-
11
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 12
graphs of music fans – they connect in providing a picture of popular culture
today. For both focus on the phenomenon of the mass subject in our advanced
period of consumer capitalism – whether of movie stars imbued with celebrity
status by their media popularity, or fans passionately identified with their
idols. And here is where Breitz’s art, in my view, begins to pose its questions: if
Mother + Father depict the “involuntary acting” of stars, then do the Monuments
portray their fans as unwitting marionettes of the entertainment industry? In
other words, do these photographs expose a slavish conformity to mainstream
stereotypes, or alternately, and more provocatively, might Breitz’s art somehow
disclose the creative and individualizing potential of consumerism? This framing
indicates the stakes of Breitz’s investigation, which invites viewers to consider the
fraught status of agency in a world of economic and cultural globalization,
wherein media conglomeration and new communication technologies threaten
to encroach upon all aspects of life.
12
Forming the focus of Breitz’s work is the mass subject, which has long been
regarded with deep ambivalence. The art of Andy Warhol, with its serialized
media images of superstars, might be the obvious reference point for its post-war
appearance. Yet already in the mid-1800s writers such as Charles Baudelaire and
Edgar Allan Poe provided literary descriptions of the anonymous passersby and
urban masses, captured as well by Impressionists as flâneurs and crowds strolling
the streets and commercial arcades of Paris – the ancestors of Breitz’s consummate consumers of pop culture. The mass subject identifies the subject’s collectivized state. Its possibility was propelled to new quantitative intensities during
the early twentieth century by the technological development of radio and then
television, as well as by the formation of modern modes of public visibility, such
as international exhibitions and mass political rallies, wherein the mass subject
was documented and reproduced photographically and cinematically.2 Following
the dark years of the early twentieth century’s First World War, Sigmund Freud
studied its “group psychology,” analyzing both the social draw of collective solidarity formed around a leader or a leading idea, and the eclipse of individual powers
of discernment and judgment, criticality and agency by communal belonging.
Examining the motivations behind military sacrifice made in the name of nationalism – the ultimate death of the individual for the cause of the collective –
Freud’s study provides a prescient forecast of the coming catastrophes of fascism
and communism, with their populations pledged to political ideology and in
thrall of the dictator’s cult of personality. These developments inform our own
ambivalent regard for the mass subject, suggesting both a figure of consumerist
conformity – the fanatic as sports or entertainment fan – and the attraction of
social belonging in an age of alienated individualism and rampant materialism.
These ambivalences are played out further by Warhol, whose work in many ways
sets the stage for today’s investigations of pop-cultural consumerism. By photographically reproducing images of celebrities such as Marilyn Monroe, Elvis
Presley and Marlon Brando, Warhol shifted the focus on who would define the con-
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 13
sumerist mass subject of the post-war years from political leader to movie star. His
iconic images of stars may empty out personality, flattening emotional depth and
psychological complexity, but Warhol celebrated the fact that identity was pressed
to the surface. By leveling diversity, pop would show how everyone was becoming
alike, inaugurating a new era of egalitarianism achieved by the mass-produced
standardization of commodities – or so Warhol appears to have thought. In other
series, he imaged anonymous subjects caught in scenes of violence, destined to
become media spectacle. Displaying catastrophic news images of car accidents,
suicides, and race riots, repeated in his familiar grids, Warhol’s “Death in America”
series exposed the morbid fascination with which the public peers at and into the
bodies of unidentified casualties. In this regard, the mass subject reveals a pathological public sphere, one where borders between public and private spaces have
broken down, both cause and consequence of traumatic experience.3
As if responding to these very images, media theorist Marshall McLuhan speculated at roughly the same time about “a future in which there can be no spectators
but only participants. All men are totally involved in the insides of all men.”4 For
Warhol, such social interpenetration could be imaged as alternately glamorous or
catastrophic; for McLuhan too, the relation between media and mass subjectivity
was similarly unstable: On the one hand, it promised a future “global village”
where technology would extend the human senses and unite all in a vast televisual community; on the other, it threatened new modes of social control: “[A]s
our senses have gone outside us,” McLuhan warned, “Big Brother goes inside.”5 In
what has become a familiar split within recent debates about the Internet,
McLuhan observed that new media held the potential either to advance society
towards participatory democracy or to inaugurate a new age of totalitarian governance achieved by technological manipulation – the latter scenario resonating
with what Gilles Deleuze would soon ominously diagnose as the “society of control.”6
With new products and interfaces continually being developed today – such as
the do-it-yourself online video protocol of YouTube and the ease of downloading
media onto mobile devices like iPhones and Blackberries – the potential for the
deepening immersion of consumer culture within private and public space only
continues to grow. Indeed, with YouTube’s trademarked motto being “Broadcast
yourself,” the division between autonomy and “participation” becomes ever thinner, in some ways realizing the very predictions of McLuhan. These developments
have paralleled a wave of recent artistic projects that have addressed the consumers of pop culture – think of the videos of Phil Collins and Rineke Dijkstra, which
variously position their fixed-frame cameras on club dancers and karaoke performers, calling to mind Warhol’s own Screen Tests, his four-minute-long films of
famous and miscellaneous visitors to his Factory. How can we understand the
state of individual agency in an age of proliferating mass subjectivity? This is exactly the question that Candice Breitz’s artistic project in turn takes up.
13
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 14
Mother + Father and the Monuments both stage the ambivalent status of the
mass subject. Are Mother + Father evocations of the pathological public sphere of
mass consumerism today, according to which Hollywood stars have become parents to us all? It would indeed be pathological were the entertainment industry
to effectively displace traditional family structures, signaling a traumatic confusion between the worlds of commerce, domestic space, and developmental psychology. Or, conversely, must the stress fall on Breitz’s playful appropriation of
Hollywood films, redirected toward artistic ends, creating room for play within
consumerism? Similarly, do the Monuments depict fans as so many look-alikes
and wannabes, where traces of individuality are themselves part of the new customized conformity of consumerism? Or, rather, do these photographs show individuals as a source of creativity and self-possession within consumerism, one that
exceeds the exploitation of the culture industry?
14
It is not easy to answer these questions, and in some ways both perspectives
apply. With children watching copious hours of daily television at home, and
given the ubiquitous presence of the Internet and mass marketing’s targeting of
kids, it is conceivable that the media’s avatars now play a greater role in raising
children than real parents do. What are the social costs of “mediatizing” parenthood? This question becomes even more disturbing when one considers that the
Hollywood models of parenthood on which Breitz draws – those from the late ‘70s
and ‘80s – are based mostly on unhappy, neurotic characters. “You couldn’t be a
mother! You couldn’t be a mother! You couldn’t be a mother!,” Susan Sarandon
screams out at one point in Mother. In an apparent attempt to be “realistic” and
show “complex” images of adulthood, mainstream cinema may end up perpetuating and normalizing these dysfunctional role models. If the relationship of
parent to child is like star to fan, then from artwork to spectator we’re all infantilized as a result. Yet this is also what Breitz’s video installations obviously reject;
for they isolate content and facilitate comparative analysis, allowing us to consider these very questions from a distance. It must also be said that to parody the
fans portrayed by Breitz as mindless victims of the culture industry would be no
less than patronizing, for the Monuments represent knowing participants, which
becomes apparent after one learns of the complex negotiations attending their
process of production: applicants answered long questionnaires in which they
discussed their identifications and signed contracts informing them of the final
use and appearance of their images. These people chose to appear in the way they
have, deciding on their own costumes and sets; any discussion of their agency
must take into account their self-conscious collaboration.
Given that contemporary consumerism has reached ever deeper into the formative conditions of modern subjectivity, how might consumerism nevertheless represent the site of relative agency, allowing for modes of subjective resistance
that avoid total capitulation to the determinations of capital? With this problem
in mind, Breitz proceeded with her quasi-anthropological investigation of consumerism, one that would – as we’ll see – simultaneously offer a nuanced account
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 15
of the use of such a methodology. The investigation began with Breitz’s testing of
her own potential agency as a creative consumer with pieces like the Babel Series
(1999). For that installation, Breitz appropriated a series of commercial music
videos, isolated close-up shots of singers, and edited down the passages to monosyllabic utterances, which are then repeated for the length of the video: Madonna’s “pa, pa, pa...”, Freddie Mercury’s “ma, ma, ma”, and Sting’s “da, da, da...” play on
different monitors and display forms of uncanny automatism, revealing the
regressive mechanization of pop-cultural entertainment. In a similar vein is Soliloquy Trilogy (2000), a series of three short films for which Breitz re-edited three
Hollywood films, pairing down each to the surprisingly minimal spoken parts of
each of their stars. The Trilogy offers monologues of relatively slight duration,
including Sharon Stone’s from Basic Instinct (with a length of 7 minutes and 11
seconds), Clint Eastwood’s from Dirty Harry (6 minutes and 57 seconds), and Jack
Nicholson’s from The Witches of Eastwick (14 minutes and 6 seconds). Breitz explains that these videos represent an attempt to analyze Hollywood’s structures
of value from the perspective of the consumer’s “common ownership” of its prod7
ucts. Her logic runs as follows: When stars like Stone, Eastwood, and Nicholson
are given millions for such limited services, the money ultimately comes from
those who pay to see their films; so in this regard, viewers are the “shareholders”
of a celebrity’s commercial value, determining his or her worth by virtue of their
financial support. It is only one step further to test the limits of this “ownership”
by seizing hold of the images one has paid to watch and manipulating them according to one’s desire.
To that end, the Soliloquy Trilogy’s fragmented monologues are delivered outside
of any narrative context, thereby destroying Hollywood’s product by eliminating
the seduction of its storylines and system of identifications. This interruptive element comes across particularly well during moments when characters speak but
without appearing on camera; their words are heard over a blacked-out screen,
which produces a frequent visual suspension of the image stream. In addition,
the endings of Breitz’s short films are notable for their meaningless abruptness,
for there is no clichéd denouement that brings a story to a close, as with Hollywood’s conclusions. Yet while the three short monologues trade narrative absorption for a probing dismantling of filmic conventions, enabling the viewer’s unwavering focus on single characters, they also provide enjoyable moments of
humorous insight – though here too the fugitive pleasure strays from that offered
in the original films: Soliloquy (Jack), for instance, includes Nicholson’s animal
grunting and snoring as “dialogue”; and quick exchanges are presented as onesided monologues with pauses eliminated, so that the stars come off as strangely
schizophrenic characters, moving from topic to unrelated topic.
Like Hollywood’s own formulaic constructions, Breitz’s procedure follows an instrumental logic that is mechanistic – editing video according to the criterion of
retaining only the star’s spoken deliveries – and this perhaps reflects the calculated rules of the system her videos so craftily disrupt. But the disruption of So-
15
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
16
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 16
liloquy Trilogy also amounts to a form of digital piracy conducted at the edges of
legality, which makes its transgression even more poignant. In this regard, Breitz’s
videos hark back to Dadaist and Constructivist procedures of montage, as well as
to the more recent appropriation aesthetics of the ‘80s, such as the videos of Dara
Birnbaum (particularly relevant is her Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman
of 1978-79) and Richard Prince’s re-photographs of advertisements, which critically mimic commercial imagery to deconstructive ends. The Soliloquy Trilogy and
the Babel Series clearly build on these precedents, insofar as they provide a likeminded analysis of the ideological conventions of Hollywood film. Just as in
Birnbaum’s videos, “television technology and the machinations of its conventions become readable as instruments of ideology in visual language,” as critic
Benjamin Buchloh observes, so too in Breitz’s videos Hollywood representations of
parenthood become legible as a limited range of mass-cultural identifications
that are stereotypically gendered.8 Yet Breitz’s project also exceeds that critical
positioning of models like Birnbaum’s as solely deconstructive of commercial
ideology; for works like Mother + Father also offer absorbing forms of aesthetic
pleasure by creatively building on their sources. Part of this pleasure certainly
owes to the subversive reversing of the normal hierarchical division between the
corporate-controlled distribution of film, on the one hand, and its passive cinematic reception on the other. But it also owes to the construction of an innovative
practice of multi-channel video montage that creatively manipulates mainstream films in experimental ways. With Breitz’s work, the consumer is offered
the pleasure of becoming a creative producer who draws on commercial film as
readymade material with which to build new scenarios.
Viewing the art of Candice Breitz as a form of creative consumerism correlates
with Nicholas Bourriaud’s thesis advanced recently in his book Postproduction, a
reference frequently cited in relation to her work, but one worth reconsidering.
Referring to the host of media procedures – those of sampling, subtitling, voiceovers, special effects – that follow the initial filming or recording of raw footage,
Postproduction identifies a new paradigm of artistic practice organized by the reprocessing of readymade elements, akin to the activities of the DJ or the programmer. For Bourriaud, the work of artists during the last decade or so – including
that of Breitz, Pierre Huyghe, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Thomas Hirschhorn, and Douglas
Gordon – parallels the post-Fordist economic shift of production into the tertiary
sector, directed toward the manipulation of products rather than the industrial or
agricultural extraction of raw materials. In the same way, “Artists today program
forms more than they compose them,” he writes; “rather than transfigure a raw
element (blank canvas, clay, etc.), they remix available forms and make use of data.” 9
Use is the key term for Bourriaud, who argues that the energy of postproduction
realizes what Marx long ago suggested regarding the act of consumerism: “consumption is simultaneously production.” 10 In this regard, Postproduction contests
a powerful line of Marxist analysis – established in such key twentieth-century
works of critical theory as Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer’s account of the
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 17
“culture industry,” Guy Debord’s Society of the Spectacle, and Fredric Jameson’s
discussion of postmodern schizophrenia – which holds that pop culture generates
only social atomization, de-differentiation, and historical amnesia, and that the
consumer represents a mere passive effect of the culture industry’s vast engine of
“mass deception.” 11 Conversely, for Bourriaud, “far from being purely passive,” the
consumer defines a “culture of activity” that animates everyday life in unexpected ways. With a nod to Michel de Certeau’s conceptualization of the subversive
consumerist use of things, as argued in The Practice of Everyday Life, Bourriaud
notes: “To use an object is necessarily to interpret it. To use a product is to betray
its concept.” 12 The critical force here involves pitting “practices of accountability,”
which invest the consumer with responsibility for his or her actions, against the
defeatist insistence on his or her submissive compliance. Postproduction posits
that by practicing such creative agency within consumerism, artistic practice proposes an ethico-political way “to inhabit global culture.” 13
For critics, however, this account turns consumerism into a “utopia of use,” which,
as Tom McDonough argues in his reading of the work of Pierre Huyghe, posits a
“realm of personal autonomy” that is in fact “petit-bourgeois fantasy.” 14 What
Bourriaud neglects, according to this perspective, is the fact that it is precisely the
imperative of creative participation that drives today’s capitalism of immaterial
production. McDonough finds support in the work of Italian social theorist
Maurizio Lazzarato, who writes: “The new slogan of Western societies is that we
should all ‘become subjects.’ Participative management is a technology of power,
a technology for creating and controlling the ‘subjective processes’.” 15 In other
words, according to the logic of our service-based economy – which some have updated further as an “experience economy” 16 – friendly interactions, individuallyinitiated communication, and creative cooperation are all now expected from
workers, just as the consumer’s taste, desires, and affects drive ever new cycles of
production. Today’s marketing of individualized products – from cell phones to
automobiles – means that the consumer’s subjectivity becomes the source of
capitalist innovation. Whereas once the subject’s interior realms may have harbored the forces of resistance against capitalist discipline, McDonough concludes,
“today its colonization is complete.” 17
In considering these positions in relation to one another, however, might it not be
the case that the polemical charge of each operates to exaggerate its conclusions –
whether emphasizing freedom or determination, creative agency or colonization –
and in the process closes down a negotiated middle ground all too quickly? Might
they equally dismiss the possibility that each position may nonetheless partly
withstand the critical pressure of the other? Clearly, the danger of arguments
such as Bourriaud’s, which underscores creative consumerism, is to perpetuate an
avant-gardist rhetoric that naively stresses the voluntary basis of freedom, as if resistance is a matter of simple choice made freely outside of psychological complication or ideological pressure. But similarly, the risk of positions such as McDonough’s, which highlight the forces of determination, is that the critic may become
17
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 18
perversely complicit with what is attacked, as any claim of autonomy or resistance is condemned to failure in advance.
18
Here it is urgent to consider the status of consumerist agency today – can it be a
creative resource or is it fully subsumed by capital? Yet perhaps the answer must
come from a negotiation between both sides of the debate: agency, in other
words, must necessarily represent the site of struggle between autonomy and
command, and in a way that it never has before. Let us return to Lazzarato’s insights. It is true, he explains, that the mandate “to become subjects” threatens a
potentially greater totalitarian form of control than earlier divisions between
mental and manual labor “because capitalism seeks to involve even the worker’s
personality and subjectivity within the production of value” (135). As such, capitalist production yearns to colonize all aspects of our lives, breaching all borders between economy, power, and knowledge. Nevertheless, Lazzarato is no prophet of
doom: he also highlights the undetermined character of the “event” of immaterial
labor, which he defines as an “open process of creation that is established be18
tween immaterial labor and the public and organized by communication” (144).
While immaterial production internalizes the participant-consumer in the creation of value, the entrepreneur consequently comes to depend on the consumer
for innovation. This new arrangement thereby endows the consumer with a form
of creative power that – crucially – may or may not be captured by capital; for its
event opens “a space for a radical autonomy of the productive synergies of immaterial labor” (139), which can engender creative forms of life irreducible to commercial functions.19
Rather than rejecting the creative potential of consumerism, Lazzarato in fact reveals its critical existence, even as he acknowledges the instability of its autonomy.
The consumerist use of products consequently suggests a contest between autonomous creative agency and capitalist forces of capture, where at any moment
what seems to be an activity recuperable by entrepreneurial systems (“part of the
product”) might also represent an independent existence outside its control (“a
creative act”) (144). Breitz’s work is exemplary of this instability. Insofar as works
like Mother + Father and the Soliloquy Trilogy are based on the appropriation of
source material from Hollywood movies, both projects locate the origins of the
creative act in the already established system of consumerism. The artist has already “become a subject” within its system and quite self-consciously participates
in the creation of value that constitutes the production-consumption cycles of
immaterial labor. Breitz’s work thus acknowledges that there is no presumed
arena of freedom that could be the clean slate for creative expression.
Yet intervening within that pre-given system, Mother + Father also generate a
rupture from within, which operates in multiple ways. In addition to the severing
of figures from their narrative contexts, the erasing of the background characters
and props, and the re-editing of commercial footage to build new narrative assemblages, Breitz also transforms the movies into a multi-channel video installation,
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 19
which creates an innovative space of reception in terms of the viewer’s embodied
and perceptual experience. Mother + Father pluralize signals, rather than retaining the unidirectional paths of their source movies. Characters speak from different screens and locations, demanding forms of attention not encountered in
movie theaters. The looped presentation figures as an additional way by which
the works deviate from the traditional cinematic apparatus, just as the installations reinvent the spatial and temporal dimensions of the theater experience: the
art gallery’s open plan and generally free circulation of visitors, moreover, replaces
the theater’s system of fixed seating and paid admission (as well, it diverges from
the domestic space where the movies, reformatted for television and endlessly
caught in a circuit of rebroadcast, are viewed).20 Insofar as this multi-directional
space of reception draws on the conventions of the art gallery – connecting to earlier moments of avant-garde experimentation with mixed-media installation in
the ‘60s and ‘70s – it engages the artistic institutions of critical attention, visual
literacy, and creative interpretation.
It’s true that Breitz’s postproduction activities arise from the use of commercial
video technology and consumer software programs like Final Cut Pro and After
Effects. These facts make it obvious that artistic production presented in commercial galleries depends on acts of consumerism. Yet the gallery site itself must be
seen in a complex light as a multiply determined space – of commercial enterprise, aesthetic pleasure, and intellectual production; indeed, it functions as the
very site of immaterial labor and its open process, where innovative practices
intersect with entrepreneurial energies. Therein, Breitz, as well as her work’s viewers, must be seen as assuming a complex agency in relation to consumer products
and commercial space. The multiplicity of this authorial position challenges those
views that insist on the passive surrender to pop culture’s maternal and paternal
identifications, even as its context may re-route intellectual participation into
profitable production. In this sense, the contradictions that emerge between the
lines of Breitz’s characters in Mother – Diane Keaton: “You’re a good mother,
Anna”; Susan Sarandon: “You couldn’t be a mother...”; Keaton: “Everybody knows,
you’re a good mother”; Shirley McLaine: “I’m ashamed to be your mother!”; Julia
Roberts: “I wish my mom was here!” Meryl Streep: “I’m his mother!”; Roberts:
“You’re Mother Earth Incarnate...” – translate the multiple determinations and
contradictions of this aesthetic space. Yet what form of intellectual work, it is
worth asking, is free from the logic of profit today, whether as salaried or institutionally supported activity? In this regard, Breitz’s practice is merely part of the
present condition of intellectual work, which invariably operates in the slippery
realm of immaterial production. This complex condition is one of neither avantgarde freedom nor total determination; rather, it designates an open process that
simultaneously responds to both the imperatives of creative living and the pressures of commercial logic.
And what about the fans captured in the Monuments? Before addressing this question, it is important to consider how this photographic series’ site of reception –
19
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
20
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 20
the artistic environment – informs our view of the represented subjects. Breitz
presents mass culture in a highbrow domain. In doing so, the work becomes prey
to reductive interpretations: it might be seen to set up a hierarchical relationship
between art audiences, assuming the position of critical, active spectators, and
their passive, pop-cultural counterparts. Similarly, defining the project as an anthropological study invites the further positioning of a relation of unequal agency
between informed viewers and observed participants – even while anthropologists have for quite some time now rejected such reductive relationships. Yet for
some, these relationships may still hold attraction, even if unconsciously, as they
provide viewers with the self-satisfied pleasure of looking at others who appear
beholden to group psychology as so many mindless specimens. Spectators may
imagine themselves as emancipated from such identifications and thereby critically empowered. But what if it is precisely the viewer’s semi-unconscious mode
of identification that Breitz’s work tests, in addition to investigating the condition
of fandom? What if we consider the possibility that the Monuments visualize not
only the mass subject as consummate consumer, but also the mass subject as
consumer of global contemporary art, one who presumes to be critical and selfreflexive in ways that are sometimes automatic, even uncritical? This supposition
might lead us to conclude that it is exactly such modes of presumed criticality
that constitute an integral part of the economic machinery of the art world and
that resistance is as such futile. Were it left at that, however, the conclusion could
be easily dismissed, for it would instrumentalize the autonomy of immaterial
production all too summarily.
The observation that Breitz’s work tests its viewers’ identifications is significant,
since it indicates a questioning of the facile opposition between high and low
that locates group psychology solely within the realm of pop culture. With the rejection of that opposition, it becomes possible to extend a more complex agency
to fans and viewers alike. Looking more closely at the Monuments, it’s true that
they portray consummate consumers, those who have made a certain pact with
their idols. Yet these subjects also appear to have creatively inhabited their consumerist roles, exploiting them for pleasures that drive creative forms of life, even
while their subjectivity may have been put to work in the process. Importantly,
this does not reveal a simple reification – meaning one’s assimilation to the pregiven categories of consumerism – but the enactment of a complex and multiply
determined agency. And indeed what is apparent in the Monuments series is a
carnivalesque mixture of codes, as when, for instance, the fans of British bands or
American singers are shown to localize their identifications within a German context. Similarly, conventional gender signs are troubled and homogeneous social
categories disrupted by the numerous identifications with the opposite sex and
from different ethnic-racial origins, as is apparent in the Britney Spears Monument and the Iron Maiden Monument. It may be true that in these images there is
a certain homogenizing repetition in terms of clothing, postures, and affect – as if
all fans yearn to mimic rock stars in common ways (consider the dominance of the
Iron Maiden fans’ black t-shirts and jeans, the made-up faces of the Marilyn
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 21
Manson fans, or the coded postures of Britney’s fans). Yet, by grouping fans together
in this way, Breitz creates a context where mimicry also multiplies to form a site
of differentiation, rather than a simple massing of collective reinforcement. Not
all of the fans define their identification via appearance – particularly exemplary
are the Deadheads, many of whom appear in simple everyday clothing. It is precisely by viewing fans together, moreover, that they can be individualized, yet still
be seen as forming a group. In so doing, the Monuments show that this mass cultural phenomenon acts as a mode of sub-cultural community formation, rather
than one of alienating conformity to the forces of global homogeneity.
As such, Breitz’s project exposes a process of “indigenization,” in the words of social anthropologist Arjun Appadurai, according to whom global consumerism is
inevitably transformed into practices and identities that are differentiated and
localized, whether it be cricket in India or MTV in Japan. While some view multiculturalism as merely the cultural logic of multinational capitalism,21 arguments
such as Appadurai’s are compelling for the complexity they extend to the agency
of mass subjects. The United States, Appadurai declares, is not the “puppeteer of a
world system of images but is only one node of a complex transnational construction of imaginary landscapes.” 22 Breitz’s Monuments, finally, make this clear:
these consumers are not the mindless puppets of pop culture; rather, they portray
a differentiated modeling of agency that is impossible to pin down – they represent at once a rebellion that may play into the hands of fashion marketers and the
music industry, and an informed performance that grounds consumerist models
in local sub-cultures. The large-scale photographs may encourage this uncertainty, insofar as they – like the artist’s videos of fans singing the songs of Michael
Jackson or Madonna, as in King and Queen, both 2005 – limit the appearance of
their subjects to group images, which invite projections made on that basis. In
this regard, the group focus of Breitz’s work differs from the models of her peers,
such as Phil Collins’ The World Won’t Listen, 2005, and Rineke Dijkstra’s The
Buzzclub, Liverpool, England, March 11, 1995, 1995, which document creative forms
of pop-cultural consumption by recording either karaoke performers or dance
club denizens, but do so by showing one person at a time. In contrast, Breitz’s
work provokes ambivalence, for she shows the collective all at once, tempting a
stereotyping gaze.
Yet the temptation of such group-based projections may be the very trap Breitz’s
work sets for us – one from which we must escape. As we become self-conscious of
our capacity for stereotyping projection, we are forced to rethink the art world’s
own group psychology and reconsider how its assumptions of criticality in the
face of mass culture may function at times robotically. That said, this may mean
that the institutions of artistic practice are in need of defense, not rejection; for it
is precisely by revitalizing visual literacy and analytical engagement that we will
realize the greatest rewards from art’s potential as a zone of open process and radical autonomy. It is precisely these values that so much pop culture today assaults,
even while its mass subjects go to extreme lengths to maintain some sense of self
21
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 22
in an age when spectacle threatens to become mother and father to us all. Perhaps this fact explains why Breitz remains committed to the artistic context as a
site of exhibition – because there one finds a remaining dedication to the forces
of creative production that are all too fragile and precarious elsewhere. She needs
that space “to crack pop open.” 23
1 The term is Breitz’s, originating in discussions with the author (October 2007).
2 Jürgen Habermas dates the emergence of mass culture back further still: in that formed around the seventeenth-century publication of newspapers. See The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry
into a Category of Bourgeois Society, trans. Thomas Burger with the assistance of Frederick Lawrence
(Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989).
3 See Michael Warner, “The Mass Public and the Mass Subject,” in Publics and Counterpublics
(New York: Zone, 2002); and Hal Foster, “Death in America,” October 75 (Winter 1996)
4 Marshall McLuhan, “Notes on Burroughs,” in Media Research: Technology, Art, Communication,
ed. Michel A. Moos (Amsterdam: G+B Arts International, 1997).
5 Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man
(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1962), 32.
22
6 On the relation of Warhol to McLuhan’s politics of new media, see Branden Joseph, “‘My Mind Split Open’:
Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable,” Grey Room no. 8 (Summer 2002).
7 Quoted in Marcella Beccaria, “Process and Meaning in the Art of Candice Breitz,” in Candice Breitz
(Milan: Castello di Rivoli and Skira, 2005), 25.
8 Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, “Allegorical Procedures: Appropriation and Montage in Contemporary Art,”
Artforum (September 1982), p. 55.
9 Nicolas Bourriaud, Postproduction: Culture as Screenplay: How Art Reprograms the World, trans.
Caroline Schneider (New York: Lukas & Sternberg, 2002), 17.
10 Karl Marx, Critique of Political Economy; Cited in Bourriaud, 23.
11 Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception,” in
Dialectic of Enlightenment, trans. John Cumming (New York: Continuum, 1994).
12 Bourriaud, 24, 92.
13 Bourriaud, 93 and 85.
14 Tom McDonough, “No Ghost,” October 110 (Fall 2004), 121.
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 23
15 Maurizio Lazzarato,“Immaterial Labor,” in Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics, ed. Paolo Virno and
Michael Hardt (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), 134; cited in McDonough, 113. Subsequent
references to Lazzarato’s essay will be made in the main body of the text.
16 See B. Joseph Pine and James H. Gilmore, The Experience Economy: Work Is Theater & Every Business a Stage
(Cambridge: Harvard Business School Press, 1999).
17 McDonough, 113.
18 That Lazzarato would make such an argument should not be surprising, as he belongs to a group of radical
intellectuals from Italy – among them Giorgio Agamben, Antonio Negri, and Paolo Virno – dedicated to the
theorization of a “potential politics” based on rescuing “creative practices” – those of “material production,
immaterial production, desiring production, affective production, and so forth” – from the institutions of
capitalism, as Michael Hardt points out in his introduction to Radical Thought In Italy.
19 “Form-of-Life” is a term of Agamben’s, designating a holistic notion of life that cannot be abstracted as
capitalist labor or stripped of political subjectivity. See Giorgio Agamben “Form-of-Life,” in Means without
Ends: Notes on Politics, trans. Vincenzo Binetti and Cesare Casarino (Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis
Press, 2000).
20 It is relevant to note that Breitz most frequently displays her work in public institutions
(e.g. museums and Kunsthalle), which she views as a particularly important site of exhibition.
21 Slavoj Zizek, “Multiculturalism, Or, the Cultural Logic of Multinational Capitalism,”
New Left Review 225 (September/October 1997), 28-51.
22 Arjun Appadurai, “Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy,” Modernity at Large:
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), 32 and 31.
23 Breitz, as cited in Beccaria, 24.
23
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
15:52 Uhr
Seite 24
T. J. DEMOS
LE JEU
D’ACTEUR (IN)VOLONTAIRE:
L’ART DE CANDICE BREITZ
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 25
On entre dans une galerie sombre pour se trouver face à six écrans plasma. L’un
après l’autre, ils se mettent à jouer des clips extraits de six films hollywoodiens.
Des personnages principaux sont visibles sur les différents écrans se comportant
comme s’ils dialoguaient les uns avec les autres: «Tu t’inquiètes parce qu’elle sort
avec des mecs pas bien,», dit Steve Martin dans Le Père de la Mariée (1991), «le genre
de mec qui ne veut qu’une chose...» «Du cul, du cul, du cul» interrompt Tony Danza
dans Touche pas à ma fille (1989), projeté sur un moniteur voisin, avec Harvey Keitel
dans Imaginary Crimes (1994) et Donald Sutherland dans Des gens comme les
autres qui ont l’air de l’écouter, anxieusement, sur d’autres moniteurs encore. «Et
tu sais exactement ce que c’est que cette chose,» poursuit Martin, «parce que c’est
exactement ce que toi aussi tu voulais à leur âge!».
Ainsi se déroule un fragment de Father, dans le Mother + Father (2005) de Candice
Breitz, qui comprend deux installations vidéo présentées dans deux espaces contigus
chacun équipé de six moniteurs qui montrent en boucle des segments de film
comprenant des acteurs connus qui incarnent des représentations style pop-art de
la maternité et de la paternité. Les fonds d’écran sont noirs et les autres personnages ont été éliminés et les vedettes sont présentées dans de brèves séquences
totalement détachées du narratif de leurs films respectifs. Ainsi, cette œuvre propose des gros plans intimes et psychologiquement chargés, d’un côté, de mères
névrosées oscillant entre apitoiement sur elles-mêmes, attitudes défensives, et
crises de nerfs hystériques et, de l’autre, des pères coléreux et protecteurs, obsédés
par le besoin de retarder l’épanouissement sexuel de leurs filles. Les répétitions
introduites par Breitz lors du montage imposent à ses personnages des tics et des
accès de bégaiement qui renforcent l’énergie nerveuse. En créant ce qui sont, en
effet, deux films originaux, tous les deux analytiques, poignants et fort divertissants, Breitz fait jouer ses personnages selon ce qu’elle appelle un mode de «jeu
d’acteur involontaire» où, en tant que réalisatrice, elle intervient pour reprogrammer numériquement ses emprunts afin de les renouveler à l’aide d’une série de
canaux vidéo synchronisés.1
Mother + Father est présenté en corrélation avec une autre œuvre de Breitz, Monuments (2007), un cycle de photographies grand format qui montrent des fans de
musique, chaque image correspondant à des adeptes d’un chanteur ou d’un
groupe spécifique tels que Iron Maiden, Britney Spears ou The Grateful Dead. Breitz
a trouvé ses sujets par voie d’annonces dans les fanzines et les sites web de langue
allemande. Elle a ensuite interviewé les candidats sur leur ferveur identificationnelle et a finalement réuni un groupe trié sur le volet pour des sessions de groupe
avec un photographe professionnel à Berlin. Dans chaque portrait collectif, on
trouve une vingtaine de fans dans des décors variés – choisis par Breitz à partir
d’informations fournies par les participants – qui reflètent les styles de leur sousculture spécifique: les fans de Marilyn Manson se rassemblent dans une grande
salle aux accents gothiques décorés de vieux sofas et de chandelles allumées; les
adeptes d’Abba sont présentés dans un décor tout blanc qui évoque l’univers clinquant de la New Wave. Alors que les titres semblent faire hommage aux musiciens
25
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 26
(ex: Grateful Dead Monument, Berlin, September 2007), les clichés eux-mêmes
constituent aussi autant de monuments aux fans rassemblés dans la chorégraphie
de Breitz.
Il y a des différences nettes entre les deux projets – Mother + Father représentent
des stars du cinéma sur des écrans plasma là où les Monuments sont des photographies de fans de musique. Pourtant, ils se rejoignent en ce que tous les deux nous
offrent un tableau de la culture populaire contemporaine. Car les deux se concentrent sur le phénomène du sujet de masse à l’heure du capitalisme de consommation avancé, qu’il s’agisse de stars de cinéma imbues du statut de célébrité que
leur confèrent les médias de masse ou de fans qui s’identifient passionnément à
leurs idoles. Et c’est là, à mon avis, que l’art de Breitz commence à soulever des questions: si Mother + Father dépeint le «jeu d’acteur involontaire» des vedettes, peut-on
dire que les Monuments présentent les fans en tant que pantins inconscients de
l’industrie des loisirs? En d’autres termes, ces clichés exposent-ils un conformisme
servile aux stéréotypes des courants dominants, ou, au contraire et de façon plus
provocatrice, l’art de Breitz, dévoile-t-il d’une certaine manière le potentiel créatif
et individualisant du consumérisme? Cet encadrement montre les enjeux de la
recherche de Breitz, qui invite le spectateur à réfléchir sur le statut lourd de conséquences de tout engagement dans cette ère de mondialisation économique et
culturelle où la conglomération des médias et des nouvelles technologies de la
communication risque d’empiéter sur tous les aspects de la vie.
26
Au centre de l’œuvre de Breitz il y a le sujet de masse, qui a longtemps été considéré avec une ambivalence certaine. L’art d’Andy Warhol, avec ses images médiatiques sérialisées de superstars parues après la deuxième guerre mondiale, fournit
un point de référence évident. Et pourtant, déjà au milieu du dix-neuvième siècle,
des auteurs tels que Charles Baudelaire et Edgar Allan Poe proposaient des descriptions littéraires de passants anonymes et de cohues urbaines, captés également
par les Impressionnistes avec leurs flâneurs et leurs foules déambulant dans
les rues et les galeries marchandes de Paris, tous les ancêtres des parfaits consommateurs de la culture pop. Le sujet de masse met en exergue le statut collectivisé
du sujet. Son potentiel a atteint de nouveaux sommets quantitatifs au début du
vingtième siècle avec la mise au point technologique de la radio et de la télévision
de l’époque, aussi bien qu’avec le développement de nouveaux modes de visualisation tels que les expositions internationales et les grands meetings politiques
où le sujet de masse a pu être documenté et reproduit photographiquement et
cinématographiquement2. Suite aux années noires de la première guerre mondiale, Sigmund Freud a étudié la «psychologie de groupe» en analysant l’attirance
sociale de la solidarité collective qui se constitue autour d’un leader ou d’une idée
dominante, de même que l’éclipse des capacités individuelles de discernement et
de jugement, d’esprit critique et d’action individuelle face à l’appartenance communautaire. Se penchant sur les motivations qui expliqueraient le sacrifice militaire consenti au nom du nationalisme – l’individu qui meurt pour la collectivité –
l’étude de Freud fournit une anticipation presciente de l’avènement catastroph-
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 27
ique du fascisme et du communisme avec leurs populations vouées à une idéologie politique et fascinées par le culte de la personnalité d’un dictateur. Ces développements sous-tendent notre propre ambivalence face au sujet de masse qui
comprend à la fois la suggestion de la conformité consumériste – le fanatique en
tant que fan de sport ou de musique pop, par exemple – et la tentation exercée par
l’appartenance communautaire dans un siècle d’individualisme aliéné et de matérialisme endémique.
Ces ambivalences sont exploitées encore plus loin par Warhol, dont l’œuvre, à bien
des égards, prépare le terrain pour les enquêtes actuelles sur le consumérisme culturel. En reproduisant photographiquement des images de stars telles que Marilyn
Monroe, Elvis Presley et Marlon Brando, Warhol a déplacé celui qui allait déterminer le sujet de masse consumériste des années d’après-guerre du leader politique à la star du cinéma. Ses images iconiques évacuent, certes, toute personnalité,
lissant toute profondeur émotionnelle et toute complexité psychologique. Mais
Warhol a célébré le fait que l’identité s’exprime en surface. En nivelant la diversité,
le pop art allait montrer que tout le monde finit par ressembler à tout le monde,
inaugurant ainsi une nouvelle ère d’égalitarisme accompli grâce à la production
en masse et standardisée des biens de consommation – ou du moins c’est ce que
semble avoir pensé Warhol. Dans d’autres séries, il dépeignait des sujets anonymes
captés dans des scènes de violence, destinées à devenir des spectacles médiatisés.
La série «La Mort aux Etats-unis» de Warhol montre des images catastrophiques
d’accidents de la route, de suicides et d’émeutes raciales répétées avec ses grilles
habituelles exposant la fascination morbide avec laquelle le public observe le corps
des victimes non-identifiées, aussi bien de l’intérieur que de l’extérieur. A cet
égard, le sujet de masse révèle une sphère publique pathologique où les frontières
entre les espaces publics et privés tombent, à la fois la cause et la conséquence
d’expériences traumatisantes.3
Comme s’il réagissait face à ces mêmes images, le théoricien des medias, Marshall
McLuhan a spéculé à peu près à la même époque sur «un avenir où il ne peut y avoir
de spectateurs mais seulement des participants. Tous les hommes sont totalement
impliqués dans ce qui se passe à l’intérieur de tout autre homme.»4 Pour Warhol, une
telle interpénétration sociale se dépeignait sous un jour alternativement séduisant
ou catastrophique. Pour McLuhan aussi, la relation entre les médias et la subjectivité
de masse était tout aussi instable. D’un côté, elle promettait un futur «village global»
où la technologie permettrait de prolonger les sens humains et tout unir dans une
vaste communauté télévisuelle. De l’autre, elle menaçait d’engendrer de nouveaux
modes de contrôle social: «Puisque nos sens ne sont plus dans nos corps», prévenait
McLuhan, «Big Brother y entrera» 5. A propos du clivage devenu familier dans les
débats récents au sujet d’Internet, McLuhan faisait remarquer que les nouveaux
médias détenaient le potentiel soit de faire avancer la société vers une démocratie
participative ou d’inaugurer une nouvelle ère de gouvernance totalitaire gérée par
la manipulation technologique – ce dernier scénario faisant écho à ce que Gilles
Deleuze allait bientôt diagnostiquer comme la menace d’une «société de contrôle».6
27
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 28
Aujourd’hui, avec la production ininterrompue de nouveaux produits et de nouvelles interfaces – tel que le nouveau protocole en ligne «do-it-yourself» de
YouTube et étant donné la facilité avec laquelle on peut télécharger les médias sur
des dispositifs portables tels que les iPhones et les Blackberries – l’éventualité d’une
immersion de plus en plus grande de la culture de consommation dans les domaines
publics et privés se profile de plus en plus. En effet, avec la devise officielle de
YouTube «Diffusez-vous vous-mêmes», l’écart entre l’autonomie et la «participation» s’amenuise progressivement et les prévisions de McLuhan sont, à certains
égards, déjà en voie de réalisation. Ces développements ont accompagné une
vague de projets artistiques récents qui ont abordé le sujet des consommateurs de
la culture pop – pensez aux videos de Phil Collins et de Rineka Dijkstra, qui braquent
leurs caméras à champ fixe sur les danseurs dans des boîtes de nuit ou sur des
chanteurs de karaoke, faisant penser ainsi aux Screen Tests de Warhol lui-même,
ses films de quatre minutes montrant les divers visiteurs célèbres à son Usine.
Comment comprendre le statut de l’agir individuel à une époque où prolifère la
subjectivité de masse? Voilà précisément la question posée à son tour par le projet
artistique de Candice Breitz.
28
Mother + Father et les Monuments mettent toutes les deux en scène le statut ambivalent du sujet de masse. Mother + Father , évoquent-ils la sphère publique pathologique de la consommation de masse contemporaine, selon laquelle les stars de
Hollywood sont devenues des parents à nous tous? Ce serait, en effet, une sphère
pathologique si l’industrie des loisirs devait effectivement éliminer les structures
familiales traditionnelles déclenchant ainsi une confusion traumatisante entre les
mondes du commerce, de l’espace domestique, et de la psychologie développementale. Ou, inversement, faut-il mettre l’accent chez Breitz sur son appropriation ludique des films hollywoodiens, réappropriés à des fins artistiques, créant comme un
espace de jeu au cœur même du monde de la consommation? Pareillement, les
Monuments, dépeignent-ils les fans comme autant de sosies ou d’imitateurs ratés
où même les traces d’individualisme les intègrent dans la nouvelle conformité
faite sur mesure de la société de consommation? Ou, plutôt, ces clichés montrentils des individus comme autant de sources de créativité et de maîtrise de soi à
l’intérieur même de ce monde de consommateurs, une source qui transcende
l’exploitation de l’industrie de la culture?
Il n’est pas aisé de répondre à ces questions et, d’une certaine manière, les deux
approches sont valides. Alors que, chaque jour, les enfants regardent la télévision
chez eux pendant des heures, et vu la présence universelle d’Internet et du ciblage
des enfants par le marketing de masse, il est tout à fait concevable que les avatars
perçus dans les médias jouent à présent un rôle plus important dans l’éducation
des enfants que les parents eux-mêmes. Quel est le coût social de cette «médiatisation» du rôle des parents? Cette question dérange encore plus quand on pense que
les modèles hollywoodiens de la paternité et de la maternité exploités par Breitz –
ceux de la fin des années 70 et des années 80 – sont basés principalement sur des
personnages malheureux et névrosés. «Tu ne pourrais pas être une mère! Tu ne
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 29
pourrais pas être une mère! Tu ne pourrais pas être une mère!», s’écrie Susan Sarandon à un moment donné dans Mother. Dans un effort apparent de «réalisme» et
afin de montrer des images «complexes» de la vie d’adulte, le cinéma grand public
va peut-être finir par perpétuer et normaliser ces modèles de rôle dysfonctionnels.
Si la relation parent-enfant est aussi celle de la star au fan, alors, par la transmission de l’œuvre d’art au spectateur, nous avons tous été infantilisés. Et pourtant,
c’est aussi cette idée que rejettent de toute évidence les installations vidéo de
Breitz puisqu’elles isolent leur contenu et facilitent l’analyse comparative, nous
permettant ainsi de pondérer ces mêmes questions à distance. Il faut dire aussi
qu’une simple parodie par Breitz des fans en tant que victimes écervelées de
l’industrie de la culture serait tout à fait condescendante, car les Monuments représentent des participants conscients de ce qu’ils font, ce qui devient tout à fait
apparent lorsqu’on apprend les négociations complexes qui ont entouré leur production. Les participants ont rempli de longs questionnaires où ils parlaient de
leur identification et ils ont signé des contrats qui les informaient de l’utilisation
finale et de l’aspect visuel de leurs images. Ces personnes ont choisi de paraître
telles qu’on les voit. Ce sont eux qui ont choisi leurs costumes et décors. Toute discussion concernant leur geste doit tenir compte du caractère délibéré de leur collaboration.
Vu que le consumérisme contemporain puise de plus en plus loin dans les conditions formatrices de la subjectivité moderne, comment le consumérisme pourraitil néanmoins représenter le site de l’action relative, permettant l’existence de
modes de résistance subjective qui évitent une capitulation complète face aux exigences du capital? Avec cette question à l’esprit, Breitz a entrepris son enquête
quasi-anthropologique du consumérisme, une enquête – comme nous allons le
voir – qui allait lui fournir un récit nuancé de l’utilisation d’une telle méthodologie. L’enquête a commencé lorsque Breitz a testé son propre comportement comme
consommateur créatif avec des œuvres telles que Babel Series (1999). Pour cette
installation, Breitz s’est appropriée une série de clips musicaux et des gros plans de
chanteurs isolés. Ensuite, elle a fait un montage où elle a réduit les chansons à des
formulations monosyllabiques qui sont répétées tout au long de la vidéo. Le «pa,
pa, pa...» de Madonna, le «ma, ma, ma...» de Freddie Mercury, et le «da, da, da...» de
Sting passent sur des moniteurs différents exhibant des automatismes troublants
qui révèlent la mécanisation régressive de la culture pop. Pareillement, Soliloquy
Trilogy (2000) propose une série de trois courts-métrages pour lesquels Breitz a
remonté trois films hollywoodiens en réduisant chaque film aux dialogues étonnamment brefs prononcés par chacune des vedettes principales. Trilogy propose
des monologues d’une durée relativement courte, comprenant Sharon Stone dans
Basic Instinct (durée: 7 minutes et 11 secondes), Clint Eastwood dans Dirty Harry
(6 minutes et 57 secondes), et Jack Nicholson dans The Witches of Eastwick (14 minutes
et 6 secondes). Breitz explique que ces vidéos constituent une tentative d’analyse
des structures de valeurs hollywoodiennes perçues du point de vue du consomma7
teur en tant que «co-propriétaire» des produits des grands studios. Breitz raisonne de la façon suivante: lorsque des stars comme Stone, Eastwood et Nicholson
29
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 30
reçoivent des millions de dollars pour des prestations aussi brèves, l’argent vient
en fin de compte des clients qui paient pour voir leurs films. Ainsi, les spectateurs
sont des «actionnaires» de la valeur commerciale des vedettes, déterminant leur
valeur par le biais de leur soutien financier. Il suffit de pousser la logique un peu
plus loin pour tester les limites de cette «actionnariat» en s’appropriant les images
que l’on a payé pour voir et en les manipulant selon ses propres désirs.
30
A cette fin, les monologues fragmentés de Soliloquy Trilogy sont présentés sans
aucun contexte narratif, détruisant ainsi le produit hollywoodien en évacuant la
séduction de son histoire et de son système d’identifications. Cette présentation
atomisée réussit particulièrement bien lorsque les personnages parlent sans être
présents à l’écran. Leurs mots sont perçus sur un fond d’écran noir, produisant ainsi
une suspension visuelle du flux des images. Par ailleurs, ces courts-métrages se
terminent remarquablement avec une soudaineté dénuée de tout sens puisqu’il
n’y a aucun dénouement stéréotypé pour mettre fin à l’histoire, comme dans les
productions hollywoodiennes. Pourtant, alors que les trois brefs monologues troquent le récit passionnant contre un démantèlement analytique des conventions
cinématographiques, permettant au spectateur de se concentrer exclusivement
sur des personnages isolés, ils fournissent également des moments délicieux faits
d’humour et de perspicacité – bien que, ici encore, ces instants de plaisir fugitif
s’éloignent des agréments proposés par les films originels: Soliloquy (Jack), par
exemple, présente les ronflements et les grognements bestiaux de Nicholson comme
autant d’énoncés et les rapides échanges prennent la forme de monologues d’où
les pauses ont été éliminées, de sorte que les stars passent pour des schizophrènes,
sautant d’un sujet à un autre sans aucune suite logique.
Tout comme les productions stéréotypées de Hollywood, la méthode de Breitz suit
une logique mécaniste – des vidéos montées pour ne présenter que les paroles de
la vedette – faisant écho peut-être de cette manière aux règles très calculées du
système que ses vidéos bouleversent si astucieusement. Cependant, l’éclatement
réalisé dans Soliloquy Trilogy constitue également une forme de piratage numérique à la limite extrême de la légalité, ce qui rend sa transgression encore plus
poignante. A cet égard, les vidéos de Breitz renvoient aux méthodes de montage
des Dadaistes et des Constructivistes, ainsi que, plus récemment, à l’esthétique de
l’appropriation des années 80 avec les vidéos de Dara Birnbaum (et surtout son
Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman de 1978-79) et les re-photographies de
panneaux d’affichages de Richard Prince, qui imitent satiriquement l’imagerie
commerciale à des fins déconstructivistes. Soliloquy Trilogy et Babel Series sont
construits à partir de ces précédents dans la mesure où ils proposent une analyse
similaire des conventions idéologiques des films hollywoodiens. Tout comme dans
les vidéos de Birnbaum, «la technologie de la télévision et les machinations de ses
conventions peuvent désormais être lues en tant qu’instruments d’une idéologie
exprimée en un langage visuel ,» comme le fait remarquer le critique Benjamin
Buchloc, de même, dans les vidéos de Breitz, les représentations de la fonction de
parent peuvent être interprétées comme présentant un éventail limité d’identi-
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 31
fications propres à la culture de masse qui sont engendrées de façon stéréotypée.8
Pourtant, le projet de Breitz va plus loin qu’une prise de position critique du genre
qu’on trouve dans les œuvres de Birnbaum qui se limitent à une déconstruction de
l’idéologie du commercialisme, puisque des œuvres comme Mother + Father proposent également des formes de plaisir esthétique passionnantes en construisant
de façon créative à partir de leurs matériaux d’origine. Une partie de ce plaisir est
sûrement basée sur le renversement subversif de la division hiérarchique habituelle entre, d’un côté, la distribution des films par les grandes corporations et, de
l’autre, l’accueil passif qu’on leur accorde dans les salles de cinéma. Mais il puise
également dans la construction de l’exploitation novatrice d’un montage vidéo
multi-canal qui manipule, avec art, des films grand public de façon expérimentale.
Avec le travail de Breitz, le consommateur a la possibilité de devenir un producteur
créatif manipulant des films commerciaux comme matière première avec laquelle
il peut construire de nouveaux scénarios.
L’art de Candice Breitz, vu comme une forme de consumérisme créative, se situe en
corrélation avec la thèse développée récemment par Nicolas Bourriaud dans son
livre Postproduction, ouvrage souvent cité en rapport avec l’œuvre de Breitz mais
qui vaut la peine d’être revisité. Faisant allusion aux nombreuses techniques liées
aux médias – sous-titrage, voix-off, effets spéciaux – qui interviennent après le
tournage ou l’enregistrement des images non-montées, Postproduction identifie
un nouveau paradigme de la pratique artistique qui consiste à retraiter des éléments déjà existants, un peu comme le travail du DJ ou du programmateur. Pour
Bourriaud, le travail des artistes au cours de la dernière décennie – incluant Breitz,
Pierre Huyghe, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Thomas Hirschhorn, et Douglas Gordon – est
l’équivalent artistique du transfert post-Fordien de la production industrielle vers
le secteur tertiaire visant la manipulation des produits plutôt que l’extraction industrielle ou agricole de matières premières. De la même manière, «Les artistes
actuels programment les formes beaucoup plus qu’ils ne les créent», écrit-il; «plutôt que de transfigurer un élément primaire (toile blanche, argile, etc.), ils font un
9
remix à partir de formes disponibles et intègrent des données.»
“Utilisation” est le mot-clé pour Bourriaud, qui soutient que l’énergie déployée
dans la postproduction réalise ce que Marx, il y a belle lurette, écrivait au sujet
de l’acte du consommateur: «la consommation est simultanément production»10
A cet égard, Postproduction conteste un aspect important de l’analyse marxiste,
développé au vingtième siècle dans des ouvrages clés de théorie critique tels
que l’analyse par Theodor Adorno et Max Horkheimer de l’industrie de la culture,
l’ouvrage de Guy Debord La Société du Spectacle, et la discussion de Frederic
Jameson au sujet de la schizophrénie post-moderne – qui soutient que la culture
pop est génératrice exclusivement d’atomisation sociale, de dé-différentiation, et
d’amnésie historique, et que le consommateur ne constitue qu’un simple produit
passif de l’énorme machine de l’industrie culturelle visant à «escroquer les mas11
ses». Inversement, pour Bourriaud, «loin d’être purement passif», le consommateur définit une culture de l’activité qui anime la vie quotidienne de diverses
31
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 32
manières inattendues. Faisant écho au concept développé dans L’Invention du Quotidien par Michel de Certeau concernant l’utilisation consumériste subversive des
objets, Bourriaud observe: «Utiliser un objet, c’est nécessairement l’interpréter.
Utiliser un produit, c’est trahir son concept».12 La force critique présente ici implique nécessairement l’opposition entre les «pratiques de la responsabilité», qui
font que le consommateur est responsable de ses actions, et l’accent défaitiste
placé sur sa soumission docile. Postproduction défend l’idée qu’en pratiquant une
telle activité créatrice au sein même du consumérisme, le travail artistique propose une manière éthico-politique de «vivre à l’intérieur une culture mondiale». 13
32
Pour ses opposants, cependant, cette idée transforme le consumérisme en «utopie
de l’utilisation,» ce qui, comme le soutient Tom McDonagh dans sa glose du travail
de Pierre Huyghe, implique la notion d’un “royaume de l’autonomie personnelle”
qui est, en fait, un “fantasme petit-bourgeois”.14 Ce que néglige Bourriaud, dans
cette optique, c’est le fait que c’est précisément l’impératif de la participation
créative qui anime de nos jours le capitalisme de la production immatérielle.
McDonough trouve un soutien dans l’œuvre du théoricien social italien Maurizio
Lazzarato qui écrit: «Le nouveau slogan des sociétés occidentales est que nous
devrions tous ‘devenir des sujets’. La gestion participative est une technologie du
15
pouvoir, une technologie de la création et du contrôle des ‘processus subjectifs’»
En d’autres termes, selon la logique de notre économie des services – que d’aucuns
plus récemment ont dénommée «l’économie des expériences»16 – les interactions
amicales, la communication individuelle et la coopération créative sont toutes des
comportements exigés des travailleurs, tout comme les goûts des consommateurs,
leurs désirs et leurs sentiments, engendrent indéfiniment de nouveaux cycles de
production. De nos jours, la mise sur le marché de produits individualisés – des téléphones portables jusqu’aux automobiles – signifie que la subjectivité du consommateur est devenue la source de l’innovation capitaliste. Là où, jadis, les tréfonds
intérieurs du sujet pouvaient recéler des forces de résistance opposées à la discipline capitaliste, McDonough peut conclure, «aujourd’hui, la colonisation est
17
totale».
En examinant ces différents points de vue les uns par rapport aux autres, ne seraitil pas possible, néanmoins, que la charge polémique de chaque opinion fonctionne
de telle sorte qu’elle exagère ses conclusions – que ce soit pour accentuer la liberté
ou la détermination, l’action créative ou la colonisation – et par voie de conséquence écarte trop vite la possibilité d’un compromis négocié. Rejettent-ils aussi la
possibilité que chaque point de vue pourrait néanmoins résister en partie à la
pression critique de l’autre? De toute évidence, le danger d’un argument tel que
celui de Bourriaud, qui met l’accent sur le consumérisme créatif, est qu’il perpétue
une rhétorique avant-gardiste qui, naïvement, souligne le fondement volontaire
de la liberté, comme si la résistance était une simple question d’un choix librement
engagé en dehors de toute complication psychologique ou pression idéologique.
Mais, pareillement, le risque qui s’attache à des opinions comme celles de McDonough, qui mettent en valeur les forces de la détermination, c’est que le critique
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 33
peut devenir un complice retors de l’objet même de ses attaques, puisque n’importe quelle revendication en faveur de l’autonomie ou de la résistance est condamnée d’avance à l’échec.
A ce point, il est urgent d’examiner le statut de l’acte consumériste aujourd’hui –
peut-il constituer une ressource créative ou a-t-il été complètement récupéré par le
capital? Mais peut-être que la réponse doit sortir d’une négociation entre les deux
parties à ce débat: un acte, en d’autres termes, doit nécessairement représenter le
lieu d’une lutte entre l’autonomie et le contrôle, et d’une manière totalement nouvelle. Retournons aux intuitions de Lazzarato. Il est de fait, explique-t-il, que le mandat ordonnant aux individus de «devenir des sujets» fait peser la menace d’une
forme de contrôle potentiellement encore plus totalitaire que les divisions du passé
entre travail manuel et travail mental «puisque le capitalisme cherche à impliquer
jusqu’à la personnalité et la subjectivité des travailleurs dans la production de la
valeur» (135). Dans ce contexte, les moyens de production capitalistes aspirent à
coloniser tous les aspects de notre vie, faisant tomber toutes les frontières entre
l’économie, le pouvoir et la connaissance. Néanmoins, Lazzarato n’est nullement un
prophète de malheur. Il souligne également le caractère indéterminé de l’«événement» que constitue le travail immatériel, qu’il définit comme «un processus ouvert
de création qui s’établit entre le travail immatériel et le public et qui s’organise
18
grâce à la communication» (144). Alors que la production immatérielle intègre le
participant-consommateur dans le processus de création de la valeur, l’entrepreneur en arrive à dépendre du consommateur pour stimuler l’innovation. Cette nouvelle disposition dote, en ces circonstances, le consommateur d’une nouvelle forme
de pouvoir créatif qui – fait crucial – sera ou ne sera pas approprié par le capital. Car
cet événement ouvre «un espace permettant une autonomie radicale des synergies
productrices du travail immatériel» (139), qui est capable d’engendrer des formes de
vie créatives qui ne se réduisent pas à des fonctions commerciales.19
Plutôt que de rejeter le potentiel créatif du consumérisme, Lazzarato en dévoile
l’existence critique, au moment même où il reconnaît l’instabilité de son autonomie.
L’exploitation consumériste de produits suggère, par conséquent, une compétition
entre l’action créative autonome et les forces de récupération capitalistes dans laquelle, à tout moment, ce qui a tout l’air d’une activité susceptible d’être récupérée
par les systèmes entrepreneuriaux («une partie du produit») peut également afficher une existence indépendante échappant à son contrôle («un acte créatif»)
(144). Le travail de Breitz illustre clairement cette instabilité. Dans la mesure où des
œuvres telles que Mother + Father et Soliloquy Trilogy sont basées sur l’appropriation de matériel originel provenant de films hollywoodiens, les deux projets situent les origines de l’acte créateur dans le système déjà existant du consumérisme. L’artiste est déjà «devenu un sujet» à l’intérieur de son système et participe
de façon tout à fait lucide à la création de valeur qui constitue les cycles de production-consommation de travail immatériel. De cette manière, le travail de Breitz reconnaît qu’il n’existe aucun espace présumé de liberté qui pourrait offrir une toile
blanche pour l’expression créative.
33
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
34
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 34
Et pourtant, en intervenant dans ce système préexistant, Mothers + Fathers génère
aussi une rupture qui part de l’intérieur et qui opère de multiples façons. Non contente d’isoler les personnages de leur contexte narratif, d’effacer les autres personnages secondaires et les décors, et de remixer les images commerciales d’origine
afin de créer de nouveaux assemblages narratifs, Breitz transforme également les
films en installations vidéo à canaux multiples, ce qui a pour effet de créer un
espace novateur de réception stimulant ainsi l’assimilation et la perception chez le
spectateur. Mother + Father multiplie les signaux plutôt que de conserver le cheminement unidirectionnel du film source. Les personnages parlent sur leurs différents écrans, séparés dans l’espace, exigeant du spectateur une qualité d’attention
qui n’est jamais sollicitée par les films vus en salle. La présentation en boucle constitue une autre technique distinguant ces œuvres de l’appareil cinématographique traditionnel, tout comme les installations réinventent les dimensions spatiales et temporelles de l’expérience théâtrale: par ailleurs, la configuration ouverte
de la galerie d’art et la circulation libre (habituelle) des visiteurs se substituent
également à la disposition fixe des fauteuils et à l’entrée payante caractéristiques
des salles de cinéma (en plus, elle se distingue de l’espace domestique où les films,
reformatés pour la télévision et repris dans un cycle éternel de retransmissions
20
sont visionnés par les ménages). Dans la mesure où cet espace de réception
multi-directionnel fait appel aux conventions de la galerie d’art – le reliant à des
expériences avant-gardistes d’une autre ère pendant les années 60 et 70 avec les
installations à techniques mixtes – il engage les dimensions artistiques représentées par l’examen critique, la connaissance des arts visuels et l’interprétation créative.
Il est de fait que la post-production chez Breitz exploite la technologie des vidéos
commerciales et des logiciels grand public tels que Final Cut Pro et After Effects.
Cette vérité démontre clairement que la production artistique présentée dans les
galeries commerciales est basée sur des actes de consumérisme. Et pourtant, le site
de la galerie lui-même doit être perçu de façon complexe comme un espace à déterminations multiples – entreprise commerciale, plaisir esthétique, et production
intellectuelle. En effet, il fonctionne comme le site même du travail immatériel et
de son processus ouvert, où des pratiques novatrices se marient avec des énergies
entrepreneuriales. Il s’ensuit que Breitz, tout comme ceux qui observent son travail, assume une relation complexe vis-à-vis des produits de consommation et de
l’espace commercial. La multiplicité de cette position créative lance un défi à ceux
qui soutiennent fermement une capitulation passive aux identifications paternelles et maternelles de la culture pop, au moment même où son contexte dévie peutêtre la participation intellectuelle pour la transformer en production rentable.
Vues ainsi, les contradictions qui émergent entre les lignes chez les personnages de
Breitz dans Mother – Diane Keaton: «Tu es une bonne mère, Anna»; Susan Sarandon: «Tu ne saurais pas être une mère»; Keaton: «Tout le monde sait que tu es une
bonne mère»; Shirley McLaine: «J’ai honte d’être ta mère!»; Julia Roberts: «Si seulement ma mère était là!»; Meryl Streep: «C’est moi sa mère!»; Roberts: «Tu es la Terre
Mère incarnée...» – traduisent les multiples déterminations et contradictions de
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 35
cet espace esthétique. Cependant, quel travail intellectuel, pourrait-on demander,
est libre aujourd’hui de la logique du profit, sous forme de salaire ou de subvention? La pratique de Breitz participe tout simplement à la condition actuelle du
travail intellectuel, qui opère invariablement dans le domaine insaisissable de la
production immatérielle. Cette condition complexe ne relève ni de la liberté avantgardiste ni de la détermination totale; plutôt, elle désigne un processus ouvert qui
répond simultanément aux impératifs d’une existence créative et aux pressions de
la logique commerciale.
Et qu’en est-il des fans captés dans les Monuments? Avant d’aborder cette question, il est important de se demander comment le site de réception de cette série
de photos – l’emplacement artistique – informe notre opinion concernant les sujets représentés. Breitz nous montre la culture de masse captée dans une création
destinée aux intellectuels. Il en découle que l’œuvre se prête aux interprétations
réductrices: on pourrait considérer qu’elle établit une relation hiérarchique entre
les différent publics de l’art, opposant les spectateurs actifs et critiques et leurs
antagonistes passifs en provenance de la culture pop. Semblablement, définir le
projet comme une étude anthropologique invite également une interprétation de
l’œuvre comme une mise en relation inégale entre spectateurs avisés et participants observés – même si les anthropologues récusent depuis des lustres de tels
jugements réducteurs. Néanmoins, pour certains, de telles relations exercent toujours leur attrait, si ce n’est qu’inconsciemment, puisqu’elles permettent au spectateur de prendre un plaisir complaisant à observer ce qu’il prend pour autant
d’êtres débiles qui semblent relever de la psychiatrie de groupe. Certains spectateurs peuvent se croire au-dessus de telles identifications et, par conséquent, en
droit d’exercer leur esprit critique. Mais, qu’en serait-il si, en plus d’étudier le
monde des fans, c’était justement ce mode d’identification semi-consciente chez le
spectateur que l’œuvre de Breitz mettait à l’essai? Se peut-il que les Monuments
nous donnent à voir non seulement le sujet de masse en tant que consommateur
parfait mais également le sujet de masse en tant que consommateur de l’art contemporain mondial, un individu qui se présume capable de jugements critiques et
auto-réflexifs mais par le biais de processus qui sont des réflexes automatiques
dénués de tout sens critique? Cette supposition pourrait nous amener à conclure
que ce sont exactement de tels modes de capacité critique présumée qui font partie intégrante de l’engrenage économique du monde de l’art et qu’il est en voie de
conséquence inutile de résister. Si les choses en restaient là, cependant, on pourrait
rapidement écarter cette conclusion puisqu’elle instrumentalise l’autonomie de la
production immatérielle de façon vraiment trop sommaire.
L’observation que le travail de Breitz permet d’évaluer les identifications de ceux
qui le regarde est significative puisqu’elle indique une mise en question de l’opposition trop facile entre haut et bas qui situe la psychologie de groupe exclusivement dans la sphère de la culture pop. Ayant écarté cette opposition, il devient
possible d’attribuer un comportement plus complexe aux fans comme aux spectateurs. Si on regarde de plus près les Monuments, il s’avère que ce sont en effet des
35
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
36
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 36
portraits de parfaits consommateurs, ceux qui ont signé un certain pacte avec
leurs idoles. Néanmoins, ces sujets semblent également avoir rempli de façon créative leurs rôles de consommateur, les exploitant pour en tirer les plaisirs qui animent les formes de vie créatives, alors même que leur subjectivité a pu peut-être
avoir été mise à contribution pendant ce processus. A noter, ce processus n’est pas
le signe d’une simple réification – à savoir une assimilation aux catégories préétablies du consumérisme – mais plutôt la mise en œuvre d’un pouvoir d’action à
multiples déterminantes. Et, en effet, ce qui transparaît clairement dans la série
des Monuments, c’est le mélange carnavalesque de codes comme, par exemple,
lorsque les fans de groupes britanniques ou de chanteuses américaines nous sont
montrés en voie d’asseoir leurs identifications dans un contexte local allemand. De
même, les signes conventionnels dénotant la différence des sexes sont bouleversés
et les catégories sociales homogènes sont perturbées par de nombreuses identifications avec le sexe opposé et avec des origines ethno-raciales différentes, comme
c’est le cas dans le Britney Spears Monument ou encore dans le Iron Maiden
Monument. Il est peut-être vrai que ces images sont marquées par une certaine homogénéité en termes d’habillement, de posture et d’affect – comme si tout fan
aspire à singer les stars du rock par des moyens très répandus (prenez la prédominance des t-shirts noirs et des jeans chez les fans de Iron Maiden, les visages maquillés chez les fans de Marilyn Manson, ou les postures codifiées chez les fans de
Britney). Néanmoins, en regroupant les fans de cette manière, Breitz crée un contexte où l’imitation se démultiplie pour créer un site de différenciation plutôt
qu’un simple rassemblement de renforcements collectifs. Tous les fans ne déclinent pas leur identification par le biais de leur aspect physique – en particulier,
ceux des Deadheads dont beaucoup sont présentés dans leurs habits de tous les
jours. Par ailleurs, c’est précisément en observant les fans ensemble qu’on peut les
individualiser, bien qu’ils constituent encore un groupe. De cette manière, les
Monuments montrent que ce phénomène de la culture de masse agit comme une
sorte de communauté sous-culturelle plutôt que comme une forme de conformisme aliénant face aux forces de l’homogénéité mondiale.
Ainsi, le projet de Breitz met à jour un processus d’«indigénization», pour citer le
mot de l’anthropologue social Arjun Appadurai, selon qui le consumérisme mondial se transforme inévitablement en pratiques et en identités qui sont à la fois différenciées et localisées, qu’il s’agisse du cricket en Inde ou de MTV au Japon. Alors
que certains considèrent que le multi-culturisme n’est que la logique culturelle du
capitalisme multinational21, des arguments tels que ceux d’Appadurai convainquent par la complexité qu’ils apportent aux comportements des sujets de masse.
Les Etats-Unis, déclare Appadurai, ne sont pas le «marionnettiste qui agite un système mondial d’images mais seulement un nœud parmi d’autres dans un réseau
transnational complexe de paysages imaginaires.»22 Les monuments de Breitz,
enfin, rendent les choses très claires; ces images de consommateurs ne montrent
pas des pantins débiles appartenant à la culture pop; au contraire, elles dépeignent le déploiement différencié d’un comportement qui est difficile à cerner – elles
représentent à la fois une rébellion qui fait peut-être le bonheur des marchands de
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 37
la mode et de l’industrie du disque, et une performance bien avisée qui ancre les
modèles consuméristes dans des sous-cultures locales. Ces photographies à
grande échelle vont peut-être promouvoir cette incertitude dans la mesure où –
comme les vidéos de Breitz montrant dans King and Queen, toutes les deux de
2005, les fans entonnant les chansons de Michael Jackson et de Madonna,- ils limitent la visibilité de leurs sujets à des images de groupes, ce qui invite des projections basées sur ce constat. A cet égard, en mettant l’accent sur les groupes, le travail de Breitz se distingue du modèle adopté par ses pairs tels que Phil Collins avec
The World Won’t Listen, 2005, et Rineke Dijkstra avec son The Buzzclub, Liverpool,
England, March 11, 1995, (1995), qui décrivent des manifestations de la consommation dans le monde de la culture pop à l’aide d’enregistrements soit de chanteurs
de karaoke ou de clients de boîtes de nuit mais en les montrant individuellement,
une personne à la fois. En revanche, le travail de Breitz provoque l’ambivalence, car
elle montre le collectif tout ensemble, invitant ainsi un regard stéréotypé.
Néanmoins, la tentation de faire de telles projections à partir d’images de groupe
constitue peut-être le piège même que le travail de Breitz nous tend – un piège auquel nous devons nous arracher. En devenant plus conscients de notre capacité à
formuler des projections stéréotypées, nous sommes obligés de repenser la psychologie de groupe du monde de l’art lui-même et de réexaminer les processus par lesquels ses attitudes critiques face à la culture de masse fonctionnent par moments
de façon robotique. Cela dit, ceci signifie peut-être que les institutions artistiques
ont besoin d’être défendues et non pas rejetées. Car, c’est précisément en donnant
un nouveau souffle à la critique artistique et à l’engagement analytique que nous
engrangerons les plus belles récompenses proposées par le potentiel de l’art perçu
comme une aire d’autonomie radicale et de processus en cours. Ce sont ces valeurs,
précisément, qui sont assaillies par une grande section de la culture pop contemporaine, alors même que ses sujets de masse se donnent tant de mal pour entretenir
le sens de posséder sa propre individualité à une époque où l’industrie du spectacle menace de devenir les père et mère à nous tous. Ce constat explique peutêtre pourquoi Breitz continue à s’engager pour promouvoir le contexte artistique
comme lieu d’exposition – parce que c’est là que l’on trouve encore intact un certain dévouement aux forces de la production créative qui, ailleurs, ne sont que trop
fragiles et précaires. Elle a besoin de cet espace pour «décortiquer le pop».23
37
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 38
1 L’expression est de Breitz dans ses discussions avec l’auteur (Octobre 2007).
2 Jürgen Habermas fait remonter l’émergence de la culture de masse encore plus loin au moment de la
création des premiers quotidiens au dix-septième siècle. Voir: The Structural Transformation of the Public
Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society, trad. Thomas Burger assisté par Frederick Lawrence
(Cambridge: Polity Press, 1989).
3 Voir Michael Warner, “The Mass Public and the Mass Subject,” dans Publics and Counterpublics
(New York: Zone, 2002); et Hal Foster, “Death in America,” October 75 (Winter 1996).
4 Marshall McLuhan, “Notes on Burroughs,” dans Media Research: Technology, Art, Communication,
ed. Michel A. Moos (Amsterdam: G+B Arts International, 1997).
5 Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man
(London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1962), 32.
6 Sur la relation entre Warhol et la politique des nouveaux medias de McLuhan, voir Branden Joseph,
“‘My Mind Split Open’: Andy Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable,” Grey Room no. 8 (Summer 2002).
7 Cité dans Marcella Beccaria, “Process and Meaning in the Art of Candice Breitz,” dans Candice Breitz
(Milan: Castello di Rivoli and Skira, 2005), 25.
38
8 Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, “Allegorical Procedures: Appropriation and Montage in Contemporary Art,”
Artforum (September 1982), p. 55.
9 Nicolas Bourriaud, Postproduction: Culture as Screenplay: How Art Reprograms the World, trad.
Caroline Schneider (New York: Lukas & Sternberg, 2002), 17.
10 Karl Marx, Critique of Political Economy; Cité dans Bourriaud, 23.
11 Theodor Adorno et Max Horkheimer, “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception,” dans
Dialectic of Enlightenment, trad. John Cumming (New York: Continuum, 1994).
12 Bourriaud, 24, 92.
13 Bourriaud, 93 et 85.
14 Tom McDonough, “No Ghost,” October 110 (Fall 2004), 121.
15 Maurizio Lazzarato, “Immaterial Labor,” dans Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics, ed. Paolo Virno et
Michael Hardt (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), 134; cité dans McDonough, 113.
Les références suivantes à l’essai de Lazzarato seront integrées dans le corps du texte.
16 Voir B. Joseph Pine et James H. Gilmore, The Experience Economy: Work Is Theater & Every Business a Stage
(Cambridge: Harvard Business School Press, 1999).
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 39
17 McDonough, 113.
18 Que Lazzarato puisse soutenir un tel argument n’est guère surprenant puisqu’il appartient à un groupe
d’intellectuels radicaux italiens parmi lesquels Giorgio Agamben, Antonio Negri, et Paolo Virno-qui se
consacrent à la théorisation d’une “politique potentielle” basée sur le besoin de sauver les “pratiques
créatives”, celles de la production matérielle, de la production immatérielle, de la production du désir, la
production des sentiments, et ainsi de suite » des institutions du capitalisme, comme l’indique
Michael Hardt dans son introduction à Radical Thought In Italy.
19 “Form-of-Life”(Forme de vie) est un mot d’Agamben qui désigne une notion holistique de la vie qui ne peut
pas être intellectualisée en une idée abstraite telle que la main d’œuvre capitaliste privée de subjectivité
politique. Voir Giorgio Agamben “Form-of-Life,”dans Means without Ends: Notes on Politics,
trad. Vincenzo Binetti et Cesare Casarino (Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis Press, 2000).
20 Il est intéressant de noter que Breitz expose son travail le plus souvent dans des institutions publiques
(ex: musées et Kunsthalle), qu’elle considère être des lieux d’exposition particulièrement intéressants.
21 Slavoj Zizek, “Multiculturalism, Or, the Cultural Logic of Multinational Capitalism,” New Left Review 225
(September/October 1997), 28-51.
22 Arjun Appadurai, “Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy,” Modernity at Large:
Cultural Dimensions of Globalization (Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press, 1996), 32 et 31.
23 Breitz, citée dans Beccaria, 24.
39
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 40
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 41
MOTHER+FATHER
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 42
MOTHER
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 43
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 44
I never wanted to be a mom…
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 45
I’m scared…
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 46
What do I have that you don’t?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 47
You’re Mother Earth Incarnate…
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 48
How long did you feel that way?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
18:49 Uhr
Seite 49
All my life, I’ve felt like somebody’s wife,
or somebody’s mother, or somebody’s daughter...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 50
Oh dear!
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
14:59 Uhr
Seite 51
I really think you have to understand that you see, with, um,
Brian, we just stopped having sex a long time before we split up...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
18:55 Uhr
Seite 52
I never knew who I was...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 53
Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear!
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
18:59 Uhr
Seite 54
And, just because I needed some kind of creative or emotional
outlet other than my child, that didn’t make me unfit to be a mother...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 55
You know what your problem is?
You are so self-involved – you couldn’t be a mother...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 56
FATHER
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 57
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:03 Uhr
Seite 58
Look, let’s just say I’m doing this for your own good, okay?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 59
Exactly!
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 60
Where the hell are your brains?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:06 Uhr
Seite 61
Exactly, exactly, exactly...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 62
Goddamn it!
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:10 Uhr
Seite 63
You’re missing the point...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:14 Uhr
Seite 64
Some things once they’re done, can’t be undone...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:17 Uhr
Seite 65
Wouldn’t it be easier if we all talked about it?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
28.01.2008
19:20 Uhr
Seite 66
What law is it that says that a woman is a better parent
simply by virtue of her sex?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 67
What about me? What about me?
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 68
And we built a life together...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 69
What about me? I’m real too...
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 70
piac_m_f_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:00 Uhr
Seite 71
MOTHER+FATHER
Director: Candice Breitz
Producer: Jack Bakker
Post-Production: Alexander Fahl
Post-Production Assistants: Julien Binet, Yvonne Brandl, Halina Kliem,
Andrei Loginov, Lars Oeschler, René Petit, Julia Pfeiffer, Janne Schäfer,
Boris Schmidt, Max Schneider, Katja Schubert, Riccardo Zito.
Sound: Max Schneider
Technical Realisation: Cine Plus, Berlin
Special Thanks: Jack Bakker, Marie-Claude Beaud, Marcella Beccaria,
Nicolette Cavaleros, María and Lorena de Corral, Björn Dahlström,
T. J. Demos, Jean-Louis Froment, Lorenzo Fusi, Mélanie Gatti,
Benjamin Geiselhart, Francesca Kaufmann, Michael Lantz,
Bjørn Melhus, Ralph Niebuhr, Fabian Richter, Raimar Stange.
Mother+Father are dedicated to, though not necessarily inspired
by EPB+LRB.
In memory of Lars Oeschler (14.5.1975- 19.9.2007).
leerseite.qxp
15.11.2007
23:15 Uhr
Seite 1
leerseite.qxp
15.11.2007
23:15 Uhr
Seite 1
CANDICE BREITZ
MONUMENTS
MONUMENTS
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:27 Uhr
Seite 1
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:27 Uhr
Seite 2
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:27 Uhr
Seite 3
CANDICE BREITZ
MONUMENTS
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:27 Uhr
Seite 4
MARILYN MANSON MONUMENT, BERLIN, JUNE 2007
2007, DIGITAL C-PRINT MOUNTED ON DIASEC, 180 CM X 463,5 CM
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:27 Uhr
Seite 5
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 6
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 7
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 8
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 9
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 10
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 11
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 12
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 13
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 14
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 15
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 16
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 17
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:28 Uhr
Seite 18
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 19
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 20
ABBA MONUMENT, BERLIN, JUNE 2007
2007, DIGITAL C-PRINT MOUNTED ON DIASEC, 180 CM X 358,4 CM
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 21
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 22
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 23
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 24
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 25
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 26
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 27
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 28
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 29
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 30
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 31
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 32
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 33
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 34
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 35
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 36
IRON MAIDEN MONUMENT, BERLIN, JUNE 2007
2007, DIGITAL C-PRINT MOUNTED ON DIASEC, 180 CM X 427 CM
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:29 Uhr
Seite 37
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 38
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 39
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 40
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 41
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 42
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 43
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 44
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 45
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 46
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 47
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:30 Uhr
Seite 48
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:31 Uhr
Seite 49
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:31 Uhr
Seite 50
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 51
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 52
BRITNEY SPEARS MONUMENT, BERLIN, SEPTEMBER 2007
2007, DIGITAL C-PRINT MOUNTED ON DIASEC, 180 CM X 428,6 CM
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 53
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 54
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 55
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 56
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 57
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 58
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:35 Uhr
Seite 59
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 60
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 61
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 62
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 63
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 64
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 65
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:36 Uhr
Seite 66
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 67
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 68
GRATEFUL DEAD MONUMENT, BERLIN, SEPTEMBER 2007
2007, DIGITAL C-PRINT MOUNTED ON DIASEC, 180 CM X 419,6 CM
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 69
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 70
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 71
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 72
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 73
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 74
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 75
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:37 Uhr
Seite 76
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 77
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 78
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 79
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 80
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 81
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 82
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 83
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 84
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 85
MONUMENTS CREW
Project Management: Alex Fahl
Casting+Coordination: Dennis Feser, Kim Pfeiffer,
Janne Schäfer, Karin Then
Pre-Production: Matthias Weingärtner, Franziska Strohm
Photography: Marcus Gaab
Digital Operator: Henriette Primus
8x10 Operator: Sebastian Schobbert
Photo Assistants: Matthias Weingärtner,
Marie Louise Skindballe
Lighting: Delight Rental Services
Making Of Photography: Darin Breitz, June Breitz,
Alex Fahl, Marcus Gaab, Ralf Henning, Christin Lahr,
Sebastian Schobbert, Hemmi Sigurdsson
Make-up: Amélie Gebhard, Catrin Kreyss, Christa Raqué,
Katja Schulze
Assistants: Anna Chkolnikova, Agathe Fleury, Jana Kaffka,
Benjamin Lee Martin, Iris Musolf, Marko Schiefelbein,
Clemens Wilhelm
MARILYN MANSON MONUMENT
Location: Postfuhramt, Berlin, June 2007
Fans: Stefanie Barfuß, Ulrike Blasius, Janine Christ,
Ralf Dirks, Bentje Fügner, Bastian Gelhard, Julia Gosny,
Ivona Guekova, Thomas ‘Reverend MM’ Keil,
Thomas Kretschmann, Clarissa Lortz, Justine Nowka,
Manuela Pohl, Robert Quillfeldt, Tim ‘Twiggy’ Teske,
Felix Tischer, Franziska ‘Tracy’ Wendt,
Iris ‘Shaddai’ Winkler
Thanks: Julia Baumann, Katharina Kraske,
Martini von Heldentat
ABBA MONUMENT
Location: Bangaluu, Berlin, June 2007
Fans: Michaela Axer, Daniel Bartelt, Alain Barthel,
Marcus Bergs, Anita Frackenpohl, Thomas Goersch,
Valerie Högerle, Britta Kunz, Marie Lange, Erik Menkens,
Uwe Meyer, André Selbach, Thorsten Weiß, Iris Werner.
General Thanks: Tim Ackermann, Ben de Biel,
Christiane Bördner, Anke Degenhard,
Christoph Westerbarkey, Christiane Hardt, Ralf Henning,
Christin Lahr, Volker Leppers, Stefan Reuter, Marko Schilp,
Milena Schlösser, Raimar Stange, Frank Thiel,
Elisabeth von Thurn und Taxis, Mathias Zentner,
Tanja Zöller
Thanks: Monica Berleth, Daniela Gloatz, Regina Grafunder,
Patrick Kroos, Isan Oral.
85
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 86
IRON MAIDEN MONUMENT
Location: Gewerbehof in der alten Königstadt,
Berlin, June 2007
GRATEFUL DEAD MONUMENT
Location: Tempodrom, Berlin, September 2007
Fans: Raymundo Aguilar, Günther ‘Maiden’ Bachhuber,
Dennis Biehler, Niklas Brunke, Daniel Bührle, Omar J. Gomez,
Jorge Haspela, Jörg-Thomas Kellermann, Thomas Kreutzer,
Florian ‘Churchill’ Langsdorf, Cedric ‘Wickerman’ Linke,
Angelika Meisen, Philipp Neumann, Günther Peschau,
Sven Rappolt, Karsten Roth, René Schmidt, Charlotte Spies.
Fans: Ronald Bässler, Olaf Behnke, Cassandra Bell,
Jessica Bell, Karen Bell, Adrian Bock, Lore Bürkle,
Norbert Gläsel, Hagen Gläß, Andrea Greve, Hjördis Greve,
Heike Kern, Wolf Kobernuss, Christian Krebs, Oranna Krebs,
Oliver Meiser, Ralph Metzger, Björn Eric Münz, Werner Nieke,
Ingrid Osdowski, Gerald Piepenburg, Natalie Pohl,
Jörg ‘Akki’ Struppek.
Thanks: Conny Kittscher, Kerstin Sewe, Klaus Lemmnitz +
Daniela Thomsen (Gewerbehof Saarbrücker Straße e.G.),
Niko Rollmann (unter-berlin e.V.), Holger Veenker.
Thanks: Michael Barth, Beate + Gerd Baumann,
Walther Glaubitt, Arne + Anneliese Heinen,
Kati Ihde (unkul), Marko Schilp, Mathias Zentner.
BRITNEY SPEARS MONUMENT
Location: Tempodrom, Berlin, September 2007
Fans: Jennifer Aufermann, Vanessa Aufermann,
Franziska Maria Birk, Julian Marc Fetzer, Nicole Gronich,
Thomas Liebenstein, Sonja Katharina Löck,
Matthias Marschang, Manuel Mayer, André Midek,
Konstantin Rain, Eyman Abdul Razzak, Susanne Schubert,
Michael Spallek, Anne Spaller, Bernhard Straßner,
Jan-Ole Sydow, Selvin Tatli, Jelena Tomovic,
Wojciech Trzcinski, Mona Weber, Sandra Weber,
Frank Zimmermann.
86
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 87
THE PRINCE PIERRE OF MONACO FOUNDATION
LA FONDATION PRINCE PIERRE DE MONACO
Created on 17 February 1966 by H.S.H. Prince Rainier in
memory of his father Prince Pierre, a great patron of the
arts, the Foundation’s vocation is to encourage contemporary creativity. Presided over by H.R.H. the Princess of
Hanover, every year the Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation organizes prizes that are conferred by three juries
composed of internationally renowned personalities:
Créée le 17 février 1966 par S.A.S. le Prince Souverain, en
hommage à la mémoire de son Père, le Prince Pierre, grand
protecteur des lettres et des arts, la Fondation a pour
vocation de favoriser la création contemporaine. Présidée
par S.A.R. la Princesse de Hanovre, la Fondation Prince
Pierre organise chaque année des Prix décernés par trois
conseils, ou Jurys, qui regroupent des personnalités internationalement reconnues :
The Prince Pierre Prize for Literature
Instituted in 1951, this prize is awarded to a renowned
French language writer in honor of his or her entire work,
on the occasion of the recent publication of a work by this
author. The prize is awarded by the literature jury.
Le Prix Littéraire Prince Pierre de Monaco
Créé en 1951, honore un écrivain d’expression française de
renom pour l’ensemble de son œuvre, à l’occasion de la
parution récente d’un ouvrage de cet auteur. Il est proposé
par le conseil littéraire.
The Emerging Writer Bursary
Instituted in 2001 on the 50th anniversary of the Prince
Pierre Prize for Literature, this bursary is conferred every
two years upon a young French language writer by the
literature jury, for his or her first fictional work.
La Bourse de la Découverte
Créée en 2001 à l’occasion du 50e anniversaire du Prix
Littéraire, est réservée à un jeune écrivain francophone
pour son premier ouvrage de fiction. Elle est attribuée tous
les deux ans par le conseil littéraire.
The Prince Pierre of Monaco Prize for
Musical Composition
Instituted in 1960, this prize is awarded yearly by the music
jury to a contemporary musical work composed during the
preceding year.
Le Prix de Composition Musicale Prince Pierre de Monaco
Fondé en 1960, est attribué à une œuvre de musique
contemporaine créée pendant l’année précédente. Il est
proposé par le conseil musical.
87
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 88
The International Prize for Contemporary Art
First conferred in 1965, this prize has been organized by the
Foundation since 1983. Since 2005, it has been awarded
yearly for a contemporary work of art created in the course
of the previous two years by an emerging artist, and selected by the art jury after consultation with international
experts. During the same year, the winner is given an exhibition in Monaco, planned around the prize-winning work.
The Foundation additionally organizes a series of lectures,
which are open to renowned personalities and which cover
varied subjects ranging from current affairs, literature,
music, art and history, to psychoanalysis, the sciences and
human sciences, etc.
Le Prix International d’Art Contemporain
Attribué pour la première fois en 1965, il est organisé par la
fondation depuis 1983. Depuis 2005, il est attribué à une
œuvre d’art contemporain, créée au cours des deux années
précédentes par un artiste émergent, et retenue par le
conseil artistique à l’issue d’une consultation internationale d’experts. Le lauréat se voit consacrer, la même
année, à Monaco, une exposition spécialement conçue
autour de l’œuvre primée. Par ailleurs, la fondation organise chaque année une saison de conférences. Ces cycles de
conférences, ouverts à des personnalités de renom, traitent
de sujets très variés : actualité, littérature, musique, art,
histoire, psychanalyse, sciences et sciences humaines, etc.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
For their advice, generosity and cooperation, heartfelt
thanks to all of those who have made it possible for the
Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation to accomplish its
cultural mission and to increase public awareness of contemporary art. Thanks are due in particular to:
REMERCIEMENTS
Que soient ici vivement remerciés pour leurs conseils,
leur générosité et leur collaboration, toutes les personnes
qui ont permis à la Fondation Prince Pierre de Monaco
d’accomplir sa mission culturelle et de sensibiliser le public en faveur de la création contemporaine, et notamment:
The Art Jury
Chairperson: H.R.H. the Princess of Hanover
Le Conseil Artistique
Présidente: S.A.R. la Princesse de Hanovre
Deputy Chairperson: Marie-Claude Beaud, Director of the
Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg
Vice-présidente: Marie-Claude Beaud, directrice du Musée
d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Mudam Luxembourg
88
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 89
Artistic Director: Jean-Louis Froment
Directeur artistique: Jean-Louis Froment
Members:
Michel Enrici, director of the Fondation Maeght, Vence
Lorenzo Fusi, director of the Palazzo delle Papesse,
Centro Arte Contemporanea Siena
Abdellah Karroum, independent curator
Jean Nouvel, architect
Philippe Rahm, architect
Myriam Salomon, editor and art consultant
Jérôme Sans, independent curator
Membres:
Michel Enrici, directeur de la Fondation Maeght, Vence
Lorenzo Fusi, directeur du Palazzo delle Papesse,
Centro Arte Contemporanea de Sienne
Abdellah Karroum, commissaire indépendant
Jean Nouvel, architecte
Philippe Rahm, architecte
Myriam Salomon, éditeur/consultant artistique
Jérôme Sans, Commisaire Indépendant
SPONSORS OF THE PRINCE PIERRE OF MONACO FOUNDATION
LES PARTENAIRES DE LA FONDATION PRINCE PIERRE
DE MONACO
The Government of the Principality,
the Principality’s Press Office, which helps every year to
publicize the prizes of the Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation,
the Princess Grace of Monaco Foundation, which supports
the International Prize for Contemporary Art in the framework of its campaigns to provide international backing to
young artists,
the Société des Bains de Mer, which contributes to the
quality of the events organized by the Foundation.
Le Gouvernement Princier,
Le Centre de Presse de la Principauté qui contribue chaque
année à la promotion des prix de la Fondation Prince
Pierre de Monaco,
La Fondation Princesse Grace qui, dans le cadre de ses
actions de soutien international à de jeunes artistes, a
accepté de soutenir le développement du Prix International d’Art Contemporain et de la Bourse de la découverte,
La Société des Bains de Mer qui contribue à la qualité des
manifestations organisées par la Fondation.
89
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:38 Uhr
Seite 90
The Princess Grace of Monaco Foundation
The Princess Grace of Monaco Foundation was initially
founded in 1964 by H.S.H. Princess Grace to support local
craftsmen and women. The organization soon went on to
sponsor students wishing to embrace a career in culture
and the arts. In 1982, the Sovereign Prince asked Her Royal
Highness the Princess of Hanover to assume the duties of
President of the Foundation, His Serene Highness Prince
Albert being Vice-President. The Princess added a humanitarian component to the Foundation’s mission, providing
support for hospitalized children and taking an active part
in the modernization of hospitals in the developing world,
whilst continuing its support for medical research. The
Princess Grace Foundation financially supports four medical laboratories specializing in childhood diseases and
working on various projects.
La Fondation Princesse Grace de Monaco
La Fondation Princesse Grace de Monaco, créée en 1964 par
Son Altesse Sérénissime la Princesse Grace, avait principalement selon ses statuts une action de soutien à des étudiants particulièrement talentueux souhaitant embrasser
une carrière artistique. Dans un deuxième temps, la Fondation Princesse Grace a décidé d’aider les artisans locaux
afin de leur permettre de commercialiser leurs travaux.
Depuis 1982, la présidence de la Fondation est assurée par
Son Altesse Royale la Princesse de Hanovre qui a souhaité
développer une nouvelle activité qualifiée d’humanitaire
et consistant d’une part à accompagner par la présence de
leurs mères les enfants hospitalisés dans des hôpitaux
pédiatriques, et d’autre part à améliorer si nécessaire les
installations de ceux-ci. À cette activité de soutien direct
aux familles s’ajoute une aide accordée à quatre laboratoires de recherche médi-cale pour des travaux portant sur
l’amélioration des thérapeutiques pédiatriques.
Anda’s Spirit
The International Prize for Contemporary Art enjoys the
special backing of Mr. Henri Zimand, whose cultural patronage in many areas of the world is inspired by the memory of
his wife, Anda.
The name of Anda is recognized throughout the world as a
symbol of love, hope and joy. With a simple mouse-click, millions of Internet users in 198 countries have been able to
visit a website that is a unique source of strength and inspiration. Using sound and image, www.andaspirit.com enables visitors to relive the joy, courage and beauty of Anda
Zimand’s life and to share her undying passion. Despite her
Anda’s Spirit
Le Prix International d’Art Contemporain bénéficie du soutien particulier de M. Henri Zimand, dont les actions de
mécénat culturel, conduites dans de nombreuses régions
du monde, sont guidées par le souvenir de son épouse,
Anda.
Le prénom d’Anda est reconnu, dans le monde, comme un
symbole d’espérance, de joie et d’amour. Des millions d’utilisateurs d’Internet, issus de 198 pays, ont découvert qu’un
90
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 91
simple clic leur permettrait d’accéder à un site, source unique de force et d’inspiration. En utilisant le son et l’image,
www.andaspirit.com permet à chaque visiteur de revivre
la joie, le courage et la beauté de la vie d’Anda Zimand et
de découvrir que l’amour vrai ne meurt jamais. Malgré sa
disparition prématurée due au cancer, le souvenir d’Anda
reste très présent et sous différentes formes soutenant les
communautés dans le besoin, aidant ceux dans l’effort,
mais surtout, montrant que le vrai amour existe et peut
toujours être trouvé par ceux qui le cherchent.
premature death from cancer, Anda’s remarkable spirit remains vitally alive in significant ways, supporting communities in need, helping those enduring stressful conditions,
and most of all, showing that true love exists and can always be found by those who seek it.
HSBC Private Bank (La Belle Epoque – 17, av. d’Ostende –
98000 Monaco – phone + 3 77 93 15 25 25) has contributed
to making this catalogue possible.
DONORS
The following donors have extended production support
to the winner, in the form of a fund set up to help with the
creation of new works of art:
The National Council
The Town Council
The Société des Bains de Mer
The Florence Gould Foundation
HSBC Private Bank (La Belle Epoque – 17, av. d’Ostende –
98000 Monaco – phone + 3 77 93 15 25 25) qui par son concours a permis la réalisation de cet ouvrage.
LES DONATEURS
qui ont souhaité doter le crédit de production du lauréat
destiné à l’aider à créer des oeuvres nouvelles:
Le Conseil National,
La Mairie de Monaco,
La Société des Bains de Mer,
La Fondation Florence Gould
We are indebted to the following companies for their kind
interest in contemporary art:
Cine+, Berlin, Germany – Installation of Mother + Father
Hasenkamp, Düsseldorf, Germany – Transport
Monaco Déménagement, Monaco – Transport
Les Ateliers du Bois, Monaco – Woodwork and Painting
Insobat Peinture, Monaco – Signage and Marking
L’Atelier des Décors, La Trinité, France – Textile
Sefonil
Aux entreprises qui ont marqué leur intérêt pour ce projet
et la création contemporaine:
Cine+, Berlin, Allemagne – installation de Mother + Father
Hasenkamp, Düsseldorf, Allemagne – Transport
Monaco Déménagement, Monaco – Transport
91
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 92
Les Ateliers du Bois, Monaco – Menuiserie et peinture
Insobat Peinture, Monaco – signalétique
L’Atelier des Décors, La Trinité, France – Textiles
Sefonil
We also extend our thanks to:
Björn Dahlström, independent curator and patron of
Candice Breitz’s award-winning work Mother + Father,
as well as to all of the other patrons who so generously
helped to put together and perpetuate this new version of
the prize.
Nos remerciements s’adressent également à:
Björn Dahlström, commisaire indépendant, parrain de
l’oeuvre lauréate Mother + Father, de Candice Breitz, ainsi
que tous les autres parrains qui ont encore bien voulu
participer avec générosité à la mise en oeuvre de cette nouvelle formule et à sa poursuite.
PRINCE PIERRE OF MONACO FOUNDATION
Chairperson: H.R.H. the Princess of Hanover
General Secretary: Rainier Rocchi
41st International Prize for Contemporary Art
Artistic Director: Jean-Louis Froment
General Coordination: Mélanie Gatti
Secretarial Coordination: Anne-Marie Battaini+
Josiane Debieuvre
Coordination and Accounting: Josiane Montuori
Communication: Emmanuelle Xhrouet
Graphic Design: Presse Papier, Bordeaux – Marie Bruneaux
and Bertrand Grenier
Chief Technician: Jean-Michel Bianchi assisted by
Damien Gelot, Christophe Maisonneuve and Gérard Allard
Press Office: 2e Bureau Paris, Sylvie Grumbach, assisted by
Martial Hobbeniche
FONDATION PRINCE PIERRE DE MONACO
présidente: S.A.R la Princesse de Hanovre
secrétaire général: Rainier Rocchi
41e Prix International d’Art Contemporain – Organisation
direction artistique: Jean-Louis Froment
coordination générale: Mélanie Gatti
coordination et secrétariat: Anne-Marie Battaini et
Josiane Debieuvre
coordination et comptabilité: Josiane Montuori
communication: Emmanuelle Xhrouet
Design Graphique: Presse Papier, Bordeaux –
Marie Bruneaux et Bertrand Grenier
chef technique: Jean-Michel Bianchi assisté de
Chistophe Maisonneuve, Damien Gelot et Gérard Allard
92
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 93
Catalogue
Translation: George Morgan
Catalogue Design: Ralf Henning
Printing: Druckerei Conrad GmbH, Berlin
Photo Credits Mother + Father:
Alex Fahl: Pages 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58,
59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70
Paolo Pellion: Pages 43, 57
Photo Credits Monuments:
Candice Breitz: Pages 5, 21, 37, 53, 69
Darin Breitz: Pages 38, 43, 46, 47, 49, 51,
Marcus Gaab: Pages 54, 78, 78, 78, 84
Ralf Henning: Pages 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, 26, 27,
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 55, 56,
57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 79, 80,
81, 82, 83
Christin Lahr: Pages 10, 11, 18, 23, 24, 25, 28, 35, 59, 67, 70, 75,
76, 77, 78, 80
presse: 2e Bureau Paris, Sylvie Grumbach, attachée de
presse – assistée de Martial Hobbeniche
Prince Pierre of Monaco Foundation
4, boulevard des Moulins
MC- 98000 Monaco
tél.: +3 77 98 98 85 15/fax: +3 77 93 50 66 94
www.fondationprincepierre.mc
Fondation Prince Pierre de Monaco
4, boulevard des Moulins
MC- 98000 Monaco
tél.: +3 77 98 98 85 15/fax: +3 77 93 50 66 94
www.fondationprincepierre.mc
© Fondation Prince Pierre, Monaco 2007
© Fondation Prince Pierre, Monaco 2007
Catalogue
Traduction: George Morgan
Design graphique: Ralf Henning
Imprimé par Druckerei Conrad GmbH, Berlin
Photographie Mother + Father:
Alex Fahl: Pages 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 58,
59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70
Paolo Pellion: Pages 43, 57
Photographie Monuments:
Candice Breitz: Pages 5, 21, 37, 53, 69
Darin Breitz: Pages 38, 43, 46, 47, 49, 51,
Marcus Gaab: Pages 54, 78, 78, 78, 84
Ralf Henning: Pages 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, 26, 27,
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 48, 49, 50, 55, 56,
57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 79, 80,
81, 82, 83
Christin Lahr: Pages 10, 11, 18, 23, 24, 25, 28, 35, 59, 67, 70, 75,
76, 77, 78, 80
93
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 94
CANDICE BREITZ
2005
Castello di Rivoli (Turin)*
Palais de Tokyo (Paris)
White Cube (London)*
Sonnabend Gallery (New York)*
Born in Johannesburg, 1972.
One-Artist Exhibitions
* indicates exhibition catalogue
2004
Moderna Museet (Stockholm)
Foundation for Art & Creative Technology (Liverpool)
2008
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (Humlebaek)*
Collection Lambert en Avignon (Avignon)*
Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean (Luxembourg)
Yvon Lambert (New York)
2003
Modern Art Oxford (Oxford)*
2007
Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (León)*
White Cube (London)
Prix International d’Art Contemporain 2007 (Monaco)*
2002
Artpace San Antonio (Texas)
INOVA Institute of Visual Arts (Milwaukee)
Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Berlin)*
2006
Konstmuseum Uppsala (Uppsala)
Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art (Gateshead)
Hellenic American Union (Athens)*
Kukje Gallery (Seoul)*
Bawag Foundation (Vienna)*
2001
De Appel Foundation (Amsterdam)
O.K Center for Contemporary Art Upper Austria (Linz)*
Kunstverein St. Gallen Kunstmuseum (St. Gallen)
Galleria Francesca Kaufmann (Milan)
2000
Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève (Geneva)
New Museum of Contemporary Art (New York)
94
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 95
2006
Mori Art Museum – Tokyo–Berlin/Berlin–Tokyo – Tokyo*
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art – Sip My Ocean –
Humlebaek, Denmark*
Neue Nationalgalerie – Berlin–Tokio/Tokio–Berlin – Berlin*
Kunsthalle Mannheim – Full House: Faces of a Collection –
Mannheim*
Centraal Museum – This is America! – Utrecht*
Belgrade Biennial – Art, Life & Confusion/47th October
Salon – Belgrade*
Adelaide Bank Festival of Arts – Video Venice – Adelaide,
Australia
Haus am Waldsee – Anstoß Berlin, Kunst macht Welt – Berlin*
Miami Beach Cinematheque – Giving Visibility – Miami
Oper Leipzig – Eine Frage (nach) der Geste – Leipzig
Akademie der Künste – sonambiente 2006 – Berlin*
Selected Group Exhibitions
* indicates exhibition catalogue
2008
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden –
The Cinema Effect – Washington, D.C.
The Hayward Gallery – Laughing in a Foreign Language –
London
2007
Kunstverein Hannover – Made in Germany – Hannover*
Museum of Contemporary Art Denver – Star Power:
Museum as Body Electric – Denver
Hamburger Kunsthalle – World Receiver – Hamburg
Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean – The Collection:
Aiwa To Zen – Luxembourg
Beijing Centre for Creativity – Seduction: A Theory-Fiction
between the Real & the Possible – Beijing
Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art – Celebrity –
Arizona*
Hangar Bicocca – Collateral: When Art Looks at Cinema –
Milan*
Project Space 176 – The Zabludowicz Collection: An Archaeology – London*
2005
51. Biennale di Venezia – The Experience of Art – Venice*
Kunsthalle Wien – Superstars – Vienna*
Milwaukee Art Museum – CUT: Film as Found Object –
Milwaukee*
Zwirner + Wirth Gallery – Girls on Film – New York
Armand Hammer Museum – Fair Use – Los Angeles
Castello di Rivoli – From the Electronic Eye. Works from
the Video Collection – Turin*
Nikolaj Contemporary Art Center – Circa Berlin –
Copenhagen*
95
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 96
2004
Montevideo Time Based Arts – TV Today – Amsterdam
Kunsthalle Wien – Africa Screams – Vienna*
Henry Art Gallery – The Work of the Work – Seattle*
Queensland Art Gallery – Video Hits – Brisbane*
Museum of Contemporary Art – CUT: Film as
Found Object – North Miami*
Monographs
2007
Zaya, Octavio (editor). Candice Breitz: Multiple Exposure.
(Barcelona + León: ACTAR + MUSAC – Museo de Arte
Contemporáneo de Castilla y León, 2007).
2006
Kintisch, Christine (editor). Candice Breitz: Working Class
Hero. (Vienna: Bawag Foundation, 2006) exhibition
catalogue.
Lange, Christy (interview). Candice Breitz. (Seoul: Kukje
Gallery, 2006) exhibition catalogue.
Potamianou, Artemis (editor). Candice Breitz. (Athens:
Hellenic American Union, 2006) exhibition catalogue.
2003
Govett-Brewster Art Museum – Extended Play:
Art Remixing Music – New Zealand*
Dundee Contemporary Arts – Plunder – Dundee
2002
Tate Liverpool – Remix: Contemporary Art and Pop –
Liverpool*
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo – Continuity +
Transgression – Tokyo*
Hamburger Kunsthalle – Schrägspur – Hamburg
Studio Museum in Harlem – Africaine – New York
8th Baltic Triennial of International Art – Centre of
Attraction – Vilnius*
2005
Beccaria, Marcella (editor). Candice Breitz. (Rivoli-Torino:
Castello di Rivoli, 2005) exhibition catalogue.
Himmelsbach, Sabine and von Sydow, Paula (editors).
Candice Breitz: Mother. (Frankfurt: Revolver Archiv für
Aktuelle Kunst, 2005) exhibition catalogue.
Neri, Louise (editor). Candice Breitz. (London: White Cube,
2005) exhibition catalogue published by Jay Jopling/
White Cube, Francesca Kaufmann and Sonnabend Gallery.
2001
Kunsthalle Wien – Tele[Visions] – Vienna*
Hamburger Kunsthalle – Monet’s Legacy. Series: Order and
Obsession – Hamburg*
Museum Fridericianum – Looking at You – Kassel*
96
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 97
2005
Chambers, Nicholas. ‘Candice Breitz: Mother + Father –
Interview with Nicholas Chambers,’ Artlines (Queensland
Art Gallery, South Brisbane – Volume 2: 2005) pp. 12-15.
Lange, Christy. `Crazy for You: Candice Breitz on Pop Idols
& Portraiture,’ Modern Painters (London: September, 2005)
pp. 68-73.
Neri, Louise. ‘Candice Breitz and Louise Neri: Eternal
Returns,’ in: Neri, Louise (editor). Candice Breitz. (London:
White Cube, 2005) exhibition catalogue published by
Jay Jopling/ White Cube, Francesca Kaufmann and
Sonnabend Gallery.
2003
Cotter, Suzanne (editor). Candice Breitz: Re-Animations.
(Oxford: Modern Art Oxford, 2003) exhibition catalogue.
2002
Tannert, Christoph (editor). Candice Breitz: Alien (Ten Songs
from Beyond). (Essen: Museum Folkwang im RWE Turm,
2002) exhibition catalogue.
2001
Sturm, Martin and Plöchl, Renate (editors). Candice Breitz:
Cuttings. (Linz: O.K Center for Contemporary Art Upper
Austria, 2001) exhibition catalogue.
2004
Kröner, Magdalena. ‘Candice Breitz: Schreien, Stottern,
Singen: Das Playback des Ich: Ein Gespräch mit Magdalena
Kröner,’ Kunstforum (No. 168: January-February, 2004)
pp. 276-283.
Interviews
2007
Beccaria, Marcella. ‘Family Values: An Interview by
Marcella Beccaria with Candice Breitz,’ Janus
(No. 21: January, 2007) Section III: pp. 2-11.
Matt, Gerald. ‘Candice Breitz,’ Interviews. (Cologne: Verlag
der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2007) pp. 58-65.
2003
Stange, Raimar. Zurück in die Kunst. (Hamburg: Rogner &
Bernhard bei Zweitausendeins, 2003).
2001
Altstatt, Rosanne. ‘Killing Me Softly... An Interview with
Candice Breitz,’ Kunst-Bulletin (No. 6: June, 2001) pp. 30-37.
2006
Kedves, Jan. ‘Interview: Candice Breitz,’ Zoo Magazine
(No. 12: 2006) pp. 138-145.
97
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 98
2006
Buhr, Elke. ‘Candice sucht den Superstar,’ Art: Das Kunstmagazin (No. 10: October, 2006) pp. 70-75.
Casavecchia, Barbara. ‘Tutti gli specchi di Candice,’
D – la Repubblica delle Donne (No. 525: November 18, 2006)
pp. 149-152.
Garcia, Cathy Rose. ‘Artist Shows How Stars Influence
Fans,’ The Korea Times (Seoul: September 23-24, 2006).
Graham-Dixon, Andrew. ‘Haunted Staircase. Candice
Breitz: Working Class Hero (A Portrait of John Lennon),’ The
Sunday Telegraph/Seven Magazine (London: October 29,
2006) p. 32.
Holmes, Nigel. ‘The Art Universe: from the Vanity Fair
Observatory High Atop Times Square,’ Vanity Fair (No. 556:
December, 2006) pp. 340-341.
Januszczak, Waldemar. ‘Art: Urban Myths,’ The Sunday
Times (London: November 26, 2006).
Oliver, William. ‘Candice Breitz: getting snippy with
Sharon,’ The Art Newspaper: Art Basel/Miami Beach Daily
Edition 9/10 (December, 2006) p. 6.
O’Toole, Sean. ‘A Star Astride the World Stage,’ Business
Day (Johannesburg: September 1, 2006) p. 10.
Paice, Kimberley. ‘Repetition and Theft: Recent video works
by American women artists,’ n.paradoxa: International
Feminist Art Journal (London – Volume 17: 2006) pp. 5-18.
Rappolt, Mark. ‘Lucky Star: Candice Breitz,’ i-D Magazine
(London – Vol. II/XVI/No. 266: May, 2006) pp. 118-121.
2000
Hunt, David. ‘Candice Breitz: Fighting Words,’ Flash Art
(No. 211: March-April, 2000) p. 94.
Selected Periodicals
2007
Arnaudet, Didier. ‘Candice Breitz.’ Art Press (No. 340:
December, 2007).
Büsing, Nicole and Klaas, Heiko. ‘We are the Champions:
Candice Breitz,’ Weltkunst Contemporary (Munich:
September 2007) pp. 26-28.
Hayden, Malin Hedlin. ‘On Candice Breitz’s Becoming,’
n.paradoxa: International Feminist Art Journal (London –
Volume 20: 2007) pp. 50-57.
Holmes, Pernilla. ‘In Your Face,’ Artnews (New York –
Volume 106/No. 6: June, 2007) pp. 106-111.
Koerner von Gustorf, Oliver. ‘Lauter schräge Vögel,’
Welt am Sonntag (Berlin: May 27, 2007) p. 71.
Sooke, Alastair. ‘How to replace a diamond-studded skull,’
The Daily Telegraph (London: July 31, 2007) p. 28.
von Thurn und Taxis, Elisabeth. ‘Spiel’s Nochmal Fan!’
Vanity Fair (Berlin – No. 30/31: July 19, 2007) pp. 146-149.
Ward, Ossian. ‘Private View: Candice Breitz,’ Time Out
(London: July 25-31, 2007) p. 49.
Wyndham, Constance. ‘Video saves the radio star,’
The Financial Times (London: July 28, 2007) p. 18.
98
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 99
Johnson, Ken. ‘Girls on Film,’ New York Times (New York:
August 26, 2005).
Jones, Alice. ‘My family and other actors,’ The Independent
(London: September 5, 2005) p. 43.
Kent, Sarah. ‘Screen Idols,’ Time Out (London: September
21 -28, 2005) p. 57.
Lange, Christy. ‘Crazy for You: Candice Breitz on Pop Idols &
Portraiture,’ Modern Painters (London: September, 2005)
pp. 68-73.
Perra, Daniele. ‘Candice Breitz: Castello di Rivoli Museo
d’Arte Contemporanea,’ Tema Celeste (No. 109: May-June,
2005) p. 89.
Robecchi, Michele. ‘Candice Breitz,’ Contemporary
(Issue 76: 2005) pp. 34-37.
Smith, Roberta. ‘A Medium in the Making: Slicing Familiar
Films Into Something New,’ New York Times (New York:
July 29, 2005).
Smith, Roberta. ‘Art in Review: Candice Breitz,’
New York Times (New York: October 21, 2005).
Volk, Gregory. ‘Candice Breitz at Sonnabend,’
Art in America (No. 11: December, 2005) p. 136.
Whitfield, Sarah. ‘Exhibition Reviews: Candice Breitz at
White Cube,’ The Burlington Magazine (London –
Volume CXLVII/Number 1232: November, 2005) pp. 766-767.
Ross, Christine. ‘The Temporalities of Video: Extendedness
Revisited,’ Art Journal (Volume 65/No. 3: Fall, 2006) pp. 83-99.
Sooke, Alastair. ‘Singing to the Gallery,’ The Daily Telegraph
(London: September 2, 2006) p. 4.
Whetstone, David. ‘Stairwell with a Lennon touch,’
The Journal (Newcastle: October 10, 2006) p. 31.
2005
Althen, Michael. ‘Ich bin deine Erfindung,’ Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung (Frankfurt: October 13, 2005) p. 39.
Bruhns, Annette. ‘Die Meisterin des Loops,’ KulturSPIEGEL
(Issue 11: November, 2005) pp. 26-32.
Chambers, Nicholas. ‘Candice Breitz: Mother+Father –
Interview with Nicholas Chambers,’ Artlines (Queensland
Art Gallery, South Brisbane – Volume 2: 2005) pp. 12-15.
Chapman, Peter. ‘Private View: Candice Breitz,’
The Independent / The Information (London: September
10-16, 2005) p. 15.
Crompton, Sarah. ‘Why Women Slipped out of the Frame,’
The Daily Telegraph (London: June 29, 2005).
Darwent, Charles. ‘Shot by Both Sides,’ The Independent on
Sunday/ABC Magazine (London: September 11, 2005) p. 15.
Dorment, Richard. ‘Screaming and Singing,’ The Daily
Telegraph (London: September 6, 2005) p. 21.
Glover, Michael. ‘A game of happy families,’ The Financial
Times (London: September 16, 2005) p. 16.
Graham-Dixon, Andrew. ‘Implosion of the body-snatched,’
The Sunday Telegraph (London: September 11, 2005) p. 6.
99
piac_mon_endv.qxp
18.12.2007
15:39 Uhr
Seite 100

Documents pareils