World bank documents

Commentaires

Transcription

World bank documents
Public Disclosure Authorized
Document of
Public Disclosure Authorized
Public Disclosure Authorized
Public Disclosure Authorized
The World Bank
Report No: 34252
IMPLEMENTATION COMPLETION REPORT
(IDA-29850)
ON A
CREDIT
IN THE AMOUNT OF US$50 MILLION
TO
THE REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL
FOR AN
INTEGRATED HEALTH SECTOR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
December 29, 2005
Human Development II
Country Department 14
Africa Regional Office
CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS
(Exchange Rate Effective 09/30/05)
Currency Unit = Franc CFA (CFAF
1 = US$ 0.00775
US$ 1 = 560
FISCAL YEAR
January 1 December 31
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
CBHI
CDD
CIS
DAGE
DCA
DHS
EDCP
ENEA
EU
GTZ
HIS
HR
HRDP
ICR
IEC
IHSDP
M&E
MDGs
MPHSA
MPH
NGO
PDIS
PDO
PRSC
RAC
SOE
SSU
SWAP
TTL
WHO
Community-based health insurance
Community-driven development
Comité Interne de suivi
Direction de l'Administration Générale et de l'Equipement
Development Credit Agreement
Demographic and Health Survey
Endemic disease control project
Ecole Nationale d’Economie Appliquée
European Union
German cooperation agency
Heath Information System
Human resources management
Human Resources Development Project
Implementation Completion Report
Information, education and communications
Integrated health sector development project
Monitoring and evaluation
Millennium Development Goals
Ministry of Public Health and Social Action
Ministry of Public Health
Nongovernmental organization
Programme de développement intégré de la santé
Project Development objective
Poverty Reduction Strategy Credit
Réunion Annuelle Conjointe “annual donor meeting”
Statement Of Expenditures
Sector Support Unit
Sector-wide Approach Program
Task Team Leader
World Health Organization
Vice President:
Country Director
Sector Manager
Task Team Leader/Task Manager:
Gobind T. Nankani
Madani M. Tall
Alexandre V. Abrantes
Eric T'kint de Roodenbeke
SENEGAL
Integrated Health Sector Development Project
CONTENTS
1. Project Data
2. Principal Performance Ratings
3. Assessment of Development Objective and Design, and of Quality at Entry
4. Achievement of Objective and Outputs
5. Major Factors Affecting Implementation and Outcome
6. Sustainability
7. Bank and Borrower Performance
8. Lessons Learned
9. Partner Comments
10. Additional Information
Annex 1. Key Performance Indicators/Log Frame Matrix
Annex 2. Project Costs and Financing
Annex 3. Economic Costs and Benefits
Annex 4. Bank Inputs
Annex 5. Ratings for Achievement of Objectives/Outputs of Components
Annex 6. Ratings of Bank and Borrower Performance
Annex 7. List of Supporting Documents
Annex 8. Borrower's contribution
IBRD Map 33475
Page No.
1
1
2
4
9
11
12
14
15
16
17
22
24
28
31
32
33
36
Project ID: P002369
Project Name: Integrated Health Sector Development
Project
TL Unit: WBIHD
Report Date: December 29, 2005
Team Leader: Eric De Roodenbeke
ICR Type: Core ICR
1. Project Data
Name: Integrated Health Sector Development Project
Country/Department: SENEGAL
L/C/TF Number: IDA-29850
Region: Africa Regional Office
Sector/subsector: Health (72%); Compulsory health finance (12%); Central government administration (11%);
Sub-national government administration (5%)
Theme: Health system performance (P); Population and reproductive health (P); Access to urban
services and housing (S); Rural services and infrastructure (S)
KEY DATES
PCD: 10/01/1995
Appraisal: 05/22/1997
Approval: 09/04/1997
Original
Effective: 09/04/1997
MTR: 05/01/2000
Closing: 06/30/2003
Borrower/Implementing Agency:
Other Partners:
STAFF
Vice President:
Country Director:
Sector Manager:
Team Leader at ICR:
ICR Primary Author:
Revised/Actual
02/02/1998
06/06/2001
06/30/2005
GOVT OF SENEGAL/MIN OF FINANCE AND OF HEALTH
Current
Gobind T. Nankani
Madani M. Tall
Alexandre V. Abrantes
Eric T'kint de Roodenbeke
Eric T'kint de Roodenbeke; Dirk
Prevoo
At Appraisal
Jean-Louis Sarbib
Mahmoud A. Ayub
Ok Pannenborg
Anouar Bach-Baouab
2. Principal Performance Ratings
(HS=Highly Satisfactory, S=Satisfactory, U=Unsatisfactory, HL=Highly Likely, L=Likely, UN=Unlikely, HUN=Highly Unlikely,
HU=Highly Unsatisfactory, H=High, SU=Substantial, M=Modest, N=Negligible)
Outcome:
U
Sustainability:
L
Institutional Development Impact:
M
Bank Performance:
U
Borrower Performance:
U
QAG (if available)
ICR
Quality at Entry:
U
Project at Risk at Any Time: Yes
The u ratings for the outcome, the bank performance, and the quality at entry should be read as moderately
unsatisfactory in the upcoming 6 points scale
3. Assessment of Development Objective and Design, and of Quality at Entry
3.1 Original Objective:
The project was intended to support the Integrated Health Sector Development Program (IHSDP) covering
the first five-year phase of the National Health Development Plan (NHDP). The primary objective of the
IHSDP (referred to as “the program”) was to improve the health status of the Senegalese population and
accelerate the country's demographic transition toward slower population growth. The program was to
pursue this objective by supporting policies and investments designed to improve the quality, access, and
sustainability of health delivery systems. The project was in support of the government's efforts to: (i)
expand access to primary health care and referral services for the majority of the population; (ii) improve
the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of health care provision, including reproductive health information
and services; and (iii) strengthen the institutional capacity of the Ministry of Public Health and Social
Action (MPHSA) to efficiently organize, monitor and evaluate health services. During the first five years of
the program, expected results were: (a) a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality stemming from
poor preventive and curative treatment, particularly among women and children; (b) increased use of
contraceptive methods nationwide; and (c) more cost efficient and better-managed public health facilities.
The program was fully supported by the donor community as the main conduit for its efforts to expand the
population's access to public health care and to improve financing and management of the health system. It
was in line with the health reform agenda outlined in the 1993 World Development Report and the 1994
World Bank report on “Better health in Africa : experience and policy issues.”
The project objective was also in line with the Bank's country assistance strategy, with its emphasis on
human development, particularly for rural populations, and on cost-effective expansion of service delivery.
The previous project, the Human Resources Development Project (HRDP), had a satisfactory outcome
rating, despite its ambitious objectives and complex project design. The HRDP implementation completion
report highlighted the need to continue support for reproductive health and family planning. It also
acknowledged weaknesses in procurement and day-to-day management capacity.
The project objectives should be viewed against the background of a modestly performing health sector,
with stagnating key indicators between 1992 and 1996. The health sector had several strengths, such as the
quality of staff and strong donor support (though not well coordinated), but also considerable weaknesses
(weak management capacity, insufficient funding, deteriorating infrastructure, and poor distribution and
motivation of personnel). In this context, the very broad program objectives were too ambitious in regard
to national capacity and most likely could not be met within five years..
3.2 Revised Objective:
The overall project objective was not revised and was deemed valid at the mid-term review.
3.3 Original Components:
Understanding the project as designed at appraisal poses difficulties because there are discrepancies
between the project description in the Staff Appraisal Report (SAR) and in the Development Credit
Agreement (DCA). The DCA is the legal document binding the Bank to the client. It was used to monitor
project implementation and does not contradict the global objectives of the components described in the
SAR. For these reasons, the ICR has taken the project description from the DCA to guide its evaluation of
the project. The project description identified two components: improving health status and reproductive
health for the poor and developing the performance and sustainability of the health system.
A. Improving health status and reproductive health for the poor through:
Construction or rehabilitation of about 50 health posts and three health centers, located in the
•
-2-
regions of Dakar, Thiès, Louga, Fatick, and Kaolack, and meeting the eligibility criteria
Construction or rehabilitation of at least two tertiary hospitals and minor construction of social
•
and health- related buildings and centers
Provision of initial stocks of drugs, vaccines, and contraceptives, as well as vehicles, furniture,
•
equipment and supplies for this infrastructure.
B. Developing the performance and sustainability of the health system through support of:
Information, education, and communication (IEC) activities
•
Training of health workers in public health and management
•
Technical advisory services for the design, supervision, and management of health services
•
Targeted multimedia campaigns
•
Training of physicians and other health personnel in reproductive health
•
Provision of community health workers, through nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), with
•
equipment and supplies to carry out IEC
Provision of technical advisory services for: (i) studies on the health sector; (ii) preparation of
•
pilot hospital development projects; and (iii) training for implementation of hospital reforms
Provision of technical advisory services to facilitate project implementation, management, and
•
monitoring at the national and regional levels.
The cost of the IHSDP program for the first five years was estimated at US$411.2 million, US$123.19
million of it provided by donors, including an IDA credit of US$50 million.
Although the two components were in line with project objectives, why the formulation of the second
component is not better aligned with the IHSDP priorities is unclear. The SAR emphasized the use of
annual work programs and budgets whose content could not be defined (except for the first two years) at
the time of appraisal. The content of the second component appears to have been influenced by the first
two years’ program funding commitments. Defining components that emphasize certain activities instead of
priority areas seems to conflict with the project concept. In many ways, the project design comes across as
neither a full program nor a standard project. This project was intended to support a Sector Wide
Approach Program (SWAP) but the absence of guidelines at that time and inexperience with this new
project design may explain the difficulties in presenting a clear description of Bank support to a sector
program. This unclear presentation led to confusion during implementation for both the borrower and the
Bank. If the Legal Department had been involved throughout appraisal, the DCA would likely have been
more in line with the initial purpose of the project.
3.4 Revised Components:
The components were not revised during project implementation. As expected, significant reallocations
were made in the disbursement schedule to accommodate priorities set in the annual work programs. The
category "unallocated" in Schedule 1 of the DCA was unusually large (61.2 percent of total credit) because
it was impossible, at appraisal, to project accurately funding needs for the other categories.
3.5 Quality at Entry:
The quality at entry is rated moderately unsatisfactory because of shortcomings in the design and risk
evaluation although the preparation was well conducted. The Bank was to play the role of financier of last
resort, funding activities for which no donor financing was available. Certain activities had been identified
upfront for the first two years of project implementation (mostly civil works). The extensive sector
analysis in the SAR provides detailed information on sector performance and areas requiring strengthening.
The intensive, well-supported project preparation has been a catalyst for Senegal to better focus its strategy
-3-
on fewer but better defined objectives. In addition, the project supported a new concept for Senegal, which
theoretically allowed greater flexibility in project implementation.
The risks section of the SAR was, however, underdeveloped. Although program financing was a new
approach for the health sector, the SAR did not provide any analysis of the risks associated with this
approach vis-à-vis project implementation, such as poor donor coordination by the Ministry of Public
Health (MPH), or one or more donors’ not providing funds in a timely manner or for activities not included
under the IHSDP, or simply discarding the program approach for a project approach. The success of the
project also depended on the decentralization reforms. Stronger risk analysis would have considered
alternative approaches to deal with the consequences of difficulties in implementing decentralization.
Human resources were considered a key challenge for IHSDP success, but the measures adopted were not
ambitious enough to yield results. Although the safeguard policy mentioned the issue of medical waste
management, no national strategy described how reliable solutions would be applied. Except for
construction of facilities in the poorest regions, there were no specific approaches to implement and monitor
activities to target the poor and increase their access to health care. Reproductive health was emphasized,
but the gender issue was not analyzed in the project description and no particular measures were considered
to mitigate the consequences of gender disparities. These shortcomings spawned significant problems
during project implementation.
The project was based on the premise that the reorganization and required capacity building of MPH could
be concluded in the first two years of implementation and that capacity was sufficient to implement the
project. Capacity issues had plagued the previous project, and the assumption by the design team that they
would not plague this project was a leap of faith. As a result, the risk was underestimated and, the MPH,
especially the small support unit, lacked the capacity to implement so complex a project on time.
The ICR of the Endemic Disease Control Project (EDCP-IDA-29510) rightly mentions the overlapping of
the two projects and the insufficient operational complementarities, which had negative consequences in
preparation and implementation of both projects.
4. Achievement of Objective and Outputs
4.1 Outcome/achievement of objective:
Based on development objectives as stated in the project description, the key project indicators (Annex 1)
and results from studies, surveys, and the national information system (Annex 7), the project outcome is
rated moderately unsatisfactory.
Notwithstanding the weaknesses of project design mentioned previously, this project should be considered a
SWAP. The key performance indicators in the DCA were clearly those of a SWAP. There was a national
strategy drawn up by the government, which was fully responsible for its implementation. The donors
agreed to support the strategy, and coordination mechanisms were organized through an annual meeting Réunion Annuelle Conjointe- (RAC). A budgeting process, including all donor contributions, was
implemented through annual work programs (Plans d’Opération). This was not a full SWAP because the
implementation mechanisms were not harmonized and, with the exception of the Bank, only a few partners
used the national systems and procedures to channel resources. Consequently, the project development
objectives are assessed through the results of the IHSDP.
Although overall results can be considered satisfactory compared to the key indicator values for
sub-Saharan Africa, the current trend of progress does not put Senegal on track to enable it attain the
MDGs. Given the resources mobilized in the health sector (2 percent of GDP), the GNI per capita
(US$670 in 2004, Atlas method) and the size of the urban population (50 percent live in urban areas),
-4-
results should have been better than those achieved.
Expanding access to primary health care and referral services for the majority of the population is rated
moderately unsatisfactory.
The national primary health care coverage per inhabitant has merely kept pace with population
growth mainly because of the shortcomings in the primary health care investment plan. Regional
differences have been slightly balanced but remain considerable. Service availability at delivery points has
increased (see below) but utilization rates of primary health care facilities have not improved and are still at
only at 20 percent contact rate per inhabitant. Although coverage rates evolved more rapidly in rural areas
and the poorest regions than in better-off areas, efforts to offset the wide disparities were inadequate.
While in Dakar, 92 percent of births were attended, less than 40 percent were in Kolda, Kaolack, Fatick,
and Tambacounda. Overall, the attended birth rate for urban women (88 percent) was twice as high as for
rural women (47 percent). For referral services, a net utilization growth did occur during the period,
especially in regional hospitals, but the overall utilization rates of hospital facilities remain low (hospital
occupancy is about 60 percent)
Improve the quality, efficiency and effectiveness of health care provision including reproductive health
information and services is rated moderately satisfactory.
With respect to quality of health care provision, there was significant improvement in drug availability,
implementation of priority programs, and training of staff, but this improvement did not translate into client
satisfaction. The last reliable survey on satisfaction with health care facilities (EPPS 2001) indicates that
only 50 percent of users are satisfied with public maternity facilities and 40 percent with primary health
care facilities. The hospital quality improvement program is recent, and no major outcomes can be
documented.
Measuring efficiency of health care provision is difficult because the available data from the health
information system do not capture such indicators. Nevertheless, considering the increase in rate of health
expenditures and comparing it to the overall increase of activity, the net return is negative. The same
applies to labor. These negative results support the assumption that the health sector should have achieved
better results with the resources at its disposal.
With regard to the effectiveness of health care provision, mixed successes were achieved. The
immunization program reached its objective for key vaccines with no significant regional differences in
coverage. Coverage of infant care also increased. Ninety-five percent of (functional) health posts provide
vaccination and primary curative care. For reproductive health, some progress was made in prenatal care
and assisted birth rates, despite the shortage of midwives ( a total 650 midwives instead of the 4,000 needed
to meet WHO standards) and their uneven distribution (50 percent are in Dakar). Family planning
programs achieved few results: the number of women using contraceptives is very low, and fertility
decreased little. The demand for contraceptives is far from being met: only 50 percent of the women who do
not want any more children have access to them. As for endemic diseases, the poor results were described
in the EDCP ICR, especially in regard to malaria control.
Strengthening the institutional capacity of the Ministry of Public Health and Social Action (MPHSA) to
efficiently organize, monitor, and evaluate health services is rated unsatisfactory.
The strengthening of institutional capacity was a major project priority. In this area, results should be
measured in the long term. Nonetheless, whether the expected major institutional changes have indeed
occurred and whether capacity has improved can be determined. The late delivery of significant advisory
services makes an assessment of their impact difficult. Although important restructuring measures were
carried out during project preparation or within the following year (hospital reform, reorganization of the
Ministry of Health) some major institutional reforms have been pending for the past seven years (mutual
-5-
health insurance, hospital personnel regulations, health committee, rules for implementing health facilities
based on the health map). The planned modification of the health committee composition, intended to
promote gender balance, is still pending.
The capacity to organize more efficiently was adversely affected by frequent changes of the head of the
Ministry of Health (seven changes in seven years) and lack of effective leadership in the last years. The
lack of stewardship capacity in the various directorates did not facilitate the implementation of a sector
approach. While capacity building efforts are evident, especially with the support of the credit to the
Administrative Directorate (DAGE) and to regional health offices, managerial capacity remains inadequate.
The poor results of the information system (funded under EDCP) and the lack of accountability in the
public sector have hampered the establishment of a monitoring and evaluation system on which both the
government and donors can rely.
4.2 Outputs by components:
A. Improving health status and reproductive health of the poor
This component is rated moderately unsatisfactory. The title of the component is broad and ambitious in
relation to the specific outputs expected, namely "the provision of works and goods.”
According to the last survey, Senegal has 20 hospitals, 54 health centers, and 813 health posts. The project
financed the equipment and construction of 45 health posts and renovation of an additional 38 (total DCA
target of 50), as well as the renovation and expansion of 5 health centers, 2 hospitals (DCA targets of 3 and
2, respectively), and several other infrastructure works (e.g., training center, national laboratory). All the
civil works were supervised by AGETIP, which had successfully managed similar tasks on behalf of the
MPH. However, the facilities were unable to open on schedule due to protracted delays in procurement and
unavailability of qualified staff. Because of the late delivery of some major works, the impact of
investments on the improvement of health care service delivery cannot be fully evaluated. During the ICR
mission, most of the 11 health posts visited were fairly active and well equipped. Following up on
maintenance will be the major challenge for the future of these buildings.
Under the program, only 26 percent of projected health posts were built, but more referral health centers
and hospitals were built than originally planned. With one health post serving more than 11,000
inhabitants, the coverage did not meet program objectives (one health post per 10,000 inhabitants). Most of
the health posts constructed or rehabilitated under the project were in areas that had poor service coverage.
Overall, the credit financed 70 percent of all new construction or rehabilitation carried out under the
IHSDP. Health posts built by the credit are in operation, although country-wide, about 10 percent (same
as at project start-up) of all health posts were still nonfunctional at credit closing due to a variety of
reasons, including lack of staff. Regarding services provided and utilization by the population, details
given in the previous section on achievement of development objectives sustain the rating of this
component: outputs did not turn into expected outcomes.
B. Developing the performance and sustainability of the health system
This component is rated unsatisfactory because the institutional capacity of the MPH remains weak at
both the central and decentralized levels, despite large investments in capacity building since 1997. Reform
delays, lack of empowerment, and weaknesses in piloting new approaches are the primary reasons for the
unimpressive performance of the health system. Considering the large scope of activities under this
component, only the critical outputs will be detailed.
Activities to promote health education were partially conducted, but their impact has not been
-6-
measured. At the end of the project, an integrated plan for health education was adopted but has not yet
been implemented. Major obstacles to implementation remain because each health program still has its own
communication strategy and there is little concern about the effectiveness and efficiency of this strategy.
The credit contributed to the achievement of the training plan: 2,093 personnel received training (target
2,090). Scholarships (378) for long- and short-term training were awarded (78 percent funded by the
credit). The many seminars funded during the project should be added but, unfortunately, they were not
recorded. The qualitative appreciation is less positive than the quantitative appreciation: (i) too many
training sessions for physicians, too few for nurses and (ii) too much specialized medical training, too little
management training. The directorate in charge of training and research (created at the beginning of the
project and dissolved in 2004) has not achieved its objectives: (i) the training plan is not part of a human
resources strategy, (ii) there is no control over training, (iii) the national training plan has not been adjusted
to better fit the needs, (iv) training capacity has not increased significantly, and (iv) there is no real
coordination with all the actors involved.
The credit supported advisory services in many fields, providing data, advice, and technical tools for the
MPH. It is impossible to present a full list of these services, but some should be mentioned for their role in
capacity building. The DAGE received extensive advisory services and support, but results are mixed.
Following major delays, the DAGE is now equipped with software (TOMPRO) to facilitate financial
management. Unfortunately not all functions are fully operational. Advisory services helped with the
reorganization of the DAGE and the description of more effective managerial processes. Because of the
lack of capacity, the potential for improvement was not capitalized. The significant progress recently
achieved is attributable to the contractual staff hired rather than to any expert advice or tools funded by the
credit. Extensive advisory services for human resources were made available to guide and support the
human resources policy. So far, these services have not translated into capacity building. Advisory
services have also helped to formalize strategies for key public health priorities like reproductive health,
infant health, and malaria. The implementation of these strategies is still ongoing, and results cannot yet be
measured. Advisory services backed hospital reforms with technical assistance for the realization of
hospital plans and hospital reform evaluation. Progress was mixed, according to the latest evaluations.
Most of the evaluations and major reports on the program were financed through the credit (mid-term
review, final evaluation of IHSDP, public expenditure review, decentralization of health sector, tracking of
public expenditures, Demographic and Health Survey – DHSIV- and health map). At the end of the credit,
the MPH had acquired a wealth of knowledge and a database, but so far little use has been made of them.
Poor dissemination and lack of proper management of this knowledge and database have hampered efficient
use of this important capacity-building investment.
The project exceeded its target in contracting with NGOs (22 instead of 15), but qualitative results
are below expectations as noted in the audit done by ENEA. Most of these NGOs were from Dakar
because eligibility criteria did not allow small NGOs to benefit from the credit. The Bank suspended
funding of the NGOs before the end of the credit because most of them were unable to comply with the
administrative manual requirements on expense justifications and on monitoring and evaluation. NGOs
received funds based on a program of activities, but to implement this program, more funds were used for
recurrent costs (20 percent) and equipment (31 percent) than for activities (26 percent) with direct
community benefits.
Credit performance was poor with regard to enhancing the effectiveness of health districts. This
action was rated unsatisfactory in the various PSRs because of the difficulties in channeling resources to
the local level. The share of the national budget transferred to the regions remained at only 5 percent, which
explains why contributions from local governments were insignificant throughout the program. Other
reasons for the poor effectiveness of the medical regions were: (i) the weak administrative capacity of the
-7-
DAGE; (ii) the complex procedures for channeling money to the local level; and (iii) the reluctance to
decentralize resources. Since resources were limited at the local level, it was difficult to mobilize the credit
that would finance only 20 percent of the expenditures. Given the weakness of local administrations, the
Bank could not afford to take risks by opening local accounts as suggested by the MPH. Donors that
funded activities directly at local level (e.g., USAID, GTZ, Belgium cooperation) using a project-type
approach played a crucial role in supporting the implementation of the priority health programs and the
supervision of health districts in some regions.
Support to central level was diluted. In any program, tracking major outputs through the support from
the credit to the central level is very difficult. It is assumed that the credit played a significant role in the
realization of various activities because mobilization of funds from the credit was more flexible than MPH
budgetary resources. Among other things, the credit financed the full costs of the sector support unit (SSU)
the organization of the annual donors’ reviews, and quarterly medical region meetings.
4.3 Net Present Value/Economic rate of return:
The SAR states that the project aimed to improve management capacity of the public health system and
increase access to and quality of health services. It also states that the project was to support improved
cost recovery at all levels, provide support to emerging insurance schemes as alternative financing sources,
and promote decentralized management of service delivery.
A public expenditure review of the health sector has shown that regions where poverty was higher received
only a small share of public spending for health. The cost recovery system has led to a dramatic increase in
the average cost per episode with a doubling in nominal value. Both indicators suggest that equity has not
improved.
It is apparent that the project fell short of its overall cost-effectiveness goals, despite improvements in some
areas. Because the original analysis is a description of resource flow it is difficult to measure the shortfalls
in efficiency and equity improvements. A table summarizing the financial goals of the project and their
status at the end of the project is given in Annex 3
4.4 Financial rate of return:
Not applicable
4.5 Institutional development impact:
Institutional development impact is considered modest.
Given the delays in project implementation and the various ministerial reorganizations, training and
provision of improved tools did not have the expected positive impact on project implementation. They did,
however, improve the capacity of MPH to implement future programs (except for monitoring of
implementation). The creation of a Human Resources Department toward the end of the project will now
enable MPH to better plan and monitor staff development and target recruitment closer to actual needs.
The project supported an important program for staff training with a potential impact on institutional
capacity, but no tracking system can document whether trained staff are in positions where they can best
use their acquired skills. Annual work programs were developed and tested during the project as a means
to better assess needs at the regional level. The tool needs fine-tuning but is considered an improvement.
The organization of regular donor meetings- Réunion Annuelle Conjointe –(RAC) and biannual meetings
with the regions - Comité Interne de Suivi - (CIS) that began during project preparation is also an
important mechanism for better implementing priority health measures, coordinating efforts and drawing
lessons from experiences in the regions.
-8-
At project end, numerous obstacles to institutional development remain, such as low salaries that do not
attract the best professionals and the lack of incentives-associated performance indicators.
Two overarching issues that cannot be resolved in the short or medium term are: the dependency of MPH
on contractual workers for key positions due to lack of competency in the civil service; and the poor
distribution of qualified staff between the urban centers and other areas. There are few incentives for health
staff to move away from urban areas, hence many rural health centers are understaffed.
5. Major Factors Affecting Implementation and Outcome
5.1 Factors outside the control of government or implementing agency:
Some major donors had a preference for a project-based approach with easier-to-control outcomes. The
continued emphasis on project-based funding also affected the timeliness of funding availability and delays
or changes in emphasis by certain donors.
5.2 Factors generally subject to government control:
The administrative strike by health personnel retaining all the information on activities and results lasted
for more than a year before the government took necessary steps to end this social conflict. As a result,
start-up activities did not get the required attention, and first-year implementation was seriously delayed.
This loss of focus on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) was not recovered in later years.
Ministerial instability led to inevitable delays in decision making, did not improve performance and reduced
the leadership role in a crucial sector. It also contributed to the ministry’s failure to play a more active role
in donor coordination. The ministerial turnover did not allow for a strong dialogue within the government,
as would have been required, to address some of the institutional issues raised during preparation and still
not solved.
Decentralization efforts were not accompanied, at national level, by the requisite legal and financial
framework to empower the new actors and ensure that personnel would be reassigned to rural areas.
The lengthy processes required by the national public accounting and procurement rules, currently
addressed through the PRSC, played a role in delaying implementation.
When the project started, the weak capacity of national training institutes limited staffing efforts and
thereby sapped potential for progress in service delivery. Increase in training capacity should have been an
upfront priority but it was decided only at the end of the project.
5.3 Factors generally subject to implementing agency control:
Because the credit supported a sector program, the project was “integrated” into the existing MPH. A
sector support unit (known as the CAS/PNDS) was created to monitor progress and support technical
implementation of the IHSDP. The administrative unit of the Ministry of Health (DAGE) was in charge of
the financial management and the procurement of IDA credit.
During the life of the project, the MPH underwent permanent reorganizations. In addition, delays in the
construction of the new MPH headquarters, which was to regroup all departments under one roof, also had
impaired performance. Several services are still physically located elsewhere, even though space usage in
the new building is suboptimal.
The SSU was the pivot of the whole IHSDP, but the lack of a planning unit in the MPH appeared quickly
-9-
to be a major pitfall. The SSU did not have the capacity to guide the budgeting process in accordance with
the program's major priorities. Nor did the regions have a planning or managerial capacity. Mobilizing
resources was the major focus of the budgeting system, and little was done to organize for accountability
on resource utilization and achievement of results for either the MPH directorates or the medical regions.
The SSU assisted donor coordination efforts through the preparation of the annual meetings (RAC), but,
although each meeting concluded with a list of recommendations, there was no active follow-up. Most of
the recommendations were repeated in successive meetings but were not prioritized. Moreover, there was
no assignment of responsibility for follow-up or feedback on results between the annual meetings.
Responsibility was a constant problem during the implementation because the directorates considered the
SSU almost a World Bank implementation agency, while vis-à- vis the Bank the SSU did not play this role
at all. The SSU never established a reliable M&E system to follow implementation of the IHSDP priorities
and the components of the IDA credit step by step. Although it had received all relevant reports and had
adequate staff for the task, there seems to have been no system for filing or conservation of documents
related to the program. The reorganization of the SSU with focus persons to better follow donor activities
did not yield any improvement in the implementation of the Bank's credit.
Poor communication between the SSU and the DAGE, between the DAGE and directorates, and between
the SSU and directorates was a source of constant concern for the duration of the project and played a
significant role in the delays and undermining of potential results from resource mobilization. This
miscommunication prevented sharing of problem-solving approaches and was not conducive to capacity
building.
The delays encountered by the project were due in large part to the weak capacity of the DAGE in financial
management and procurement. Activities were often delayed due to cumbersome processes and poor
follow-up. Some progress was made during the last year of the credit extension with the reorganization of
the DAGE.
The Department of Health, the largest department within MPH, is responsible for a large number of
vertical programs. Its capacity to manage these programs and coordinate activities with the regions still
falls short of what would be needed to improve health service delivery. A case in point is its poor
performance in the implementation of the Endemic Disease Control Project.
Only in the last year were the necessity for and importance of human resources management (HR) fully
recognized. At the same time, efforts were made to better align training capacities with HR requirements
for improving access to health care services. But the MPH has experienced difficulties in staffing its new
HR directorate which has not been effective so far. The lack of resources should not be used as an excuse
for the misuse of existing resources and the low productivity in the sector. There has been no national
incentive system for human resources: high performers received no specific acknowledgement, while poor
performers were not reprimanded.
5.4 Costs and financing:
At appraisal, the Bank was expected to finance US$50 million of an estimated US$411.2 million sector
program, with other donors providing US$73.19 million, while the community and government would fund
the rest. At the end of the project, about 50 percent of the credit has been spent for each of the two
components. Under component A, expenditures were evenly split between (i) works and (ii) goods and
equipment. Under component B, training represented 40 percent of the credit while advisory services and
operating costs at central level represented 37 percent. The completion cost of the program over the
- 10 -
seven-year period is estimated at US$800 million. The sizeable increase may be explained by the two-year
extension (the initial financial plan extended for two years would have led to an estimate of US$615
million) and by the significant increase in resources. A projection from the initial financing plan and the
actual resources recovered indicates an increase of 240 percent in cost recovery from the districts over the
period. Moreover, the government's budget also increased significantly especially in the last years.
The incomplete implementation of the sector approach means that an important part of donor funding
comes through parallel financing rather than cofinancing with limited information on the exact amounts. In
the last years, the European Union (EU) shifted to nontargeted budget support while, in 2005, the Bank
also moved in the same direction with the PRSC1. With such funding, estimating the specific contribution
of donors or multilateral agencies to a specific sector program becomes irrelevant.
6. Sustainability
6.1 Rationale for sustainability rating:
Sustainability is rated likely, based on what was achieved during the project although the results were
considered modest and below expectations.
The project was implemented through the national organizational framework and was not assigned to any
specific unit. Under the circumstances, the various obstacles to the achievement of the development
objectives affected program performance more heavily than program sustainability.
At the end of the IHSDP, the health sector is financed mostly by the national budget and through cost
recovery. The Ministry of Health has assumed full responsibility for the delivery of essential public health
services. Most of the capacity building was supported by nationals through consultant contracts. The
MPH can follow up with these local consultants to further implement the programs they have worked on.
Most of the programs and actions were decided by consensus; there is little chance for any drastic changes
in the established measures.
The other factors of sustainability at the end of the program are the following:
Long-lasting improvement of generic drugs availability and rationalized prescription
•
Cost recovery and stronger participation of the population in health committees
•
National budget for health sustained by reasonable growth perspective and a Mid-Term
•
Expenditure Framework. In the past years, the MPH was able to execute about 90 percent of its budget.
Increase in training capacity and updated curricula, providing additional and better trained human
•
resources for health in coming years
Improved public finance efficiency and have made more effective procurement as a result of the
•
national reforms.
Sustainability is rated only likely because some of the shortcomings of the institutional development will
affect it:
Maintenance resources increased, but at delivery point there is no effective follow-up.
•
Regional management teams are still weak, and accountants departed when the credit stopped
•
paying for their contracts.
The sector approach had a limited impact and needs to be put back on track.
•
Some reforms have been frozen over the last seven years.
•
Added to these shortcomings are uncertainties, such as:
The HR directorate has all the tools needed but not yet the manpower.
•
- 11 -
•
•
Willingness for better leadership has to be translated into action.
Building greater accountability through contracting has to be implemented.
6.2 Transition arrangement to regular operations:
Although the Ministry of Health has not fully availed itself of all the opportunities within the new context
of aid to developing countries, it was able to include in its strategy the commitment to poverty reduction
and to the Millennium Development Goals. This project has prepared the client for budget support to the
extent that the Senegal’s institutional development has improved despite some pitfalls.
The Bank’s PRSC has included health in its matrix, and the ICR on PRSC1 indicated that the triggers were
met in the health sector. While this project ended up process oriented with limited leverage over results, the
PRSC is fully result oriented with stronger leverage through the commitment of the government.
A second phase program was adopted at the end of 2004, and the government is implementing it. This
program emphasizes better access to primary health care, improved service delivery for maternal and child
health, and improved effectiveness of the major programs against epidemic diseases. These priorities are
consistent with need to improve population health status and are built on the lessons learned from the
shortcomings of the IHSDP.
Because decentralization is still at an early stage, community-driven development (CDD) approaches
should be regarded as an important vehicle to promote health at this level. When decentralization matures
enough to be supported by reliable local administration, it would be expedient to consider the possibility of
providing loans for health development in the poorest regions. This could be an effective combination to
quicken progress at local level while budget support would be better designed to support the evolution of
the systemic component of the health system.
7. Bank and Borrower Performance
Bank
7.1 Lending:
Considering the shortcomings and weaknesses noted previously, Bank performance can be rated
moderately unsatisfactory. But this rating, based on the results achieved at the end of the project,
undermines the very innovative project approach. Risk taking for innovation, accepted at the time of project
approval, is unrewarded at project closing date.
The Bank provided important technical support during project preparation and facilitated donor
mobilization in support of the sector project. But whether this very active support has allowed full
ownership by the MPH is unclear, although preparation relied on a strongly participatory process
encompassing both districts and regions. During preparation most of the relevant issues may have been
covered, but there was a lack of specialized capacity to identify an effective strategy on human resources.
At the end, the project design suffered from a number of shortcomings, mentioned previously. The first
major problem was the nature of the project: half-way between a full program and a standard project. The
second stemmed from the fact that the highly innovative design of the project raised the risks. To make it
acceptable for the Bank, the team probably did not wish to highlight the risks. However, an in-depth risk
analysis would have been advisable to better prepare mitigation measures. The project was too ambitious,
considering the overall capacities of the Ministry of Health.
When the project was activated, the administrative unit was not in a position to handle project
requirements. Having chosen the option not to rely on an implementation unit, strong technical assistance
- 12 -
was needed to supplement the well-known weakness of the DAGE.
The preparation of two projects by two different teams led to inefficient use of Bank resources and to a
lack of coordination. Efforts to include the EDCP project in the overall sector objective supported by the
IHSDP were not enough to correct this deficiency.
7.2 Supervision:
Although supervision during the last period significantly improved project outputs, overall supervision
was moderately unsatisfactory because of the weakness during the first period and the missed
opportunities to decide on more realistic development objectives after the mid-term review.
During the first two years of the project, the supervision was over-optimistic about the actual capacity of
the MPH to implement this sector approach and mobilize the credit according to the work plans. There
were important differences between the PSRs (giving good ratings and positive comments on
implementation progress) and the aide-mémoires detailing the various problems. Slippages were constant,
and no corrective measures were taken. The ratings were sustained by perspective rather than actual
fulfillments. No actions were taken to finalize the database and the M&E system mentioned in the SAR.
Legal covenants had been fully complied with only 18 months after project inception and were not
systematically followed up until after 2001.
The mid-term review relied on the consultant report on mid-term achievements of the IHSDP. Although
this report did not document progress on outcomes, it did highlight many problems in program
implementation, and the slow pace of institutional reforms. After this review, the project was rated
unsatisfactory, and measures were taken to put it back on track; nonetheless, M&E remained weak. Project
restructuring was decided against because of its nature: as a SWAP, the targets were set by IHSDP. The
borrower was not in favor of reducing the objectives of the sector program for obvious political reasons:
reducing objectives for health would have been interpreted by the population as a lack of commitment on
the part of the government. Nevertheless, the Bank could have decided to go back to a project approach
with specific objectives related to its action instead of keeping a SWAP design while the implementation
was monitored more as a project than a program.
Suspension was also considered but decided against because of the risk of disrupting the sector dialogue. If
the project had been closed at that time, most of the ratings would have been between unsatisfactory and
highly unsatisfactory.
The two project extensions covering a total of two years, made it possible to complete almost all the
activities funded by the project and to prepare the MPH for budget support. But to attain these results
during the last two years, the Task Team Leader (TTL) had to be proactive and expend a great deal of
energy trying to put the project on track so that it could yield better results. The TTL had to follow
activities closely and adopt a supervisory style closer to that of a traditional investment project. The
supervision team also encouraged the government to depart from the concept of lender of last resort to fund
activities more likely to improve the sector performance. Supervision of commitments was made difficult
by the high turnover of ministers (between 2002 and 2004, the minister changed four times).
7.3 Overall Bank performance:
The overall performance is therefore rated as moderately unsatisfactory.
Borrower
7.4 Preparation:
- 13 -
Borrower performance at the preparation stage is judged satisfactory. As part of project preparation, the
government established a team to work with the Bank, adopted a sector policy letter, and created a unit
within the ministry responsible for project implementation. The resulting IHSDP, despite its many
weaknesses, did constitute a useful guide for the implementation of a priority program.
7.5 Government implementation performance:
Implementation performance is judged unsatisfactory.
Three main factors undermined the borrower's ability to implement the project satisfactorily: (i) high
ministerial turnover, diminishing the political leadership required for the implementation of such an
ambitious program; (ii) lack of coordination between the different ministries; (iii) institutional weaknesses
at the central and regional levels, which affected the ability to plan and implement activities; (iv) misplaced
emphasis on resource mobilization instead of service delivery made it difficult to evaluate project
implementation and devise corrective measures; and (v) corruption at all levels against which no
appropriate measures have been adopted.
7.6 Implementing Agency:
The performance of the MPH is unsatisfactory.
A strong commitment to achieve results was lacking in the MPH. The ministers did not put enough
emphasis on piloting the implementation of the IHSDP and relied too much on the SSU. The main
functions of the SSU were well described in the SAR. It achieved little of what was expected: (i) there has
been no effective liaison between the various partners and no proactivity regarding discussion of potential
bottlenecks in implementing the program; (ii) beneficiaries did not receive support to execute IHSDP; (iii)
the budgeting process was oriented only toward expenditures, not results and efficiency; (iv) no M&E
system was set up for the whole program or for the credit (v) documentation and reporting was sporadic
and of poor quality. The SSU should have played the role of conductor, fully accountable for overall
results. The SSU was piloting the implementation of the IHSDP, but it considered that the directorates and
medical regions were the only ones that should be accountable for the results.
As for the DAGE, which supported the implementation through resource mobilization and procurement, the
many weaknesses described previously account for the poor results in project implementation. The late
improvements were not sufficient to change the overall course of the project but can be considered
positively for future operations.
7.7 Overall Borrower performance:
Overall performance is judged unsatisfactory, because the borrower was unable to implement the
required activities within the agreed time frames, despite the availability of sufficient resources
and technical support.
8. Lessons Learned
Project preparation: realism and appropriate lending instrument
An ambitious project may be well received, but it paves the way for implementation difficulties and
probably the need to restructure to achieve satisfactory Project Development Objectives (PDO) outcomes.
Instead of framing highly ambitious objectives, it is more important to focus on building capacities and on
steady progress translated into results recorded throughout the life of the project. Realism in setting
objectives can guide project preparation only when a sound sector dialogue is possible with the client.
When the political climate is not conducive to the adoption of limited but reachable objectives, a sector
approach is not the wisest contribution the Bank can make to a country. In this case, a limited but
well-defined investment project can be effective with well targeted operations with direct benefits for the
- 14 -
population. The lending instrument should not be decided according to the Bank's preference but rather
according to the borrower’s circumstances.
Supporting institutional capacity development: start with an audit
When supporting institutional capacity development, it is important to have an independent organizational
audit leading to a shared diagnosis and to agreed priorities. Institutional reforms that are accepted but not
wanted invite failure of institutional capacity development. Such an audit would also provide a measure of
the reform absorption capacity of the ministry and its decentralized services. Then it would be easier to
design a project choosing the right pace and scope of institutional changes. Often, specific sector
institutional reforms are under constraints of a broader sector reform; the audit would make it possible to
define what the line ministry can realistically accomplish. The audit would also allow better placement of
emphasis on a limited set of priority measures to be implemented. Without the guidance of an audit,
institutional development support in the project will be diluted, spread over a multitude of studies, group
work, and training activities instead focused strongly on implementation for results. Last but not least, an
organizational audit provides a comprehensive overview of the sector’s human resources, drawing attention
to the need to address simultaneously all the different components of human resource management.
Health sector approach: choose the right indicators to closely monitor results
The choice of the outcome indicators is critical to judge the PDOs and to implement the relevant M&E
system. The pressure to reach the MDGs and the systemic approach imbedded in the sector approach
together feed a tendency to rely on sociodemographic indicators (maternal and infant mortality, fertility
rates, …). Such indicators may provide good information on a country’s development, but it is difficult to
link them exclusively to the performance of the health system. Moreover, in low-income countries, the
figures for these indicators rely on specific surveys (mostly DHS reports) undertaken every five or six
years with no possibility of including them in an effective M&E system. Indicators should be better linked
to health system performance and to the national information system. For example, instead of looking at
progress in maternal mortality, assessing the number of attended births, referral births, C-section rates,
and the birth mortality rates in health facilities would be more relevant. The health sector policy results can
be better measured with such indicators.
Auditing financial management and procurement: more room for an economic approach
The current auditing process—in which the government prepares the terms of reference and chooses the
auditor—is not fully satisfactory. Although auditors will comply with international auditing standards, the
auditing might not be as in-depth as could be with a more independently chosen auditor. In the terms of
reference, the audit should not only certify the accounts but also conduct an economic analysis of prices
paid and the relevance of use of goods and services procured under the project. The volume of
transactions, the need to give timely nonobjections, and the large scope of subjects do not allow a TTL to
do such a review. The periodic SOE (statement of Expenditures) reviews are not sufficient to track all
misuses of funds. This approach may add costs to implementing a project, but it is important to ensure
better governance, reduce corruption, and get the best value for money spent.
9. Partner Comments
(a) Borrower/implementing agency:
The borrower has prepared its own project completion report (Annex 8). Its evaluation of the project is
focused on outputs and on a limited set of outcomes, measured mostly by sociodemographic indicators; it
concludes that the project was satisfactory although some of the major pitfalls indicated in the ICR are also
mentioned. (These include weakness of the M&E system, weakness of the administrative unit [DAGE],
difficult implementation of decentralization, constraints to the channeling of funds to local level, limited
- 15 -
participation of donors in the program approach, and insufficient follow-up of NGO activities).
There are discrepancies between some of the data provided in the borrower’s report and the ICR. The
reliability of data and their lack of consistency throughout the various national documents has constituted a
major issue in the dialogue with the borrower. To avoid endless discussions on results in regard to data
source, it was decided in the policy dialogue supported by the PRSC that routine data will rely on the
annual national health report. All data mentioned in the ICR were based either on the DHS or on the
national annual report on health.
The borrower was also given an opportunity to comment on the draft ICR in a workshop organized during
the ICR mission. The comments are included in the ICR mission aide-mémoire. No additional written
comments were received on the final ICR draft.
(b) Cofinanciers:
The draft ICR was presented at a workshop including all stakeholders and donors, and the conclusions
were largely shared. The donors did not consider the sector approach successful although it promoted
better coordination. The budgeting system (operation plan) had many weaknesses but it should be
improved with lessons learned during implementation of the IHSDP. Donors expect the Ministry of Health
to take on a stronger leadership role, without which putting a sector program back on track would be
difficult. No written comments were received on the draft ICR.
(c) Other partners (NGOs/private sector):
NGOs acknowledged the major role of this project in promoting contracted community-based activities but
felt that that the rules on fund mobilization considerably limited the expansion of their role.
10. Additional Information
Social Affairs was part of the Ministry of Health when the IHSDP was adopted. The project
included the construction of two social centers. Construction began soon after the credit became
effective. With the new government in 2001, Social Affairs was no longer part of the Ministry of
Health. One of the two centers built with credit funding was visited during the ICR mission.
Though fully completed, it was not in use.
- 16 -
Annex 1. Key Performance Indicators/Log Frame Matrix
Outcome/Impact Indicators (from schedule 6 ):
Baseline
Projected in Actual/latest
Indicator
(1997)a SAR/PAD end of estimate
project
(2004)b
Maternal
510
380
NA
Mortality
Rate
(MMR)
Per 100000
birth
Infant
60 (68)
54
61
Mortality
Rate Per
1000 child
Total
5.9 (5.7)
4.9
5.3
Fertility
index
Per woman
Comments
The 2005 DHS result is to be
published in February 2006.
A survey in 2000 in health services
has estimated MMR in health
facilities at 460. About 40% of the
deliveries occur in the health
facilities.
Source 2005 DHS
A 10% decrease was expected in
five years. A 10.3% decrease has
occurred in seven years
A 17% decrease was expected in
five years and a 7% decrease has
occurred in seven years.
a Figures in parentheses are the corrected baseline figures following the 1997DHS III.
b. Actual are from 2005 DHS IV
Financial indicators (from schedule 6):
Indicator
Baseline Projected in
Actual/latest
(1997) SAR/PAD end of estimate
project
(2003)
Share of Health 7.25
8.40
9.5
sector budget in
government
budget
Rate of increase
10% per year
8.62 % per
in recurrent
year
cost (excluding
personnel
Comments
If the share is calculated with the
debt service then it would fall to
8.2 %
These data from the national
executed budget are for years 2000
to 2003 included
Health service indicators:
Indicator
Baseline Projected in Actual/latest
(1997) SAR/PAD estimate (2004)
Health service
indicator from
Schedule 6 - DCA
- 17 -
Comments
This indicator not included in
the health information system
(HIS) was not monitored
The actual base line value was
0.27 (HIS)
PHC use
Frequency rate
0.4
0.6
N.A
Primary curative
care consultation
rate
Children
immunization
DTP3 rate
Prenatal care
coverage (CPN1)
0.5
(0.27)
0.5
0.21
0.6
0.8
> 0.8
0.4
(0.46)
0.8
0.93
(0.65)
The actual estimate is from DHS
IV while (HIS) data are in
parentheses.
158,000 150,000
11,000 10,000
170,014
11,260
Health center is equivalent to
district hospital while health post
is the primary health care center
data from (HIS)
25%
N.A
Additional health
service indicators
from the PAD
A. Improve access
to CSP and
referral services
Population per
facility
Health Center
Health Post
Referral centers
utilization (%)
Cases referred (%)
1 to 2 level
2 to 3 level
Improve quality
and effectiveness of
health services
Establish treatment
guidelines
Health centers
equipped according
to WHO guidelines
(%)
Human resources
development
(i) recruitment (#)
(ii) training
- initial
- continuing
10%
50%
This information is not captured
in the HIS
This information is not captured
in the HIS
25%
not defined
1998
The DHS IV indicates 0.78%
and the EIP program 0.84%
N.A
N.A
This information is not captured
in the HIS
This information is not captured
in the HIS
not defined
400 per
annum
310
83
2093 persons
- 18 -
Recruitment constrain is the
training capacity which cannot
provide the needed staff.
There is no specific tracking
system for training activities
(nobody can assess utilization of
trained people)
education
medical
paramedical
management
120
600
80
trained in the
PDIS
100
N.A
The EDCP project ICR
mentioned that the upgraded
system is ineffective and up to
date problems are not solved.
New Health
Committee (#)
245
65
Evolution of
recurrent health
costs recovered (%)
1.40 (?)
(+34 %)
+ 240%
Health committee is
systematically created when a
new health post is built but
management committees are
often lacking
SAR mentioned that household
contribution should increase
annually by 5% : over 6 years
would make + 34 %)
Institutional
strengthening of
MOH
Districts with
functional MIS (%)
(i) Increased community
participation
(ii) Increased private
sector and NGO
involvement
Agreements signed
Agreements
implemented
Improve the
management and
financial viability
of the public health
system
Hospital
administration
related regulations
approved
Hospital sector
studies completed
Charter projects
completed and
approved
15
15
22
22
the Audit on NGOs mentions that
1997
1998
Law approved but part of the
regulatory framework is still
missing
1998
2004
4
18
A study was completed in 2004
to evaluate the impact of the
reform : results are disappointing
with an overall decrease of
productivity and no evidence of
quality increase
All the charter projects are
approved and are supposed to be
used to mobilize investment
budgets for the hospital sector.
- 19 -
10 NGOs benefitted from 91% of
credit for NGOs with too many
activities around Dakar.
1997
Representative
health committees
50%
Mutual health
insurance (#)
not defined
(20)
100
Improve access to
quality health care
Hospitals built
Hospitals renovated
2
5
5
5 (2)
Hospitals equipped
17
N.A (3)
Health Centers built
12
18 (2)
Health Centers
renovated
Health Centers
equipped
Health Posts built
12
15 (3)
12
N.A (2)
245
65 (45)
Health Posts
renovated
Health Posts
equipped
Maintenance budget
166
137 (35)
245
N.A (45)
In parenthese the number
financed by IDA
not defined
+ 163 %
Latest data are from 2003
(DAGE)
Latest data are from 2003
(DAGE)
not defined
not defined
not defined
MFCFA 0.39
MFCFA 0.5
MFCFA 615
60
62
(40)
20
NA
Average operating
budget
Health Post
Health Center
Hospital
Accelerate Fertility
Decline
Assisted births (%) 40
(51)
(%)Detection of
12
pregnancies at risk
2001
(management
autonomy)
0
The delivery of generic drugs
has significantly improve in the
country.
Privatization of
PNA
- 20 -
The regulation has still not
passed. This measure is now
included in the PRSC matrix
But the total covered population
is only between 2.5 to 5 % of
population.
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
In parentheses the number
financed by IDA
The first datum is from DHSIV
and in paranthesis from HIS
related to activities in public
facilities
The percentage of live children
weighing less than 2.5 kg
remains constant over the period
at 10 % of newborns.
Contraceptive
prevalence (%)
Nutritional
surveillance (%)
9
16
10.3
DHSIV – with traditional
method rate goes to 11.8 %
40
80
23
330,000 children below age 3 are
monitored (HIS)
The indicators retained are from Annex 9, pages 1-3. Indicators are also identified in several
other areas of the SAR (cf. pages 45 and 46), but this is in the only place in the SAR, where they
are fully defined. No indicators are available to fully measure the evolution of the equity, the
efficiency and the responsiveness of the health system over the period covered by the PDIS
- 21 -
Annex 2. Project Costs and Financing
Project Cost by Component (in US$ million equivalent)
Appraisal
Estimate
US$ million
Component
Improving the health and reproductive outome of the poor
Enhancing the performance and sustainability of health
systems
TOTAL
Total Baseline Cost
Percentage of
Appraisal
26.00
25.01
50.00
102
50.00
50.00
50.00
Total Project Costs
Total Financing Required
Actual/Latest
Estimate
US$ million
51.01
51.01
51.01
Project Costs by Procurement Arrangements (Appraisal Estimate) (US$ million equivalent)
1
Expenditure Category
1. Works
2. Goods
3. Services
4. Other Construction
5. Training
6. Operating Costs
Total
ICB
1.40
(1.30)
2.50
(2.10)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
3.90
(3.40)
Procurement Method
2
NCB
Other
4.00
(2.80)
0.30
(0.30)
0.00
(0.00)
1.40
(1.40)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
5.70
(4.50)
1.00
(0.70)
0.10
(0.10)
4.80
(4.80)
0.10
(0.10)
4.00
(2.60)
23.40
(3.10)
33.40
(11.40)
N.B.F.
Total Cost
4.00
(0.00)
14.80
(0.00)
3.60
(0.00)
18.80
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
70.80
(0.00)
112.00
(0.00)
10.40
(4.80)
17.70
(2.50)
8.40
(4.80)
20.30
(1.50)
4.00
(2.60)
94.20
(3.10)
155.00
(19.30)
Note ; At appraisal, procurement by method was presented only for the first two years of project
implementation. Comparison of data in the ex-ante and ex-post tables is therefore not meaningful.
Project Costs by Procurement Arrangements (Actual/Latest Estimate) (US$ million equivalent)
1
Expenditure Category
1. Works
2. Goods
3. Services
4. Other Construction
ICB
3.90
(3.70)
11.70
(11.70)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
Procurement Method
2
NCB
Other
7.30
(6.90)
0.50
(0.50)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
- 22 -
0.08
(0.08)
2.60
(2.40)
20.80
(20.80)
0.00
N.B.F.
Total Cost
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
11.28
(10.68)
14.80
(14.60)
20.80
(20.80)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
15.60
(15.40)
5. Training
6. Operating Costs
Total
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
7.80
(7.40)
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
5.40
(4.93)
28.88
(28.21)
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
5.40
(4.93)
52.28
(51.01)
Note : In this table all works and construction fall under Works and Services include training
because both consultant services and training were included in the same category in the Schedule
1 of the DCA.
A relatively large proportion of procurement was executed using ICB. DAGE staff preferred
ICB, even though amounts were in several cases far under the threshold, because it required
non-objections from the Bank, protecting them from potential mistakes. This unnecessarily added
to delays because Bank staff rightfully required time to review the documentation and the DAGE
had difficulty in addressing Bank comments in a timely manner.
Consultant selection was in general done using the QCBS method in agreement with the
procurement section of the SAR.
1/
Figures in parenthesis are the amounts to be financed by the Bank Loan. All costs include contingencies.
2/
Includes civil works and goods to be procured through national shopping, consulting services, services of contracted staff
of the project management office, training, technical assistance services, and incremental operating costs related to (i)
managing the project, and (ii) re-lending project funds to local government units.
Project Financing by Component (in US$ million equivalent)
Percentage of Appraisal
Component
Appraisal Estimate
Bank
Govt.
Actual/Latest Estimate
CoF.
Improving the health and
reproductive Outome of the
Poor
Enhancing the
performance and
sustainability of health
systems
TOTAL
50.00
220.50
140.70
Bank
Govt.
CoF.
26.00
231.16
144.31
25.01
260.67
113.44
51.01
491.83
257.75
Bank
Govt.
CoF.
102.0
223.1
183.2
The appraisal estimate was for a five years period while the actual financing covers a seven years period.
The increase though significant is less dramatic than it appears.
- 23 -
Annex 3. Economic Costs and Benefits
The project from identification to appraisal was supported by several analytical documents
focusing mostly on financial sustainability of the program. Expanding health coverage to the
population required capital investments for which a prospective analysis on recurrent costs
coverage was important.
A complementary approach on technical efficiency would be interesting to assess proper
utilization of resource mobilization. Economic efficiency of health spending could also provide
important guidance for decision making. However, due to the poor quality of data linking
resource mobilization and results, such a study would not be conclusive or reliable. Results
might even be misleading due to reliance on successive estimates related to key values for results.
The SAR states that the project aimed to improve management capacity of the public health
system and increase access to and quality of health services. It also states that the project was to
support improved cost recovery at all levels, provide support to emerging insurance schemes as
alternative financing sources, and promote decentralized management of service delivery.
Therefore, it is important to center the economic analysis on the available data for health sector
financing. This analysis will review financial resource mobilization in the macroeconomic context
to assess the degree of sustainability of the health programs supported by the IHSDP. Moreover,
it will make it possible to better determine whether or not public spending has helped to reduce
inequalities among regions through reallocation between regions.
Table 3-1 summarizes the financial goals of the project and their status at the end of the project:
Table 3-1. Project Goals and End-Project Status
Objective : improvements in
Expenditure allocation
Quality of expenditures
Equity
Appraisal target
ICR estimate
The share of the health sector in In 2003 health represented
government budget is 8.40%. 9.5% of public spending
Better distribution of
(debt excluded). Health
expenditures between hospitals budget represents about 2%
and health districts is the target. of GDP.
District share of
expenditures rose from 48 %
to 70 %.
Allocate more funds to finance Budget increased by 163%
maintenance
over seven years.
Improve non wage/wage
Wages went from 53% of
allocation
recurrent budget in 1996 to
30% in 2003
Improved staffing at health
- 24 -
Proportion of non-functional
posts and centers
health posts unchanged since
1997 (10%)
Evolution of financing as
Mutual health insurances
indicator for sustainability
cover less than 5% of
population and not the
poorest
Revenues from user fees
doubled between 1998 and
2002 but inequity worsened.
Improve execution and
Amount of funds transferred
transparency at decentralized were far below appraisal
level
targets and regional
accounting units were not
sustained.
Resource mobilization
Financial management
Financing to Sustain the Health Programs
The data can indicate only trends in health sector expenditure to measure the country’s level of
commitment to finance the sector. They do not estimate the gap between available resources and resources
needed to scale up the health programs to attain better results. They cannot show if productivity gains are
possible or would lead to better results with current resources.
Table 3-2 : Evolution of GDP and population between 1997-2003
Senegal
1997
GDP in M (constant
2000 US$)
GDP growth (annual
%)
GDP per capita
(constant 2000 US$)
Population growth
(annual %)
Population, in M
1998
1999 2000
2001
2002
2003
3,730
3,945
4,142
4,373
4,617
4,670
4,971
5.04
5.74
5.00
5.58
5.57
1.14
6.45
424.98
436.65
446.00
458.90
472.65
466.63
485.45
2.87
2.87
2.76
2.58
2.47
2.42
2.30
8.8
9
9.3
9.5
9.8
10
10.2
Source: World Development Indicators database
Expanding health service delivery for the population could be supported by potential increases in
both public spending and household expenditures relying on the positive trend of growth during
the period.
Table 3-3 Public spending on health: 1996 baseline and during the period 2000 and 2003 (in billion of
francs CFA)
1996
2000
2001
2002
2003
recurrent
18.76
21.84
24.59
26.54
35.48
investment
13.49
27.58
42.32
43.11
39.92
total
32.35
49.43
66.91
69.66
75.41
- 25 -
Execution rate of budget
95%
Health expenditures in % of total 7.3 %
public expenditure (debt excluded)
Health expenditure in % GDP
1.2 %
102%
8.5%
1.6%
98%
9.3%
2.0%
90%
9.0%
2.0%
92%
9.5%
2.0%
Source : national budget
Although public expenditures on health increased significantly during the period, the execution
rate remained at a reasonable level. This indicates a good absorption capacity of the sector but the
large increase in investment in the last years of the program may trigger important recurrent costs
to support expansion of health services. A more detailed analysis of the investments reveals that a
major part of it was for refurbishing facilities: such investments target quality improvement rather
than capacity enlargement. Impact on recurrent costs is low.
During the period, wages in the health sector represented a constant percentage of about 5.5% of
public expenditures on wages. The increase in human resources for health was not higher than
the average increase in civil servants in the country. This result, which can be considered a
harbinger of sustainability, translates into a bottleneck for the health sector to scale up service
delivery.
Table 3-4 Health sector financing by sources: 1998 base line and results in 2000, 2002 and
billions of CFA)
Years
1998
2000
% 2002
% 2004
23.19 29. 64 48.18
38.56 43.5
46.18
Central government
4
2.20
0.82 1.33
4.31 4.87
4.38
Local government
4.50
7 .82 12.72
17.87 20.1
18.14
Cost recovery - households
7
10.46
23.23 37.77
27.83 31.4
18.90
Donors
1
40.36 61.51
100
88.58 100
87.60
Total
2004 (in
%
52.7
2
5.00
20.7
0
21.5
8
100
Source: public expenditure review and Ministry of health 2004.
Table 3-4 highlights the role of donors. Though still very significant in the health sector, it is now
at the same level as cost recovery. Household contributions to finance the health sector resources
increased considerably during the period. Local governments still play a small role while central
government remains the backbone of the sector’s financing. Both the growth of resources and the
importance of both household and government shares in total financing of the health sector
reveals a positive trend for sustainability.
Reducing inequity?
Table 3-5 public health expenditure and regional poverty profiles
Région
% of public health % of poverty in
expenditure
the country
- 26 -
Dakar
Diourbel
Fatick
Kaolack
Kolda
Louga
Tambacounda
Thiès
St Louis
Ziguinchor
43%
11%
3%
7%
3%
6%
4%
10%
8%
5%
9%
11%
9%
14%
11%
6%
7%
16%
10%
7%
Source: public expenditure review and poverty analysis 1998-2002
Consolidating the expenditures during the execution of the IHSDP and comparing the regional
allocation of public resources to the poverty profile (table 3-5) indicates that the government has
not fully used public expenditures for poverty reduction. The five poorest regions, representing
62% of total poverty share of the country, have only received 39% of public expenditure on
health. The Dakar region captures almost half of public expenditure but represents only 9% of
the poverty in the country.
Table 3-6 percentages of: public expenditure, cost recovery and population by regions in 2003.
Dakar
Public
55
expenditure
Cost
59
recovery
Population
22.4
Diourbel
Fatick
Kaolack
Kolda
Louga
Matam
Tamba
Thiès
St
Louis
Zigchor
3.27
5.25
4.25
5.10
3.7
0.7
3.8
6.8
6.26
5.0
100
4.25
2.0
4.7
2.7
4.37
0.9
4.9
6.63
6.7
2.9
100
10.6
6.2
10.6
8.5
6.8
4.4
6.2
12.9
6.9
4.4
TOTAL
100
Source: National health report for 2003.
In most regions, cost recovery increases inequity in health care financing. The project had
considered that the development of community-based health insurance (CBHI) could play an
important role both in sustaining the financing of health sector and in reducing inequity. At the
end of the project, although there are more than 120 CBHI, their role in population coverage
remains marginal (less than 5% of population covered). These schemes are local and not part of a
nationwide risk pooling. The program fell short of its goals for poverty reduction through the
improvement of the financing scheme. From the lesson of these shortcomings, the government has
decided to try two complementary approaches: providing free care for essential services in the
poorest regions and scaling up health insurance through larger schemes. These two options need
close monitoring before adopting a pro-poor national policy on health care financing.
- 27 -
Annex 4. Bank Inputs
(a) Missions:
Stage of Project Cycle
Month/Year
Identification/Preparation
06/1995
Count
No. of Persons and Specialty
(e.g. 2 Economists, 1 FMS, etc.)
Specialty
5
11/1995
6
03/1996
6
10/1996
5
Appraisal/Negotiation
05/1997
Performance Rating
Implementation Development
Progress
Objective
POPULATION SPEC. (1) TTL
PUBLIC HEALTH SPEC. (2)
ECONOMIST (1)
OPERATIONS SPECIALIST (1)
TTL . (1)
PUBLIC HEALTH SPEC. (1)
ECONOMIST (1)
PARTICIPANT SPECIALIST
(1)
OPERATIONS SPECIALIST (1)
HEALTH SPECIALIST (1)
TTL (1)
ECONOMIST (1)
DEMOGRAPHER (1)
PUB. HEALTH SPECIALIST (1)
PARTICIPATION SPEC. (1)
OPERATIONS SPEC. (1)
TTL (1)
OPERATIONS SPECIALIST (2)
NUTRITION &PUB. HLTH SP
(1)
PUB. HEALTH SPECIALIST (1)
8
TTL (1)
PUB. HEALTHPECIALIST
(1)
ECONOMISTS (2)
OPERATIONS SPEC. (3)
PARTICIPATION SPEC. (1)
02/27/1998
3
10/30/1998
6
06/04/1999
3
TTL (1);
SR. OPERATIONS
OFFICER (1);
IMPLEMENTATION SPEC.
(1)
HNP CLUSTER LEADER (1);
PORTFOLIO OFFICER (1);
EDUCATION ECONOMIST (1);
PUBLIC HEALTH SPEC. (1);
SR. OPERATIONS OFFICER
(1); IMPLEMENTATION SPEC.
(1)
HNP OPERATION SPEC. (1);
Supervision
- 28 -
S
HS
S
HS
S
S
11/26/1999
7
06/15/2001
8
11/04/2001
6
02/07/2002
5
05/31/2002
6
11/15/2002
5
10/15/2003
5
08/06/04
3
11/06/2004
4
04/30/05
5
IMPL.SPEC (1); HNP CLUSTER
LEADER (1)
PUBLIC HEALTH SPEC (3);
IMPL. SPEC (1); FINANCIAL
ANALYST (1); PUBLIC
HEALTH SPEC. (1);
PR.OPERATION SPEC (1)
TTL (1); PUBLIC HEALTH
SPECIALIST (2); ECONOMIST
(2), IMPLEMENTATION
SPECIALIST (2); FINANCIAL
MGMT. SPEC. (1)
TEAM LEADER (1); HEALTH
SPECIALIST (1); LEAD
OPERAT. OFFICER (1);
FINANCIAL ANALYST (2);
SR. PROCUREMENT SPEC.
(1);
TEAM LEADER (1); HEALTH
SPECIALIST (1); SR. HEALTH
ECONOMIST (1); SR.
PROCUREMENT SPECIA (1);
TEAM ASSISTANT (1)
TEAM LEADER (1); HEALTH
SPECIALIST (1); SR.
PREOCUREM. SPEC. (1);
TEAM ASSISTANT (1);
FINANC. MANAG. SPEC. (1);
HUMAN RES. MANAG. SPEC
(1)
TEAM LEADER (1); HEALTH
SPECIALIST (1); SR.
PROCUREMENT SPEC. (1);
TASK ASSISTANT (1);
FINANCIAL MNAG. SPEC. (1)
TEAM LEADER (1); HEALTH
SPEC. (1); FINANCIAL
MANAG. SPEC. (1); SR
PROCUREMENT SPEC. (1);
TEAM ASSISTANT (1)
TTL (1); HEALTH SPECIALIST
(1); SR. PROCUREMENT
SPECIALIST (1); PROGRAM
ASSISTANT (1);
TTL (1); HEALTH SPECIALIST
(1); SR. PROCUREMENT
SPECIALIST (1); FINANCIAL
MANAGMENT SPECIALIST
(1); PROGRAM ASSISTANT
(1)
TTL (1); HEALTH SPEC. (1);
SR. PROCUREMENT
SPECIALIST (1); FINANCIAL
- 29 -
S
S
U
S
U
S
S
U
S
S
S
S
U
S
S
S
S
S
S
U
MGMT SPEC. (1); PROGRAM
ASSISTANT (1)
ICR
U
For the last ISR and the ICR the U ratings should be read as MU in the new 6 points scale
and for implementation progress the S should be read MS
(b) Staff:
Stage of Project Cycle
Identification/Preparation
Appraisal/Negotiation
Supervision
ICR
Total
Actual/Latest Estimate
No. Staff weeks
US$ ('000)
38
178,807
16
34,602
185.8
485,000
7
10,500
246.8
708,909
- 30 -
Annex 5. Ratings for Achievement of Objectives/Outputs of Components
(H=High, SU=Substantial, M=Modest, N=Negligible, NA=Not Applicable)
Macro policies
Sector Policies
Physical
Financial
Institutional Development
Environmental
Rating
H
SU
H
SU
H
SU
H
SU
H
SU
H
SU
M
M
M
M
M
M
N
N
N
N
N
N
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
H
H
H
H
H
H
M
M
M
M
M
M
N
N
N
N
N
N
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Social
Poverty Reduction
Gender
Other (Please specify)
Private sector development
Public sector management
Other (Please specify)
SU
SU
SU
SU
SU
SU
The private sector development takes into consideration the important involvement of the NGOs in
delivering health services and the expansion of the mutual health insurance
Gender is only N because the critical measure to promote gender balance in taking responsibility in the
health committees has not been adopted at the end of the project
- 31 -
Annex 6. Ratings of Bank and Borrower Performance
(HS=Highly Satisfactory, S=Satisfactory, U=Unsatisfactory, HU=Highly Unsatisfactory)
6.1 Bank performance
Lending
Supervision
Overall
Rating
HS
HS
HS
S
S
S
U
U
U
HU
HU
HU
S
S
S
S
U
U
U
U
HU
HU
HU
HU
Rating should be read as moderately unsatisfactory
6.2 Borrower performance
Preparation
Government implementation performance
Implementation agency performance
Overall
Rating
HS
HS
HS
HS
- 32 -
Annex 7. List of Supporting Documents
IDA project preparation documents
World Bank. Staff Appraisal Report. August 8, 1997.
World Bank. Memorandum and Recommendation of the President. August 8, 1997.
Ministère de la Santé Publique et de l'Action Sociale. Lettre de politique sectorielle. (June 1997).
World Bank. Aide-mémoires from 1995 to 1997.
World Bank. Back to Office reports from 1995 to 1997.
Bank project implementation documents
World Bank. 19 Implementation/Project Status Reports (PSR). 1998 - 2005.
World Bank. Aide-mémoires of supervision missions. 1998 - 2005.
World Bank. Mid-Term Review Report. June 2001.
World Bank. Development Credit Agreement. September 15, 1997.
Other project implementation documents
AGETIP. Programme de développement intégré de la santé et Projet de lutte contre les maladies
endémiques, Rapport d'activités du 15 avril 2005. (April 2005).
Elizabeth Paul. L'approche sectorielle "Santé" au Sénégal : Analyse des incitants et des coûts de
transaction. Rapport de mission. (June 29, 2005)
Main documents prepared by the borrower during implementation
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. La synthèse de projets de PO 2002. (April 10, 2002.)
- Ministère de la Santé et de la prévention Médicale. Contrats de performance. (July 2005)
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Rapport mensuel de suivi des recommandations de la RAC
2003. (18 July 2005 version).
- Ministère de l'Economie et des Finances. Etude sur la décentralisation des services de santé au Sénégal.
(July 2001).
-Ministère de la Santé, de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Rapport de la Réunion Annuelle Conjointe du
PDIS. 4 et 5 février 2003. (June 2003)
-Ministère de la Santé. Rapport sur les sessions de formation sur les procédures de gestion du
programme de développement intégré de santé (P.D.I.S.) August 1999.
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Journées de réflexion sur la santé de la reproduction (SR).
Analyse de l'offre et de la demande de SR. (April 2003).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Bilan des quatre années (2000-2004) du Gouvernement de
l'Alternance dans le secteur pharmaceutique: Perspectives
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Orientations Stratégiques pour une restructuration de la
formation initiale et continue. (September 2001).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Evaluation à mi-parcours du PDIS; 6-7-8 juin 2001. Rapport
Général. (November 2001).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Evaluation du secteur de la santé, Programme de
développement intégré de la santé. (May 2002).
- Ministère de la Santé Publique et de l'Action Sociale. Mission d'appui à la DAGE, Rapport d'orientation
o
du Consultant, Rapport n 1. (July 1998).
- 33 -
- Ministère de la Santé Publique et de l'Action Sociale. Mission d'appui à la DAGE, Rapport d'étape du
o
consultant C.E.A.SA ex. PANAUDIT, Rapport n 2. (July 1998).
- Ministère de la Santé, de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Rapport financier du Programme de
Développement intégré de la Santé. (June 30, 2002).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Enquête démographique et de Santé au Sénégal
(EDS-IV), 2005; Quatrième rapport d'étape. (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Etude sur le Renforcement
des capacités des agents de la DRH au niveau central et au niveau déconcentré. (June 2005).
o
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Rapport d'Etude n 1.
Répertoire des emplois types du secteur de la santé au Sénégal, Rapport final. (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Etude sur la mobilité et le
o
redéploiement des personnels du Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Rapport d'Etude n
2. (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Etude sur la gestion
prévisionnelle des ressources humaines du Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Rapport
o
d'étude n 3. (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Etude sur le Renforcement
des capacités des agents de la DRH au niveau central et au niveau déconcentré. Le Manuel des
o
Procédures. Rapport d'étude n 4 (partie 1). (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Etude sur le Renforcement
des capacités des agents de la DRH au niveau central et au niveau déconcentré. Le Plan de formation.
o
Rapport d'étude n 4 (partie 2). (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Adira Etudes et Conseils. Rapport sur la gestion des
o
carrières des personnels du Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Rapport d'étude n 5.
(June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Measure DHS+ORC MACRO. Enquête
démographique et de Santé 2005, Rapport préliminaire (July 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Groupement SANIPLAN KIT. Evaluation à mi-parcours du
PDIS, Rapport Final. (May 2001)
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. CEFORET. Evaluation finale du PDIS 98-02 et des
PRDS/PDDS. Rapport final (Tome I). (November 2003)
- Ministère de la Santé. Réforme hospitalière, présentation, lois et décrets. (August 1998).
- Ministère de la Santé de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Prise en charge intégrée des maladies de l'enfant au
Sénégal, Plan stratégique 2002 - 2007. (April 2003).
- Ministère de la Santé de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Assises nationales sur la santé. Rapport Général,
Tome 1. (July 2000)
- Ministère de la Santé de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Assises nationales sur la santé. Rapport Général,
Tome 2. (July 2000)
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention, HYGEA-ACODESS. Carte sanitaire du Sénégal. (June 2005).
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Rapport d'audit des ONG.
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Programme national de lutte contre les infections
nosocomiales "Pronalin"(2005-2015). November 2004
- Ministère de la Santé de l'Hygiène et de la Prévention. Mise en place d'une politique pérenne de
motivation des personnels de la santé, Rapport Final. (July 2003)
- Définition d'une politique de recrutement accéléré à moyen terme 2003-2005.
- 34 -
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Guide du monitoring du centre de santé.
- Gouvernement du Sénégal/UNICEF. Rapport de l'enquête sur les objectifs de la fin de décennie sur
l'enfance (MICS-II - 2000). November 2000.
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention. Situation sanitaire et démographique 2001-2002. April 2004.
- Health risks and shocks.
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Plan national de développement sanitaire (PNDS) Phase II : 2004-2008. August 2004.
- Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention Médicale. Document de présentation du cadre de dépenses
sectorielles à moyen terme 2005-2007 du secteur de la santé.July 20.
- 35 -
Additional Annex 8. Borrower's Completion Report
Summary of Borrower’s Contribution
1.
Main Achievements of Project Objectives
The project has contributed positively to health investments (health facilities and equipment), to the reform
agenda (decentralization of financial management), and to capacity building (in the areas of planning and
knowledge generation). Regarding investments, it acknowledges that the accomplishments of the primary
health care (PHC) construction program were mediocre while the referral was more successful. For the
health programs, the improvements as well as some obstacles are listed. The list covers: (i) availability of
drugs and contraceptives; (ii) improvement of service delivery; (iii) fighting epidemic diseases; (iv)
training; (v) studies and research; and (vi) institutional strengthening. Results are not compared to
objectives or to progress made during the same period in the region. This description emphasizes the
program results, making an implicit link with the project’s contribution. It indicates how the credit has
funded various units and activities in support of the program approach (CAS/PNDS, DAGE, RAC, CIS,
…). These expenditures have contributed to national capacity building. The program’s major
shortcomings are: (i) uneven coverage of PHC, (ii) shortage of adequate human resources, (iii) poor
integration of vertical programs, (iv) deficient human resource management, and (v) lack of major
progress on health sector decentralization effectiveness.
2.
Project Implementation
Project preparation was well aligned with the adoption of the national health policy and contributed to
finalizing IHSDP. Efficient preparation enabled timely signing of the DCA. Project implementation, based
on an annual work program (PO), was done through national processes and institutions. The program
approach provided for, but did not achieve, better coordination due to (i) lack of leadership from
government and (ii) poor harmonization among donors. The annual reviews (RAC), though recurrent and
fully attended, had little impact on problem solving. The Bank monitored the project closely with two to
three missions a year. The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system, ineffective during the first three
years of the project, relied on the national information system. Project implementation suffered from: (i)
frequent ministerial reorganizations and concomitant institutional instability, (ii) important social conflicts
and lack of human resources, (iii) donor adherence to a project approach, each following its own
procedures. The IHSDP has enhanced various forms of partnerships with local government and NGOs.
3.
Sustainability
Health sector financial resources doubled by the end of the program, and major program achievements are
considered sustainable. Texts supporting the reform have been adopted regarding: (i) hospital reform; (ii)
voluntary health insurance; (iii) ministry reorganization leading to creation of a human resources
department, an information system unit, and a financing and partnership unit; (iv) new health district
zoning; and (v) incentives for health personnel. Recent improvements in training capacities should help
accelerate the staffing efforts made during the program. The political context is stable, but social tensions
still pose risks. Various measures have been adopted to favor access for the poor at primary and referral
levels.
4.
Bank Performance
The Bank has played a major role in supporting and advocating for the IHSDP and has fully supported the
implementation of the program. The special account was replenished in a timely manner and credit
extension played a significant role in achieving results. However, the Bank could have: (i) better supported
decentralization and (ii) provided quicker nonobjections to annual work programs. Change of TTLs at
- 36 -
mid-term led to reconsideration of some previously approved options.
5.
Borrower Performance
The borrower complied with all covenants. However, the decentralization policy was not successful in
allocating financial resources to the regions. Eighty-eight percent of counterpart funds were made
available; the population’s contribution to health care expenditure was thrice the amount expected; and
voluntary health insurance schemes increased dramatically. An average of 87 percent of the national
budget was executed. Delays resulted in late delivery of infrastructure and financial management was
weak at different levels. The DAGE’s performance improved only toward the end of the project.
6.
Project Impact
The initial results of the latest DHS survey show positive developments in the population’s health status.
Notwithstanding the previously mentioned progress, the government recognized that too much emphasis
had been put on process at the expense of health care activities.
7.
Lessons Learned
A program approach is a challenge when most donors prefer to run their own projects. In these
circumstances, government’s lack of leadership adversely affects results. To make NGOs more efficient,
their mobilization should be reviewed. The project also highlighted weaknesses in the national information
system.
- 37 -
REPUBLIQUE DU SENEGAL
Un Peuple – Un But – Une Foi
----------------------
Octobre 20005
RAPPORT D’ACHEVEMENT DU PROGRAMME DE DEVELOPPEMENT
INTEGRE DE LA SANTE (Cr : 2985–SE)
INTRODUCTION
Le Sénégal dispose depuis 1998 d’un Plan National de Développement Sanitaire (PNDS). Ce plan décennal
(1998-2007) a pour but d’améliorer l’efficience et l’efficacité du système de santé en général et vise trois
objectifs : la réduction de la mortalité maternelle ; la réduction de la mortalité infantile ; la maîtrise de la
fécondité.
Le Programme de Développement Intégré du Secteur de la Santé (PDIS) est l’instrument de mise en ouvre de
la première phase quinquennale du PNDS. La contribution de l’IDA à la réalisation du PDIS vise un double
objectif : 1) appuyer le Ministère de la Santé dans la prise en charge des responsabilités techniques,
administratives et financières ; 2) assurer une collaboration entre le niveau central et les collectivités locales
dans le respect des textes réglementant le transfert de compétences aux régions, communes et communautés
rurales.
Le crédit IDA 2985-SE-PDIS d’un montant de 35.900.000 DTS (50.000.000 $ EU) est entré en vigueur
depuis Février 1998. Il a été clôturé le 30 Juin 2005 après une dernière prorogation de six mois justifiée par le
retard constaté dans l’exécution de certains volets du programme.
Les activités du crédit se répartissent en deux composantes : A) Amélioration des soins dispensés aux pauvres
et de leur situation en matière de santé génésique ; B) Amélioration de la performance et de la pérennité des
systèmes de soins.
Le présent rapport d’achèvement du crédit entre dans le cadre des clauses contractuelles. Il porte sur
l’exécution des activités du projet, les coûts et les avantages qui en ont découlé, le niveau de réalisation des
objectifs du crédit et s’articule autour des huit sections suivantes : (1) rappel des objectifs du projet ; (2)
niveau d’atteinte des objectifs du projet ; (3) exécution du projet ; (4) pérennité du projet ; (5) performance de
la Banque Mondiale ; (6) performance de l’Etat ; (7) résultats globaux et impact du projet ; (8) leçons tirées du
projet et de sa réalisation.
1. RAPPEL DES OBJECTIFS ET ACTIVITES DU PROJET
Le projet a pour but d’apporter un soutien à l’exécution du Programme de Développement Intégré de la Santé
(PDIS) du Gouvernement du Sénégal. Les objectifs poursuivis sont au nombre de trois : a) élargir l’accès aux
soins de santé primaire et aux services d’aiguillage médical ; b) améliorer la qualité, l’efficience et l’efficacité
des prestations de soins, y compris des services et de l’information dans le domaine de la santé génésique ; et
c) mettre l’Etat du Sénégal mieux à même d’organiser efficacement les services de santé, et d’assurer leur
suivi et leur évaluation.
Les principales activités par composante sont les suivantes :
- 38 -
Composante A: amélioration des soins dispensés aux pauvres et de leur situation en matière de santé
génésique. Les activités à réaliser dans le cadre de cette composante portent sur :
1) la construction ou la remise en état d’une cinquantaine de postes de santé et de trois centres de santé de
district et d’environ trois hôpitaux tertiaires dans les régions de Dakar, Fatick et Kaolack, et les travaux de
remise en état ou de constructions mineures dans certains centres et locaux à vocation sociale ou sanitaire ;
2) la fourniture de médicaments, vaccins, contraceptifs, véhicules, mobiliers de bureau, matériels et
fournitures pour les postes et centres de santé.
Composante B : amélioration de la performance et de la pérennité des systèmes de soins. Cette deuxième
composante couvre les actions suivantes :
1) la réalisation de toute une série d’activités d’information, d’éducation et de communication ;
2) la formation académique et continue, entre autres, dans le domaine de la gestion et de la santé publique ;
3) la prestation de services de conseil à caractère technique et d’une aide logistique en vue de la mise en place
d’un système d’information automatisé ;
4) la prestation de services de conseil à caractère technique en vue de la conception, de la supervision et de la
gestion des équipements du système de santé ;
5) la prestation de services de conseil à caractère technique en vue de l’organisation de campagnes multimédia
ciblées ;
6) la formation des médecins et autres travailleurs du secteur de la santé en matière de santé génésique ;
7) l’octroi de dons par l’intermédiaire d’organisations non-gouvernementales, pour financer du matériel, des
fournitures médicales et autres destinés aux agents de santé communautaires, aux activités organisées dans le
domaine de la santé par des groupements féminins, et en vue de l’organisation d’activités d’information,
d’éducation et de communication ;
8) la prestation de services à caractère technique en vue de la réalisation d’une enquête hospitalière, de la
préparation et de la mise au point de plans de développement des hôpitaux, et de l’organisation d’un
programme de formation aux fins de l’exécution de la réforme ;
9) la prestation de services de conseil à caractère technique et d’une aide logistique en vue de l’exécution, de
la gestion et du suivi du projet à l’échelon central ;
10) la prestation de services de conseil à caractère technique et d’une aide logistique en vue de l’exécution, de
la gestion et du suivi du projet à l’échelon régional.
Les objectifs du projet de même que les composantes retenues pour les atteindre ainsi que les activités à
réaliser dans le cadre de ces composantes recoupent parfaitement les objectifs du PNDS. Mieux, ils s’intègrent
globalement dans les dix (10) orientations stratégiques du PDIS. Par ailleurs, on note une forte synergie entre
les deux composantes du projet. En effet, les actions de construction, réhabilitation et équipements
d’infrastructures sanitaires prévues dans la composante A, articulées au développement des ressources
humaines et au renforcement du système d’information, d’éducation et de communication mis en œuvre à
travers la composante B, contribuent à l’atteinte globale des objectifs du PNDS. L’adéquation entre le projet et
le PNDS a surtout été facilitée par la collaboration étroite entre l’IDA et le Ministère de la Santé au moment
de l’élaboration de ces deux documents sans oublier la participation active des autres partenaires au
développement et de la société civile.
2. NIVEAU D’ATTEINTE DES OBJECTIFS DU PROJET
Globalement les indicateurs ont présenté une amélioration par rapport à la période précédente. Ce constat a
été fait par les informateurs clé rencontrés lors de l’élaboration du rapport. Tous ont insisté sur les acquis
physiques (équipements, logistique et construction d’infrastructure), les acquis institutionnels (la
décentralisation de la gestion comptable dans les régions), les acquis en matière de renforcement des capacités
(compétence en planification, relèvement des connaissances des prestataires).
Le niveau d’atteinte des objectifs du projet, composante par composante, se présente comme suit :
Composante A : amélioration des soins dispensés aux pauvres et de leur situation en matière de santé
- 39 -
génésique
Au plan des réalisations physiques, les prévisions en génie civil pour la première phase du PNDS
s’établissaient comme suit : (i) 03 hôpitaux, 4 centres de santé, 151 postes de santé ruraux, et 94 PS urbains à
construire ; (ii) 12 centres de santé et 166 Postes de Santé (PS) à réhabiliter.
Le taux de réalisation de ce programme (toutes sources de financement confondues) à la fin de cette première
phase a dépassé les prévisions pour ce qui concerne les hôpitaux et les centres de santé. Cependant, le taux est
plus faible pour ce qui concerne les postes de santé (26% selon le rapport d’évaluation du PDIS). Le crédit a
fortement contribué à la réalisation de ce programme notamment en finançant la construction et l’équipement
de 45 PS, 2 CS sans compter la réhabilitation des deux hôpitaux de Louga et de Kaolack et la rénovation du
centre de santé de Thiès et de 38 postes de santé ruraux.
Selon la dernière évaluation faite lors de la réalisation de la carte sanitaire en 2005 le nombre de structures se
présente comme suit : 20 hôpitaux, 54 centres de santé et 813 postes de santé. Ces différentes réalisations ont
amélioré la couverture passive en infrastructures sanitaires à un niveau acceptable pour les centres de santé et
les hôpitaux: le nombre d’habitants/CS est passé de 240.685 en 1997 à 180.900 en 2004. Pour les hôpitaux le
nombre d’habitants par lit hospitalier est passé de 3.519 à 3.360 pour la même période.
L’amélioration de l’accessibilité géographique qui voudrait que les PS soient au moins à une distance égale ou
inférieure à 5 Km des lieux d’habitation a été un moment entravée par le nombre important de PS non
fonctionnels. Aussi une politique de contractualisation des PS surtout en milieu rural a t-elle été mise en
place. Elle avait permis la réouverture de la quasi-totalité des PS non fonctionnels même si à ce jour le même
phénomène ré apparaît. Ceci s’est traduit par un relèvement de la couverture active en soins curatifs de base,
en consultation prénatale et vaccination.
Composante B : amélioration de la performance et de la pérennité des systèmes de soins.
En matière d’approvisionnement en médicaments, vaccins et contraceptifs: La pharmacie Nationale
d’Approvisionnement (PNA) est autonome et elle est devenue Etablissement Public de Santé (EPS) depuis
1999. Les ruptures de stock sont devenues exceptionnelles, la PNA approvisionne les Pharmacies Régionales
d’Approvisionnement. Les médicaments sont livrés sous forme générique et les prix de vente sont publiés
dans un catalogue de prix conseillés. Toutefois cette réglementation n’est pas toujours respectée et les tarifs
des centres de santé ne sont pas contrôlés.
Si auparavant on a parfois enregistré des ruptures en vaccins, cette contrainte a été levée par la signature
d’un accord entre le MSPM et l’UNICEF dans le cadre de l’Indépendance Vaccinale.
Les produits contraceptifs sont introduits dans les génériques et bénéficient du système d’approvisionnement
de la PNA renforçant ainsi leur disponibilité et leur accessibilité.
Amélioration de la prestation des soins
En matière de consultations primaires curatives le taux de couverture varie de 30% à 55% selon le PS. Il est à
noté que la PCIME couvre actuellement la quasi-totalité des postes de santé grâce en partie à l’appui du crédit
qui a permis de renforcer la formation en partenariat avec le CHU
Le Programme élargi de vaccination (PEV) a nettement amélioré ses performances au cours de la première
phase du PDIS. De 34% en 1997, le taux de couverture en DTC3 est passé à 87% en fin 2004. Ceci est la
traduction de l’effort fourni par l’Etat et les partenaires au développement pour porter à 80% au moins le taux
de couverture vaccinale. la Division de l’immunisation créée au sein de la Direction de la Prévention
Médicale est assistée par un comité de coordination inter agences qui regroupe l’ensemble des partenaires
impliqués dans la mise en œuvre du programme. Le PEV a mis en place une stratégie de suivi de la
performance des districts ce qui permet un appui orienté et localisé selon la zone. Toutefois des difficultés
- 40 -
persistent dans certaines zones difficilement accessibles.
L’indice synthétique de fécondité est passé de 5,7 au début du PDIS à 5,3 en 2005 traduisant une amélioration
de la maîtrise de la fécondité comme l’atteste la prévalence contraceptive qui a évolué de 8,10% à 10,30% au
cours de la même période. Ces résultats peuvent être considérés comme appréciables si l’on sait que le désir
d’avoir un enfant pour les femmes en âge de procréer est resté constant au cours de la même période.
De même les soins prénatals et les accouchements assistés ont connu une amélioration entre 1997 et 2005. En
plus, les Services Obstétricaux d’Urgences sont fonctionnels en milieu semi rural pour améliorer la qualité de
la prise en charge des accouchements.
Il faut noter que le taux de consultations prénatales a évolué de 82% à 93% entre 1997 et 2005. Durant la
même période, le taux des accouchements assistés est passé de 51% à 62%. Ces performances s’expliquent par
le fait que 80% des PS fonctionnels mènent des activités de prévention. N’eut été le déficit en personnel
qualifié au niveau périphérique (sages femmes), ces résultats pourraient être améliorés.
Lutte contre les maladies transmissibles
La lutte contre le VIH demeure performante comme l’atteste la prévalence VIH/SIDA qui, selon les résultats
préliminaires de l’EDS IV, est de 0,7% dans la population en générale.
Le paludisme continue d’occuper la première place des motifs de consultations (30%). Il faut noter que la
morbidité proportionnelle est de 40% chez les personnes âgées de 5 ans et plus. Il faut rappeler que le PLCME
a accompagné le programme de lutte contre le paludisme lorsqu’il a fallu changer le protocole thérapeutique
par l’acquisition de moustiquaires imprégnées.
La lutte conte la tuberculose a connu depuis 10 ans des résultats stationnaires. Avec un risque annuel
d’infection de 2%, environ 10 000 cas de tuberculose à frottis positifs sont attendus chaque année. La
généralisation du traitement directement observé a amélioré le taux de guérison à 62% et baissé le taux
d’abandon de 30% en 2000 à 18% en 2002.
Il faut cependant déplorer l’insuffisance de la qualité des services et le manque d’intégration des programmes
de lutte contre la maladie. C’est pourquoi, des stratégies comme la PCIME ont été appuyées par le projet et
qu’un comité a été mis en place pour élaborer des stratégies d’amélioration de la qualité des services à tous les
niveaux.
Formation/Recyclage
Les objectifs du PNF ont été réalisés à 85%pour la formation continue et 65% pour la formation initiale. Le
PDIS a permis de financer 378 bourses dont 296 sur le crédit IDA. Cela a permis entre autres de disposer de
30 pédiatres, 24 gynécologues, 26 chirurgiens, 15 anesthésistes, 5 radiologues. Le projet a également financé
la formation de 26 médecins en santé publique et de 16 agents dans le domaine de la gestion au CESAG.
Cette formation s’est poursuivie après le programme pour accompagner la réforme hospitalière.
La performance relativement faible pour la formation initiale s’explique en partie par le démarrage tardif des
centres régionaux de formation qui n’ont pu être fonctionnels qu’à partir de 2003. Il s’y ajoute que la plupart
des écoles privées n’ont été autorisées à présenter des candidats au diplôme d’Etat qu’à compter de 2005.
Aussi, les conventions signées avec trois de ces écoles privées n’ont pu être exécutées.
Malgré les bons résultats enregistrés notamment dans le domaine de la formation continue, les besoins en
matière de personnels sont loin d’être satisfaits. Les nouveaux diplômés ne sont pas recrutés à temps, ce qui
est à l’origine de beaucoup de déperditions. Les affectations ne répondent pas toujours aux priorités en dépit
des engagements signés au moment de l’octroi de la bourse.
- 41 -
Etudes et Recherche
Comme pour la formation, le crédit a appuyé la recherche opérationnelle en santé. Cet appui a permis
l’élaboration d’un document de plan stratégique qui a été largement diffusé. Ce document définit les domaines
prioritaires en matière de recherche en santé et propose des thèmes de recherche pour le niveau central et les
régions.
Les principaux résultats enregistrés dans ce domaine sont : (i) La création et le fonctionnement d’un Conseil
National de Recherche en santé par arrêté n°01422 MS/CAB du 02 Mars 2001 qui a pu approuver au cours de
la période, 84 protocoles de recherche sur les 130 examinés ; (ii) la formation en méthodologie de la
recherche opérationnelle et de supervision formative au profit des équipes cadres de région et de district ; (iii)
l’organisation d’un forum de partage des résultats de recherche. La mise en oeuvre du programme de
recherche se poursuit avec l’appui d’autres partenaires.
Renforcement institutionnel
Le projet a permis de renforcer les capacités de gestion du secteur au niveau central et à l’échelon régional sur
le plan de l’organisation, des ressources humaines et de la logistique.
Le niveau central a enregistré la création d’une nouvelle structure de coordination, d’appui et de suivi
dénommée Cellule d’Appui et de Suivi du PNDS (CASPNDS) qui est rattachée au cabinet du ministre. Cette
cellule née avec l’avènement du PNDS, assure la coordination de l’intervention des partenaires au
développement y compris l’appui de l’IDA. Le crédit 2985- SE PDIS a permis de financer une partie des
salaires, de la logistique et du fonctionnement jusqu’en décembre 2004. D’autres partenaires comme la BAD,
l’UE, l’OMS et l’UNFPA ont également contribué à ce financement.
Pour accompagner la Cellule, le crédit a appuyé l’organisation régulière des réunions annuelles conjointes
(RAC), des missions conjointes de supervision (MCS) et des réunions du Comité Interne de Suivi (CIS).
La Direction de l’Administration Générale et de l’Equipement (DAGE) qui a eu la responsabilité
d’administrer le crédit et donc d’assurer la passation des marchés, la gestion financière et la gestion
comptable a connu une réorganisation visant une meilleure efficacité de la dépense et une amélioration
notable de la capacité d’absorption des crédits. Au démarrage du projet, il a été créé un poste de contrôleur
interne, un poste de chef comptable et un poste d’analyste financier pour renforcer l’équipe traditionnelle de la
DAGE, les deux derniers étant payés sur le crédit. Par la suite, compte tenu des difficultés rencontrées dans le
suivi des marchés et les décaissements, un expert en passation des marchés a été recruté, suivi par un
responsable de la Division des Affaires Administratives Financières et Comptables (DAAFC), division créée
par le dernier décret organisant le ministère de la santé et de la prévention médicale. Il faut ajouter à tout ce
personnel cadre, une dizaine de comptables recrutés sur la contrepartie du crédit.
Au plan de la logistique et du renforcement des capacités, toutes les directions centrales y compris la DAGE et
la CAS/PNDS ont bénéficié de l’appui du crédit. Les directions ont acquis en effet des véhicules de
supervision et de liaison, un équipement informatique et même un appui en fonctionnement. Il a été
régulièrement organisé des voyages d’études pour le perfectionnement des responsables. Des bourses de
longue durée ont été aussi accordées à des cadres pour une spécialisation notamment à l’ENDSS au profil des
enseignants, à la DPL pour la formation d’inspecteur et au niveau de l’ancienne direction de l’action sociale
(DAS).
Par ailleurs, La CAS/PNDS a acquis un logiciel de planification appelé "InfoPDIS" qui est aujourd’hui la
propriété du ministère de la santé et de la prévention médicale. La DAGE a également acquis un logiciel de
gestion comptable appelé TOMPRO auquel les utilisateurs au sein de la DAGE ont été formés dont certains en
France. Ce logiciel, en plus du financement de l’IDA permet de gérer les financements des partenaires
administrés par la DAGE.
- 42 -
A la différence du niveau national, le niveau régional n’a pas connu de changements majeurs au plan
organisationnel du fait du PDIS. Cependant, le crédit a permis au cours des deux dernières années, de
renforcer les équipes régionales par des comptables à raison d’un comptable par région. Cette mesure entrait
dans le cadre de la décentralisation de la gestion financière après que la RAC a déploré à plusieurs reprises la
concentration de la gestion financière au niveau de la DAGE. C’est ainsi qu’il a été ouvert dans chaque région
un compte qui a été alimenté à partir du compte bancaire de la DAGE dont le plafond a été relevé en
conséquence.
Cette expérience n’a toutefois pas donné les résultats escomptés pour des raisons liées aux difficultés
d’application du scénario de prise en charge des dépenses de fonctionnement.
Au plan logistique, les équipes cadres de région et de district ainsi que certains hôpitaux de région ont été
équipés par le projet en véhicules (supervision, liaison, ambulances, vedettes-ambulances double cabine pour
la vaccination) sans compter le reste de la logistique PEV et l’équipement informatique. Le parc moto a été
aussi particulièrement renforcé. La répartition de ces équipements a tenu compte de l’appui des autres
partenaires (BAD, UE, Japon, Belgique etc.) pour éviter le double emploi.
Au total, il ne fait aucun doute que le projet a contribué au renforcement des capacités de gestion du secteur,
surtout en planification, même s’il faut regretter que cela ait plus profité au niveau central. Il faut déplorer
aussi la mise en place tardive des équipements et le retard accusé dans les constructions.
3. EXECUTION DU PROJET
Phase préparatoire
Il faut rappeler que le projet a été préparé en 1997 dans un contexte particulier où le secteur de la santé venait
d’adopter les nouvelles orientations de la politique de santé et de l’action sociale (NOPSAS) après une année
de réflexion approfondie. C’est alors qu’une structure spéciale dénommée secrétariat permanent pour
l’élaboration du plan national de développement sanitaire et social (SP/PNDS) - devenue par la suite
CAS/PNDS- a été créée pour coordonner l’élaboration du PNDS en veillant à ce que les NOPSAS soient
traduites en plan opérationnel et que tous les acteurs soient impliqués notamment les partenaires au
développement. A l’instar des autres partenaires, l’IDA a accompagné ce processus jusqu’à l’organisation de
la table ronde de 1997 au cours de laquelle l’Etat a présenté officiellement à la communauté des partenaires au
développement le PNDS (1998-2007) et son premier programme opérationnel de la première phase
(1998-2002), appelé Programme de Développement Intégré de la santé et de l’action sociale (PDIS).
La participation active de l’IDA à ce processus ainsi que l’intérêt particulier accordé à l’approche programme
qui devait sous-tendre sa mise en oeuvre, ont facilité la préparation du crédit 2985-SE considéré comme la
contribution de la Banque à la mise en oeuvre du PNDS. Les objectifs étaient partagés, l’approche également.
D’où la grande similitude entre le document du PDIS et le rapport d’évaluation du crédit 2985-SE, PDIS.
Tout cela explique que les négociations ayant abouti à la signature de l’accord de crédit y afférent n’avaient
guère duré plus de six (6) mois.
Phase opératoire
Les opérations du programme ont été exécutées dans le cadre du PDIS, suivant le cadre institutionnel mis en
place, en veillant à la cohérence des interventions des différents partenaires qui, malgré l’existence d’un
manuel de procédures du PDIS, ont tous conservé leurs procédures propres y compris l’IDA.
Au plan institutionnel et organisationnel, l’accord de crédit indique bien que la DAGE est responsable de
l’administration et de la gestion du crédit. En cela elle est responsable de la gestion des fonds vis à vis de
l’IDA, la CAS/PNDS restant, comme son nom l’indique, une structure d’appui technique, de coordination et
de suivi. Les autres directions, les régions médicales et les districts ont en charge la planification et
l’exécution des programmes de santé qui relèvent de leur compétence.
- 43 -
Les activités financées sur le crédit sont inscrites dans les plans d’opération annuels (PO) élaborés à chaque
échelon avec un budget par objectif précisant toutes les sources de financement et les cibles. Ces PO sont
validés par l’ensemble des partenaires au développement qui confirment notamment la disponibilité des fonds
pour les actions qui leur sont imputées. Dans ce processus, l’IDA a toujours été considérée comme "bailleur de
dernier recours". Les activités du PO financées sur le crédit IDA 2985-SE ainsi que les dossiers d’appel
d’offres y afférents ont toujours fait l’objet de la non objection de l’IDA. Pour le cas particulier des dossiers
d’appel d’offres et des décaissements, les procédures utilisées sont strictement celles de l’IDA.
Approche programme
L’approche programme utilisée pour le PDIS est différemment appréciée selon les acteurs de la santé.. Tout le
monde admet cependant que, malgré les acquis (concertation avec les partenaires, meilleure lisibilité des
interventions, amélioration de la transparence de la gestion), il reste que le leadership du Gouvernement n’a
pas été suffisamment fort pour assurer une meilleure synergie des actions des partenaires au développement
qui ont continué avec leurs propres procédures. L’organisation des partenaires avec un chef de file a certes
permis de partager les informations mais n’a nullement permis une plus grande cohérence des actions et une
harmonisation des procédures. Aussi, les relations bilatérales gouvernement/partenaires prises
individuellement sont-elles toujours privilégiées au détriment des actions conjointes.
Système de suivi/évaluation
Au niveau central, il s’agit de la réunion annuelle conjointe (RAC), du comité interne de suivi (CIS) et de la
mission conjointe de supervision (MCS). Les activités liées à ces différentes instances ont été parmi les plus
régulières du programme. Il a été souvent déploré cependant que la plupart des recommandations pertinentes
issues de ces instances aient rarement fait l’objet d’une mise en oeuvre diligente, surtout celles ayant un
caractère institutionnel.
Par rapport au crédit 2985-SE, l’IDA a régulièrement organisé des missions de supervision (2 à 3 missions
par an) pour un suivi plus rapproché des activités financées sur le crédit. Ces missions sont toujours
sanctionnées par un aide mémoire. En plus de ces missions, la revue du portefeuille a permis de passer en
revue les performances des projets financés par l’IDA et de prendre des mesures correctrices.
Une évaluation à mi-parcours a été faite en 2000 et une évaluation finale en 2003 comme prévu, par des
cabinets indépendants. En plus, deux enquêtes ont été financées par le projet en 1999 (ESIS 99) et en 2004
(EDS IV).
Le système de suivi/évaluation au niveau opérationnel est bâti sur le SIG et le monitoring. Les réunions de
coordination sont institutionnalisées à raison d’une réunion mensuelle pour le district et d’une réunion
trimestrielle pour les régions. L’ensemble de ce système au niveau opérationnel a connu des perturbations au
cours des trois premières années du PDIS, suite à la rétention des informations sanitaires issue du mot d’ordre
du syndicat unique des travailleurs de la santé et de l’action sociale (SUTSAS).
Facteurs ayant affecté l’exécution du projet
Au plan interne, la mobilisation des partenaires au développement pour appuyer conséquemment le secteur de
la santé et l’accompagner activement dans la mise en oeuvre du PNDS a constitué un atout certain même si la
multiplicité de leurs procédures et "le réflexe" du drapeau ont parfois constitué un frein. Les autres facteurs
internes notés ont eu des répercussions négatives sur l’exécution du projet : l’instabilité institutionnelle, le
climat social et l’important déficit en personnel de santé.
Durant toute la première phase du PNDS (PDIS), l’organisation des services est restée instable au gré des
décrets successifs, jamais suivis d’arrêtés d’application. Les nouveaux services créés ne sont pas suffisamment
- 44 -
dotés en moyens. Le transfert de services essentiels vers d’autres départements ministériels a davantage
perturbé la situation. La direction de la prévention avec la vaccination et le service de l’hygiène ont eu un
moment à séjourner au ministère chargé de la Prévention et de l’Assainissement. La division des
infrastructures, des équipements et de la maintenance (DIEM) au sein de la DAGE a été transférée au
ministère du patrimoine bâti, de la construction et de l’habitat (MPBHC) ; cette division vient tout juste d’être
retournée au ministère de la santé et de la prévention médicale.
Il faut ajouter à ces difficultés l’important déficit des personnels de santé qui a fait qu’un nombre relativement
important de postes de santé sont restés fermés pendant longtemps faute d’infirmiers. Tout cela dans un
climat social délétère ayant abouti au blocage du SIG pendant trois années.
Au plan externe, le consensus au niveau du gouvernement et de la communauté des partenaires sur la
pertinence de l’approche programme et la place centrale de la santé dans la lutte contre la pauvreté ont
favorisé la mobilisation de ressources additionnelles pour le secteur de la santé. Le Sénégal est un pays de
démocratie stable et aucun fait politique majeur n’a constitué un frein pour la mise en oeuvre du projet.
Partenariat
Le partenariat a été renforcé avec l’avènement du PDIS. Les collectivités locales, les ONG/OCB et les
partenaires au développement ont participé activement à toutes les phases du projet. Il faut souligner que c’est
le crédit qui a toujours pris en charge l’organisation des réunions conjointes de coordination avec les
partenaires au développement. A compter de 2006, ces activités seront inscrites dans le budget national. Le
crédit a permis également de mieux impliquer les ONG/OCB par le financement de projets identifiés sur le
terrain en collaboration avec les responsables des services de santé au niveau local. Il a aussi appuyé
l’organisation de différentes activités avec les collectivités locales dont un forum sur "PDIS et
décentralisation" qui a contribué fortement à atténuer les difficultés rencontrées lors des premières années
d’application de la loi sur la décentralisation de 1996.
La nouvelle dynamique de ce partenariat et la volonté de le développer ont amené le ministère de la santé et
de la prévention médicale à se réorganiser en conséquence par la création de la Cellule d’appui au
financement de la santé et au partenariat (CAFSP) et par l’élaboration d’une politique de contractualisation.
Le partenariat devra être élargi en tenant compte surtout des avantages comparatifs et en veillant à la bonne
gestion des contrats.
4. Pérennité du projet
Le Gouvernement du Sénégal, tout au long de la mise en œuvre du PDIS a posé des actes qui s’inscrivent dans
la pérennité et le maintien des acquis du programme. Ces actes concernent essentiellement l’amélioration du
cadre institutionnel, le renforcement de la disponibilité des ressources et de la capacité du personnel.
Acquis majeurs
L’appui du crédit IDA au PDIS a permis une augmentation significative des ressources du secteur qui ont
doublé entre 1998 et 2003.
Les autres acquis majeurs se résument comme suit : (i) le renforcement de la capacité opérationnelle du
Ministère de la Santé grâce au regroupement de l’essentiel de ses services au sein d’un même immeuble
facilitant ainsi le contact des acteurs du système et la coordination de la mise en oeuvre des programmes ; (ii)
l’amélioration de l’accès des populations , notamment les plus démunies, à des soins de qualité ; (iii)
l’amélioration de la disponibilité en médicaments de qualité à moindre coût, grâce à la promotion de la
distribution des médicaments génériques par le secteur privé ; (iv) l’accroissement régulier du budget de l’Etat
et la diversification des sources de financement du secteur avec notamment la promotion des mutuelles de
santé ; (v) l’accroissement de l’effectif en personnel du secteur et sa formation continue afin de favoriser une
- 45 -
augmentation de la productivité du travail dans le secteur public ; (vi) la création d’un Service National de
l’information sanitaire rattaché au cabinet, dans la perspective d’une intégration et d’une coordination
centrale de l’ensemble des sous systèmes de l’information apte à fournir une information sanitaire globale,
régulière, à jour et de qualité ; (vii) le renforcement de la planification et de la budgétisation grâce à la mise
en place de la Cellule d’appui et de Suivi du PNDS ; (viii) l’élaboration du plan national stratégique de
communication pour promouvoir chez les populations des comportements favorables à la santé ;
Capacité de maintien de ces acquis
Elle dépend essentiellement du cadre institutionnel d’un contexte politique favorable marqué par la stabilité et
l’engagement en faveur du secteur au plus haut sommet de l’Etat.
Dispositions institutionnelles : Le secteur a engagé des réformes dans plusieurs domaines en vue d’améliorer
les capacités opérationnelles du Ministère. Ces réformes concernent notamment l’amélioration de l’accès à
des soins de qualité en particulier en faveur des populations les plus démunies, le renforcement de la
mobilisation des ressources financières, de la disponibilité des ressources humaines en quantité et en qualité,
l’amélioration de la gestion des formations sanitaires .
Ces réformes sont matérialisées à travers les dispositions institutionnelles suivantes : (i) la loi n° 98-08
portant sur la Réforme hospitalière adoptée par l ‘Assemblée Nationale le 12 février 1998 et dont le but est
d’améliorer les performances des hôpitaux sur le plan de la gestion et de la qualité des soins (ii) la loi
2003-14 du 4 juin 2003 relative aux mutuelles de santé qui traduit l’importance que le Gouvernement du
Sénégal accorde à cette stratégie de facilitation de l’accès aux soins pour les populations à faible revenu, (iii)
le Décret N° 2004-1404 portant organisation du Ministère de la Santé et de la Prévention médicale qui entre
autres crée de nouveaux services (Service national de l’Information sanitaire, la Cellule d’appui au
Financement de la Santé et au Partenariat pour assurer l’accès financier aux soins de santé, notamment aux
populations les plus démunies, la Direction des Ressources humaines pour une meilleure planification des
effectifs, et une amélioration de la capacité de gestion des responsables du système, la Direction de l’hygiène
publique) ; (iv) l’arrêté ministériel n° 005796 du 13 juillet 2004, fixant le ressort territorial et l’organisation
des districts sanitaires qui donne une meilleure visibilité de la répartition sur le territoire national des 56
districts sanitaires, fixe les normes d’implantation des postes de santé et des centres de santé et détermine le
niveau du plateau technique du centre de santé de référence ; (v) l’arrêté interministériel fixant la répartition
des ressources du fonds pour la santé dans le cadre de la motivation financière du personnel de santé ; (vi) le
projet de décret portant statut spécial du personnel des établissements publics de santé, (vii) le projet de
décret portant sur les comités de santé.
Disponibilité des ressources : Le financement du PDIS provient de plusieurs sources : l’Etat qui s’est engagé
à augmenter le budget de la santé de 0,5% par an, les populations par le biais du recouvrement des coûts, des
communautés locales sous forme de recettes fiscales et des bailleurs de fonds. De 1998 à 2002, le crédit a
financé 12% des coûts du PDIS. Il s’ajoute à ces différentes sources de financement, la possibilité de
mobiliser des fonds à partir des subventions et les mutuelles de santé.
A l’état actuel, il est difficile d’avoir une idée précise sur le niveau exact du financement de la santé. La
commission macro économie et santé dont le décret de mise en place est en cours, devrait permettre de
disposer d’une vision globale du financement dans le secteur.
En ce qui concerne les ressources humaines, le gouvernement s’est engagé à recruter à partir de 1998, en
moyenne 250 agents par an et de recourir à la contractualisation en vue de combler le déficit en personnel.
Malgré ces efforts, les effectifs ne sont pas encore maîtrisés et les besoins sont loin d’être satisfaits. Toutefois,
la création des centres régionaux de formation en santé ainsi que la mise à contribution des écoles privées de
santé pour la formation d’infirmiers et de sages femmes ouvre de nouvelles perspectives dans le renforcement
de l’effectif du personnel. La création de la DRH, l’élaboration et la mise en œuvre du plan de formation,
l’amélioration des conditions de travail, l’arrêté interministériel fixant la répartition des ressources du fonds
pour la santé ainsi que le projet de décret portant statut spécial du personnel des établissements publics de
- 46 -
santé sont un ensemble de mesures incitatives.
Contexte politique et syndical : Le contexte politique est nettement favorable. Grâce à l’ouverture
démocratique, le pays connaît une stabilité. Par contre, la vie syndicale est émaillée par des tensions
périodiques entre le gouvernement et les syndicats du secteur qui justifient cela par la non satisfaction de leur
plateforme revendicative. Ces tensions répétées réduisent les efforts et compromettent à terme les acquis. La
rétention de l’information sanitaire pendant 3 ans par les membres du SUTSAS en est une parfaite
illustration.
Mesures incitatives au profit des bénéficiaires et participants : À l’endroit des bénéficiaires, des initiatives
sont en cours. Ainsi, pour favoriser l’accès des populations vulnérables aux soins, le Ministère de la Santé a
assuré la gratuité des accouchements et des césariennes dans les cinq régions les plus pauvres en vue de
réduire la mortalité maternelle. Dans le cadre de la lutte contre le paludisme, le TPI est gratuit pour les
femmes enceintes. L’élaboration du plan national stratégique de communication a pour but de susciter
l’adhésion des populations aux programmes de santé, par une campagne soutenue d’IEC. A ce propos, il
importe de mobiliser les ressources nécessaires à sa mise en œuvre afin d’atteindre les objectifs qu’il s’est
fixés. Certaines orientations de la Réforme Hospitalière représentent aussi des mesures incitatives pour les
bénéficiaires. Il s’agit notamment : (i) du respect de tarifs accessibles, avec la détermination de fourchettes ;
(ii) de la prise en charge gratuite des personnes démunies ; (iii) de l’institution d’une charte du malade qui
indique les droits et devoirs du malade vis à vis de l’hôpital et des personnels ; (iv) de la représentation des
usagers dans le Conseil d’Administration de l’Hôpital.
5. Performance de la Banque
La Banque Mondiale dans le cadre du soutien à l’exécution du Programme de développement Intégré de la
Santé (PDIS) a accordé un crédit à la république du Sénégal pour financer un vaste programme de dépenses
sectorielles de 1998 à 2002.
Ce crédit a servi à financer des dépenses d’investissement et à rembourser une part des coûts de
fonctionnement de cet exercice.
L’appréciation de la performance de la Banque par rapport à ce projet est à évaluer par rapport aux missions
dévolues à cette organisation dans le cadre de la mise en œuvre de ce programme aux différentes étapes et
répondre aux questions : (i) La Banque a-t-elle joué son rôle pendant la phase de préparation ? (ii) a-t-elle
assuré le suivi des activités du programme dans la mise en œuvre des différentes composantes à travers des
missions de supervision ? (iii) a-t-elle assuré la mise à disposition des fonds conformément aux procédures et
délais ?
Pendant la phase de préparation, la Banque a apporté un soutien. à l’élaboration du PDIS. Ce soutien a
consisté à : (i) la participation à l’élaboration du projet ; (ii) la recherche de fonds pour la prise en charge des
activités préparatoires du PDIS ; (iii) le plaidoyer auprès des autres partenaires pour l’adhésion à l’approche
programme ; (iv) l’allégement des conditions d’accès au crédit.
Durant la phase de mise en oeuvre du programme, les supervisions de la Banque ont été régulières et ont
permis à chaque fois de faire des recommandations consignées dans des aides mémoires. C’est ainsi que des
améliorations ont été apportées au fonctionnement de la DAGE et dans l’exécution des programmes
prioritaires.
Les résultats du programme ont été régulièrement partagés avec les autres départements ministériels à
l’occasion des revues du portefeuille organisées par l’IDA. La Banque a également accompagné
techniquement et financièrement les réformes entreprises dans le secteur et diligenté le traitement des
demandes de renouvellement de fonds qui sont examinées dans un délai raisonnable de 30 à 45 jours avec une
moyenne de 30 jours. L’acceptation de l’extension du crédit a permis l’achèvement de beaucoup d’activités ;
ce qui a porté le taux d’exécution du crédit à 99% (contre 48% à la date prévue de clôture du compte).
- 47 -
Malgré ces performances, il faut regretter que la Banque n’ait pas accepté l’ouverture de comptes d’avances
au niveau des régions ; ce qui aurait amélioré l’exécution des activités au niveau opérationnel. Par ailleurs, la
validation trop tardive par l’IDA des activités des PO a influencé négativement le taux de réalisation à tel
point qu’à partir d’un certain moment les régions n’accordaient plus de crédit aux PO. Le changement du
Task Team Leader en cours d’exécution, comme desideratum inhérent à cela, nous pouvons retenir la remise
en question des orientations stratégiques, l’exemple est donné par la remise en question de certains projets de
génie civil des hôpitaux et le retard dans l’exécution.
6. Performance de l’Etat
Respect des engagements souscrits : L’Etat a respecté en son temps toutes les conditions de mise en vigueur
du crédit ainsi que les préalables aux premiers décaissements.
La réorganisation de la DAGE a conduit d’une part à l’éclatement de l’ancienne Division des
Approvisionnements et des Contrats (DAC) en une Division des Affaires Administratives Financières et
Comptables (DAAFC) et une Cellule de Passation des Marchés (CPM) et d’autre part à la mise en place d’un
Bureau de l’Analyste Financier.
Au point de vue de la mobilisation des ressources, la DAGE a produit un guide sur les modalités pratiques de
mise à disposition des fonds au niveau des structures bénéficiaires dans le cadre de procédures harmonisées.
L’ouverture de caisses d’avance et le recrutement de 11 comptables (1 comptable par région) a permis de jeter
les bases d’une décentralisation de la gestion financière permettant une plus grande flexibilité dans la
disponibilité des ressources au niveau local.
Cependant la politique de la décentralisation à travers les caisses d’avances n’a pas connu le succès escompté
en raison d’un certain nombre de contraintes d’ordre institutionnel dont l’inapplicabilité du décret 90-600 et
la complexité des scénarios de prise en charge.
Au plan de la coordination, du suivi des opérations et de l’appui pour la mise en œuvre du PDIS de nets
progrès ont été enregistrés.
La planification des opérations annuelles a été organisée de manière à assurer la participation de tous les
acteurs. Par la suite, les arbitrages au niveau central on été abandonnés au profit des arbitrages au niveau
régional avec toutefois la détermination par le niveau central d’allocations budgétaires globales.
La RAC a permis au ministère de renforcer son leadership même s’il est insuffisant. Le suivi évaluation a été
toutefois perturbé par le climat social délétère au cours des premières années de mise en oeuvre du PDIS avec
le blocage du PDIS. La situation s’est améliorée par la suite sans toutefois atteindre les performances
souhaitées. Il faut toutefois souligner que les évaluations à mi-parcours et finale ont été réalisées comme prévu
et que deux enquêtes de grande envergure ont été menées à savoir l’ESIS 99 et l’EDS4. Mais il reste que la
fonctionnalité du SIG fait partie des principaux défis à relever au cours de la phase II du PNDS qui a fait de la
performance du système une priorité.
Niveau de libération du fonds de contrepartie : De façon globale, l’apport de l’Etat à titre de
contrepartie a été satisfaisant. Le fonds de contrepartie qui était prévu pour 2 518 Millions FCFA a été libéré à
hauteur de 2 215 Millions FCFA soit un taux de libération de 88%.
Il faut noter les importants efforts complémentaires fournis par l’Etat (1 118 Millions FCFA soit 44% de
l’engagement initial).
Ce fonds de contrepartie a permis la réalisation d’une partie des volets génie civil et équipements du
programme destiné aux structures de santé.
Niveau d’implication des bénéficiaires : L'approche multisectorielle adoptée devait permettre, d’une part de
- 48 -
centraliser les ressources octroyées au secteur et d’autre part de créer une synergie au sein des structures
sanitaires et d’autre part de renforcer les capacités de planification, d'exécution et du suivi.
L’apport des populations notamment dans le financement de la santé a été constant durant l’exécution de la
première phase du PNDS (PDIS).
Prévu pour un montant de 24 865 Millions FCFA, l’apport financier des populations s’est chiffré finalement à
71 426 Millions FCFA (soit le triple de ce qui a été prévu).
La mise en œuvre du PDIS a consacré l’émergence d’un secteur mutualiste à travers la Cellule d’Appui aux
Mutuelles, aux IPM et aux Comités de Santé (CAMICS). Plusieurs mutuelles de santé ont ainsi vu le jour
contribuant ainsi à l’accessibilité financière au service de santé d’une frange importante de la population. De
19 mutuelles de santé fonctionnelles répertoriées lors de l’inventaire de 1997, le nombre de mutuelles de santé
fonctionnelles est passé à 28 en 2000, à 79 en 2003. En d’autres termes, le nombre de mutuelles de santé
fonctionnelles a été multiplié par 4 en l’espace de 6 ans ; la fondation des mutuelles de santé s’est accélérée
entre 2000 et 2003, le nombre de mutuelles fonctionnelles étant multiplié par 3 en l’espace de 3 ans. En plus
des 79 mutuelles de santé fonctionnelles répertoriées en 2003, 30 mutuelles de santé étaient en cours de
gestation au moment de l’inventaire de 2003, 18 mutuelles de santé à l’état de projet, et 9 mutuelles de santé
en difficulté. Ainsi, en 2004, le nombre de mutuelles de santé fonctionnelles a été porté à plus de 120.
La contrepartie attendue des collectivités locales a dans l’ensemble été libérée permettant la réalisation du
programme d’infrastructures sanitaires. De façon globale, l’apport des collectivités locales au financement de
santé dans le cadre du PDIS se situe environ à 12 809 Millions F CFA sur une prévision globale de 12 939
Millions (soit un taux de réalisation de 99%).
L’existence d’un document sur la politique de contractualisation a permis au secteur de la santé de disposer
d’un cadre propice au développement d’un partenariat entre les ONG, le secteur privé et les organismes
publics.
Niveau d’absorption des crédits : Les partenaires au projet (Etat, bailleurs de fonds, collectivités locales et
populations) ont contribué significativement à la réalisation des objectifs du programme. Ainsi, les crédits
totaux mis à la disposition du programme (576 684 Millions de FCFA) ont été exécutés à hauteur de 435 076
Millions FCFA soit un taux d’absorption de 75%.
Il faut cependant signaler que les taux d’absorption des crédits Etat (87%) on été plus satisfaisants que ceux
enregistrés avec ceux des autres partenaires.
Contraintes d’exécution et difficultés rencontrées
Facteurs d’ordre structurel : L’exécution de certains volets du programme comme le génie civil et
l’équipement a été plus lente que prévue. En effet, l’essentiel des travaux de génie civil n’a été achevé et
réceptionné qu’à partir de l’an cinq du programme alors qu’ils devaient l’être dans les deux premières années
d’exécution comme mentionné dans l’accord de crédit. Les équipements destinés aux structures sanitaires
(équipements médicaux, véhicules, matériels informatiques) n’ont pas été acquis à temps pour mieux asseoir
un appui logistique en vue de l’exécution, de la gestion et du suivi du projet à l’échelon central et régional.
L’inadéquation entre mécanismes de financement et procédures d’exécution : les mécanismes définis pour
l’exécution financière du PDIS ont mis du temps à être traduits en procédures d’exécution globales et
efficaces. Ainsi, le manuel du PDIS n’a été adopté consensuellement qu’en juin 2000 et n’a jamais été
appliqué correctement et il n’incluait pas les procédures de gestion décentralisée.
Les Missions Conjointes de Supervision sont périodiquement organisées pour un suivi rapproché du
programme. Elles se font avec des partenaires au développement. Mais il est à déplorer que chaque bailleur
ne s’est intéressé qu’aux activités qu’il a financées ou aux zones géographiques qu’il a investies.
- 49 -
Facteurs de blocage dans le fonctionnement des structures : Le financement de la Banque, est logé dans un
compte spécial géré par le Direction de la Dette et des Investissements (DDI) du Ministère de l’Economie et
des Finances qui est aussi l’Ordonnateur délégué. Un sous compte est cependant ouvert au nom du Directeur
de l’Administration Générale et de l’Equipement (DAGE) dont le plafond est décidé par le Ministère de
l’Economie et des Finances. La faiblesse du plafond de ce sous compte n’a jamais permis de couvrir
suffisamment les besoins en financement des services pour exécuter les activités programmées dans les Plans
d’Opération (PO).
A l’échelon régional les régions médicales qui ne disposaient que d’une caisse d’avance de 3 millions de
FCFA mise en place par l’Etat ont été aussi confrontées à un problème d’insuffisance de ressources pour le
financement des activités planifiées dans leur plan d’opération. L’IDA a, au début du programme, été réticent
dans la mise en place de comptes d’avances au niveau régional. Ces comptes d’avance ouverts tardivement en
Février 2004 n’ont ainsi pas permis d’atteindre les résultats escomptés dans le cadre de la politique de
décentralisation de la gestion financière.
En effet, les retards dans l’exécution et la justification des activités financées au niveau régional n’ont pas
permis de renouveler régulièrement les comptes d’avance.
Les facteurs conjoncturels : Le démarrage du PDIS s’est fait sans qu’au préalable des outils de gestion
adaptés au programme ne soient mis en place à la DAGE pour prendre en charge les apports des bailleurs. En
effet, cette Direction n’a pas été, au début du programme, ni bien structurée, ni suffisamment étoffée en
compétences pour la prise en charge du PDIS (dont l’exécution sous forme d’approche programme était une
nouveauté).
La DAGE n’a en effet commencé à renforcer ses capacités (Contrôleur Interne, Analyse Financier, Chef
Comptable) qu’un an après le démarrage du programme.
En outre, la réorganisation des services par la création d’une Division des Affaires Administratives
Financière et Comptables et d’une Cellule de Passation des Marchés est intervenue tardivement (un an avant
la clôture du projet) pour produire les résultats escomptés.
La décentralisation financière n’a pas produit d’impact significatif dans la réalisation des activités au niveau
périphérique. Les contraintes d’ordre législatif et réglementaire (mise en œuvre du décret 90-600) et des
problèmes de scénario de prise en charge expliquent les faibles résultats enregistrés.
L’utilisation partielle des possibilités offertes par le logiciel Tompro n’a pas favorisé la synergie escomptée
pour le suivi comptable, budgétaire et la passation des marchés. Ce qui a eu comme conséquence, pour
certains exercices, le retard dans la production des états financiers.
La supervision des activités des ONG par le niveau central (suivi évaluation) n’a pas été effective. Cette
situation a eu comme conséquence majeure la baisse de la qualité des prestations sur le terrain.
7. Impact du projet
Sans conteste le projet a contribué à la réduction de la mortalité infantile et à la baisse du taux de fécondité. Il
reste à évaluer la tendance de la mortalité maternelle. Dans ce cadre, les résultats de l’EDS IV fourniront des
données en février 2006. Dores et déjà les résultats enregistrés en matière de surveillance de la grossesse et de
l’accouchement font espérer des progrès certains dans ce domaine.
Les réformes entreprises à la faveur du projet ont abouti à la réorganisation du Ministère notamment par la
création de nouvelles directions à même de prendre en charge les priorités du département.
La tenue régulière des réunions de coordination a développé l’esprit de coordination et de concertation entre
les différents acteurs ce qui a contribué à l’amélioration de la performance de la plupart des services.
- 50 -
L’approche programme a permis la participation des collectivités locales et de la société civile à la gestion des
programmes de santé. L’intervention de plus en plus importante de ces acteurs a amené le Ministère de la
santé à se doter d’une politique de contractualisation
Les populations ont également bénéficié d’un renforcement de leurs compétences dans le domaine de la
mutualité, de la prévention de la maladie et dans la prise en charge des questions liées à l’hygiène. S’agissant
précisément des mutuelles de santé, leur avènement a contribué certainement à l’amélioration de la couverture
sanitaire en facilitant l’accessibilité financière aux soins.
Il faut toutefois déplorer la forte propension à privilégier les activités de gestion au détriment des activités de
soins.
8. Leçons tirées du projet et de sa réalisation
Le PDIS a montré que "l’approche programme" est difficile à appliquer par les partenaires qui tiennent plus à
leurs procédures qu’à l’idée de toute harmonisation. Cette situation a constitué un facteur bloquant avec
l’insuffisance de leadership constaté au niveau de l’Etat.
Le projet a aussi mis en évidence les faiblesses du système de suivi évaluation des programmes. Il est évident
que les progrès réalisés au cours de la première phase du PNDS n’auraient pas pu être mesurés si l’EDS4
n’était pas réalisée. En effet le SIG a montré ses limites et sa fragilité, situation qui a amené les programmes à
développer des stratégies alternatives qui perturbent d’avantage le système. Il est temps de disposer d’un
système performant qui allie la nécessité de répondre aux besoins spécifiques des programmes à l’obligation
de disposer d’un tableau de bord qui renseigne en permanence sur l’évolution des indicateurs de santé
principaux.
A la lumière des résultats obtenus avec les ONG, il est souhaitable de revoir le système de gestion des contrats
signés avec ces dernières. Toutefois, l’intervention de la société civile reste cependant nécessaire au vu de
l’importance des défis à relever au niveau communautaire.
- 51 -
- 52 -
18°W
16°W
14°W
SENEG AL
M A U R I TA N I A
Sénégal
To
Nouakchott
Rosso
REGION CAPITALS
Doue
Dagana
SENEGAL
SELECTED CITIES AND TOWNS
Podor
Ndiay
Ndiayè
ène
Ndiayène
Richard-Toll
Richard-Toll
NATIONAL CAPITAL
Haïïré Lao
Ha
Haïré
RIVERS
Lac de
Guier
MAIN ROADS
To
Mbout
Kaedi
Saint-Louis
16°N
Léona
Ndiaye
llé
Va
Mpal
ed
Lagbar
uF
S A I N TLOUIS
erlo
Louga
RAILROADS
16°N
Thilogne
REGION BOUNDARIES
INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARIES
Matam
Koki
Tioukougne Peul
Fâs Boye
Bakel
La Ferdo
a ll é
Diourbel
e du
Gossas
FAT I C K
m
Karang
Keur Madiabel
50
75
100 Kilometers
gou
TA M B A C O U N D A
Bounkiling
C
Oussouye
Casamance
Goudomp
To
Ingore
Sédhiou
S
édhiou
am
as
anc
e
Diana
Malari
KOLDA
V
élingara
Vélingara
M
Kolda
al
50
TTanaf
anaf
To
Farim
m b ie
Mako
419 m
K
édougou
Kédougou
To
Balake
GUINEA
75 Miles
16°W
Ga
Saraya
To
Koundara
To
Bafata
12°N
18°W
e
14°W
12°N
12°W
IBRD 33475
JANUARY 2005
25
ink
n ga
Kaya
GUINEA-BISSAU
0
Dialakoto
Meedina
Gounas
ntou
lo u
Ziguinchor
25
d ou
San
u
Ko
Bignona
MALI
Tambacounda
Tambacounda
TH E
G AM B IA
IA
GAM
ZIGUINCHOR
0
Koussanar
Maka
G ambia
Diouloulou
Diembéreng
14°N
Koungheul
Nganda
Nioro du Rip
To
Barra
To
Banjul
KAOLACK
Niahè
ène
ne
Sakone
ATLANTIC
OCEAN
Kaffrine
Kaffrine
Kaolack
Nayé
Nayé
Toub
Toubéré
oubééré Bafal
oum
Sal
Guinguinééo
Guinguin
Guinguinéo
é
lou
To
Kayes
F alé m
14°N
Sa
Mbou n
Payar
Fatick
Ndangane
l
ga
né
Sé
THIÈS
Mbour
lo
Rufisque
Mbaké
Mbaké
DIOURBEL
Thièès
Thi
Thiès
u
Vèlingara
Vèlingara
Tivaouane
Tivaouane
V
DAKAR
Kayar
ed
Mamâ
Mam
âri
Mamâri
r
Fe
Darou Mousti
Mékhé
Mékh
khéé
CAPVERT
Va
ll é
LOUGA
Darou Khoudos
This map was produced by the Map Design Unit of The World Bank.
The boundaries, colors, denominations and any other information
shown on this map do not imply, on the part of The World Bank
Group, any judgment on the legal status of any territory, or any
endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries.
Linguèère
Lingu
Linguère
Daraa
K
ébémèr
Kébémèr

Documents pareils