DUT FC - Evaluation #1

Commentaires

Transcription

DUT FC - Evaluation #1
DUT FC - Evaluation #1 - November 2010
Corrigé
Questions and Answers (6 points)
Directions: you will hear a question or statement and three responses. They will be spoken twice. Select
the best response to the question or statement and circle the letter A, B, or C on your statement sheet.
12.
C / the clerk will assist a hotel guest who loses a room key
13.
B / since the barber is free this morning, he can cut the speaker’s hair
14.
A / the French asociate answers ‘who’
15.
C / the marketing department has a list of suggestions for the name of the product
16.
B / the speaker responds to the suggestion od eating with a reason for not being hungry
17.
B / I don’t have tilme answers ‘why’ by providing a reason for not resting
Conversation (6 points)
Directions: you will hear some conversations between two people. You will be asked to answer three
questions about what the speakers say in each conversation. Select the best response to each question
and circle the letter A, B, C, or D. The conversation will be spoken twice.
Conversation 1
#10 – Who is the man talking to?
A) a bus driver - B) a mail carrier - C) a store clerk - D) a bank
teller
#11 – What is the man doing?
A) mailing a letter - B) asking directions - C) counting his
money - D) paying for something
#12 – What is across the street from
the post office?
A) a mailbox - B) a taxi stand - C) a library - D) a vending
machine
IUT de Troyes / Gilles Grosdoit-Artur – English Passeport – academic year 2006-2007
-1-
24/11/2010
Keep your English Up-to-date (28 points)
VOCABULARY (6 points)
Match these words and phrases to their definitions.
A. versatile
1 - without respect for tradition or normal ways of doing
things
B. relatives
2 - can be used in many different ways
C. professionals
3 - to give in to something; to be defeated by
something
D. to upload something
4 - members of your family
E. cavalier
5 - people who have good jobs requiring a good
education and extra training
F. to succumb
6 - to add something to an Internet web page
A/
2
B/
4
C/
5
D/
6
E/
1
F/
3
LISTENING 1 (9 points)
Do you use any of the social networking websites which are so popular these days? You know - the places where you can
connect up with friends and relatives and meet people who share the same interests as you?
If you’re younger you may use MySpace, young adults are more likely to be found on Facebook and busy professionals may
prefer something like LinkedIn. But at least two of these sites have one thing in common: apart from being social spaces
where you can meet and chat to people, share photos and other things, they’ve all added new verbs and nouns to the language
in the past couple of years.
Now, listen to Gavin Dudeny talking about change in the English language and answer these questions.
a. What type of Internet site does he discuss?
b. Who do you connect up with on those sites?
a. social networking sites
b. friends and relatives
Listen to Section 1 again and decide if the following statements are true or false, according to Gavin
Dudeny.
a. People who use Myspace are generally not as old as people who use Facebook
b. LinkedIn is for people with good jobs.
c. Sites like these have given new words such as adverbs and adjectives to the language.
a. True – ‘If you’re younger you may use MySpace, young adults are more likely to be
found on Facebook’
b. True – ‘busy professionals may prefer something like LinkedIn’
c. False – ‘they’ve all added new verbs and nouns to the language in the past couple of
years.’
IUT de Troyes / Gilles Grosdoit-Artur – English Passeport – academic year 2006-2007
-2-
24/11/2010
LISTENING 2 (10 points) – use capital F or capital M for Facebook and Myspace
Let’s take a look at some examples. I’ve just facebooked the photos from my summer holiday [uploaded them to
my Facebook page]. I facebooked that guy John and it turns out he’s an architect [looked him up in Facebook].
Did you facebook Susan about the party? [contact Susan through her Facebook page]. Anyway, nice to meet
you. Do you mind if I facebook you? [add you as a Facebook friend].
As you can see, ‘facebook’ is a pretty versatile word, and you could say the same about ‘myspace’, which you
will find being used in much the same way all over the Net. LinkedIn (being a more adult, professional
community) is yet to succumb to such cavalier twisting of the English language!
And while you’re ‘facebooking’ or ‘myspacing’ you may also find yourself ‘commenting’ (writing a comment
on someone’s Facebook or MySpace page), as in this example: ‘I commented Dawn that she should come to the
pub on Saturday and she commented me that she couldn’t because she was going away for the weekend’.
Anyway, I must get on. I haven’t facebooked yet today and there’s sure to be a lot to catch up on!
Find the phrases in the text that have the following meanings. (3 points)
a. a group of people with similar interests or connections
b. stop doing something in order to do something more important
c. to find out the latest news and information; to bring yourself up-to-date
a. community
b. to get on
c. to catch up on something
Grammar (40 points)
Remplacer les éléments soulignés par un pronom personnel (sujet ou complément) / 5 points
James drove Cathy to the station.
he / her
Kevin and Simon need that computer.
they / it
Mary still hasn’t got her driving licence.
she / it
Chris wants to buy a new car.
he / it
Arnold and I lost our books.
we / them
Complétez les phrases suivantes par le pronom réfléchi qui convient. / 5 points
I did a good job. I’m very proud of MYSELF
They told me they enjoyed THEMSELVES at the party.
Look at YOURSELF Have you been playing in the mud again?
China has established ITSELF as a fast-growing nation.
We’ve managed to coinvince OURSELVES that it’s no big deal.
IUT de Troyes / Gilles Grosdoit-Artur – English Passeport – academic year 2006-2007
-3-
24/11/2010
Transformer les phrases comme dans l’exemple. / 7 points
This house belongs to my aunt.
her / It’s hers.
This computer belongs to my parents.
their / theirs
This sofa belongs to Jane and me.
our / ours
This book belongs to Jane and Terry.
their / theirs
This is the dog’s bone.
its / its
This pen belongs to you.
your / yours
This is Mum’s recipe.
her / hers
This Mp3 player belongs to me.
my / mine
Mettez les phrases suivantes à la forme négative. / 6 points
He would have done it.
Wouldn’t
I’ve been there.
I’ve not / I haven’t
They must come back tomorrow.
Mustn’t
He hates coffee.
Doesn’t hate
We watched television last night.
Didn’t watch
We saw you.
Didn’t see
Posez les questions portant sur les éléments soulignés. / 8 points
Jennifer flew* to Los Angeles yesterday.
Who flew
Jennifer flew to Los Angeles yesterday.
What did J do
Jennifer flew to Los Angeles yesterday.
Where did she fly to
Jennifer flew to Los Angeles yesterday.
When did she fly
I go to the cinema once a week.
How often do you
I went to see him because he’s sick.
Why did you
There were eighty-five people at his wedding.
How many
He’s tall, thin, and wears glasses.
What does he look like
*: To fly / flew / flown (voler, s’envoler)
IUT de Troyes / Gilles Grosdoit-Artur – English Passeport – academic year 2006-2007
-4-
24/11/2010
Traduisez les phrases ou expressions suivantes en utilisant « ‘ », « ‘s » ou « of ». / 8 points
Pour « ‘ », « ‘s », vous prendrez soin d’indiquer la prononciation /s/, /z/, /iz/ ou ∅ si la marque du génitif ne
s’entend pas. / + 1 point (phonétique)
Les amis de Nancy.
Nancy’s friends.
/z/
Les bénéfices (profits) de l’année prochaine.
Next year’s profits.
/z/
La maison de Silas.
Silas’s house.
/ iz /
Le chien de mon colocataire (roomate).
My roomate’s dog.
/s/
Le politique étrangère (foreign policy) de l’Angleterre.
France’s foreign policy.
/ iz /
C’est la voiture de l’homme qui a disparu (to disappear) hier.
It the car of the man who disappeared
yesterday.
/z/
Les souvenirs de mes grands-parents.
My grand-parents’ memories.
/∅/
C’est la décision de United Airlines.
IUT de Troyes / Gilles Grosdoit-Artur – English Passeport – academic year 2006-2007
-5-
24/11/2010