Debates - adibs feminista

Commentaires

Transcription

Debates - adibs feminista
Debates
Do you approve of spending
$300 million on HPV vaccination?
NO
Abby Lippman
PhD Madeline Boscoe
W
omen in North America most at risk of developing
and dying from invasive cervical cancer are those
for whom Papanicolaou testing has “failed”1: either they
were not tested within the recommended time frame or
they did not have follow-up and appropriate interventions. Although women in this situation are often already
marginalized by poverty and lack access to primary care,
many who do enter the health system remain inexplicably
untested.2 This raises the question: will vaccination itself
make a substantial difference in the lives of the women
in Canada most likely to develop and die from invasive
cervical cancer? Current evidence creates serious doubts.
Adding value?
As with all new technologies, new vaccines need to be
evaluated to determine whether using them will improve
upon what is already available and, if so, at what cost.3
Many provinces currently lack linked cancer and screening registries or well-developed organized screening
programs; follow-up on abnormal Pap smear results is
erratic; and outreach programs struggle for funding. It
is legitimate, then, to question the rushed introduction
of school-based vaccination programs before appropriate evaluation of what vaccinations would contribute to existing programs that are themselves in need of
resources and support. It is also unfortunate that programs were introduced in an atmosphere of confusion
and misunderstanding that arose from vast pharmaceutical advertising and marketing campaigns creating “fear
[of cancer] and cheer [about the vaccine].”4 These erroneous “end cervical cancer” promotions eclipsed public
education about issues such as the actual low prevalence of oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus
(HPV), the very high rate of spontaneous clearance of
infections, and the slow progression of infections.
Data to support public health agencies and individuals in making reasoned decisions about immunizations
are limited. The published trial of Gardasil focusing on
RN DU Carol Scurfield
MD FRCPC MCHS
young girls ages 9-15, the group targeted specifically for
school-based immunizations in Canada, reported only
on short-term immunogenicity and safety, not efficacy.5
Broader context
Immunization is not the only approach to preventing
cervical cancer in Canada; secondary prevention through
Pap testing has already reduced mortality.6 There is,
moreover, added value associated with health care visits for Pap testing. For many women, these visits provide
opportunities for counseling about contraception and
preconception, screening for sexually transmitted infections, health assessments, and health promotion with
regard to smoking and nutrition.
Certainly, the costs (financial and other, private and public) of Pap testing and programs for its delivery, of subsequent interventions for those with true- and false-positive
test results, and of the personal effects of invasive cervical cancer warrant attention. But we cannot overlook
how cervical cancer screening—and vaccination—occur
within a broad reproductive and general health care context that often does not serve women well. Consequently,
any renewed attention to cervical cancer as a “preventable
disease” will remain problematic as long as discussions of
prevention narrow to an artificial debate between those
apparently “for” and those accused of being “against” a
vaccine. We need to consider vaccinations not in isolation,
but as part of an overall reproductive and sexual health
strategy within which reduction in the already relatively
low frequency of substantial morbidity and mortality from
cervical cancer (compared with other cancers affecting
women throughout life) is but one objective.
Simply adding vaccinations to current practices for
reducing the burden of cervical cancer can have net costs
in the millions of dollars for many years to come.7 Yet
there has been no public debate about whether vaccination as an add-on is the best use of resources in light of
continued on page 177
The parties in this debate will have the opportunity to refute each other’s arguments in Rebuttals to be published
in an upcoming issue.
Vol 54: february • fÉvrier 2008 Canadian Family Physician • Le Médecin de famille canadien 175
Debates
NO continued from page 175
possible alternatives needing funding (eg, enhanced and
improved Pap smear screening to capture women now
missed; further developing other approaches, including
direct HPV testing8 and liquid-based cytology; establishing
registries to monitor Pap testing programs and to record
rare side effects to the vaccine; and tracking those who, if
vaccinated, might need booster shots in the future).
The high projected costs of vaccination programs
suggest that their benefits—and cost-effectiveness—will
be most unlikely to be realized in countries such as
Canada unless there are substantial changes to existing screening and treatment programs.7,9 But we must
be cautious about simply replacing ongoing activities to
offset the cost of immunizations and first obtain all the
evidence needed for policy making, including evidence
on potential lost opportunity costs: what works now,
even if it is in need of improvement, must not be inappropriately sacrificed. As well, we need to be cautious
so that hastily introduced mass vaccinations do not lead
to iatrogenic effects that might occur if, for example,
those vaccinated have a false sense of security about
their chances of developing cancer and thereby become
less vigilant in getting Pap tests and using measures to
reduce their risk of sexually transmitted infections.10
Cautious approach
Given the many unknowns and unplanned-for matters
already highlighted by others,11,12 we continue to advocate
a cautious public health approach to mass immunization
programs, an approach that avoids the rush to vaccinate
girls and that is, instead, based on solid evidence that
immunization will actually be able to attain the goals
those promoting it have described and that girls’ and
women’s overall sexual and reproductive health needs
will be met. This approach will require consideration of
the health services available, of the educational needs of
the target population, of the data on cost-effectiveness,
and of the lost opportunity costs in setting public health
policy for a nonepidemic condition for which there are
(changing) secondary prevention measures.
We are not against the vaccine, and we are dedicated to
promoting women’s health. We firmly believe that prevention is always better than treatment. But prevention must
be done with full consideration of all of its components. At
this time, it remains difficult to justify spending $300 million on a rushed vaccination-only program when funds to
build up the necessary public health infrastructure have yet
to be provided, and many pertinent questions that could
readily be addressed remain unanswered. We have the
time to proceed cautiously, and we should. Dr Lippman is a Professor in the Department of
Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at
McGill University in Montreal, Que, and is Chair of the Policy
Committee for the Canadian Women’s Health Network.
Ms Boscoe is an Advocacy Coordinator with the Women’s
Health Clinic in Winnipeg, Man, and is Executive Director
of the Canadian Women’s Health Network. Dr Scurfield is
Medical Director of the Women’s Health Clinic in Winnipeg.
Competing interests
None declared
Correspondence to: Dr Abby Lippman, McGill
University, 1020 Pine Ave W, Montreal, QC H3A 1A2;
telephone 514 398-6266; fax 514 398-4503;
e-mail [email protected]
References
1. Spence AR, Goggin P, Franco EL. Process of care failures in invasive cervical
cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. Prev Med 2007;45:93-106.
2. Decker K, Demers AA, Chateau D, Harrison M. Cervical cancer in Manitoba:
evaluating Pap test utilization, cancer risk, and opportunity to be screened.
Open Med In press.
3. Emanuel EJ, Fuchs VR, Garber AM. Essential elements of a technology and
outcomes assessment initiative. JAMA 2007;298:1323-5.
4. Batt S. Limits on autonomy: political meta-narratives and health stories in the
media. Am J Bioethics 2007;7(8):23-5.
5. Reisinger KS, Block SL, Lazcano-Ponce E, Samakoses R, Esser MT, Erick J, et
al. Safety and persistent immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16, 18 L1 virus-like particle vaccine in preadolescents and adolescents: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2007;26(3):201-9.
6. Ng E, Wilkins R, Fung MF, Berthelot J-M. Cervical cancer mortality by neighbourhood income in urban Canada from 1971 to 1996. CMAJ
2004;170(10):1545-9.
7. Krueger H. A population-based HPV immunization program in British Columbia:
background paper. Vancouver, BC: Cervical Cancer Prevention Program, BC
Cancer Agency; 2006. Available from: http://www.preventcancer.ca/publications/HPV%20Immunization%20Report.pdf. Accessed 2007 December 10.
8. Mayrand M-H, Duarte-Franco E, Coulee F, Rodrigues I, Walter SD, Ratnam S, et
al. Human papillomavirus DNA versus Papanicolaou screening tests for cervical cancer. N Engl J Med 2007;357(16):1579-88.
9. Schiffman M. Integration of human papillomavirus vaccination, cytology, and
human papillomavirus testing. Cancer 2007;111(3):146-53.
10. Lippman A, Melnychuk R, Shimmin C, Boscoe M. Human papillomavirus, vaccines and women’s health. CMAJ 2007;177(5):484-7.
11. Raffle A. Challenges of implementing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination policy. BMJ 2007;335:375-7.
12. Wheeler CM. Advances in primary and secondary interventions for cervical
cancer: human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccines and testing. Nature Clin
Pract Oncol 2007;4(4):224-35.
CLOSING ARGUMENTS
•
Before launching a population-based HPV vaccination program, we need to know more about the
prevalence of and risk of exposure to oncogenic
HPV, as well as the real-world effectiveness of the
vaccine.
• The goals of the vaccination program should be
clarified to permit development of the most appropriate and sustainable immunization policies.
• New resources should go to improve programs coordinating innovative outreach and follow-up for cervical cancer screening, including a public education
campaign.
Vol 54: february • fÉvrier 2008 Canadian Family Physician • Le Médecin de famille canadien 177
Débats
Approuvez-vous les 300 M $ pour la
vaccination contre le VPH?
NON
Abby Lippman
PhD Madeline Boscoe
L
es femmes les plus à risque en Amérique du Nord
d’avoir un cancer envahissant du col de l’utérus et
d’en mourir sont celles chez qui le test de Papanicolaou
a «échoué»1, soit parce qu’elles n’ont pas passé l’éxamen
ou qu’elles n’ont pas eu de suivi ou d’interventions
appropriées. Si la pauvreté explique souvent cette situation, pourquoi alors un si grand nombre d’autres
femmes ne subissent-elles pas le test2? La vaccination
fera-t-elle une grande différence dans la vie des femmes
à risque au Canada. Les données probantes actuelles
laissent planer de sérieux doutes.
Valeur ajoutée?
Tout nouveau vaccin doit être évalué pour déterminer
si son utilisation améliorera ce qui est déjà accessible
et, dans l’affirmative, à quel prix3. Bon nombre de pro­
vinces n’ont pas de registre ou de programme structuré
de dépistage du cancer; le suivi des résultats anormaux
du test de Pap n’est pas uniforme; et les programmes de
sensibilisation se battent pour obtenir du financement. Il
est donc légitime de remettre en question l’instauration
précipitée de programmes de vaccination dans les écoles
avant d’avoir évalué en profondeur la contribution
qu’apporterait la vaccination aux programmes existants
déjà en quête de ressources et d’appui. Il est aussi déplorable qu’on ait instauré les programmes dans la confusion
à la suite de vastes campagnes de marketing des compagnies pharmaceutiques, créant «la peur du cancer et
l’ovation du vaccin»4. Ces prétentions erronées de «mettre
fin au cancer du col» ont éclipsé l’éducation du public sur
la faible prévalence des souches oncogènes du virus du
papillome humain (VPH), du taux très élevé de disparition
spontanée et de la lente progression des infections.
Les données à l’appui de décisions éclairées à propos
de l’immunisation sont limitées. L’étude publiée sur le
Gardasil, qui ciblait des jeunes filles de 9 à 15 ans, soit
le groupe visé par les programmes de vaccination dans
les écoles au Canada, ne présentait de l’information
que sur l’immunogénicité et l’innocuité et ne parlait pas
d’efficacité5.
Contexte plus large
L’immunisation n’est pas la seule approche à la
RN DU Carol Scurfield
MD FRCPC MCHS
prévention du cancer du col au Canada; la prévention
se­condaire au moyen des tests de Pap a déjà réduit la
mortalité6. De plus, une visite médicale pour un test
de Pap donne l’occasion de recevoir du counseling
sur la contraception, la préconception, le tabagisme et
l’alimentation, de subir un test de dépistage d’infections
transmises sexuellement et d’avoir un bilan de santé.
Évidemment, il importe de se préoccuper des coûts
(financiers et autres, publics et privés) du test de Pap,
des interventions subséquentes pour les résultats de
tests vrais et faux positifs et des répercussions d’un
cancer du col envahissant sur le plan personnel. Mais
il ne faut pas oublier non plus comment le dépistage du
cancer du col - et la vaccination- se produisent dans un
large contexte de soins de santé générale et de la reproduction qui ne sert pas toujours très bien les intérêts
des femmes. Par conséquent, toute attention renouvelée
pour la prévention du cancer du col demeurera problématique tant et aussi longtemps que la prévention se
limitera à un débat artificiel entre ceux «en faveur» et
ceux accusés d’être «contre» un vaccin. Il faut envisager
la vaccination dans le contexte d’une stratégie bien plus
globale de santé sexuelle et de la reproduction, où la
réduction de la fréquence déjà relativement faible d’une
morbidité et d’une mortalité du cancer du col (par rapport à d’autres cancers qui touchent les femmes) n’est
qu’un objectif parmi d’autres.
Le simple ajout de la vaccination aux pratiques
actuelles pour réduire le cancer du col peut se traduire par des coûts nets de millions $ pendant plusieurs
années à venir 7. Pourtant, il n’y a pas eu de débats
publics à savoir si la vaccination constitue la meilleure utilisation des ressources à la lumière d’autres
options qui ont aussi besoin de financement (p. ex.,
l’élargissement et l’amélioration du dépistage par le
test de Pap; l’élaboration d’autres approches, comme
le dépistage direct du VPH8 et la cytologie liquide; la
mise en place de registres pour surveiller les programmes du test de Pap et pour consigner au dossier
les rares effets secondaires du vaccin; et le repérage
de celles qui, si elles sont vaccinées, pourraient avoir
besoin d’un rappel).
suite à la page 181
Vol 54: february • fÉvrier 2008 Canadian Family Physician • Le Médecin de famille canadien 179
Débats
NON
suite de la page 179
Les coûts élevés prévus des programmes de vaccination portent à croire que leurs bienfaits—et leur
rentabilité—ne se matérialiseront fort probablement
pas dans des pays comme le Canada à moins qu’on
apporte des changements substantiels aux programmes
de dépistage et de traitement existants7,9. Cependant,
il ne faudrait pas simplement remplacer les activités
actuelles pour compenser le coût de la vaccination. Il
faut d’abord obtenir toutes les données nécessaires à la
prise de décisions stratégiques, y compris les données
sur les coûts potentiels des occasions manquées; ce qui
fonctionne maintenant, même s’il faut l’améliorer, ne
doit pas être indûment sacrifié. De plus, nous devons
éviter que la vaccination en masse instaurée à la hâte
entraîne des effets iatrogènes qui pourraient survenir si,
par exemple, celles qui sont vaccinées avaient un faux
sentiment de sécurité et devenaient moins vigilantes à
l’endroit du test de Pap et des moyens de réduire leur
risque d’infections transmises sexuellement10.
La prudence
Étant donné les multiples inconnus que d’autres ont déjà
mis en évidence11,12, nous continuons de préconiser la
prudence dans l’approche de la vaccination en masse en
santé publique. Nous favorisons une approche qui évite
une vaccination précipitée des jeunes filles. La stratégie doit être fondée sur de solides données scientifiques
prouvant que l’immunisation peut atteindre les objectifs
décrits par ses promoteurs. Elle doit aussi répondre aux
besoins globaux des filles et des femmes en matière de
santé sexuelle et de la reproduction. Il faut aussi prendre
en compte les services de santé disponibles, les besoins
d’information de la population ciblée, les données sur
la rentabilité et les coûts des occasions manquées dans
l’établissement de la politique en santé publique pour
un problème non épidémique pour lequel il existe déja
des mesures de prévention secondaire (en évolution).
Nous ne sommes pas contre le vaccin. Nous sommes
pour la promotion de la santé des femmes. Nous sommes fermement convaincues que mieux vaut prévenir
que guérir. Mais la prévention doit être faite en pleine
connaissance de toutes ses composantes. À l’heure
actuelle, il reste difficile à justifier une dépense de 300
millions $ pour un programme précipité comportant
seulement la vaccination, alors même que les fonds
pour établir l’infrastructure nécessaire en santé publique
n’ont toujours pas été versés et que de nombreuses
questions pertinentes restent encore sans réponse. Nous
avons le temps de procéder avec prudence et nous devrions le prendre. Mme Lippman est professeure au Département d’épidémio­
logie, de biostatistique et de santé au travail de l’Université
McGill à Montréal au Québec et présidente du Comité des
politiques du Réseau canadien pour la santé des femmes.
Mme Boscoe est coordonnatrice de l’action sociale à
la Women’s Health Clinic à Winnipeg, au Manitoba et
directrice générale du Réseau canadien pour la santé des
femmes. Dre Scurfield est directrice médicale à la Women’s
Health Clinic à Winnipeg.
Intérêts concurrents
Aucun déclaré
Correspondance à: Abby Lippman, Université McGill,
1020, avenue des Pins O, Montréal, QC H3A 1A2; téléphone 514 398-6266; télécopieur 514 398-4503; courriel
[email protected]
Références
1. Spence AR, Goggin P, Franco EL. Process of care failures in invasive cervical
cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. Prev Med 2007;45:93-106.
2. Decker K, Demers AA, Chateau D, Harrison M. Cervical cancer in Manitoba:
evaluating Pap test utilization, cancer risk, and opportunity to be screened. Open
Med In press.
3. Emanuel EJ, Fuchs VR, Garber AM. Essential elements of a technology and
outcomes assessment initiative. JAMA 2007;298:1323-5.
4. Batt S. Limits on autonomy: political meta-narratives and health stories in
the media. Am J Bioethics 2007;7(8):23-5.
5. Reisinger KS, Block SL, Lazcano-Ponce E, Samakoses R, Esser MT, Erick J, et
al. Safety and persistent immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16, 18 L1 virus-like particle vaccine in preadolescents and
adolescents: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2007;26(3):201-9.
6. Ng E, Wilkins R, Fung MF, Berthelot J-M. Cervical cancer mortality
by neighbourhood income in urban Canada from 1971 to 1996. CMAJ
2004;170(10):1545-9.
7. Krueger H. A population-based HPV immunization program in British Columbia:
background paper. Vancouver, CB: Cervical Cancer Prevention Program, BC
Cancer Agency; 2006. Accessible à: http://www.preventcancer.ca/publications/HPV%20Immunization%20Report.pdf. Accédé le 10 décembre 2007.
8. Mayrand M-H, Duarte-Franco E, Coulee F, Rodrigues I, Walter SD, Ratnam
S, et al. Human papillomavirus DNA versus Papanicolaou screening tests for
cervical cancer. N Engl J Med 357(16):1579-88.
9. Schiffman M. Integration of human papillomavirus vaccination, cytology, and
human papillomavirus testing. Cancer 2007;111(3):146-53.
10. Lippman A, Melnychuk R, Shimmin C, Boscoe M. Human papillomavirus,
vaccines and women’s health. CMAJ 2007;177(5):484-7.
11. Raffle A. Challenges of implementing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination policy. BMJ 2007;335:375-7.
12. Wheeler CM. Advances in primary and secondary interventions for cervical
cancer: human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccines and testing. Nature Clin
Pract Oncol 2007;4(4):224-35.
conclusions finaleS
•
•
•
Avant de commencer un programme de vaccination contre le VPH, il faudrait mieux connaître la
prévalence de sa souche oncogène, le risque d'exposition et l'efficacité du vaccin dans la réalité.
Il faut préciser les buts du programme de vaccination pour assurer l'élaboration des politiques d'immunisation les plus appropriés et viables.
Il faudrait de nouvelles ressources pour des programmes novateurs de suivi du dépistage du cancer
du col et de sensibilisation du public.
Vol 54: february • fÉvrier 2008 Canadian Family Physician • Le Médecin de famille canadien 181

Documents pareils