11867-00

Commentaires

Transcription

11867-00
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 1 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
Product Insert Data Sheet
MENTOR MEMORYGEL® SILTEX® BECKER
EXPANDER/BREAST IMPLANTS
November 2010 11867-00
INTRODUCTION - DIRECTIONS TO THE PHYSICIAN
The information supplied in this physician labelling document is intended to provide an overview of essential information about Mentor's
MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants, including a device description, instructions for use, indications, contraindications,
warnings, precautions, important factors to discuss with a patient, adverse events, other reported conditions, clinical study results, device
identification card, device retrieval efforts, how to report problems with an implant, and returned goods authorization.
Patient Counselling Information
You should review this document and patient labelling prior to counselling the patient about Mentor's MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/
Breast Implants and breast implant surgery. Please familiarise yourself with the content of this document and resolve any questions or concerns
prior to proceeding with use of the device. As with any surgical procedure, breast reconstruction using breast implants is NOT without risks.
Breast reconstruction is an elective procedure, and the patient must be well counselled and understand the risk/benefit relationship.
Before making the decision to proceed with surgery, the surgeon or a designated patient counsellor should instruct the patient to read Important
Information for Reconstruction Patients About Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants (patient labelling) and
discuss with the patient the warnings, contraindications, precautions, important factors to consider, complications, Round Gel Study, CPG Core
Study, and Product Availability (Adjunct ) Study results, and all other aspects of the patient labelling. The physician should advise the patient of
the potential complications and that medical management of serious complications may include additional surgery and explantation.
Informed Decision
Each patient should receive Mentor's Important Information for Reconstruction Patients About Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker
Expander/Breast Implants during her initial visit/consultation, to allow her sufficient time to read and adequately understand the important
information on the risks, follow-up recommendations, and benefits associated with silicone gel-filled breast implant surgery.
Allow the patient an adequate amount of time (generally between 1 to 2 weeks) before deciding whether to have breast reconstruction surgery,
unless an earlier surgery is deemed medically necessary
In order to document a successful informed decision process, the patient labelling includes an Acknowledgment of Informed Decision form at
the end of the document, which is to be signed by both the patient and the surgeon and then retained in the patient's file.
DEVICE DESCRIPTION: SILTEX® BECKER EXPANDER/BREAST IMPLANT
Figure 1: Becker Expander/Breast Implant
ENGLISH
*11867-00*
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 2 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
2
11867-00
Postoperative volume adjustment with saline is made available through a remote injection dome/filling port connected to the implant by a
removable fill tube passing through the dual valve system. The silicone elastomer fill tube is pre-inserted into the dual self-sealing valve system
at the time of manufacture and is joined to the injection dome by the connector system at the time of surgery.
Round Becker 25
Gel volume 25 percent nominal implant
size
Round Becker 50
Gel volume 50 percent nominal implant
size
Contour Profile Becker 35
Gel volume 35 percent nominal implant
size
Cohesive I® (standard) gel filling material
Cohesive I® (standard) gel filling material
Cohesive II® (moderate) gel filling material
®
The Siltex Becker Expander/Breast Implant has a low-bleed, gel-filled outer lumen and an adjustable saline-fillable inner lumen. In order to
provide a prosthesis with elasticity and integrity, the outer and inner shells are made with successive cross-linked layers of silicone elastomer.
The textured Siltex® shell provides a disruptive surface for collagen interface.
In addition, the MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants possess the following unique design features not present in other
permanent expander/implants:
• a low-bleed, gel-filled outer lumen and an adjustable saline-fillable inner lumen combine the advantages of tissue expanders with the feel of
a gel breast implant,
• silicone gel fills the superior aspect of the implant giving a natural curve to the upper and lower poles,
• the choice of two remote filling ports (also referred to as injection domes) and connectors can better address surgeon preference and patient
size,
• the filling port/injection dome and fill tube are removed entirely (recommended up to 6 months post-implantation), whereas other gel
expander/implants have built-in permanent injection domes,
• designed for up to 25% overexpansion capability,
• the Contour Profile Becker 35 design has orientation marks to assist surgeons with implant positioning,
• controlled low pole expansion of the Contour Profile Becker 35 design yields a natural anatomical breast shape,
• the incidence of wrinkling and rippling is considerably reduced compared to saline expander implants,1 and
• controlled overexpansion may address the early phases of capsular contracture because periprosthetic tissue could be stretched and
released by overexpansions and deflations.2
Postoperative volume adjustment with saline is made available through a remote injection dome/filling port connected to the implant by a
removable fill tube passing through the dual valve system (Figure 1; also refer to Product Insert Data Sheet for the Injection Domes with
Connection Systems). The silicone elastomer fill tube is pre-inserted into the dual self-sealing valve system at the time of manufacture and is
joined to the injection dome by the connector system at the time of surgery. The fill tube should be handled carefully to avoid accidental
dislodgment from its prepositioned location. Do not hold the device by its fill tube.
Two types of connector systems and injection domes are provided with each Becker product and either may be used. The inner lumen can be
gradually filled with saline over an extended period of time via the fill tube and injection dome. The saline-filled inner lumen of the Becker Breast
Implant provides the physician with the ability to control, within specified limits, the amount of expansion desired.
Once expanded to the desired volume, the fill tube and injection dome are removed through a small incision under local anaesthetic, and the
prosthesis remains in position as a breast implant. It is recommended that the duration of expansion not exceed six months as tissue adhesions
may make it difficult to easily remove the fill tube or compromise valve integrity. The valve system is designed to self-seal upon removal of the
tubing.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 3 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
3
Connecter and Injection Dome/Filling Port Options:
Each prosthesis is supplied with a choice of two connector systems and a choice of two injection domes.
• Connector Systems (for additional information refer to WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS)
1. The Mentor True-Lock™ connector does not require a suture tie (Figure 2; for additional information refer to the "True-Lock Connector"
section provided in the connector and dome package).
Figure 2: True-Lock Connector
2. The stainless steel connector does require suture material tied around tube and connector to secure the connection (Figure 3).
Figure 3: Stainless Steel Connector
• Injection Domes/Filling Ports (Figure 4; used for temporary subcutaneous implantation)
1. The micro injection dome may be used when diminished palpability is desirable. This dome is designed to withstand up to 10 total
injections. It is suggested that the dome be placed in a relatively superficial location to allow ease of identification and access during
subsequent filling procedures. Inflation is accomplished by using sterile isotonic saline. Use a 23 gauge (or finer) standard or butterfly 12°
bevel needle. Extreme care should be taken to puncture only the center of the top surface of the micro injection dome.
2. The standard injection dome is larger in diameter and height than the micro injection dome and can withstand up to 20 total injections.
C
A
B
Figure 4: Injection Dome
A - Injection Area; B - Tubing that is connected to the implant; C - butterfly needle [not provided]
Implant Options Available:
1. Siltex® Round Becker 25 Expander/Breast Implant
Gel volume 25 percent nominal implant size
Cohesive I® (standard) gel filling material
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 4 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
4
Catalogue
Number
354-1500
354-2000
354-2500
354-3000
354-3500
354-4000
354-5000
354-6000
354-7000
354-8000
11867-00
TABLE 1. Siltex® Round Becker 25 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive I® Specifications
Final Volume Ranges
Nominal Implant
Nominal Saline
Total
Gel Volume
Total Saline
Size
Volume
Gel-Saline
150 cc
110 cc
40 cc
85-150 cc
125-190 cc
200 cc
150 cc
50 cc
125-200 cc
175-250 cc
250 cc
190 cc
60 cc
165-255 cc
225-315 cc
300 cc
225 cc
75 cc
200-300 cc
275-375 cc
350 cc
260 cc
90 cc
235-350 cc
325-440 cc
400 cc
300 cc
100 cc
275-400 cc
375-500 cc
500 cc
375 cc
125 cc
350-500 cc
475-625 cc
600 cc
450 cc
150 cc
425-600 cc
575-750 cc
700 cc
525 cc
175 cc
500-700 cc
675-875 cc
800 cc
600 cc
200 cc
575-800 cc
775-1000 cc
2. Siltex® Round Becker 50 Expander/Breast Implant
Gel volume 50 percent nominal implant size
Cohesive I® (standard) gel filling material
Catalogue
Number
354-1515
354-2020
354-2525
354-3030
354-3535
TABLE 2. Siltex® Round Becker 50 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive I® Specifications
Final Volume Ranges
Nominal Implant
Nominal Saline
Gel
Total
Total
Size
Volume
Volume
Saline
Gel-Saline
300 cc
150 cc
150 cc
150-200 cc
300-350 cc
400 cc
200 cc
200 cc
200-300 cc
400-500 cc
500 cc
250 cc
250 cc
250-350 cc
500-600 cc
600 cc
300 cc
300 cc
300-425 cc
600-725 cc
700 cc
350 cc
350 cc
350-500 cc
700-850 cc
3. Siltex® Contour Profile Becker 35 Expander/Breast Implant
Gel volume 35 percent nominal implant size
Cohesive II® (moderate) gel filling material
TABLE 3. Siltex® Contour Profile Becker 35 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive II® Specifications
Catalogue
Number
324-0955
324-1055
324-1155
324-1205
324-1255
324-1305
324-1355
324-1405
324-1505
324-1605
Nominal
Implant Size
145 ccm
195 ccm
255 ccm
290 ccm
325 ccm
365 ccm
400 ccm
460 ccm
565 ccm
685 ccm
Nominal Saline
Volume
95 ccm
125 ccm
165 ccm
190 ccm
215 ccm
240 ccm
270 ccm
300 ccm
370 ccm
445 ccm
Gel
Volume
50 ccm
70 ccm
90 ccm
100 ccm
110 ccm
125 ccm
130 ccm
160 ccm
195 ccm
240 ccm
Temporary
Overexpansion Volumes*
Maximum
Total GelSaline
Saline
120 ccm
170 ccm
155 ccm
225 ccm
205 ccm
295 ccm
235 ccm
335 ccm
270 ccm
380 ccm
300 ccm
425 ccm
335 ccm
465 ccm
375 ccm
535 ccm
460 ccm
655 ccm
555 ccm
795 ccm
Final Volumes
Total
Saline
85-95 ccm
110-125 ccm
145-165 ccm
170-190 ccm
190-215 ccm
215-240 ccm
240-270 ccm
270-300 ccm
330-370 ccm
440-445 ccm
Total GelSaline
135-145 ccm
180-195 ccm
235-255 ccm
270-290 ccm
300-325 ccm
340-365 ccm
370-400 ccm
430-460 ccm
525-565 ccm
640-685 ccm
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 5 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
5
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE
(For additional information on the Becker Breast Implants refer to WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS.)
Testing Procedure for Becker Breast Implants
The device should be tested for patency and shell integrity immediately prior to use. Partially inflate the device with air or saline through the fill
tube, taking care not to damage the tube. Visually inspect the device for leakage and for any compromise of the outer shell using firm hand
manipulation. Remove any air from the device prior to filling.
Filling and Connection Procedure
1. Prior to inserting the prosthesis into the surgically prepared pocket, deflate the device completely.
2. Fold the prosthesis and insert it into the surgically prepared pocket. (Some surgeons prefer to partially fill the prosthesis prior to
placement.) Whatever method is used, evacuation of air from the implant and the fill tube as indicated in Step 1 will minimize the air to be
removed in Step 4.
3. Use a syringe filled with STERILE, PYROGEN-FREE, SODIUM CHLORIDE U.S.P. SOLUTION FOR INJECTION to inflate the prosthesis
to the recommended volume. A luer adapter and check valve have been included to facilitate intraoperative filling of the device, and must
not be implanted (Figure 5). The enclosed two-way check valve opens when a syringe is attached, and closes when the syringe is
removed. Prior to adding fluid to the implant, the two-way check valve should be attached to the luer adapter of the fill tube. ONLY
STERILE, PYROGEN-FREE, SODIUM CHLORIDE U.S.P. SOLUTION FOR INJECTION, drawn from its original container, should be used.
Figure 5: Luer Adapter and Two-Way Check Valve
CAUTION: The prosthesis must not be filled to a volume less than or greater than specified (refer to the expansion guideline tables under
DEVICE DESCRIPTION). The prosthesis must be filled to the "Final Volume Range" before removing the fill tube.
4. Entrapped air may be removed by using the attached filling syringe. Any remaining air will eventually diffuse out and be absorbed by tissue.
NOTE: Should adjustment of volume be necessary during surgery, fluid may be added or removed by following Steps 3 and 4.
5. If the device will not be postoperatively adjusted, the fill tube must be removed. The self-sealing valve will close to create the long-term
implant.
6. Should postoperative adjustability be desired, connect the fill tube to the injection dome after trimming the fill tube and discarding the luer
adapter and check valve. Connect the fill tube to the desired injection dome using one of the connectors supplied with the injection dome
(refer to Connecter and Injection Dome/Filling Port Options). Care should be taken to tailor the length of the tube so that it will not kink
or shorten as the implant expands.
NOTE: If the standard or micro dome with stainless steel connector is selected, non-absorbable suture material should be tied around the
tube and connector (Figure 3) to secure the connection. It is important to securely tie the fill tube both distally and proximally to the
connector so the entire filling port assembly (fill tube and filling port/injection dome) will be removed from the patient. Care must be taken to
secure the tube to the connector with ligatures in such a manner as to avoid cutting or occluding the tube or connector. (Further detail is provided
in the 'Injection Domes with Connection Systems' instructions located in the connector and dome package.)
Once the injection dome is connected to the fill tube, the assembly is referred to as the filling port assembly.
CAUTION: Forceps or hemostats to aid in the connection and suture tying process should NOT be used as tube or connector damage may lead
to deflation of the device.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 6 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
6
11867-00
NOTE: Instructions for use of the True-Lock connector are included in the 'Injection Domes with Connection Systems' instructions located in
the connector and dome package. Read the instructions carefully before using this connection system. It is important to securely assemble both
sides of the fill tube to the connector so that the entire fill tube will be removed when the injection dome is removed from the patient (for
additional information, refer to WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS).
It is suggested that the filling port assembly (injection dome and fill tube) be placed high in the subcutaneous tissue adjacent to the device to
allow easy identification and access during subsequent filling. A common placement location for the filling port is against the chest wall under the
arm; however, other placement locations can be used depending on the surgeon and patient preference.
The dome should be placed no less than three inches from the prosthesis to avoid damage to the device during postoperative filling. Inflation is
accomplished by using STERILE, PYROGEN-FREE, SODIUM CHLORIDE U.S.P. SOLUTION FOR INJECTION. Use a 23 gauge (or finer)
standard or butterfly needle. Extreme care should be taken to puncture only the center of the top surface of the injection dome at an angle
perpendicular ± 30° to the top surface (Figure 6).
Figure 6: Top of Injection Dome
Before closing the surgical incisions, confirm that the device is patent. This can be done by inserting the 23 gauge butterfly needle, with
syringe attached, into the injection dome, infusing or withdrawing fluid and observing for proper inflation/deflation of the prosthesis.
CAUTION: At the time of wound closure, extreme care should be taken not to damage the prosthesis with surgical instruments.
Preplacement of deep sutures may help to avoid inadvertent product contact with suture needles and subsequent product damage.
Postoperative Expansion Procedure
1. Use a syringe filled with STERILE, PYROGEN-FREE, SODIUM CHLORIDE U.S.P. SOLUTION FOR INJECTION, drawn from its original
container, to inflate the prosthesis to the recommended volume (refer to expansion guidelines tables under DEVICE DESCRIPTION).
2. The patient must be monitored during the volume adjustment period to guard against sloughing, necrosis, wound dehiscence, and other
complications associated with tissue expansion. If at any time the overlying tissue exhibits any of these symptoms, the device should be
reduced in volume by reversing the filling procedures and withdrawing fluid from the prosthesis. If signs persist, the device must be
removed.
(Refer to the additional information under WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS)
CAUTION: The Final Expansion Volume should not be less than the minimum recommended volume or greater than the maximum
recommended volume (refer to the expansion guideline tables under DEVICE DESCRIPTION). Underfilled prostheses may buckle, fold, or
wrinkle causing crease/fold failure of the device and subsequent deflation and/or rupture. Inflation beyond the maximum recommended volume
may also cause crease/fold failure or shell rupture.
NOTE: It is recommended that the duration of expansion not exceed six months as tissue adhesions may make it difficult to easily remove the fill
tube or compromise valve integrity. Damage to the implant may result. Mentor recommends that periodic volume adjustments are made up
through six months based on the specific needs of each patient and the physician's medical judgment. Upon achievement of the desired
expansion result, the fill tube and injection dome must be removed.
For expansion guidelines refer to the following tables under DEVICE DESCRIPTION:
Table 1. Siltex® Round Becker 25 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive I® Specifications
Table 2. Siltex® Round Becker 50 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive I® Specifications
Table 3. Siltex® Contour Profile Becker 35 Expander/Breast Implant, Cohesive II® Specifications
7.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 7 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
7
Removal of Filling Port Assembly (Injection Dome/Filling Port Connected to Fill Tube)
Once expansion is complete, the filling port assembly (injection dome/filling port and fill tube) must be carefully removed from the Becker dual
valve system.
NOTE: The implant must be filled to the "Final Volume Range" (refer to expansion guideline tables under DEVICE DESCRIPTION) before
removing the filling port assembly. The tubing must be removed from the implant before separating the injection dome from the tubing.
a. Make a small incision at the location of the injection dome/filling port.
b. It is important to grasp the tubing beyond the injection dome and the connector and as close to the implant as possible. Avoid
instrument damage to the fill tube that may result in tube breakage, retraction of the tube into the pocket, and subsequent deflation and/or
rupture of the device. The injection dome must remain attached to the fill tube during removal of the fill tube from the implant dual valve
system.
c. Place the opposite hand on the adjustable implant to secure it in place while pulling the fill tube.
d. Exert a slow, steady, even force when withdrawing the fill tube. If the fill tube turns white, relax the tube and re-grasp the fill tube
closer to the implant. Again, exert a slow, steady, even force to withdraw the tube.
e. Gentle massage of the adjustable implant and valve while withdrawing the tube may help facilitate removal. You, or the patient, may feel
the implant move in its pocket when the fill tube is withdrawn. This is a normal sensation.
f.
The implant dual valve system is designed to self-seal after removal of the tubing.
g. There should be a 'notch' at the end of the tubing that is removed, indicating that it separated at the desired point and is completely
removed.
CAUTION: Tissue ingrowth can occur when using the True-Lock connector. Surgeons should anticipate the need to dissect the capsule
prior to removing the fill tube and injection dome. Grasp beyond the connector and remove the tube before taking out the injection dome.
(Refer to the additional information under WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS)
Recording Procedure for Becker Expander/Breast Implant
Each breast implant is supplied with two Patient Record Labels showing the catalogue number, lot number, and serial number for that device.
Patient Record Labels are located on the internal product packaging attached to the label. To complete the Patient ID Card, adhere one Patient
Record Label for each implant on the back of the Patient ID Card. The other labels should be attached to the patient's chart. The implanted
position (left or right side), date of surgery, and the fill volume (expansion record) of each breast implant should be indicated on the label. If a
Patient Record Label is unavailable, the lot number, catalogue number, description of the device may be copied by hand from the device label.
In addition, the fill volume (expansion record) should be recorded by hand if the Patient Record Label is unavailable.
INDICATIONS
Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants are indicated for females for the following use (procedure):
• Breast Reconstruction. Breast reconstruction includes primary reconstruction to replace breast tissue that has been removed due to cancer
or trauma or that has failed to develop properly due to a severe breast abnormality. Breast reconstruction also includes revision surgery to
correct or improve the results of a primary breast reconstruction surgery.
CONTRAINDICATIONS
Patient Groups in which the product is contraindicated:
• Women with active infection anywhere in their body.
• Women with existing cancer or pre-cancer who have not received adequate treatment for those conditions.
• Women who are currently pregnant or nursing.
WARNINGS
1. Avoiding Implant Damage During Surgery and Medical Treatment or Procedures
Iatrogenic events inadvertently induced by a physician or surgeon, or by medical treatment or procedures, may contribute to premature implant
failure.
• Do not allow sharp instruments, such as scalpels or needles, to contact the device during the implantation or other surgical procedures.
Patients should be instructed to inform other treating physicians to observe this warning.
• The technique for inserting a gel device is significantly different than for a saline implant. Ensure that excessive force is not applied to a very
small area of the shell during insertion of the device through the incision. Instead, apply force over as large an area of the implant as possible
when inserting it. Avoid pushing the device into place with one or two fingers in a localized area, as this may create an area of weakness on
the shell.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 8 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
8
11867-00
• An incision should be of appropriate length to accommodate the style, size, and profile of the implant. The incision will be longer than the one
typically made for a saline breast augmentation. This will reduce the potential for creating excessive stress to the implant during insertion.
• The anatomical limitations of periareolar and axillary incision sites may make insertion of the implant more difficult, increasing the risk of
damage to the implant.
• Avoid creating wrinkles or folds in the device during the implantation or other procedures (e.g., revision surgery). A typical practice is to run
your finger around the implant before closing to ensure the implant is lying flat and has no folds or wrinkles. Submuscular placement of the
device makes the inspection for wrinkles or folds more difficult.
• Do not treat capsular contracture by closed capsulotomy or forceful external compression, which will likely result in implant damage, rupture,
folds, and/or hematoma.
• Use care in subsequent procedures such as open capsulotomy, breast pocket revision, hematoma/seroma aspiration, biopsy, and
lumpectomy to avoid damage to the implant shell. Re-positioning of the implant during subsequent procedures should be carefully evaluated
by the medical team and care taken to avoid contamination of the implant. Use of excessive force during any subsequent procedure can
contribute to localised weakening of the breast implant shell potentially leading to decreased device performance.
• Do not contact the implant with cautery devices.
• Do not immerse the implant in Betadine® solution. If Betadine is used in the pocket, ensure that it is rinsed thoroughly so no residual solution
remains in the pocket.
• Do not alter the implants or attempt to repair or insert a damaged implant.
• Do not re-use or resterilize any product that has been previously implanted. Breast implants are intended for single use only.
• Do not place more than one implant per breast pocket.
• Do not use the periumbilical approach to place the implant.
• Do not introduce or make injections of drugs or other substances into the implant. Injections through the implant shell will compromise the
product's integrity, causing it to leak while in use and eventually deflate and/or rupture.
• Excessive inflation of the device may result in tissue necrosis/thrombosis.
• Final Expansion Volume should not be less than the minimum recommended volume or more than the maximum recommended volume
(refer the expansion guidelines under DEVICE DESCRIPTION). Underfilled prostheses may buckle, fold, or wrinkle causing crease/fold
failure of the device and subsequent deflation and/or rupture. Inflation beyond the maximum recommended volume may also cause crease/
fold failure or shell rupture.
2. Microwave Diathermy
Do not use microwave diathermy in patients with breast implants, as it has been reported to cause tissue necrosis, skin erosion, and implant
extrusion.
PRECAUTIONS
1. Specific Populations
Safety and effectiveness has not been established in patients with:
• Autoimmune diseases (e.g., lupus and scleroderma).
• A compromised immune system (e.g., currently receiving immunosuppressive therapy).
• Patients with conditions or medications which interfere with wound healing ability (e.g., poorly controlled diabetes or corticosteroid therapy) or
blood clotting (such as concurrent coumadin therapy).
• Reduced blood supply to breast or overlying tissue.
• Patients undergoing radiation therapy.
• Clinical diagnosis of depression or other mental health disorders, including body dysmorphic disorder and eating disorders. Please advise
the patient to discuss any history of mental health disorders with you prior to surgery. Patients with a diagnosis of depression, or other mental
health disorders, should wait until resolution or stabilization of these conditions prior to undergoing breast implantation surgery.
There may be other patients with complicated medical histories, who in the surgeon's judgment present risk factors such that breast implant
safety and effectiveness have not been established. As with all surgery, you should review your patient's medical history to ensure that she is an
appropriate candidate for breast implant surgery.
2. Surgical Precautions
• Device integrity – The device should be tested for patency and shell integrity immediately prior to use. This can be accomplished by gently
manipulating the prosthesis with hand and fingers, while carefully examining for rupture or leakage sites.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 9 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
9
• Surgical technique – The implantation of silicone gel-filled breast implants involves a variety of surgical techniques. Therefore, the surgeon
is advised to use the method which her/his own practice and discretion dictate to be best for the patient, consistent with this product insert
data sheet. It is advisable to have more than one size breast implant in the operating room at the time of surgery to allow for flexibility in
determining the appropriate size implant to be used. A backup implant should also be available.
• Implant Selection
Some of the important surgical and implant sizing variables that have been identified include the following:
• The implant should be consistent in size with the patient's chest wall dimensions, including base width measurements, bearing in mind the
laxity of the tissue and the projection of the implant.
• A thorough discussion should be conducted with the patient, employing appropriate visual aids such as imaging, sizing implants, or other
options to clarify their objectives and reduce the incidence of reoperation for size change.
• The following may cause implants to be more palpable: textured implants, larger implants, subglandular placement, and an insufficient
amount of skin/tissue available to cover the implant.
• Available tissue must provide adequate coverage of the implant.
• One report indicates that larger sized implants (>350 cc) may increase the risk of developing complications such as implant extrusion,
hematoma, infection, palpable implant folds, and visible skin wrinkling requiring surgical intervention to correct these complications3.
• Implant Placement Selection
• A well-defined, dry pocket of adequate size and symmetry must be created to allow the implant to be placed flat on a smooth surface.
• Submuscular placement may make surgery last longer, may make recovery longer, may be more painful, and may make it more difficult to
perform some reoperation procedures than subglandular placement. The possible benefits of this placement are that it may result in less
palpable implants, less likelihood of capsular contracture,4 and easier imaging of the breast for mammography. Also, submuscular
placement may be preferable if the patient has thin or weakened breast tissue.
• Subglandular placement may make surgery and recovery shorter, may be less painful, and may be easier to access for reoperation than
the submuscular placement. However, this placement may result in more palpable implants, greater likelihood of capsular contracture, 3, 5
and increased difficulty in imaging the breast with mammography.
• Maintaining Hemostasis/Avoiding Fluid Accumulation
• Careful hemostasis is important to prevent postoperative hematoma formation. Should excessive bleeding persist, implantation of the
device should be delayed until bleeding is controlled. Postoperative evacuation of hematoma or seroma must be conducted with care to
avoid breast implant contamination, or damage from sharp instruments, retraction, or needles.
• Recording Procedure
• Each breast implant is supplied with two Patient Record Labels showing the catalogue number, lot number, and serial number for that
device. Patient Record Labels are located on the internal product packaging attached to the label. To complete the Patient ID Card, adhere
one Patient Record Label for each implant on the back of the Patient ID Card. The other label should be attached to the patient's chart. The
implanted position (left or right side), date of surgery, and the fill volume (expansion record) of each breast implant should be indicated on
the label. If a Patient Record Label is unavailable, the lot number, catalogue number, description of the device may be copied by hand from
the device label. In addition, the fill volume (expansion record) of each breast implant should be recorded by hand if the Patient Record
Label is unavailable.
• Postoperative Care
• You should advise your patient that she will likely feel tired and sore for several days following the operation, and that her breasts may
remain swollen and sensitive to physical contact for a month or longer. You should also advise her that she may experience a feeling of
tightness in the breast area as her skin adjusts to her new breast size. For at least a couple of weeks, the patient should avoid any
strenuous activities that could raise her pulse and blood pressure. She should be able to return to work within a few days. Breast massage
exercises may also be recommended as appropriate.
• Additional Precautions for the MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants
• The dual self-sealing valve of the Becker Breast Implant family of prostheses is unique and may be unfamiliar to the surgeon. The fill tube
is inserted into the prosthesis at the time of manufacture and should be handled carefully to avoid accidental dislodgment from its
prepositioned location. Do not hold the device by its fill tube.
• The silicone elastomer shell, fill tube, and injection dome may be easily cut by a scalpel or ruptured by excessive stress, manipulation with
blunt instruments, or penetration by a needle. Subsequent deflation and/or rupture will result. All prostheses should be carefully inspected
for structural integrity prior to and during implantation.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 10 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
10
11867-00
• When removing the fill tube and injection dome (filling port assembly), the fill tube should be removed first. Grasp the fill tube
beyond the connector to prevent separation of the injection dome from the fill tube. Do not exert sudden or undue tension on the fill tube
during removal. Avoid instrument damage to the fill tube which may result in tube breakage, retraction of tube into the pocket, and
subsequent deflation and/or rupture of the device.
• Tissue ingrowth can occur when using the True-Lock connector. Surgeons should anticipate the need to dissect the capsule prior to
removing the fill tube and injection dome. Grasp beyond the connector and remove the tube before taking out the injection dome.
• The tube which connects the implant to the injection dome should be carefully sized to avoid kinks. Careful attachment of the fill tube to the
connector is important to prevent separation. Failure of the device to inflate may be due to kinking of the tube, leakage, separation of the
components, or injections which do not penetrate the injection dome.
• Extreme care should be taken when connecting the fill tube to the connector. The tube is easily damaged with surgical instrumentation
(e.g., contact with forceps), and their use should be avoided.
• Surgeons should ensure themselves of the position of the injection dome prior to adding or withdrawing fluid.
• Potential for contamination exists when fluid is added to or removed from the device. Use aseptic technique in the introduction of saline
into the implant; a single-use, sterile saline container is recommended.
IMPORTANT FACTORS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH PATIENTS AS PART OF PHYSICIAN CONSULTATION
Breast implantation is an elective procedure and the patient must be thoroughly counselled on the risks, as well as the benefits, of these
products and procedures. You should advise your patient that she must read the patient labelling for reconstruction. You must read the patient
labelling in its entirety. The labelling is intended as the primary means to relate uniform risk and benefit information to assist your patient in
making an informed decision about primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction surgery (as applicable), but are not intended to replace
consultation with you. The patient should be advised to wait an adequate amount of time (generally between one to two weeks) after reviewing
and considering this information, before deciding whether to have this surgery, unless an earlier surgery is deemed medically necessary.
Both you and your patient will be required to sign the "Acknowledgement of Informed Decision" form prior to surgery. The form can be found on
the last page of the patient labelling. The form, once signed, acknowledges the patient's full understanding of the information provided in the
patient labelling. The form should be retained in the patient's permanent clinical record.
Below are some of the important factors your patients need to be aware of when using silicone gel-filled breast implants. Section 1.4 of the
patient labelling provides a more detailed listing of important factors for patients.
• Rupture – Rupture of a silicone gel-filled breast implant is most often silent (i.e., there are no symptoms experienced by the patient and no
physical sign of changes with the implant) rather than symptomatic.
The following six-step process is recommended for screening for silent rupture:
1. Patient self-examination;
2. New symptom or sign suspected;
3. Physician physical examination, related to a periodic review or new symptoms and signs, suggests findings that warrant further
investigation;
4. Ultrasound, mammogram, or both, of the implant and the breast involved should be acquired;
5. MRI if ultrasound is inconclusive. The MRI should be performed at a centre with a breast coil with a magnet of at least 1.5 Tesla. The
MRI should be read by a radiologist who is familiar with looking for implant rupture; and
6. If signs of rupture are seen on ultrasound, mammogram, and/or MRI, then you should advise your patient to have her implant removed.
• Explantation – Implants are not considered lifetime devices, and patients likely will undergo implant removal(s), with or without replacement,
over the course of their life. When implants are explanted without replacement, changes to the patient's breasts may be irreversible.
Complication rates are higher following revision surgery (removal with replacement).
• Reoperation – Additional surgeries to the patients' breasts and/or implants will likely be required, either because of rupture, other
complications, or unacceptable cosmetic outcomes. Patients should be advised that their risk of future complications increases with revision
surgery as compared to primary reconstruction surgery. There is a risk that implant shell integrity could be compromised inadvertently during
reoperation surgery, potentially leading to product failure.
• Infection – Signs of acute infection reported in association with breast implants include erythema, tenderness, fluid accumulation, pain, and
fever. In rare instances, as with other invasive surgeries, Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) has been noted in women after breast implant
surgery, and it is a life-threatening condition. Symptoms of TSS occur suddenly: a high fever (102°F, 38.8°C or higher), vomiting, diarrhoea,
a sunburn-like rash, red eyes, dizziness, light-headedness, muscle aches, and drops in blood pressure which may cause fainting. Patients
should contact a physician immediately for diagnosis and treatment for any of these symptoms.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 11 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
11
• Breast Examination Techniques – Patients should perform breast self-examinations monthly and be shown how to distinguish the implant
from their breast tissue. The patient should not manipulate or squeeze the implant excessively. The patient should be told that the presence
of lumps, persistent pain, swelling, hardening, or change in the implant shape may be signs of symptomatic rupture of the implant. If the
patient has any of these signs, they should be told to report them, and possibly have an MRI evaluation to screen for rupture.
• Mammography – Patients should be instructed to undergo routine mammography exams as per their primary care physician's
recommendations. The importance of having these exams should be emphasized. Patients should be instructed to inform their
mammographers about the presence, type, and placement of their implants. Patients should request a diagnostic mammography, rather than
a screening mammography, because more pictures are taken with diagnostic mammography. Breast implants may complicate the
interpretation of mammographic images by obscuring underlying breast tissue and/or by compressing overlying tissue. Accredited
mammography centres, technicians with experience in imaging patients with breast implants, and use of displacement techniques are
needed to adequately visualize breast tissue in the implanted breast. The current recommendations for preoperative/screening
mammograms are no different for women with breast implants than for those women without implants. Presurgical mammography with a
mammogram following the procedure may be performed to establish a baseline for routine future mammography.
• Lactation – Breast implant surgery may interfere with the ability to successfully breast feed, either by reducing or eliminating milk production.
• Avoiding Damage During Treatment - Patients should inform other treating physicians of the presence of implants to minimize the risk of
damage to the implants.
• Smoking – Smoking may interfere with the healing process.
• Radiation to the Breast – Mentor has not tested the in vivo effects of radiation therapy in patients who have breast implants. The literature
suggests that radiation therapy may increase the likelihood of capsular contracture, necrosis, and implant extrusion and, therefore, should be
carefully considered when deciding on the course of treatment. The challenge of increased incidence of these complications may be
addressed with the right reconstruction techniques.6,7
• Mental Health and Elective Surgery – It is important that all patients seeking to undergo elective surgery have realistic expectations that
focus on improvement rather than perfection. Request that your patient openly discuss with you, prior to surgery, any history that she may
have of depression or other mental health disorders.
• Long-Term Effects – Mentor will continue its MemoryGel® Round Gel and Contour Profile Gel (CPG) Core Studies through 10 years and the
ongoing Product Availability (Adjunct) Study (refer to specific clinical study sections in brochure for more details). In addition, Mentor has
undertaken a separate 10-year postapproval study in the U.S. and Canada to address specific issues for which the Round Gel Core Study
was not designed to fully answer, as well as to provide a real-world assessment of some endpoints. The endpoints in the large postapproval
study include long-term local complications, connective tissue disease (CTD), CTD signs and symptoms, neurological disease, neurological
signs and symptoms, offspring issues, reproductive issues, lactation issues, cancer, suicide, mammography issues, and MRI compliance and
results. Mentor will update its labelling as appropriate with the results of its clinical studies. It is also important for you to relay any new safety
information to your patients as it becomes available.
MENTOR CLINICAL STUDIES
The safety and effectiveness of Mentor's MemoryGel® silicone gel-filled implants have been evaluated in open-label multicentre clinical studies,
referred to as the Round Gel Core Study and the Contour Profile Gel Core Study. In addition, the safety of MemoryGel® Round Breast Implants
and Becker Round Expander/Breast Implants has been studied in the large Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study.
The rates of adverse events reported in the Mentor clinical studies are presented in the following section. Overall, the results of the Round Gel
Core Study, CPG Core Study, and the Product Availability (Adjunct) Study demonstrate that these devices are safe and effective for breast
reconstruction patients. The rates for complications reported in the Core Studies are generally comparable to or lower than those reported in the
Product Availability (Adjunct) Study.
Due to the differences in study design and data analysis, it is difficult to draw conclusions from comparisons of complication rates in the Core
and Product Availability (Adjunct) studies. The Product Availability (Adjunct) Study is being accomplished under a limited clinical protocol in
which specific parameters are required but with controls somewhat less stringent than those normally required in Investigational Device
Exemption Trials (i.e., "Core" studies). The following may contribute to complication rate differences:
• The patient study visit schedules and case report forms are different among studies.
• Mild occurrences of asymmetry, breast pain, nipple sensation changes, and wrinkling were excluded from the Core study complication rates
presented in this brochure.
• Becker patients are one-stage reconstruction patients and experience additional complications associated with an expansion phase as well
as the presence of a breast implant.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 12 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
12
11867-00
Because the entire MemoryGel® breast implant family, including the Becker, shares identical raw materials and the reconstruction indication, the
clinical data presented in this brochure provide an overall safety and efficacy profile for all MemoryGel® breast implants.
ADVERSE EVENTS
The Becker implants have a long history of use worldwide and the Becker Round devices have been studied for safety for over 16 years in the
ongoing U.S. FDA-approved Product Availability (Adjunct) Clinical Study. No serious, unanticipated adverse device effects have been reported.
The complications reported are consistent with the type of complications reported in other gel-filled breast implants studies.
Clinical evidence demonstrating the Becker is safe and effective for breast reconstruction is also reported in the published literature.7,8,9,10,11,12
These published studies showed lower or comparable complication rates for the Becker as compared to alternative breast implants as well as a
high rate of patient satisfaction. In addition, Guay and Haykal13 have reported on the benefits of using the Becker for delayed single-stage
breast reconstruction.
Complications associated with the Becker expander/implant are consistent with the type of complications associated with other single-stage
expander/implants, 2-stage tissue expanders with implants, and autologous tissue reconstructions. Based on the literature, the capsular
contracture rate for Becker permanent expander/implants (3-29%) is comparable to rates observed with 2-stage reconstructions (10-29%).14,15
When compared to autologous breast reconstructions (i.e. TRAM Flap), procedural complications such as abdominal hernia, flap necrosis, and
donor site cosmesis are avoided in single-stage Becker reconstructions. Good aesthetic results with low complication rates have been observed
using single-stage expander/implants, although patient selection and a well-dissected submuscular pocket play an important role.16 Becker
combined with autologous flap reconstructions can obtain good aesthetic results in patients receiving adjuvant therapy, by using a large flap
without redundant skin and close follow-up during and after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.15
Below is a description of potential adverse events that may occur with silicone gel-filled breast implant. For specific adverse event rates/
outcomes for Mentor implants, refer to the clinical trial study sections in this brochure. The rates of adverse events reported in these sections are
from clinical studies on the use of MemoryGel® Round, CPG, and Becker Round devices. Because the entire Memory Gel breast implant family,
including the Becker, shares identical raw materials and the reconstruction indication, these clinical data provide an overall safety and efficacy
profile for all MemoryGel® breast implants.
Potential adverse events that may occur with silicone gel-filled breast implant surgery include the following: implant rupture, capsular
contracture, reoperation, implant removal, pain, changes in nipple and breast sensation, infection, scarring, asymmetry, wrinkling, implant
displacement/migration, implant palpability/visibility, breast feeding complications, hematoma/seroma, implant extrusion, necrosis, delayed
wound healing, breast tissue atrophy/chest wall deformity, calcium deposits, and lymphadenopathy.
The rates of adverse events reported in these sections are from published literature and Mentor's clinical studies on the use of MemoryGel®
Round, CPG, and Becker Expander/Breast Implant devices.
• Rupture
Breast implants are not lifetime devices. Breast implants rupture when the shell develops a tear or hole. Rupture can occur at any time after
implantation, but rupture is more likely to occur the longer the implant is implanted.
Silicone gel-filled implant ruptures are most often silent. This means that most of the time neither you nor your patient will know if the implant has
a tear or hole in the shell. However, sometimes there are symptoms associated with gel implant rupture. These symptoms include hard knots or
lumps surrounding the implant or in the armpit, change or loss of size or shape of the breast or implant, pain, tingling, swelling, numbness,
burning, or hardening of the breast.
The following things may cause implants to rupture: damage by surgical instruments, stressing the implant during implantation and weakening it,
folding or wrinkling of the implant shell, excessive force to the chest (e.g., during closed capsulotomy; refer to WARNINGS), trauma,
compression during mammographic imaging, and severe capsular contracture. Breast implants may also simply wear out over time. Laboratory
studies have identified some of the types of rupture for Mentor's product; however, it is not conclusively known whether these tests have
identified all causes of rupture. These laboratory studies are continuing postapproval.
As a note, supplemental safety information was also obtained from the U.K. Sharpe/Collis Study and the literature to help assess long-term
rupture rate and the consequences of rupture. The literature, which had the most available information on the consequences of rupture, was
also used to assess other potential complications associated with silicone gel-filled breast implants. The key literature information is referenced
in this document.
Rupture - Round Gel Core Study
Mentor's Round Gel Core Study had 251 women undergoing primary breast reconstruction and 60 women undergoing revision-reconstruction.
Of the 251 primary reconstruction patients, 134 were enrolled in the MRI sub-study, of which 97 underwent MRI screening for silent rupture at 4
years. The rupture rate was 3.1% in primary reconstruction patients through 4 years. There was 1 patient with a suspected rupture by MRI who
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 13 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
13
died. There were 2 patients with suspected ruptures by MRI that were confirmed to be intact on explant in the reconstruction group. Of the 60
revision-reconstruction patients, 28 were patients enrolled in the MRI sub-study, of which 18 underwent MRI screening. The rupture rate was 0%
in revision-reconstruction patients through 4 years. There were no confirmed ruptures in patients outside the MRI sub-study. The Round Gel
Core Study is currently ongoing, with a total of 10 years of follow-up planned to help determine the long-term rupture rate for Mentor implants.
Further information on the estimated incidence rate of rupture for MemoryGel® implants is provided by a limited set of long-term follow-up data
from an MRI study in the U.K. (Sharpe and Collis). In this study, textured MemoryGel® implants placed subglandularly in 101 patients by a single
physician, with follow-up of 4-12 years, were evaluated for rupture status by MRI with confirmation by explantation. Based on their results, at 12
years, the estimated cumulative rate of silent ruptures is 15% for the patients and 9% for implants. By implant, at 12 years, the cumulative rate of
9% is the best statistical estimate, and 19% is a worst case statistical estimate. By patient, at 12 years, the cumulative rate of 15.1% is the best
statistical estimate, and 24.5% is the worst case statistical estimate. These data are consistent with a published MRI-based rupture study of
current silicone gel-filled breast implants from a variety of manufacturers.17
Rupture - CPG Core Study
Mentor's CPG Core Study had 191 women undergoing primary breast reconstruction and 68 women undergoing revision-reconstruction. There
were no ruptures reported in the MRI or non-MRI cohorts for either the primary reconstruction or revision-reconstruction patients through 3
years. Of the 191 primary reconstruction patients, 74 were enrolled in the MRI sub-study, of which 56 underwent MRI screening for silent rupture
at 2 years. For primary reconstruction patients in the MRI cohort, the rupture rate was 0% through 3 years. Of the 68 revision-reconstruction
patients, 37 were enrolled in the MRI sub-study, of which 31 underwent MRI screening at 2 years. For the 37 revision-reconstruction patients,
the rupture rate was 0% through 3 years. The CPG Core Study is currently ongoing, with a total of 10 years of follow-up planned to help
determine the long-term rupture rate for Mentor implants.
Rupture- Product Availability (Adjunct) Study
The MemoryGel® Round and Becker Round implants have been studied for safety for over 16 years in the ongoing U.S. FDA-approved Product
Availability (Adjunct) Clinical Study. The study includes 9,227 primary reconstruction and 3,008 revision-reconstruction patients implanted with
Becker devices, and 57,828 primary reconstruction and 18,491 revision-reconstruction patients implanted with the MemoryGel® Round devices.
Each patient is followed for 5 years.
Becker Round
Through 5 years, 8% of primary reconstruction patients and 10% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced a rupture.
MemoryGel® Round
Through 5 years, 3% of primary reconstruction patients and 5% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced a rupture.
Health Consequences of Rupture
If rupture occurs, silicone gel may either remain within the scar tissue capsule surrounding the implant (intracapsular rupture), move outside the
capsule (extracapsular rupture), or gel may move beyond the breast (migrated gel). No confirmed cases of extracapsular rupture of Mentor's
Round or CPG MemoryGel® breast implants were observed in Mentor's Round Gel and CPG Core Studies, or in a limited, long-term follow-up
study from the U.K. (Sharpe & Collis) of Mentor's MemoryGel® devices.
Studies of Danish women evaluated with MRI involving a variety of manufacturers and implant models showed that about three-fourths of
implant ruptures are intracapsular and the remaining one-fourth is extracapsular.18 Extracapsular ruptures appear largely to be the result of
closed capsulotomy (refer to WARNINGS) and/or trauma to the chest area. For example, there was a significantly higher prevalence of
extracapsular ruptures (14.7%) in these Danish women who had undergone closed capsulotomy as compared to those who had not.18 In a
study of British women, one patient observed to have severe bilateral silicone granulomas and bilateral extracapsular ruptures suffered a
fractured sternum in a traffic accident.19
There is a possibility that rupture may progress from intracapsular to extracapsular and beyond. Studies of Danish women indicate that over a 2year period, about 10% of the implants with intracapsular rupture progressed to extracapsular rupture as detected by MRI.20 Approximately half
of the women whose ruptures had progressed from intra- to extracapsular reported that they experienced trauma to the affected breast during
this time period or had undergone mammography. In the other half, no cause was given. In the women with extracapsular rupture, after 2 years,
the amount of silicone seepage outside the scar tissue capsule increased for about 14% of these women. This type of information pertains to a
variety of silicone implants, from a variety of manufacturers and implant models, and is not specific to Mentor's implants.
The health consequences of implant rupture have not been fully established. There have been rare reports of gel movement to nearby tissues
such as the chest wall, armpit, or upper abdominal wall, and to more distant locations down the arm or into the groin. This has led to nerve
damage, granuloma formation and/or breakdown of tissues in direct contact with the gel in a few cases. There have been reports of silicone
presence in the liver of patients with silicone breast implants. Movement of silicone gel material to lymph nodes in the axilla also has been
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 14 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
14
11867-00
reported, even in women without evidence of rupture, leading to lymphadenopathy, as discussed below.21 These reports were in women who
had implants from a variety of manufacturers and implant models.
Local breast complications reported in the published literature that were associated with rupture include breast hardness, a change in breast
shape or size, and breast pain.20 These symptoms are not specific to rupture, as they also are experienced by women who have capsular
contracture. Most of the Danish women evaluated in these studies, whose ruptured implants were left in place for two years, reported no
symptoms.
Concerns have been raised over whether ruptured implants are associated with the development of connective tissue or rheumatic diseases
and/or symptoms such as fatigue and fibromyalgia.22,23,24,25 A number of epidemiology studies have evaluated large populations of women with
breast implants from a variety of manufacturers and implant models. These studies do not, taken together, support an association of breast
implants and a diagnosed rheumatic disease.26 Other than one small study,24 these studies do not distinguish whether the women had ruptured
or intact implants.
The autoantibody status of 64 Danish women who had at least 1 ruptured implant according to MRI evaluation was compared to 98 Danish
women who had intact implants.20 Blood samples were obtained to measure antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, and cardiolipin
immunoglobulin G and M antibodies, which are all used to assess the presence of autoimmune disease. There was no increase in any of these
autoantibodies in the women with ruptured implants as compared to those with intact implants, and women whose ruptures progressed from
intracapsular to extracapsular over a period of 2 years did not have progression of autoantibody production. In fact, a number of women who had
measurable levels of 1 or more antibodies 2 years prior to this evaluation no longer had measurable levels at the subsequent examination.
When MRI findings of rupture are found (such as subcapsular lines, characteristic folded wavy lines, teardrop sign, keyhole sign, or noose sign),
or if there are signs or symptoms of rupture, you should remove the implant and any gel you determine your patient has, with or without
replacement of the implant. It also may be necessary to remove the tissue capsule, as well as the implant, which will involve additional surgery,
with associated costs. If your patient has symptoms, such as breast hardness, a change in breast shape or size, and/or breast pain, you should
recommend that she has an MRI to determine whether rupture is present.4,20
• Capsular Contracture
The scar tissue (capsule) that normally forms around the implant may tighten over time and compress the implant, making it feel firm and leading
to what is called capsular contracture. Capsular contracture may be more common following infection, hematoma, and seroma, and the chance
of it happening may increase over time. Capsular contracture occurs more commonly in patients undergoing revision surgery than in patients
undergoing primary implantation surgery. Capsular contracture is a risk factor for implant rupture, and it is one of the most common reasons for
reoperation in reconstruction patients.
Symptoms of capsular contracture range from mild firmness and mild discomfort to severe pain, distorted shape of the implant, and palpability
(ability to feel the implant). Capsular contracture is graded into 4 levels depending on its severity. Baker Grades III or IV are considered severe
and often additional surgery is needed to correct these grades:
Baker Grade I:
the breast is normally soft and looks natural
Baker Grade II:
the breast is a little firm but looks normal
Baker Grade III:
the breast is firm and looks abnormal
Baker Grade IV:
the breast is hard, painful, and looks abnormal
Capsular Contracture - Round Gel Core Study
In Mentor's Round Gel Core Study, the risk of capsular contracture Baker Grades III/IV through 4 years was 10.1% for primary reconstruction
and 19.7% for revision-reconstruction.
Capsular Contracture - CPG Core Study
In Mentor's CPG Core Study, the risk of capsular contracture Baker Grades III/IV through 3 years was 6.0% for primary reconstruction and
15.9% for revision-reconstruction.
Capsular Contracture - Product Availability (Adjunct) Study
Becker Round
Through 5 years, 12% of primary reconstruction patients and 13% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced capsular contracture Baker
Grades III/IV.
Percentage of capsular contracture in the literature for single-stage permanent expander/implants varies from 0 to 29%.2,7,8,10,11,12,16,27,28,29
This is comparable to the 10-29% rate observed for classical 2-stage tissue expander reconstruction.30,31
MemoryGel® Round
Through 5 years, 8% of primary reconstruction patients and 11% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced capsular contracture Baker
Grades III/IV.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 15 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
15
Patients should also be advised that additional surgery may be needed in cases where pain and/or firmness are severe. This surgery ranges
from removal of the implant capsule tissue to removal and possible replacement of the implant itself. This surgery may result in loss of breast
tissue. Capsular contracture may happen again after these additional surgeries. Capsular contracture may increase the risk of rupture.4
• Reoperation
The patient should assume that she will need to have additional surgeries (reoperations). Patients may decide to change the size or type of their
implants, requiring a reoperation, or they may have a reoperation to improve or correct their outcome.
Reoperation - Round Gel Core Study
The risk rate of reoperation at least 1 time through 4 years was 31.2% for primary reconstruction and 32.8% for revision-reconstruction.
Problems, such as, but not limited to, rupture, capsular contracture, hypertrophic scarring (irregular, raised scar), asymmetry, infection, and
shifting can require additional surgery. Summary tables are provided in the Mentor Round Gel Core Study section that describes the reasons for
reoperation during the first 4 years after receiving the implants.
Reoperation - CPG Core Study
The risk of reoperation at least 1 time through 3 years was 34.6% for primary reconstruction and 24.3% for revision-reconstruction. Problems,
such as, but not limited to, rupture, capsular contracture, hypertrophic scarring (irregular, raised scar), asymmetry, infection, and shifting can
require additional surgery. Summary tables are provided in the Mentor CPG Core Study section that describes the reasons for reoperation
during the first 3 years after receiving the implants.
Reoperation - Product Availability (Adjunct) Study
Becker Round
Through 5 years, 18% of primary reconstruction patients and 11% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced reoperation. Due to the
Product Availability (Adjunct) Study design, reoperation rates were calculated using only additional surgery data.
MemoryGel® Round
Through 5 years, 7% of primary reconstruction patients and 9% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced reoperation. Due to the Product
Availability (Adjunct) Study design, reoperation rates were calculated using only additional surgery data.
• Implant Removal
Implant Removal - Round Gel Core Study
Among the 37 (14.7%) women in the primary reconstruction cohort who had an explanation, the most frequently reported reasons for
explantation through 3 years were patient request for style/size change, asymmetry, and capsular contracture. Among the 10 (16.7%) women in
the revision-reconstruction cohort who had an explanation, the most frequently reported reasons for explantation through 3 years were capsular
contracture, asymmetry, patient request for style/size change, and symmastia.
Implant Removal - CPG Core Study
Among the 26 (13.6%) women in the primary reconstruction cohort who had an explanation, the most frequently reported reasons for
explantation through 3 years were asymmetry and patient requested size change. Among the 14 (20.6%) women in the revision-reconstruction
cohort who had an explanation, the most frequently reported reasons through 3 years for explantation were asymmetry, wrinkling, and position
dissatisfaction.
Implant Removal - Product Availability (Adjunct) Study
Becker Round
Through 5 years, 18% of primary reconstruction patients and 11% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced implant removal.
MemoryGel® Round
Through 5 years, 11% of primary reconstruction patients and 13% of revision-reconstruction patients experienced implant removal.
Most women who have their implants removed, have them replaced with new implants, but some women do not. If patients choose not to
replace their implants, they should be advised that they may have cosmetically unacceptable dimpling, puckering, wrinkling, and/or other
potentially permanent cosmetic changes of the breast following removal of the implant. Even if a patient has her implants replaced, implant
removal may result in loss of breast tissue. Also, implant replacement increases a patient's risk of future complications. For example, the risks of
severe capsular contracture double for primary reconstruction patients with implant replacement compared to first time placement. Patients
should consider the possibility of having her implants replaced and its consequences when making their decision to have implants.
• Filling Port Assembly
A low number of complications related to the filling port assembly have been reported in the Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study of
Becker implants, including tubing and connector breakage during removal, migration of injection port, leakage, discomfort, pain, and infection at
the injection site.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 16 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
16
11867-00
• Pain
Pain of varying intensity and length of time may occur and persist following breast implant surgery. In addition, improper size, placement,
surgical technique, or capsular contracture may result in pain. The surgeon should instruct his or her patient to inform them if there is significant
pain or if pain persists.
• Changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation
Feeling in the nipple and breast can increase or decrease after implant surgery, and are typically lost after complete mastectomy where the
nipple itself is removed, and can be severely lessened by partial mastectomy. Radiation therapy also can significantly reduce sensation in the
remaining portions of the breast or chest wall. The placement of breast implants for reconstruction may further lessen the sensation in the
remaining skin or breast tissue. The range of changes varies from intense sensitivity to no feeling in the nipple or breast following surgery. While
some of these changes can be temporary, they can also be permanent, and may affect the patient's sexual response or ability to nurse.
• Infection
Infection can occur with any surgery or implant. Most infections resulting from surgery appear within a few days to weeks after the operation.
However, infection is possible at any time after surgery. In addition, breast and nipple piercing procedures may increase the possibility of
infection. Infections in tissue with an implant present are harder to treat than infections in tissue without an implant. If an infection does not
respond to antibiotics, the implant may have to be removed, and another implant may be placed after the infection is resolved. As with many
other surgical procedures, in rare instances, Toxic Shock Syndrome has been noted in women after breast implant surgery, and it is a lifethreatening condition. Symptoms include sudden fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, fainting, dizziness, and/or sunburn-like rash. Patients should be
instructed to contact a doctor immediately for diagnosis and treatment if they have these symptoms.
• Hematoma/Seroma
A hematoma is a collection of blood within the space around the implant and a seroma is a build-up of fluid around the implant. Having a
hematoma and/or seroma following surgery may result in infection and/or capsular contracture later on. Symptoms from a hematoma or seroma
may include swelling, pain, and bruising. If a hematoma or seroma occurs, it will usually be soon after surgery. However, this can also occur at
any time after injury to the breast. While the body absorbs small hematomas and seromas, some will require surgery, typically involving draining
and potentially placing a surgical drain in the wound temporarily for proper healing. A small scar can result from surgical draining. Implant
rupture also can occur from surgical draining if there is damage to the implant during the draining procedure.
• Unsatisfactory Results
Unsatisfactory results such as wrinkling, asymmetry, implant displacement/migration, incorrect size, implant palpability/visibility, scar deformity,
and/or hypertrophic scarring, may occur. Some of these results may cause discomfort. Pre-existing asymmetry may not be entirely correctable
by implant surgery. Revision surgery may be recommended to maintain patient satisfaction, but carries additional considerations and risks.
Careful preoperative planning and surgical technique can minimize but not always prevent unsatisfactory results.
• Breast Feeding Complications
Breast feeding difficulties have been reported following breast surgery. If you use a periareolar surgical approach, it may further increase the
chance of breast feeding difficulties.
• Calcium Deposits in the Tissue Around the Implant
Calcium deposits can form in the tissue capsule surrounding the implant. Symptoms may include pain and firmness. Deposits of calcium can be
seen on mammograms and can be mistaken for possible cancer, resulting in additional surgery for biopsy and/or removal of the implant to
distinguish calcium deposits from cancer. If additional surgery is necessary to examine and/or remove calcifications, this may cause damage to
the implants. Calcium deposits also occur in women who undergo breast reduction procedures, in patients who have had hematoma formation,
and even in the breasts of women who have not undergone any breast surgery. The occurrence of calcium deposits increases significantly with
age.
• Extrusion
Extrusion may occur when the wound has not closed or when breast tissue covering the implants weakens. Radiation therapy has been reported
to increase the likelihood of extrusion. Extrusion requires additional surgery and possible removal of the implant, which may result in additional
scarring and/or loss of breast tissue.
• Necrosis
Necrosis may prevent or delay wound healing and require surgical correction, which may result in additional scarring and/or loss of breast
tissue. Implant removal may also be necessary. Factors associated with increased necrosis include infection, use of steroids, smoking,
chemotherapy, radiation, and excessive heat or cold therapy.
• Delayed Wound Healing
Some patients may experience a prolonged wound healing time. Smoking may interfere with the healing process. Delayed wound healing may
increase the risk of infection, extrusion, and necrosis. Depending on the type of surgery or the incision, wound healing times may vary.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 17 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
17
• Breast Tissue Atrophy/Chest Wall Deformity
The pressure of the breast implant may cause breast tissue thinning (with increased implant visibility and palpability) and chest wall deformity.
This can occur while implants are still in place or following implant removal without replacement. Either of these conditions may result in
additional surgeries and/or unacceptable dimpling/puckering of the breast.
• Lymphadenopathy
Literature reports associate lymphadenopathy with both intact and ruptured silicone breast implants. One study reported that armpit lymph
nodes from women with both intact and ruptured silicone gel implants had abnormal tissue reactions, granulomas, and the presence of
silicone.21 These reports were in women who had implants from a variety of manufacturers and implant models.
Other Reported Conditions
There have been reports in the literature of other conditions in women with silicone gel-filled breast implants. Many of these conditions have
been studied to evaluate their potential association with breast implants. Although no cause and effect relationship has been established
between breast implants and the conditions listed below, you should be aware of these reports. Furthermore, there is the possibility of risks, yet
unknown, which in the future could be determined to be associated with breast implants. It should also be noted that the cited references include
data from augmentation and/or reconstruction patients, as well as from a variety of manufacturers and implant models.
• Connective Tissue Disease (CTD)
Connective tissue diseases include diseases such as lupus, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by
chronic pain in the muscles and soft tissues surrounding joints, with tenderness at specific sites in the body. It is often accompanied by fatigue.
There have been a number of published epidemiological studies which have looked at whether having a breast implant is associated with having
a typical or defined connective tissue disease. The study size needed to conclusively rule out a smaller risk of connective tissue disease (°‹2)
among women with silicone gel-filled breast implants would need to be very large.4,23,24,25,32,33,34,35,36,37 The published studies taken together
show that breast implants are not significantly associated with a risk of developing a typical or defined connective tissue disease.4,33,34,35 These
studies do not distinguish between women with intact and ruptured implants. Only one study evaluated specific connective tissue disease
diagnoses and symptoms in women with silent ruptured versus intact implants, but it was too small to rule out a small risk.24
• CTD Signs and Symptoms
Literature reports have also been made associating silicone breast implants with various rheumatological signs and symptoms such as fatigue,
exhaustion, joint pain and swelling, muscle pain and cramping, tingling, numbness, weakness, and skin rashes. Scientific expert panels and
literature reports have found no evidence of a consistent pattern of signs and symptoms in women with silicone breast implants.4,22,38,39,40
Having these rheumatological signs and symptoms does not necessarily mean that a patient has a connective tissue disease; however, you
should advise your patient that she may experience these signs and symptoms after undergoing breast implantation. If a patient has an increase
in these signs or symptoms, you should refer your patient to a rheumatologist to determine whether these signs or symptoms are due to a
connective tissue disorder or autoimmune disease.
• Immunotoxicity
While there is no scientific evidence that silicone can cause hypersensitivity reactions in humans, some animal testing reports in the literature
suggest that silicone gel may cause an adjuvant effect. The biological mechanism and clinical significance for these findings in animal models
remain unknown.
• Cancer
Breast Cancer - Reports in the medical literature indicate that patients with breast implants are not at a greater risk than those without breast
implants for developing breast cancer.41,42,43,44,45 Some reports have suggested that breast implants may interfere with or delay breast cancer
detection by mammography and/or biopsy; however, other reports in the published medical literature indicate that breast implants neither
significantly delay breast cancer detection nor adversely affect cancer survival of women with breast implants.41,45,46,47,48
Brain cancer - One study has reported an increased incidence of brain cancer in women with breast implants as compared to the general
population.49 The incidence of brain cancer, however, was not significantly increased in women with breast implants when compared to women
who had other plastic surgeries. Another recently published review of four large studies in women with cosmetic implants concluded that the
evidence does not support an association between brain cancer and breast implants.50
Respiratory/lung cancer - One study has reported an increased incidence of respiratory/lung cancer in women with breast implants.49 Other
studies of women in Sweden and Denmark have found that women who get breast implants are more likely to be current smokers than women
who get breast reduction surgery or other types of cosmetic surgery.51,52,53
Cervical/vulvar cancer - One study has reported an increased incidence of cervical/vulvar cancer in women with breast implants.49 The cause of
this increase is unknown.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 18 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
18
11867-00
Lymphomas, including anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma (ALCL) - Information from published case
reports54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71 and a retrospective observational chart review have suggested a possible association
between breast implants and the very rare occurrence of ALCL in the breast. These findings are considered "preliminary and hypothesisgenerating", not strong enough to conclude that breast implants predispose women to ALCL, and require further research.71 Cases of ALCL in
the breast have also been reported in women without breast implants.70,72 A published study72 and recent presentations of ongoing research68
indicate that most cases identified to date, in patients with breast implants, presented as late occurring seromas. In the presence of late
occurring seromas, it is indicated in this ongoing research that to rule out ALCL "open exploration with total capsulectomy and pathologic
analysis" (including specific immunohistochemistry) be performed. All pertinent findings respecting cases associated with Mentor devices should
be reported to Mentor (e.g., time to clinical presentation, signs or symptoms, immunohistological analysis, type of implant, texture, patient history
with implants, etc.).
Other cancers - One study has reported an increased incidence of stomach cancer and leukemia in women with breast implants compared to
the general population.49 This increase was not significant when compared to women who had other types of plastic surgeries.
• Neurological Disease, Signs, and Symptoms
Some women with breast implants have complained of neurological symptoms (such as difficulties with vision, sensation, muscle strength,
walking, balance, thinking, or remembering things) or diseases (such as multiple sclerosis), which they believe are related to their implants. A
scientific expert panel report found that the evidence for a neurological disease or syndrome caused by or associated with breast implants is
insufficient or flawed.4
• Suicide
In several studies, a higher incidence of suicide was observed in women with breast implants.73,74,75,76 The reason for the observed increase is
unknown, but it was found that women with breast implants had higher rates of hospital admission due to psychiatric causes prior to surgery, as
compared with women who had breast reduction or in the general population of Danish women.74
• Effects on Children
At this time, it is not known if a small amount of silicone may pass through from the breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during
breastfeeding. Although there are no current established methods for accurately detecting silicone levels in breast milk, a study measuring
silicon (one component in silicone) levels did not indicate higher levels in breast milk from women with silicone gel-filled implants when
compared to women without implants.77
In addition, concerns have been raised regarding potential damaging effects on children born to mothers with implants. Two studies in humans
have found that the risk of birth defects overall is not increased in children born after breast implant surgery.78,79 Although low birth weight was
reported in a third study, other factors (for example, lower pre-pregnancy weight) may explain this finding.80 This author recommended further
research on infant health.
• Potential Health Consequences of Gel Bleed
Small quantities of low molecular weight (LMW) silicone compounds, as well as platinum (in zero oxidation state), have been found to diffuse
("bleed") through an intact implant shell.4,81 Studies on implants implanted for a long duration have suggested that such bleed may be a
contributing factor in the development of capsular contracture4 and lymphadenopathy.82 Evidence against gel bleed being a significant
contributing factor to capsular contracture and other local complications, is provided by the fact that there are similar or lower complication rates
for silicone gel-filled breast implants than for saline-filled breast implants. Saline-filled breast implants do not contain silicone gel and, therefore,
gel bleed is not an issue for those products. Furthermore, toxicology testing has indicated that the silicone material used in the Mentor implants
does not cause toxic reactions when large amounts are administered to test animals. It should also be noted that studies reported in the
literature have demonstrated that the low concentration of platinum contained in breast implants is in the zero oxidation (most biocompatible)
state.83,84,85,86 In addition, two separate studies sponsored by Mentor have demonstrated that the low concentration of platinum contained in its
breast implants is in the zero oxidation (most biocompatible) state.
Mentor performed a laboratory test to analyze the silicones and platinum (used in the manufacturing process), which may bleed out of intact
implants into the body. The test method was developed to represent, as closely as possible, conditions in the body surrounding an intact implant.
The results indicate that only the LMW silicones D4, D5, and D6, and platinum, bled into the serum in measurable quantities. In total, 4.7
micrograms of these 3 LMW silicones was detected. Platinum levels measured at 4.1 micrograms by 60 days, by which time an equilibrium level
was reached and no more platinum was extracted from the device. Over 99% of the LMW silicones and platinum stayed in the implant. The
overall body of available evidence supports that the extremely low level of gel bleed is of no clinical consequence.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 19 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
19
• Additional Factors to be Considered with MemoryGel® Siltex® Becker Expander/Breast Implants
Complications Correlated with Predisposing Factors
An analysis of complication rates and their correlation with potential predisposing factors while using the Becker Expander/Breast Implant in 111
patients (120 implants) was conducted by Camilleri et al.12 Patients with mastectomy (90), congenital asymmetry (16), acquired asymmetry (3)
and implant rupture (2) comprised the study group. Thirty-seven patients were heavy smokers (>20 cigarettes daily) and 28 patients had
previously received adjuvant radiotherapy. Becker devices were placed subpectorally (74), using a latissimus dorsi (LD) flap (36), or
subglandularly (10). Statistical analysis showed that heavy smoking and previous adjuvant radiotherapy were significant predisposing factors to
skin necrosis (p <= 0.05).
Significant Baker III or Baker IV capsular contracture was detected in 10 (9%) patients on follow-up. The authors attributed this low rate to the
overexpansion process, which inhibits myofibroblast function12 Furthermore, speed of expansion and degree of overexpansion did not influence
capsular contracture rates, similar to that seen with 2-stage reconstruction.14 The authors concluded that breast reconstruction using the Becker
device is a reliable alternative to other reconstructive methods, but good patient selection is essential for satisfactory results.
Eskenazi's review of 322 consecutive breast reconstructions with Mentor's Becker and Spectrum expander/implants over 14 years showed that
it is possible to preserve soft results even with the advent of postoperative radiation therapy.15 The keys to a soft irradiated breast are to create
a large flap without redundant skin and to maintain close follow-up during and after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
Eskenazi also noted that the forces of motion and gravity greatly influence the short- and long-term results.15 To achieve symmetry in a singlestage reconstruction, anticipation of these forces must be taken into account. This is the most difficult and subtle factor that influences the
surgical learning curve with this technique. Hence, the importance of extra-surgical factors may play a role in the aesthetic complication of
asymmetry for single-stage reconstructions. Furthermore, Eskenazi noted that with careful biopsy incision placement and aggressive early
debridement of flaps, there was enough skin available for all the reconstructions (i.e. no LD flaps required). This indicates that pre-surgical
planning by both the general and plastic surgeons for single-stage reconstructions can greatly influence the depth of the procedure selected and
its outcome.
Immediate vs. Delayed Reconstructions - Complications
In a study by Mandrekas et al, results of 19 immediate breast reconstructions versus 25 delayed breast reconstructions with an expander/
implant (Cox-Uphoff, USA) were compared.87 All patients had a biopsy-proven diagnosis of breast cancer treated by modified or radical
mastectomy. Complications occurred in both groups of patients: a total of 15 patients experienced 16 complications. Capsular contracture at 12
months follow-up (Baker II-IV) was 16% (3 patients) and 28% (7 patients) in the immediate and delayed groups, respectively. A Mantel-Haenszel
test showed a non-significant result (p=0.46) demonstrating there was no difference in the severity of capsular contracture according to the
Baker classification between the 2 groups. This observation was limited to this small sample size; the authors postulate that if the sample size
was much larger, there would be a detectable difference in capsular contracture being greater for the delayed reconstruction cohort. Overall, 7
(37%) of 19 immediate reconstruction patients experienced complications, and 9 (36%) of 25 in the delayed group had complications. The
maximum follow-up in this series was 7 years; the authors considered the aesthetic results to be excellent.
MENTOR ROUND GEL CORE STUDY
The safety and effectiveness of Mentor's Round silicone gel-filled implants were evaluated in an open-label multicentre clinical study, referred to
as the Round Gel Core Study.
As a note, supplemental safety information was also obtained from the U.K. Sharpe/Collis Study and the literature to help assess long-term
rupture rate and the consequences of rupture for this product. The literature, which had the most available information on the consequences of
rupture, was also used to assess other potential complications associated with silicone gel-filled breast implants. The key literature information is
referenced in this document.
Mentor's Round Gel Core Study results indicate that the risk of any complication (including reoperation) at some point through 4 years after
implant surgery is 52% for primary reconstruction patients and 55% for revision-reconstruction patients. The information below provides more
details about the complications and benefits your patients may experience.
Study Design:
The Round Gel Core Study is a 10-year study to assess safety and effectiveness in augmentation, reconstruction, and revision (augmentation
and reconstruction) patients. The Round Gel Core Study consists of 1,008 patients, including 552 primary augmentation patients, 145 revisionaugmentation patients, 251 primary reconstruction patients and 60 revision-reconstruction patients. The following presents the data for the
reconstruction subset of patients (primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction).
Patients' medical histories were collected at baseline. Patient follow-up is at 6 months and annually through 10 years. MRI scans to detect silent
rupture of the implant for a subset of patients are scheduled at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. Safety assessments include complication rates and
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 20 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
20
11867-00
rates of reoperation. Effectiveness assessments include measures of patients' satisfaction and assessments of quality of life (QoL). The results
through 4 years for reconstruction patients are currently being reported, and the study is currently ongoing. Mentor will periodically update this
labelling as more information becomes available.
Patient Accounting and Baseline Demographic Profile:
The Round Gel Core Study had 251 primary reconstruction patients and 60 revision-reconstruction patients. The follow-up rates through 4 years
for the primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction patients are 87% and 77%, respectively.
One hundred and thirty-four primary reconstruction patients and 28 revision-reconstruction patients are in the MRI cohort, which means that they
are assessed for silent rupture by MRI at years 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. At this time, MRIs have been performed at years 1, 2 and 4, and the followup rates at the 4-year timepoint for the MRI primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction cohorts were 76% and 64%, respectively.
Demographic information for the Round Gel Core Study:
Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 92% were Caucasian, 3% were African American, and 5% were other. The mean age at surgery was 45 years and 69%
were married. Seventy-nine percent had at least some college education.
Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 93% were Caucasian, 3% were African American, and 4% were other. The mean age at surgery was 51 years and 67%
were married. Seventy-five percent had at least some college education.
With respect to surgical baseline factors in the Round Gel Core Study, for primary reconstruction patients, the most frequently used devices
were textured surface implants, the most common incision site was the mastectomy scar, and the most frequent site of placement was
submuscular. For revision-reconstruction patients, the most frequently used devices were smooth implants, the most common incision site was
mastectomy scar, and the most frequent site of placement was submuscular.
Round Gel Core Effectiveness Outcomes:
Effectiveness was assessed by patient satisfaction and quality of life (QoL). Mentor's patient satisfaction was based on a single question of
"Would the patient have this breast surgery again?" The QoL measures were the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the Body Esteem Scale, the
Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS), the SF-36, and the Functional Living Index of Cancer.
Primary Reconstruction Patients:
For primary reconstruction patients, 155 (62%) out of the original 251 patients were included in the analysis of circumferential chest size at 4
years. Of these 155 patients, the average increase in circumferential chest size was 3.6 centimetres.
At 4 years, 189 (75%) of the 251 patients enrolled answered the patient satisfaction question. Of these 189 patients, 185 (98%) stated to their
surgeon that they would have the breast implant surgery again.
With regard to QoL measures at 4 years for primary reconstruction patients, no change was observed in the Functional Living Index of Cancer or
the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale. The Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS) is a survey completed by the patient that evaluates how the
patient sees herself and what she does, likes, and feels. There was no change in the overall score for the TSCS. There was no change on the
overall score of the Body Esteem Scale. The Chest Score of the Body Esteem Scale significantly improved. The SF-36 is a collection of scales
assessing mental and physical health. Seven of the 10 scores were similar postoperatively as compared to preoperatively. After adjusting for the
aging effect, none of the 10 scores showed a statistically significant overall mean change from baseline.
Revision-Reconstruction Patients:
For revision-reconstruction patients, 36 (60%) out of the original 60 patients were included in the analysis of circumferential chest size at 4
years. Of these patients, the average increase in circumferential chest size was 3.8 centimetres.
At 4 years, 40 (67%) of the 60 revision-reconstruction patients enrolled answered the patient satisfaction question. Of these 40 patients, 37
(93%) stated to their surgeon that they would have the breast implant surgery again.
With regard to QoL measures at 4 years for revision-reconstruction patients, no change was observed on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale or
on the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. For the Body Esteem Scale, after adjusting for the aging effect, no significant changes were observed.
The Sexual Attractiveness Subscale of the Body Esteem Scale significantly improved over time. The SF-36 is a collection of scales assessing
mental and physical health. Although most of the 10 scales showed decreases over time, only 2 scores showed statistically significant overall
mean change from baseline after adjusting for the aging effect.
Safety Outcomes - Complications:
Mentor's 10-year Round Gel Core Study is continuing. All patients available for follow-up have been evaluated at the 4-year timepoint.
Complications from the primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction cohorts are provided in Tables 1a and 1b below. Note: Complications
are defined as adverse events occurring in connection with the breast implant surgery, breast implants and/or the breast mound, and systemic
diseases.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 21 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
21
TABLE 1a. Round Gel Core Study: 4-Year Cumulative First Occurrence Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
N=251 Patients
Key Complications
CI
Reoperation
31.2
25.7, 37.6
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
10.1
6.8, 14.9
Implant Removal with Replacement with Study Device
7.9
5.1, 12.1
Implant Removal with Replacement with Unknown Device
1.1
0.3, 4.2
Implant Removal without Replacement
7.8
4.9, 12.4
Infection
6.2
3.8, 10.0
Rupture1
3.1
Complications >1%
2
%
1.0, 9.5
CI
Other (Non-cosmetic)3
8.3
5.3, 13.0
Asymmetry4
7.6
4.8, 12.0
Ptosis
6.3
3.7, 10.7
Hypertrophic Scarring
6.3
3.9, 10.3
Seroma
4.8
2.8, 8.4
Breast mass
4.1
2.2, 7.9
Wrinkling4
3.1
1.5, 6.6
Breast Pain4
2.2
0.9, 5.1
2.2
0.9, 5.3
2.1
0.9, 5.1
Recurrent Breast Cancer
5
Nipple Sensation Changes
4
Implant Malposition/Displacement
2.1
0.9, 5.0
Metastatic disease
1.8
0.7, 4.7
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade II with Surgical Intervention
1.8
0.7, 4.7
Extrusion (intact)
1.6
0.6, 4.3
New Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
1.4
0.5, 4.4
Hematoma
1.3
0.4, 3.9
New Diagnosis of Rheumatic Disease
1.1
0.3, 4.6
1
There was 1 patient with a suspected ruptures by MRI who died, there were 2 patients with suspected ruptures by MRI that were confirmed to be intact on explant in
the reconstruction group at 4 years.
2
The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%: breast sensation changes, burning sensation in nipple, capsular contracture secondary to radiation
therapy, deep vein thrombosis, delayed wound healing, distant metastasis (sternum, back, and liver), distortion of breast shape not related to capsular contracture, dog
ear scars from mastectomy, external injury not related to breast implant, loss of fullness, loss of inframammary fold, lymphadenopathy, muscle spasms, necrosis, nipple
complications, occasional burning discomfort of skin, rash, redness, skin lesion, stitch abscess, surgical complications related to technique, tight benelli suture, and wide
scars.
3 Any complication other than ptosis, hypertrophic scarring, asymmetry, or wrinkling.
4 Mild occurrences were excluded.
5
The general recurrence rate for breast cancer reported in the medical literature ranges from 5 to 25%.88,89,90
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 22 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
22
11867-00
TABLE 1b. Round Gel Core Study: 4-Year Cumulative Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence Interval), By
Patient for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
N=60 Patients
Key Complications
%
CI
Reoperation
32.8
22.2, 46.7
Capsular contracture III/IV
19.7
11.4, 32.9
Implant Removal with Replacement with Study Device
8.6
3.7, 19.4
Implant Removal with Replacement with Unknown Device
2.3
0.3, 15.4
Implant Removal without Replacement
7.9
2.9, 20.2
Infection
0
-
Rupture
0
Complications >1%
Asymmetry2
%
CI
13.2
6.4, 26.1
Ptosis
7.3
2.8, 18.5
Wrinkling2
6.9
2.6, 17.3
Breast mass
5.2
1.7, 15.3
Implant Malposition/Displacement
5.1
1.7, 15.0
Granuloma
5.0
1.6, 14.7
Surgical Complications Related to Technique
5.1
1.7, 15.1
Nipple Sensation Changes2
3.9
1.0, 14.9
Breast Pain2
3.4
0.9, 12.9
Hematoma
3.4
0.9, 13.0
New Diagnosis of Rheumatic Disease
3.4
0.9, 12.9
Symmastia
3.4
0.9, 12.8
Indented Scar
2.4
0.4, 16.1
Pain
2.0
0.3, 13.6
Secondary Injury While Moving
1.9
0.3, 12.7
Breast Sensation Changes
1.9
0.3, 12.4
Lack of Projection
1.9
0.3, 12.9
Lack of Definition of Fold
1.9
0.3, 12.4
Nipple Related Unplanned
1.8
0.3, 11.8
Hypertrophic Scarring
1.8
0.3, 11.8
Numbness in Both Hands at Night
1.8
0.3, 11.8
Capsular Contracture II with Surgical Intervention
1.8
0.3, 11.8
Irritated Breast Scars
1.7
0.2, 11.3
Seroma
1.7
0.2, 11.3
Inflammation
1.7
0.2, 11.4
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 23 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
23
Recurrent Breast Cancer
1.7
0.2, 11.4
New Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
1.7
0.2, 11.4
Delayed Wound Healing
1.7
0.2, 11.3
External Injury Not Related to Breast Implant
1.7
0.2, 11.3
Capsule Tear
1.7
0.2, 11.3
Extrusion (intact)
1.7
0.2, 11.3
Follicular Cyst
1.7
0.2, 11.4
1 No complications occurred at a rate of <1%.
2 Mild occurrences were excluded.
Safety Outcomes - Main Reasons for Reoperation:
This section includes the main reasons for reoperation. The rates exclude planned secondary surgeries and reoperations. If more than one
reason for the reoperation was reported, the hierarchy used was: rupture/deflation, infection, capsular contracture, necrosis/extrusion,
hematoma/seroma, delayed wound healing, breast pain, implant malposition, wrinkling, palpability/visibility, asymmetry, ptosis, scarring, nipple
complications, device injury/iatrogenic, breast cancer mass, biopsy, and patient request for style/size change.
There were 166 additional surgical procedures performed in 92 reoperations involving 75 primary reconstruction patients. The most common
reason for reoperation through 4 years was because of asymmetry (20% of 92 reoperations). Table 2a below provides the main reasons for the
reoperations following initial implantation that were performed through 4 years for primary reconstruction patients.
TABLE 2a. Main Reasons for Reoperation through 4 Years for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Reoperation
n
% (of 92 Reoperations)
Asymmetry
18
Biopsy
13
14.1
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade II, III, IV
14
15.2
Implant Malposition
19.6
8
8.7
11
12.0
Infection
4
4.3
Scarring/Hypertrophic Scarring
5
5.4
Ptosis (sagging)
3
3.3
Patient Request for Style/Size Change
Hematoma/Seroma
3
3.3
Breast Cancer
4
4.3
Extrusion of Intact Implant
2
2.2
Delayed Wound Healing
1
1.1
Breast Pain
3
3.3
Implant Palpability/Visibility
1
1.1
Muscle Spasm
1
1.1
Loss of Fullness
1
1.1
92
100
Total
There were 59 additional surgical procedures performed in 28 reoperations involving 19 revision-reconstruction patients. The most common
reason for reoperation through 4 years was because of biopsy (29% of 28 reoperations). Table 2b below provides the main reason for each
reoperation following initial implantation that was performed through 4 years for revision-reconstruction patients.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 24 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
24
11867-00
TABLE 2b. Main Reasons for Reoperation through 4 Years for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Reoperation
n
% (of 28 Reoperations)
Biopsy
8
28.6
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
4
14.3
Implant Malposition
2
7.1
Ptosis (sagging)
2
‘7.1
2
7.1
Hypertrophic Scarring
Suspected Rupture
1
Asymmetry
1
3.6
1
3.6
Breast Cancer
1
3.6
Extrusion of Intact Implant
1
3.6
Hematoma/Seroma
1
3.6
Patient Request for Style/Size Change
1
3.6
Breast Pain
1
3.6
Wrinkling
1
3.6
Capsular Tear
1
3.6
Palpable Nodule
Total
1
3.6
28
100
1 The device was removed and found to be intact (not ruptured).
Safety Outcomes - Reasons for Implant Removal:
The main reasons for implant removal among primary reconstruction patients in the Round Gel Core Study over the 4 years are shown in Table
3a below. Of the 251 primary reconstruction patients, there were 37 patients (15%) who had 50 implants removed over the 4 years of follow-up
in the Round Gel Core Study. Of the 50 primary reconstruction implants removed, 25 (50%) were replaced. The most common reason for
implant removal was patient request (36% of the 50 implants removed) for primary reconstruction patients.
TABLE 3a. Main Reasons for Implant Removal through 4 Years for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
Reasons for Removal
n
% (of 50 Explants)
Patient Request for Style/Size Change
18
36.0
Asymmetry
11
22.0
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade II, III, IV
7
14.0
Implant Malposition
3
6.0
Breast Pain
2
4.0
Extrusion of Intact Implant
2
4.0
Infection
2
4.0
Hematoma
1
2.0
Lack of Projection
1
2.0
Muscle Spasm
1
2.0
Recurrent Breast Cancer
1
2.0
Ptosis
1
2.0
Total
50
100
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 25 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
25
The main reasons for implant removal among revision-reconstruction patients in the Round Gel Core Study over the 4 years are shown in Table
3b below. Of the 60 revision-reconstruction patients, there were 10 patients (17%) who had 13 implants removed over the 4 years of follow-up in
the Round Gel Core Study. Of the 13 implants removed, 7 (54%) were replaced. The most common reason for implant removal was capsular
contracture Baker Grade III/IV (31% of the 13 implants removed) for revision-reconstruction patients.
TABLE 3b. Main Reasons for Implant Removal through 4 Years for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
Reasons for Removal
n
% (of 13 of Explants)
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
4
Asymmetry
2
15.4
Patient Request for Style/Size Change
2
15.4
Symmastia
2
15.4
Breast Pain
1
7.7
Extrusion of Intact Implants
1
7.7
Pocket Tear
Total
30.8
1
7.7
13
100
Other Clinical Data Findings
Below is a summary of clinical findings from Mentor's Round Gel Core Study with regard to connective tissue disease (CTD), CTD signs and
symptoms, cancer, lactation complications, reproduction complications, and suicide. These issues, along with other endpoints, are being further
evaluated as part of a Mentor postapproval study of patients followed through 10 years.
CTD Diagnoses
Two primary reconstruction patient and two revision-reconstruction patients in the Mentor Round Gel Core Study were reported to have a new
diagnosis of CTD according to a rheumatologist. These diagnoses were two cases of fibromyalgia, both at one year, pyoderma gangrenosum at
one year, and Morton's Neuroma at three years. These data should be interpreted with caution because there was no comparison group of
similar women without implants.
CTD Signs and Symptoms
Data on over 100 self-reported signs and symptoms, including about 50 self-reported rheumatological symptoms, were collected. Compared to
before having the implants, a significant increase was found for joint pain and frequent muscle cramps in the primary reconstruction patients,
and an increase in combined pain was found in the revision-reconstruction patients. These increases were not found to be related to simply
getting older over time. The Mentor Round Gel Core Study was not designed to evaluate cause and effect associations because there is no
comparison group of women without implants, and because other contributing factors, such as medications and lifestyle/exercise, were not
studied. Therefore, it cannot be determined whether these increases were due to the implants or not. However, your patient should be aware
that she may experience an increase in these symptoms after receiving breast implants.
Cancer
For primary reconstruction patients, 3 (1.2%) patients had a new diagnosis of breast cancer and 5 (2.0%) patients had a reoccurrence of breast
cancer. For revision-reconstruction, 1 (1.7%) patient had a new diagnosis of breast cancer and 1 (1.7%) patient had a recurrence of breast
cancer. There were no reports of other cancers, such as brain, respiratory, or cervical/vulvar in any indication.
Lactation Complications
For primary reconstruction patients, the 1 (0.4%) woman who attempted to breastfeed experienced no lactation difficulties. None of the revisionreconstruction patients attempted to breastfeed.
Reproduction Complications
For primary reconstruction patients, 4 (1.6%) patients reported a miscarriage. There were no reports of miscarriage in revision-reconstruction
patients.
Suicide
There were no reports of suicide in Mentor's Round Gel Core Study through 4 years.
MENTOR CPG CORE STUDY
The safety and effectiveness of Mentor's MemoryGel® CPG Breast Implant were evaluated in an open-label multicentre clinical study, referred to
as the CPG Core Study.
As a note, supplemental safety information was also obtained from the literature to help assess long-term rupture rate and the consequences of
rupture for this product. The literature, which had the most available information on the consequences of rupture, was also used to assess other
potential complications associated with silicone gel-filled and CPG implants. The key literature is referenced in this document.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 26 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
26
11867-00
Mentor's CPG Core Study results indicate that the risk of any complication or reoperations at some point through 3 years after implant surgery is
48% for primary reconstruction patients and 51% for revision-reconstruction patients. The information below provides more details about the
complications and benefits your patients may experience.
Study Design:
The CPG Core Study is a 10-year study to assess safety and effectiveness in augmentation, reconstruction, and revision (augmentation and
reconstruction) patients. The CPG Core Study consisted of 955 patients, including 572 augmentation patients, 124 revision-augmentation
patients, 191 reconstruction patients, and 68 revision-reconstruction patients. The following presents the data for the reconstruction subset of
patients (primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction).
Patients' medical histories were collected at baseline. Patient follow-up is at 10 weeks and annually through 10 years. MRI scans to detect silent
rupture of the implant for a subset of patients are scheduled at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 years. Safety assessments include complication rates and
rates of reoperation. Effectiveness assessments include measures of patients' satisfaction and quality of life. The results through 3 years are
currently being reported, and the study is currently ongoing. Mentor will periodically update this labelling as more information becomes available.
Patient Accounting and Baseline Demographic Profile:
The CPG Core Study had 191 reconstruction patients and 68 revision-reconstruction patients. The follow-up rates through 3 years for the
primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction patients are 90% and 89%, respectively
Seventy-four primary reconstruction patients and 37 revision-reconstruction patients are in the MRI cohort, which means that they are assessed
for silent rupture by MRI at years 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. At this time, MRIs have been performed at years 1 and 2, and the follow-up rates at the 2year timepoint for the MRI primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction cohorts were 81% and 86%, respectively.
Demographic information for the CPG Study:
Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 94% were Caucasian, 5% were African American, and 1% were other. The mean age at surgery was 48 years and 76%
were married. Eighty-three percent had some college education.
Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 97% were Caucasian, 2% were African American, and 1% were other. The mean age at surgery was 53 years and 69%
were married. Eighty-one percent had some college education.
With respect to surgical baseline factors in the CPG Core Study, for both the primary reconstruction patients and the revision-reconstruction
patients, the most common incision site was the mastectomy scar and submuscular placement was the most frequent site of placement.
CPG Core Study Effectiveness Outcomes:
Effectiveness was assessed by patient satisfaction and body image/self-esteem. Mentor's patient satisfaction was based on a single question of
"Would the patient have this breast surgery again?" The body image/self-esteem measurements were the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the
Body Esteem Scale, the Tennessee Self Concept Scale (TSCS), the SF-36, and the Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ).
Primary Reconstruction Patients: For primary reconstruction patients, 150 (79%) out of the original 191 patients were included in the analysis
of circumferential chest size at 3 years. Of these 150 patients, the average increase in circumferential chest size was 0.8 centimetres, indicating
that the chest mound has been restored.
Mentor's satisfaction assessment was based on a single question of "Would the patient have this breast surgery again?" At 3 years, 158 (83%)
out of 191 primary reconstruction patients enrolled answered that question. Of these 158 patients, 148 (94%) stated to their surgeon that they
would have the breast implant surgery again.
With regard to QoL measures at 3 years for primary reconstruction patients, no change was observed on Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale or the
overall score of the Body Esteem Scale. The Chest Subscale of the Body Esteem Scale significantly improved. The SF-36 is a collection of
scales assessing mental and physical health, and there was significant improvement in the Physical Functioning, Mental Health, and Vitality
Scales. The Breast Evaluation Questionnaire (BEQ) is a questionnaire developed to access breast satisfaction and quality of life outcomes
among breast surgery patients. When asked how satisfied she was with the general appearance of her breasts, the large majority of primary
reconstruction patients (75.3%) said they were "very satisfied or somewhat satisfied." For the 3 factors of 1) Comfort when not fully dressed, 2)
Comfort when fully dressed, and 3) Satisfaction with breast attributes, there was a significant improvement in the primary reconstruction cohort
for all 3 factors.
Revision-Reconstruction Patients: For revision-reconstruction patients, 51 (75%) out of the original 68 patients were included in the analysis
of circumferential chest size at 3 years. Of these patients, the average increase in circumferential chest size was 0.8 centimetres.
Mentor's patient satisfaction was based on a single question of "Would the patient have this breast surgery again?" At 3 years, 51 (75%) out of
68 revision-reconstruction patients enrolled answered that question. Of these 51 patients, 48 (94%) stated to their surgeon that they would have
the breast implant surgery again.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 27 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
27
With regard to QoL measures at 3 years for revision-reconstruction patients, no change was observed on the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, the
SF-36, or the overall Body Esteem Scale. However, the Chest Subscale of the Body Esteem Scale significantly improved over time. When asked
how satisfied she was with the general appearance of her breasts, the majority of revision-reconstruction patients (60.3%) said they were "very
satisfied or somewhat satisfied." For the 3 factors of 1) Comfort when not fully dressed, 2) Comfort when fully dressed, and 3) Satisfaction with
breast attributes, there was a significant improvement in the revision-reconstruction cohort for all 3 factors.
Safety Outcomes – Complications:
Mentor's 10-year CPG Core Study is continuing. Complications from the primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction cohorts are provided
in Tables 4a and 4b below. Note: Complications are defined as adverse events occurring in connection with the breast implant surgery, breast
implants and/or the breast mound, and systemic diseases.
TABLE 4a. CPG Core Study: 3-Year Cumulative First Occurrence Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
N=191 Patients
Key Complications
%
CI
Any Reoperation
34.6
28.2, 42.0
Explant without Replacement
7.9
4.8, 13.1
Explant with Replacement with Study Device
6.6
3.8, 11.4
Baker III, IV Capsular Contracture
6.0
3.3, 11.0
Infection
2.2
0.8, 5.8
Implant Rotation
3.5
1.6, 7.6
0
-
Rupture
Non-Cosmetic Complications = 1%1
Baker III Capsular Contracture
5.0
2.5, 9.9
Lack of Projection
4.6
2.3, 9.1
Excess Tissue
3.3
1.5, 7.2
Seroma
2.7
1.1, 6.4
Irritation/Inflammation
2.7
1.1, 6.3
Nipple Sensation Changes2
2.3
0.9, 6.1
Scarring
2.3
0.9, 5.9
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
2.2
0.8, 5.7
Baker II Capsular Contracture w/Surgical Intervention
1.7
0.6, 5.3
Recurrent Breast Cancer
1.7
0.5, 5.1
Breast Pain2
1.7
0.5, 5.0
Baker IV Capsular Contracture
1.6
0.5, 4.9
Mass/Cyst
1.5
0.4, 6.0
New Diagnosis of Rheumatic Disease
1.1
0.3, 4.4
Loss of Definition of Inframammary Fold
1.1
0.3, 4.3
Delayed Wound Healing2
1.0
0.3, 4.1
1 The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%:
breast mass/cyst not associated with breast implant, breast sensation changes, external injury not related to breast implants, metastatic disease, necrosis, nipple
complication, position dissatisfaction, skin blistering, skin lesion, suture complication, swelling (excessive), tightness of skin over implant, wound dehiscence, and wound
itching.
2
Mild occurrences were excluded.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 28 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
28
11867-00
TABLE 4b. CPG Core Study: 3-Year Cumulative Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence Interval), By Patient for
Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
N=68 Patients
Key Complications
%
CI
Any Reoperation
24.3
15.7, 36.7
Explant without Replacement
17.6
10.1, 29.5
Baker III, IV Capsular Contracture
15.9
8.5, 28.9
Explant with Replacement with Study Device
4.4
1.4, 13.1
Infection
3.0
0.8, 11.4
Implant Rotation
1.5
0.2, 10.4
0
-
Baker III Capsular Contracture
15.9
8.5, 28.9
Lack of Projection
12.7
6.2, 25.1
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
6.3
2.4, 15.9
Position Dissatisfaction2
5.0
1.6, 14.8
Seroma
4.6
1.5, 13.5
4.2
1.0, 16.1
Rupture
Non-Cosmetic Complications = 1%1
Palpability-Implant
2
Irritation/Inflammation
3.0
0.8, 11.3
Breast Pain2
1.9
0.3, 12.9
Excess Tissue
1.6
0.2, 11.1
Metastatic Disease
1.6
0.2, 10.9
Baker II Capsular Contracture w/Surgical Intervention
1.5
0.2, 10.4
Skin Paresthesia
1.5
0.2, 10.4
Tightness of Skin Over Implant
1.5
0.2, 10.4
Recurrent Breast Cancer
1.5
0.2, 10.3
Scarring
1.5
0.2, 10.3
Atrophy of Pectoralis Muscle
1.5
0.2, 10.1
Hematoma
1.5
0.2, 10.0
Swelling (Excessive)
1.5
0.2, 10.0
Erythema
1.5
0.2, 10.0
Loss of Definition of Inframammary Fold
1.5
0.2, 10.0
1 No complications occurred at a rate of <1%.
2
Mild occurrences were excluded.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 29 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
29
Safety Outcomes - Main Reasons for Reoperation:
This section includes the main reasons for reoperation. The rates exclude planned secondary surgeries and reoperations. If more than one
reason for the reoperation was reported, the hierarchy used was: rupture/deflation, suspected rupture, infection, granuloma, irritation/
inflammation, Baker Grade II capsular contracture w/surgical intervention, Baker Grade III capsular contracture, Baker Grade IV capsular
contracture, capsular contracture, extrusion, extrusion/necrosis, hematoma, hematoma/seroma, seroma, delayed wound healing, wound
dehiscence, breast pain, breast pain not associated with any other complication, implant malposition, implant movement, implant rotation,
wrinkling, palpability/visibility of implant, asymmetry, ptosis, hypertrophic scarring, scarring, nipple complication, nipple complications, device
injury/iatrogenic, breast cancer, new diagnosis of breast cancer, new diagnosis of rheumatic disease, specify where indicated, breast mass / cyst
not associated with breast implant, mass / cyst, calcification, biopsy, pat dissatisfied with aesthetic appearance of breast, patient request for
style/size change, position dissatisfaction, size change-patient request, size change-physician assessment only, lack of projection, excess
tissue, loss of definition of inframammary fold, and other.
There were 126 additional surgical procedures performed in 73 reoperations involving 64 primary reconstruction patients. The most common
reason for reoperation through 3 years was because of asymmetry (12% of 73 reoperations). Table 5a below provides the main reasons for the
reoperations following initial implantation that were performed through 3 years for primary reconstruction patients.
TABLE 5a. Main Reasons for Reoperation through 3 Years for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Reoperation
n
% (of 73 Reoperations)
Asymmetry
9
12.3
Excess Tissue
7
9.6
Position Dissatisfaction
6
8.2
Scarring
4
5.5
Patient Requested Size Change
4
5.5
Size Change (Physician Assessment Only)
4
5.5
Wrinkling
4
5.5
Lack of Projection
3
4.1
Implant Rotation
3
4.1
Breast Mass/Cyst Not Associated with Breast Implant
2
2.7
Capsular Contracture III
2
2.7
Capsular Contracture IV
2
2.7
Implant Extrusion
2
2.7
Mass/Cyst
2
2.7
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
2
2.7
Recurrent Breast Cancer
2
2.7
Seroma
2
2.7
Capsular Contracture II with Surgical Intervention
1
1.4
Delayed Wound Healing
1
1.4
Infection
1
1.4
Nipple Complication
1
1.4
Skin Lesion
1
1.4
Reason Unknown
8
11.0
73
100
Total
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 30 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
30
11867-00
There were 48 additional surgical procedures performed in 18 reoperations involving 16 revision-reconstruction patients. The most common
reason for reoperation through 3 years was wrinkling (17% of 18 reoperations). Table 5b below provides the main reason for each reoperation
following initial implantation that was performed through 3 years for revision-reconstruction patients.
TABLE 5b. Main Reasons for Reoperation through 3 Years for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Reoperation
n
% (of 18 Reoperations)
Wrinkling
3
Asymmetry
2
11.1
Capsular Contracture III
2
11.1
Patient Requested Size Change
2
11.1
Position Dissatisfaction
2
11.1
Capsular Contracture II with Surgical Intervention
1
5.6
Breast Pain
1
5.6
Lack of Projection
1
5.6
Infection
1
5.6
New Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
1
5.6
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
1
5.6
Seroma
1
5.6
18
100
Total
16.7
Safety Outcomes - Reasons for Implant Removal:
The main reasons for implant removal among primary reconstruction patients in the Mentor CPG Core Study over the 3 years are shown in
Table 6a below. Of the 191 primary reconstruction patients, there were 26 patients (13.6%) who had 34 implants removed over the 3 years of
follow-up in the Mentor CPG Core Study. Of the 34 primary reconstruction implants removed, 12 (35%) were replaced. The most common
reason for implant removal was asymmetry and patient requested size change (17.6% of the 34 implants removed) for primary reconstruction
patients.
TABLE 6a. Main Reasons for Implant Removal through 3 Years for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Removal
n
% (of 34 Explants)
Asymmetry
6
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
4
17.6
11.8
Patient Requested Size Change
6
17.6
Capsular Contracture III/IV
3
8.8
Size Change (Physician Assessment Only)
4
11.8
Lack of Projection
4
11.8
Wrinkling
3
8.8
Implant Extrusion
1
2.9
Infection
1
2.9
Implant Rotation
1
2.9
Reason Unknown
1
2.9
34
100
Total
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 31 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
31
The main reasons for implant removal among revision-reconstruction patients in the Mentor CPG Core Study over the 3 years are shown in
Table 6b below. Of the 68 revision-reconstruction patients, there were 14 patients (20%) who had 22 implants removed over the 3 years of
follow-up in the Mentor CPG Core Study. Of the 22 implants removed, 4 (18%) were replaced. The most common reason for implant removal
was asymmetry, position dissatisfaction, and wrinkling (18% of the 22 implants removed) for revision-reconstruction patients.
TABLE 6b. Main Reasons for Implant Removal through 3 Years for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
Reason for Removal
n
% (of 22 Explants)
Asymmetry
4
18.2
Wrinkling
4
18.2
Position Dissatisfaction
4
18.2
Patient Request for Size Change
2
9.1
Lack of Projection
2
9.1
Infection
1
4.5
New Diagnosis of Breast Cancer
1
4.5
Seroma
1
4.5
Capsular Contracture II with Surgical Intervention
1
4.5
Breast Pain
1
4.5
Patient Dissatisfied with Aesthetic Appearance of Breast
Total
1
4.5
22
100
Other Clinical Data Findings
Below is a summary of clinical findings from Mentor’s CPG Core Study with regard to connective tissue disease (CTD), CTD signs and
symptoms, cancer, neurological disease, neurological signs and symptoms, lactation complications, reproduction complications, and suicide.
These issues, along with other endpoints, are being further evaluated as part of a Mentor Round Gel postapproval study of patients followed
through 10 years.
CTD
Two primary reconstruction patients in the Mentor CPG Core Study were reported to have a new diagnosis of CTD according to a
rheumatologist. These diagnoses were 1 case of rheumatoid arthritis at 10 months and 1 case of reactive arthritis at 11 months. These data
should be interpreted with caution because there was no comparison group of similar women without implants.
CTD Signs and Symptoms
Data on over 100 self-reported signs and symptoms, including about 50 self-reported rheumatological symptoms, were collected. Compared to
before having the implants, there were no statistically significant increases or decreases found for primary reconstruction patients and revisionreconstruction patients. The Mentor CPG Core Study was not designed to evaluate cause and effect associations because there is no
comparison group of women without implants, and because other contributing factors, such as medications and lifestyle/exercise, were not
studied. Therefore, patients should be aware that they may experience an increase in these symptoms after receiving breast implants.
Cancer
For primary reconstruction patients, 3 (1.6%) patients had a diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer and for revision-reconstruction, 1 (1.5%)
patient had a diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer. There were no reports of new diagnoses in revision-reconstruction patients and no reports of
other new cancers, such as brain, respiratory, or cervical/vulvar in either indication.
Neurological Disease, Signs, and Symptoms
In the Mentor CPG Core Study, data on patient-reported neurological disease and signs and symptoms were collected at each postoperative
visit. Examples of neurological symptoms included weakness, numbness of feet, ringing in ears, and fatigue. Investigators also performed a
physical exam at each postoperative visit.
Through 3 years, there were no reports of patients with neurological diseases in either indication. Compared to before implantation, no
significant increases for neurological signs and symptoms were found in primary reconstruction or revision-reconstruction patients.
Lactation Complications
None of the primary reconstruction or revision-reconstruction patients attempted to breast feed.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 32 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
32
11867-00
Reproduction Complications
There were no reports of miscarriage in Mentor’s CPG Core Study through 3 years.
Suicide
There were no reports of suicide in Mentor’s CPG Core Study through 3 years.
MENTOR PRODUCT AVAILABILITY (ADJUNCT) STUDY
The Becker Round implants have been studied for safety for over 16 years in the ongoing U.S. FDA-approved Product Availability (Adjunct)
Study, designed to collect safety data through 5 years for reconstruction patients. The Product Availability (Adjunct) Study is also collecting
safety data on the use of MemoryGel® Round implants. No serious, unanticipated adverse device effects have been reported. The complications
that have been reported are consistent with the type of complications associated with other implant studies (refer to the Mentor Clinical Studies
section).
Study Design:
The Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study was designed to collect safety data through 5 years on MemoryGel® Round and Becker Round
devices. This study is being accomplished under a limited clinical protocol in which specific parameters are required but with controls somewhat
less stringent than those normally required in Investigational Device Exemption Trials (i.e., “Core” studies). Objectives of the study are to gather
study data regarding short term, post-implant events to supplement the data that is being collected in the more extensive “Core” studies for the
MemoryGel® Round and CPG implants. The study includes an enrollment period of 15 years, which began in 1992, and a patient follow-up
period of 5 years. Follow-up visits are scheduled at 1, 3 and 5 years post-implantation. Mentor will periodically update this brochure as more
information becomes available.
The Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study consists of 9,227 primary reconstruction, 3,008 revision-reconstruction, and 681 revisionaugmentation patients implanted with Becker devices, and 57,828 primary reconstruction, 18,491 revision-reconstruction, and 60,290 revisionaugmentation patients implanted with MemoryGel® Round devices. The following presents the data for the reconstruction subset of patients
(primary reconstruction and revision-reconstruction).
Patient Accounting and Baseline Demographic Profile:
The Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study includes 9,227 primary reconstruction and 3,008 revision-reconstruction implanted with Becker
devices, and 57,828 primary reconstruction and 18,491 revision-reconstruction patients implanted with MemoryGel® devices.
Becker Round- Primary Reconstruction Cohort
The follow-up rates through 1, 3, and 5 years for primary reconstruction patients were 54%, 33%, and 21%, respectively.
Becker Round- Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
The follow-up rates through 1, 3, and 5 years for revision-reconstruction patients were 53%, 32%, and 19%, respectively.
MemoryGel® Round- Primary Reconstruction Cohort
The follow-up rates through 1, 3, and 5 years for primary reconstruction patients were 35%, 25%, and 18%, respectively.
MemoryGel® Round- Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
The follow-up rates through 1, 3, and 5 years for revision-reconstruction patients were 39%, 29%, and 19%, respectively.
Demographic information for the Product Availability (Adjunct) Study:
Becker Round - Primary Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 88% were Caucasian, 5% were African American, and 7% were other. The mean age at surgery was 50 years and 68%
were married. Seventy-two percent had at least some college education.
Becker Round - Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 91% were Caucasian, 3% were African American, and 6% were other. The mean age at surgery was 52 years and 67%
were married. Seventy-four percent had at least some college education.
MemoryGel® Round - Primary Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 88% were Caucasian, 3% were African American, and 9% were other. The mean age at surgery was 43 years and 64%
were married. Eighty percent had at least some college education.
MemoryGel® Round - Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
With regard to race, 91% were Caucasian, 2% were African American, and 6% were other. The mean age at surgery was 50 years and 66%
were married. Seventy-seven percent had at least some college education.
Safety Outcomes – Complications:
Mentor’s Product Availability (Adjunct) Study is continuing with patient follow-up at 1, 3, and 5 years. Complications from the Primary
reconstruction and revision-reconstruction cohorts are provided in the tables below.
Becker Round
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 33 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
33
TABLE 7a. Product Availability (Adjunct) Study – Becker Round: Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
1 Year
N=5,465
Key Complications1
Reoperation2
3 Year
N=2,786
5 Year
N=1,127
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
8.0
7.3, 8.8
12.6
11.3, 13.9
17.7
15.3, 20.1
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
3.8
3.2, 4.4
8.0
6.9, 9.1
12.1
10.0, 14.2
Implant Removal with Replacement
5.0
4.4, 5.6
7.7
6.7,8.8
9.1
7.3, 10.9
Implant Removal without Replacement
2.5
2.1, 3.0
4.7
3.9, 5.6
8.9
7.0, 10.7
Infection
1.3
1.0, 1.7
1.8
1.3, 2.3
2.3
1.4, 3.2
Rupture
1.9
1.5, 2.3
3.8
3.1, 4.6
7.5
5.8, 9.2
Complications >1%3
%
CI
22.5, 26.0
34.6
31.6, 37.6
9.7, 13.8
Asymmetry
11.3
10.4, 12.2
24.2
Breast Pain
3.4
2.9, 4.0
7.8
6.7, 8.9
11.7
Calcification
<1
-
1.0
0.6, 1.4
2.3
1.4, 3.3
Delayed Healing
1.1
0.8, 1.4
1.5
1.0, 1.9
1.4
0.7, 2.1
0.4, 1.6
Extrusion
<1
-
<1
-
1.0
Hypertrophic Scarring
1.4
1.0, 1.7
3.8
3.0, 4.6
5.4
3.9, 6.8
Irritation/Inflammation
1.2
0.8, 1.5
2.2
1.6, 2.7
2.8
1.8, 3.9
0.6, 2.1
Lymphadenopathy
<1
-
<1
-
1.4
Seroma
<1
-
1.3
0.9, 1.8
<1
-
Wrinkling
4.1
3.5, 4.7
11.3
10.0, 12.5
18.3
15.8, 20.8
Other
2.0
1.6, 2.4
3.8
3.0, 4.6
6.1
4.5, 7.6
1
N=patients who returned for at least 1 postoperative visit
2 Additional surgeries, excluding procedures performed for planned staged reconstruction (nipple revision, staged reconstruction and flap procedures)
3 The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%: hematoma, necrosis
TABLE 7b. Product Availability (Adjunct) Study – Becker Round: Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
1 Year
N=1,819
Key Complications1
3 Year
N=980
5 Year
N=409
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
5.6
4.5, 6.6
9.4
7.5, 11.3
11.1
7.9, 14.3
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
2.3
1.6, 3.1
5.9
4.3, 7.5
12.7
9.1, 16.3
Implant Removal with Replacement
2.8
2.0, 3.6
3.4
2.2, 4.5
6.6
4.0, 9.1
Implant Removal without Replacement
1.6
1.0, 2.2
3.2
2.0, 4.4
4.7
2.4, 7.0
Infection
1.0
0.6, 1.5
1.5
0.7, 2.3
1.6
0.3, 2.8
Rupture
2.1
1.4, 2.7
4.9
3.5, 6.3
10.4
7.1, 13.6
Reoperation
2
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 34 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
34
11867-00
Complications >1%3
Asymmetry
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
11.7
10.2, 13.3
27.6
24.6, 30.5
34.2
29.2, 39.2
Breast Pain
3.7
2.8, 4.6
9.4
7.4, 11.3
14.0
10.4, 17.7
Calcification
0.1
0.0, 0.3
1.2
0.4, 1.9
2.0
0.5, 3.6
Delayed Healing
<1
-
1.3
0.6, 2.0
1.3
0.2, 2.5
Hematoma
<1
-
<1
-
1.4
0.2, 2.5
Hypertrophic Scarring
1.0
0.5, 1.5
2.1
1.1, 3.1
2.5
0.9, 4.1
Irritation/Inflammation
1.3
0.8, 1.9
1.7
0.9, 2.6
2.4
0.9, 4.0
Lymphadenopathy
<1
-
<1
-
1.9
0.4, 3.3
Seroma
<1
-
1.4
0.7, 2.2
1.4
0.2, 2.7
Wrinkling
5.0
3.9, 6.1
13.2
10.9, 15.4
17.1
13.2, 21.1
Other
1.6
1.0, 2.2
4.1
2.8, 5.4
4.8
2.5, 7.0
1 N=patients who returned for at least 1 postoperative visit
2 Additional surgeries, excluding procedures performed for planned staged reconstruction (nipple revision, staged reconstruction
3
and flap procedures)
The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%: extrusion, necrosis
MemoryGel® Round
TABLE 7c. Product Availability (Adjunct) Study – MemoryGel® Round: Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Primary Reconstruction Cohort
1 Year
N=24,019
Key Complications1
Reoperation2
3 Year
N=10,024
5 Year
N=3,635
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
3.1
2.9, 3.3
4.8
4.4, 5.2
6.7
5.9, 7.6
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
2.0
1.8, 2.2
5.1
4.6, 5.6
7.5
6.6, 8.5
Implant Removal with Replacement
2.5
2.3, 2.7
4.9
4.4, 5.3
6.7
5.8, 7.5
Implant Removal without Replacement
1.2
1.1, 1.4
2.6
2.2, 2.9
4.2
3.4, 4.9
Infection
0.4
0.3, 0.5
0.7
0.5, 0.9
0.7
0.5, 1.0
Rupture
0.4
0.3, 0.4
1.4
1.2, 1.6
2.9
2.3, 3.5
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
Asymmetry
6.8
6.5, 7.2
15.4
14.7, 16.2
23.1
21.7, 24.6
Breast Pain
2.4
2.2, 2.6
6.1
5.6, 6.6
8.9
7.9, 10.0
Delayed Healing
<1
-
<1
-
1.2
0.8, 1.5
Hypertrophic Scarring
1.4
1.3, 1.6
2.9
2.5, 3.2
3.7
3.0, 4.3
Complications >1%3
Irritation/Inflammation
<1
-
<1
-
1.2
0.8, 1.6
Wrinkling
2.6
2.4, 2.8
7.7
7.2, 8.3
13.4
12.2, 14.6
Other
1.5
1.4, 1.7
2.7
2.4, 3.0
3.6
2.9, 4.3
1 N=patients who returned for at least 1 postoperative visit
2 Additional surgeries, excluding procedures performed for planned staged reconstruction (nipple revision, staged reconstruction
3
and flap procedures)
The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%: calcification, extrusion, hematoma, lymphadenopathy, necrosis, seroma
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 35 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
35
TABLE 7d. Product Availability (Adjunct) Study – MemoryGel® Round: Kaplan-Meier Adverse Event Risk Rates (95% Confidence
Interval), By Patient for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort
1 Year
N=8,980
Key Complications1
Reoperation2
3 Year
N=4,885
5 Year
N=2,203
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
3.5
3.1, 3.8
5.8
5.1, 6.4
8.5
7.3, 9.7
Capsular Contracture Baker Grade III/IV
2.9
2.5, 3.2
7.5
6.7, 8.3
11.4
10.0, 12.8
Implant Removal with Replacement
2.8
2.4, 3.1
5.1
4.5, 5.7
7.7
6.5, 8.9
Implant Removal without Replacement
1.6
1.3, 1.8
3.0
2.5, 3.5
5.3
4.3, 6.4
Infection
0.6
0.5, 0.8
0.9
0.7, 1.2
1.3
0.8, 1.8
0.7
0.5. 0.9
2.2
1.8, 2.7
5.3
4.2, 6.3
%
CI
%
CI
%
CI
Asymmetry
8.9
8.3, 9.5
18.8
17.7, 20.0
25.8
23.8, 27.7
Breast Pain
3.7
3.3, 4.1
8.8
8.0, 9.7
12.6
11.1, 14.1
Calcification
<1
-
<1
-
1.2
0.7, 1.7
Hematoma
<1
-
<1
-
1.3
0.8, 1.8
Hypertrophic Scarring
1.0
0.7, 1.2
2.4
2.0, 2.9
3.0
2.3, 3.8
Irritation/Inflammation
<1
-
1.6
1.2, 1.9
2.4
1.7, 3.1
Rupture
Complications >1%3
Seroma
<1
-
<1
-
1.1
0.6, 1.6
Wrinkling
4.6
4.1, 5.0
11.4
10.4, 12.3
17.4
15.7, 19.1
Other
1.8
1.5, 2.0
3.3
2.8, 3.9
4.8
3.8, 5.7
1
N=patients who returned for at least 1 postoperative visit
2 Additional surgeries, excluding procedures performed for planned staged reconstruction (nipple revision, staged reconstruction and flap procedures)
3
The following complications occurred at a rate less than 1%: delayed healing, extrusion, lymphadenopathy, necrosis
Safety Outcomes - Reasons for Implant Removal:
Becker Round
The main reasons for implant removal among primary reconstruction patients were infection (22.8% of explants) and capsular contracture
(22.0% of explants).
TABLE 8a. Becker Round: Main Reasons for Implant Removal for Primary Reconstruction Cohort (Years 1 through 16)
Reason
Asymmetry
N = 1,591 Explants
61 (3.8%)
Biopsy
0 (0.0%)
Breast Pain
33 (2.1%)
Cancer/Cancer Treatment
Capsular Contracture
Delayed Wound Healing/Inflammation
Hematoma/Seroma
5 (0.3%)
350 (22.0%)
36 (2.3%)
18 (1.1%)
Infection
363 (22.8%)
Leakage/Rupture/Deflation
230 (14.5%)
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 36 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
36
11867-00
Migration
2 (0.1%)
Necrosis/Extrusion
58 (3.6%)
Palpability/Visibility
38 (2.4%)
Patient Request/Size and Implant Change
100 (6.3%)
Planned 2nd Stage
0 (0.0%)
Ptosis
0 (0.0%)
Revision/Reconstruction
48 (3.0%)
Scarring
2 (0.1%)
Trauma
0 (0.0%)
Wrinkling/Rippling
26 (1.6%)
Other
49 (3.1%)
Not Available1
172 (10.8%)
1 No information was provided by the physician
The main reasons for implant removal among revision-reconstruction patients were capsular contracture (21.4% of explants) and infection
(21.2% of explants), and leakage/rupture/deflation (20.2%).
TABLE 8b. Becker Round: Main Reasons for Implant Removal for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort (Years 1 through 16)
Reason
N = 397 Explants
Asymmetry
4 (1.0%)
Biopsy
0 (0.0%)
Breast Pain
8 (2.0%)
Cancer/Cancer Treatment
1 (0.3%)
Capsular Contracture
85 (21.4%)
Delayed Wound Healing/Inflammation
10 (2.5%)
Hematoma/Seroma
8 (2.0%)
Infection
84 (21.2%)
Leakage/Rupture/Deflation
80 (20.2%)
Migration
0 (0.0%)
Necrosis/Extrusion
3 (0.8%)
Palpability/Visibility
11 (2.8%)
Patient Request/Size and Implant Change
20 (5.0%)
Planned 2nd Stage
1 (0.3%)
Ptosis
1 (0.3%)
Revision/Reconstruction
7 (1.8%)
Scarring
1 (0.3%)
Trauma
0 (0.0%)
Wrinkling/Rippling
18 (4.5%)
Other
10 (2.5%)
Not Available1
45 (11.3%)
1 No information was provided by the physician
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 37 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
37
MemoryGel® Round
The main reasons for implant removal among primary reconstruction patients were capsular contracture (37.8% of explants) and infection
(13.7% of explants).
TABLE 8c. MemoryGel® Round: Main Reasons for Implant Removal for Primary Reconstruction Cohort (Years 1 through 16)
Reason
Asymmetry
N=3,618 Explants
214 (5.9%)
Biopsy
0 (0.0%)
Breast Pain
55 (1.5%)
Cancer/Cancer Treatment
Capsular Contracture
Delayed Wound Healing/ Inflammation
Hematoma/Seroma
43 (1.2%)
1369 (37.8%)
54 (1.5%)
30 (0.8%)
Infection
497 (13.7%)
Leakage/Rupture/Deflation
289 (8.0%)
Migration
7 (0.2%)
Necrosis/Extrusion
96 (2.7%)
Palpability/Visibility
64 (1.8%)
Patient Request/Size and Implant Change
320 (8.8%)
Planned 2nd Stage
1 (0.0%)
Ptosis
4 (0.1%)
Revision/Reconstruction
44 (1.2%)
Scarring
7 (0.2%)
Trauma
1 (0.0%)
Wrinkling/Rippling
61 (1.7%)
Other
95 (2.6%)
Not Available1
1
367 (10.1%)
No information was provided by the physician
The main reasons for implant removal among revision-reconstruction patients were capsular contracture (37.5% of explants), leakage/rupture/
deflation (12.2%), and infection (11.7% of explants).
TABLE 8d. MemoryGel® Round: Main Reasons for Implant Removal for Revision-Reconstruction Cohort (Years 1 through 16)
Reason
Asymmetry
N=1,696 Explants
85 (5.0%)
Biopsy
0 (0.0%)
Breast Pain
42 (2.5%)
Cancer/Cancer Treatment
Capsular Contracture
6 (0.4%)
636 (37.5%)
Delayed Wound Healing/Inflammation
30 (1.8%)
Hematoma/Seroma
21 (1.2%)
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 38 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
38
11867-00
Infection
198 (11.7%)
Leakage/Rupture/Deflation
207 (12.2%)
Migration
3 (0.2%)
Necrosis/Extrusion
20 (1.2%)
Palpability/ Visibility
15 (0.9%)
Patient Request/Size and Implant Change
110 (6.5%)
Planned 2nd Stage
0 (0.0%)
Ptosis
2 (0.1%)
Revision/Reconstruction
23 (1.4%)
Scarring
2 (0.1%)
Trauma
0 (0.0%)
Wrinkling/Rippling
36 (2.1%)
Other
Not Available1
52 (3.1%)
208 (12.3%)
1 No information was provided by the physician
Other Clinical Data Findings
The Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study is designed to assess short-term safety complications. Although connective tissue/
rheumatological diseases and symptoms are not a focus of this study, these data were collected at baseline and the 3-year and 5-year
postoperative visits. There is no provision on either the baseline form or the postoperative form to indicate whether a rheumatologist was
consulted and confirmed a rheumatological syndrome or symptom. Therefore, all connective tissue disease syndromes and symptoms are
patient reported.
Becker Round
Rheumatoid arthritis was the most common patient reported rheumatic disease at 1.0%, and fibromyalgia at 0.9% was the most commonly
reported rheumatic syndrome for Becker patients in the Mentor Product Availability (Adjunct) Study.
MemoryGel® Round
Rheumatoid arthritis was the most common patient reported rheumatic disease at 0.8%, and fibromyalgia and Raynaud’s phenomenon at 0.9%
and 0.7%, respectively, were the most commonly reported rheumatic syndrome for MemoryGel® patients in the Mentor Product Availability
(Adjunct) Study.
These issues, along with other endpoints, are being further evaluated as part of a Mentor Round Gel post approval study of patients followed
through 10 years.
DEVICE IDENTIFICATION CARD
Enclosed with each silicone gel-filled breast implant is a Patient ID Card. To complete the Patient ID Card, place one device identification sticker
for each implant on the back of the card. Stickers are located on the internal product packaging attached to the label. If a sticker is unavailable,
the lot number, catalogue number, and description of the device may be copied by hand from the device label. In addition, the fill volume
(expansion record) should be recorded by hand if the Patient Record Label is unavailable. Patients should be provided with these cards for
personal reference.
RETURNED GOODS AUTHORIZATION
• Canadian Customers
Authorization for return of merchandise should be obtained from Mentor, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, a division of Johnson &
Johnson Inc. Please call +1 (800) 668-6069 or contact your local Mentor sales representative.
Devices may be sent to:
Mentor, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, a division of Johnson & Johnson Inc.
200 Whitehall Drive
Markham, Ontario
Canada L3R 0T5
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 39 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
39
HOW TO REPORT PROBLEMS WITH AN IMPLANT
Mentor requires that any complications or explantation resulting from the use of this device be brought to our immediate attention. Please refer
to the Returned Goods Authorization process for instructions and shipping information for return of affected product.
Product Replacement Policy and Limited Warranties
The following is a description of the assistance available from the Mentor Lifetime Product Replacement Policy, and the Mentor Advantage
Limited Warranty.
Mentor’s Free Lifetime Product Replacement Policy
• Automatically applies to all recipients of Mentor breast implant products.
• Provides that regardless of the age of the implant, when confirmed deflation or rupture occurs, you are eligible for 1 to 2 no charge
replacement breast implant products of any size in a similar style.
The Mentor Advantage is free of charge to all patients who are implanted with Mentor saline-filled breast or silicone gel-filled implant products.
When the limited warranty applies, Mentor provides the following:
• Lifetime product replacement policy*
• 10 years and up to $1200(CAD) financial assistance for operating room, anesthesia, and surgical charges not covered by insurance**
• Free contralateral (opposite side) implant replacement upon surgeon request
• Non-cancellable terms.
With the Mentor Advantage Limited Warranty, it is important for the patient to also maintain her own records to ensure validation of her
enrollment.
Products Covered
The Mentor Advantage coverage applies to all Mentor breast implants that are implanted in Canada after May 1, 2005,† provided implants have
been:
• Implanted in accordance with the Mentor package insert, current to the date of implantation, and other notifications or instructions published
by Mentor; and
• Used by appropriately qualified, licensed surgeons, in accordance with accepted surgical procedures.
Events Covered
The Mentor Advantage coverage applies to the following:
• Deflation due to crease fold failure, patient trauma, or unknown cause
• Loss of valve integrity
• Other loss-of-shell-integrity events also may be covered by this program. Mentor reserves the right to determine if specific, additional, events
should be covered.
Events Not Covered
The Mentor Advantage coverage does not apply to the following:
• Removal of intact implants due to capsular contracture, wrinkling, or rippling.
• Loss of implant shell integrity resulting from reoperative procedures, open capsulotomy, or closed compression capsulotomy procedures.
• Removal of intact implants for size alteration.
Filing for Financial Assistance
• To file a Mentor Advantage claim for product replacement and/or financial assistance, the surgeon must contact Mentor, a unit of Johnson &
Johnson Medical Products, a division of Johnson & Johnson Inc. prior to replacement surgery.
• For financial assistance claims, a patient-specific Release form will be generated that the patient must sign and return.
• For either replacement or financial assistance claims, the surgeon must send the explanted, decontaminated Mentor breast implant(s) within
six months of the date of explantation to:
Mentor, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, a division of Johnson & Johnson Inc. 200 Whitehall Drive
Markham, ON
Canada L3R 0T5
• Upon receipt, review and approval of the completed claim, including receipt of the explanted product and the patient’s completion of a full
general release, financial assistance will be issued.
* Lifetime Product Replacement Policy: Mentor will provide replacement Mentor product of any size in the same or similar style as the originally implanted product free
of charge for the lifetime of the patient. Upon surgeon’s request, a different implant style maybe selected (subject to a charge of the difference between product list
prices). Refer to the Mentor Advantage Limited Warranty for eligibility and program details
** Operating room and anesthesia charges to be given payment priority. In order to qualify for financial assistance, you will need to sign a Release form.
†
For breast implants implanted prior to this date, contact Mentor Worldwide for information regarding any applicable warranty terms.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 40 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
40
11867-00
This is a summary of the coverage of the Mentor Advantage Limited Warranty. It is an overview only and not a complete statement of the
program. A copy of the complete Mentor Advantage Limited Warranty for saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants may be obtained by
writing or calling:
Mentor, a unit of Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, a division of Johnson & Johnson Inc.
200 Whitehall Drive
Markham, ON
Canada L3R 0T5
+1 (800) 668-6069
A copy of the complete programs may also be obtained by going to www.mentorwwllc.com.
THESE ARE LIMITED WARRANTIES ONLY AND ARE SUBJECT TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS SET FORTH AND EXPLAINED IN THE
APPLICABLE MENTOR LIMITED WARRANTIES. ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, BY OPERATION OF LAW
OR OTHERWISE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS ARE EXCLUDED.
Mentor reserves the right to cancel, change, or modify the terms of the Mentor Advantage coverage. Any such cancellation, change, or
modification will not affect the currently stated terms of the Mentor Advantage coverage for those already enrolled.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 41 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
41
For customer service call Mentor, a unit of
Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, a division
of Johnson & Johnson Inc., at +1 (800) 668-6069
or contact your local Mentor representative.
www.mentorwwllc.com
Manufacturer
Mentor Medical Systems B.V.
Zernikedreef 2
2333 CL, Leiden
The Netherlands
(+31) 71 7513600
DEFINITIONS OF SYMBOLS ON LABELLING:
QTY 1
Quantity One
Left Breast
Left Breast is the location of the implanted breast implant
Right Breast
Right Breast is the location of the implanted breast implant
Date of Implant
Date of the implant surgery
Patient Name
Patient Name
Surgeon Name
Surgeon Name
Address
Surgeon’s Address
Phone
Surgeon’s Telephone Number
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 42 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
42
11867-00
REFERENCES
1
Guay N (University of Ottawa), Haykal S (University of Toronto). Delayed Implant Single Stage Breast Cancer Reconstruction, 2009 July (pre-publication).
Berrino P, Casabona F, Santi P. Long-term advantages of permanent expandable implants in breast aesthetic surgery. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1998;101:1964.
3
Henriksen, T.F., et al. 2005. Surgical intervention and capsular contracture after breast augmentation: a prospective study of risk factors. Ann. Plast. Surg . 54(4):343-51.
4
Bondurant, S., V.L. Ernster and R. Herdman, Eds. 2000. Safety of silicone breast implants. Committee on the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants, Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention,
Institute of Medicine. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
5 For example: Kulmala, I., et al. 2004. Local complications after cosmetic breast implant surgery in Finland. Ann. Plast. Surg. 53(5):413-9.
6
Spear, S.L. and K. Schwarz. 2006. Prosthetic reconstruction in the radiated breast. In: Surgery of the Breast: Principles and Art, 2nd Edition. Spear, S.L. (ed.) Philadelphia, Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins. p. 529.
7
Eskenazi, L.B. 2007. New options for immediate reconstruction: achieving optimal results with adjustable implants in a single stage. Plast Reconstr Surg. 119(1):28-37.
8
Hsieh, F. et al. 2009. Experience with the Mentor Contour Profile Becker-35 expandable implants in reconstructive breast surgery. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. [Epub ahead of print].
9 Gui, G.P., et al. 2003. Immediate breast reconstruction using biodimensional anatomical permanent expander implants: a prospective analysis of outcome and patient satisfaction. Plast Reconstr Surg.
111(1):125-40.
10 Berry, M.G., et al. 1998. An audit of outcome including patient satisfaction with immediate breast reconstruction performed by breast surgeons. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 80(3):173-7.
11
Bortul, M. et al. 1997. Immediate reconstruction after radical mastectomy using Becker's prosthesis: long-term results. Ann Ital Chir. 68(1):49-54. [Article in Italian].
12
Camilleri, I.G. et al. 1996. A review of 120 Becker permanent tissue expanders in reconstruction of the breast. Br J Plast Surg. 49(6):346-51.
13 Guay, N.A. and S. Haykal. 2009. Delayed Implant Single Stage Breast Reconstruction. Publication pending.
14 Holmes JD. Capsular contraction after breast reconstruction with tissue expansion. Br J Plast Surg. 1989;83:845-851.
15 Eskenazi, L.B. 2007. New options for immediate reconstruction: achieving optimal results with adjustable implants in a single stage. Plast Reconstr Surg. 119(1):28-37.
16
Hunter-Smith, DJ, Laurie SWS. Breast reconstruction using permanent tissue expanders. Aust N.Z. J. Surg. 1995;65:492-495.
17 Hölmich, L.R., et al. 2003a. Incidence of silicone breast implant rupture. Arch Surg. 138:801-6.
18 Hölmich, L.R., et al. 2001. Prevalence of silicone breast implant rupture among Danish women. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 108(4):848-58.
19 Collis, N. and D.T. Sharpe. 2000. Silicone gel-filled breast implant integrity: A retrospective review of 478 consecutively explanted implants. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 105:1979-85.
20
Hölmich, L.R., et al. 2004. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114:204-14.
21
Katzin, W.E., et al. 2005. Pathology of lymph nodes from patients with breast implants: a histologic and spectroscopic evaluation. Am J Surg Pathol.29(4):506-11.
22 Berner, I., M., et al. 2002. Comparative examination of complaints of patients with breast-cancer with and without silicone implants. Eur. J Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol. 102:61-66.
23 Brown, S.L., et al. 2001. Silicone gel breast implant rupture, extracapsular silicone, and health status in a population of women. J. Rheumatol. 28:996-1003.
24 Hölmich, L.R., et al. 2003b. Self-reported diseases and symptoms by rupture status among unselected Danish women with cosmetic silicone breast implants. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 111:723-32.
25
Wolfe, F. and J. Anderson. 1999. Silicone filled breast implants and the risk of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. J. Rheumatol. 26:2025-28.
26 Hölmich, L.R., et al. 2007. Breast implant rupture and connective tissue disease: A review of the literature. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 120 (Suppl. 1):62S-69S.
27 Cicchetti S, Leone MS, Franchelli S, Santi PL. One-stage breast reconstruction using McGhan style 150 biodimensional expanders: A review of 107 implants with six years experience. J Plast
Reconst Aesthe Surg. 2006;59:1037-1042.
28 Mahdi S, Jones T, Nicklin S, McGeorge DD. Expandable anatomical implants in breast reconstructions : a prospective study. Br Jour Plast Surg. 1998;51:425-430.
29
Peyser PM, Abel JA, Straker VF, Hall VL, Rainsbury RM. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing ‘keyhole’ mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction. Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 2000;82:227235.
30
Collis N, Sharpe DT. Breast reconstruction by tissue expansion – A retrospective technical review of 197 two-stage delayed reconstructions following mastectomy for malignant breast disease in 189
patients. Br J Plast Surg. 2000;52:37-41.
31 Holmes JD. Capsular contraction after breast reconstruction with tissue expansion. Br J Plast Surg. 1989;83:845-851.
32 Brinton, L.A., et al. 2004. Risk of connective tissue disorders among breast implant patients. Am. J. Epidemiol. 160(7):619-27.
33 Janowsky, E.C., et al. 2000. Meta-Analyses of the Relation Between Silicone Breast Implants and the Risk of Connective-Tissue Diseases. N. Engl. J. Med. 342(11):781-90.
34
Lipworth, L.R.E., et al. 2004. Silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease: An updated review of the epidemiologic evidence. Ann. Plast. Surg. 52:598-601.
35
Tugwell, P., et al. 2001. Do silicone breast implants cause rheumatologic disorders? A systematic review for a court-appointed national science panel. Arthritis Rheum. (11):2477-84.
36 Weisman, M.H., et al. 1988. Connective-tissue disease following breast augmentation: A preliminary test of the human adjuvant tissue hypothesis. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 82(4):626-30.
37 Williams, H.J., et al. 1997. Breast implants in patients with differentiated and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Arthritis and Rheumatism 40(3):437-40.
38
Breiting, V.B., et al. 2004. Long-term health status of Danish women with silicone breast implants. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114:217-26.
39
Fryzek, J.P., et al. 2001. Self-reported symptoms among women after cosmetic breast implant and breast reduction surgery. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 107:206-13.
40 Kjøller, K., et al. 2004. Self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants. Ann Plast Surg. 52(1):1-7.
41 Brinton, L.A., et al. 2000. Breast cancer following augmentation mammoplasty (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 11(9):819-27. J. Long Term Eff. Med. Implants. 12(4):271-9.
42
Bryant, H., and Brasher, P. 1995. Breast implants and breast cancer--reanalysis of a linkage study. N. Engl. J. Med. 332(23):1535-9.
43
Deapen, D.M., et al. 1997. Are breast implants anticarcinogenic? A 14-year follow-up of the Los Angeles Study. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 1997 99(5):1346-53.
44
Herdman, R.C., et al. 2001. Silicone breast implants and cancer. Cancer Invest. 2001;19(8):821-32.
45 Pukkala, E., et al. 2002. Incidence of breast and other cancers among Finnish women with cosmetic breast implants, 1970-1999. J. Long Term Eff. Med. Implants 12(4):271-9.
46 Deapen, D., et al. 2000. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among patients with prior breast implants. Plast Reconstr Surg. 105(2):535-40.
47
Jakubietz, M.G., et al. 2004. Breast augmentation: Cancer concerns and mammography – A literature review. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 113:117e-122e.
48 Miglioretti, D.L., et al. 2004. Effect of breast augmentation on the accuracy of mammography and cancer characteristics. JAMA 291(4):442-50.
49 Brinton, LA., et al. 2001b. Cancer risk at sites other than the breast following augmentation mammoplasty. Ann. Epidemiol. 11:248-56.
50 McLaughlin, J.K. and L. Lipworth. 2004. Brain cancer and cosmetic breast implants: A review of the epidemiological evidence. Ann. Plast. Surg. 52(2):15-17.
2
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 43 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
51
43
Cook, L.S. 1997. Characteristics of women with and without breast augmentation. J. Amer. Med. Assoc. 20:1612-7.
52
Fryzek, J.P., et al. 2000. Characteristics of women with cosmetic breast augmentation surgery compared with breast reduction surgery patients and women in the general population of Sweden.
Ann Plast Surg. 45(4):349-56.
53 Kjøller K., et al. 2003. Characteristics of women with cosmetic breast implants compared with women with other types of cosmetic surgery and population-based controls in Denmark. Ann Plast
Surg.50(1):6-12.
54
Keech, J.A., Jr. and B.J. Creech. 1997. Anaplastic T-cell lymphoma in proximity to a saline-filled breast implant. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 100(2):554-555
55
Gaudet, G., J.W. Friedberg, A. Weng, G.S. Pinkus and A.S. Freedman. 2002. Breast lymphoma associated with breast implants: Two case-reports and a review of the literature. Leukemia Lymphoma
43:115-119.
56
Sahoo, S., P.P. Rosen, R. M. Feddersen, D.S. Viswanatha, D.A. Clark and A. Chadburn. 2003. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a silicone breast implant capsule: A case report and review of
the literature. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 127(3):e115-e118.
57 Fritzsche, F.R., S. Pahl, I. Petersen, M. Burkhardt, A. Dankof, M. Dietel and G. Kristiansen. 2006. Anaplastic large-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the breast in periprosthetic localization 32 years
after treatment for primary breast cancer – A case report. Virchows Arch. 449:561-564.
58 Olack, B., R. Gupta and G.S. Brooks. 2007. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a saline breast implant capsule after tissue expander breast reconstruction. Ann. Plast. Surg. 59(1):56-57.
59
Gualco, G. and C.E. Bacchi. 2008. B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of the breast: Clinical-pathological features of 53 cases. Int. J. Surg. Pathol. 16(4):407-413.
60
Guo, H.Y., X.M. Xhao, J. Li and X.C. Hu. 2008. Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the breast: Eight-year follow-up experience. Int. J. Hematol. 87(5):491-497.
61 Miranda, R.N., L. Lin, S.S. Talwalkar, J.T. Manning and L.J. Medeiros. 2009. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving the breast: a clinicopathologic study of 6 cases and review of the literature. Arch.
Pathol. Lab Med. 133(9):1383-1390.
62 Newman, M.K., N.J. Zemmel, A.Z. Bandak and B.J. Kaplan. 2008. Primary breast lymphoma in a patient with silicone breast implants: a case report and review of the literature. J. Plast. Reconstr.
Aesthet. Surg. 61(7):822-825
63 Roden, A.C., W.R. Macon, G.L. Keeney, J.L. Myers, A.L. Feldman and A. Dogan. 2008. Seroma-associated primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma adjacent to breast implants: an indolent T-cell
lymphoproliferative disorder. Mod. Pathol. 21(4):455-463.
64
Wong, A.K., J. Lopategui, S. Clancy, D. Kulber S. Bose. 2008. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma associated with a breast implant capsule: a case report and review of the literature. Am. J. Surg. Pathol.
32(8):1265-1268.
65
Alobeid, B., D.W. Sevilla, M.B. El-Tamer, V.V. Murty, D.G. Savage and G. Bhagat. 2009. Aggressive presentation of breast implant-associated ALK-1 negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma with
bilateral axillary lymph node involvement. Leuk. Lymphoma 50(5):831-833.
66 Bishara, M.R., C. Ross and M. Sur. 2009. Case report: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising in reconstruction mammoplasty capsule of saline filled breast implant after radical
mastectomy for breast cancer: An unusual case presentation. Diagn. Pathol. 4:11-16.
67 Gualco, G., L. Chioato, W.J. Harrington, Jr., L.M. Weiss and C.E. Bacchi. 2009. Primary and secondary T-cell lymphomas of the breast: Clinico-pathologic features of 11 cases. Appl.
Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol. 17(4):301-306.
68 Brody, G., D. Deapen, P. Gill, A. Epstein, S. Martin and W. Elatra. 2010. T-cell non Hodgkins anaplastic lymphoma associated with one style of breast implants. Abstract. American Association of
Plastic Surgeons 89th Annual Meeting, March 22. http://www.aaps1921.org/abstracts/2010/4.cgi (accessed online February 2, 2010).
69
Li, S. and A.K. Lee. 2010. Case report: Silicone implant and primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma, fact or fiction? Int. J. Clin. Exp. Pathol. 3(1):117-127.
70 Daneshbod, Y., A. Oryan, H.N. Khojasteh, A. Rasekhi, N. Ahmadi and M. Mohammadianpanah. 2010. Primary ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast: A case report and review of
the literature. J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol. 32:e75-e78.
71 Evens, A.M. and B.C.-H. Chiu. 2008. The challenges of epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. JAMA 300(17):2059-2061.
72 de Jong, D., W.L. Vasmel, J.P. de Boer, G. Verhave, E. Barbe, M.K. Casparie and F. E. van Leeuwen. 2008. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in women with breast implants. JAMA 300(17):2030-2035.
73
Brinton, L.A., et al. 2001a. Mortality among augmentation mammoplasty patients. Epidemioll. 12(3):321-6.
74
Jacobsen, P.H., et al. 2004. Mortality and suicide among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants. Arch. Int. med. 164(22):2450-5.
75 Koot, V., et al. 2003. Total and cost specific mortality among Swedish women with cosmetic breast implants: prospective study. Br. J. Med. 326(7388):527-8.
76 Pukkala, E., et al. 2003. Causes of death among Finnish women with cosmetic breast implants, 1971-2001. Ann. Plast. Surg. 51(4):339-42.
77 Lugowski, S.J., et al. 2000. Analysis of silicon in human tissues with special reference to silicone breast implants. J. Trace Elem. Med. Biol. 14(1):31-42.
78
Kjøller, K., et al. 2002. Health outcomes in offspring of Danish mothers with cosmetic breast implants. Ann. Plast. Surg. 48:238-45.
79
Signorello, L.B., et al. 2001. Offspring health risk after cosmetic breast implantation in Sweden. Ann. Plast. Surg. 46:279-86.
80 Hemminki, E., et al. 2004. Births and perinatal health of infants among women who have had silicone breast implantation in Finland, 1967-2000. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 83(12):1135-40.
81 Flassbeck, D.B., et al. 2003. Determination of siloxanes, silicon, and platinum in tissues of women with silicone gel-filled implants. Anal Bioanal Chem. 375(3):356-62.
82
Katzin, W.E., et al. 2005. Pathology of lymph nodes from patients with breast implants: a histologic and spectroscopic evaluation. Am J Surg Pathol.29(4):506-11.
83
Stein, J., et al. 1999. In situ determination of the active catalyst in hydrosilylation reactions using highly reactive Pt(0) catalyst precursors. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 121(15):3693-3703.
84 Chandra, G., et al. 1987. A convenient and novel route to bis(alkyne)platinum(0) and other platinum(0) complexes from Speier’s hydrosilylation catalyst. Organometallics. 6:191-2.
85 Lappert, M.F. and Scott, F.P.A. 1995. The reaction pathway from Speier’s to Karstedt’s hydrosilylation catalyst. J. Organomet. Chem. 492(2):C11-C13.
86
Lewis, L.N., et al. 1995. Mechanism of formation of platinum(0) complexes containing silicon-vinyl ligands. Organometallics. 14:2202-13.
87
Mandrekas AD, Zambacos GJ, Katsantoni PN. Immediate and delayed breast reconstruction with permanent tissue expanders. Br J Plast Surg. 1995;48:572-578.
88
Bartelink, H., et al. 2001. Recurrence rates after treatment of breast cancer with standard radiotherapy with or without additional radiation. NEJM 345:1378-87.
89 Jagsi, R., et al. 2005. Locoregional recurrence rates and prognostic factors for failure in node-negative patients treated with mastectomy: Implications for postmastectomy radiation. Int. J. Radiat.
Oncol. Biol. Phys. 62(4):1035-39.
90 National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine. 2005. Medline Plus ® Medical Encyclopedia: Breast Cancer (available at http://nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/print/
ency/article/00913.htm)
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 44 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 45 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
Fiche technique du produit
INTRODUCTION - INSTRUCTIONS À L’ATTENTION DU MÉDECIN
Les renseignements contenus dans cette notice à l’attention du médecin ont pour objectif de fournir un survol des données essentielles relatives
aux prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker, y compris une description de l’implant, son mode
d’emploi, ses indications, ses contre-indications, les avertissements et précautions, les facteurs importants à aborder avec la patiente, les
événements indésirables, les autres pathologies signalées, les résultats de l’étude clinique, la carte d’identification de l’implant, les efforts
d’extraction de l’implant, comment signaler des problèmes liés à un implant et l’autorisation de retour des produits.
Conseils à fournir à la patiente
Vous devrez consulter ce document ainsi que la notice destinée à la patiente avant de conseiller votre patiente sur les prothèses d’expansion/
implants mammaires Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker et la pose d’implants mammaires. Veuillez vous familiariser avec le contenu de ce
document et résoudre toute question ou élucider tout problème avant d’utiliser cet implant. À l’instar de n’importe quelle intervention
chirurgicale, la reconstruction mammaire à l’aide d’implants n’est PAS dépourvue de risques. La reconstruction mammaire est une intervention
non urgente; la patiente doit être correctement conseillée et comprendre le rapport risque/bénéfice.
Avant de prendre la décision de pratiquer l’intervention, le chirurgien ou le conseiller assigné à la patiente doit demander à celle-ci de lire les
Renseignements importants relatifs aux prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker
(notice destinée à la patiente) et d’évoquer avec elle les avertissements, les contre-indications, les précautions, les facteurs importants à
prendre en compte, les complications, les résultats de l’étude sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone, de l’étude de base sur les implants CPG
ainsi que de l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits, et tous les autres aspects de la notice destinée à la patiente. Le médecin
doit avertir la patiente des complications éventuelles et lui indiquer que la gestion médicale des complications graves peut comprendre une
intervention chirurgicale supplémentaire et l’explantation.
Consentement éclairé
Chaque patiente doit prendre connaissance des Renseignements importants relatifs aux prothèses d'expansion/implants mammaires
Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker au cours de sa première visite/consultation, pour lui laisser le temps nécessaire de lire et de bien
comprendre les renseignements importants relatifs aux risques, aux recommandations de suivi et aux avantages liés à la pose d’un implant
mammaire en gel de silicone.
Laissez le temps nécessaire à la patiente (en général entre une à deux semaines) pour réfléchir avant de prendre sa décision concernant la
reconstruction mammaire, à moins qu’il ne soit nécessaire de procéder à l’opération sans tarder pour des raisons médicales.
Afin d’attester la réussite du processus de consentement éclairé, la notice destinée à la patiente comprend un formulaire d’Attestation du
consentement éclairé à la fin du document, qui doit être signé à la fois par la patiente et par le chirurgien, puis conservé dans le dossier de la
patiente.
CANADIEN
PROTHÈSES D’EXPANSION/IMPLANTS
MAMMAIRES MENTOR MEMORYGEL® SILTEX®
DE BECKER
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 46 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
46
11867-00
DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT : PROTHÈSE D’EXPANSION/IMPLANT MAMMAIRE SILTEX® DE BECKER
Figure 1 : Prothèse d’expansion/implant mammaire de Becker
L’ajustement postopératoire du volume à l’aide de solution saline s’effectue à l’aide d’un dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage à distance relié
à l’implant par un tube de remplissage amovible qui passe dans la double valve. Le tube de remplissage en élastomère de silicone est
préalablement inséré dans la double valve auto-étanche lors de la fabrication et est relié au dôme d’injection à l’aide du système de raccord au
moment de l’intervention.
Round Becker 25
Volume de gel : 25 % du volume nominal
de l’implant
Round Becker 50
Volume de gel : 50 % du volume nominal
de l’implant
Contour Profile Becker 35
Volume de gel : 35 % du volume nominal
de l’implant
Matériau de remplissage : gel cohésif I®
(standard)
Matériau de remplissage : gel cohésif I®
(standard)
Matériau de remplissage : gel cohésif II®
(moyen)
La prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Siltex® de Becker dispose d’une enveloppe externe à faible suintement remplie de gel et d’une
enveloppe interne ajustable destinée à être remplie de solution saline. Les enveloppes internes et externes sont constituées de couches
successives réticulées d’élastomère de silicone afin de garantir l’élasticité et l’intégrité de la prothèse. L’enveloppe texturée en Siltex® fournit
une surface contrastée pour l’interface collagène.
De plus, les prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker présentent les particularités techniques uniques
suivantes que ne possèdent pas d’autres prothèses d’expansion/implant permanents :
• une enveloppe externe à faible suintement remplie de gel et une enveloppe interne ajustable destinée à être remplie de solution saline allient
les avantages des expanseurs tissulaires à la sensation d’un implant mammaire en gel;
• la partie supérieure de l’implant est remplie de gel de silicone, ce qui donne une courbe naturelle aux pôles supérieurs et inférieurs;
• le choix de deux orifices de remplissage (aussi appelés dômes d’injection) et raccords à distance est mieux adapté aux préférences du
chirurgien et à la taille des seins de la patiente;
• l’orifice de remplissage/le dôme d’injection et le tube de remplissage sont retirés en totalité au plus tard six mois après la pose de l’implant, à
l’inverse d’autres prothèses d’expansion/implants remplis de gel qui sont dotés de dômes d’injection incorporés permanents;
• conçus pour une expansion excessive jusqu’à 25 %;
• le modèle Contour Profile Becker 35 est doté de repères d’orientation pour faciliter la pose de l’implant par les chirurgiens;
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 47 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
47
• l’expansion contrôlée du pôle inférieur du modèle Contour Profile Becker 35 donne une forme anatomique naturelle aux seins;
• la fréquence de gondolement et de formation de vagues est considérablement réduite par rapport aux prothèses d’expansion remplies de
solution saline1;
• une expansion excessive contrôlée pourrait résoudre un début contracture capsulaire, car les expansions excessives et les dégonflements
permettent de détendre et de relâcher le tissu périprothétique2.
L’ajustement postopératoire du volume à l’aide de solution saline s’effectue à l’aide d’un dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage à distance relié
à l’implant par un tube de remplissage amovible qui passe dans le système à double valve (Figure 1, se référer également à la fiche technique
du produit des dômes d’injection avec systèmes de raccord). Le tube de remplissage en élastomère de silicone est préalablement inséré dans
la double valve auto-étanche lors de la fabrication et est relié au dôme d’injection à l’aide du système de raccord au moment de l’intervention. Le
tube de remplissage doit être manipulé avec précaution afin d’éviter tout déplacement accidentel de son emplacement prévu. Ne pas saisir
l’implant par son tube de remplissage.
Il est possible d’utiliser chacun des deux types de systèmes de raccord et de dômes d’injection fournis avec chaque produit Becker. L’enveloppe
interne peut être remplie progressivement à l’aide de solution saline au cours d’une longue période grâce au tube de remplissage et au dôme
d’injection. Grâce à l’enveloppe interne remplie de solution saline de l’implant mammaire de Becker, le médecin peut contrôler le niveau
d’expansion désiré dans des limites prédéfinies.
Une fois le volume d’expansion désiré atteint, le tube de remplissage et le dôme d’injection sont retirés en pratiquant une petite incision sous
anesthésie locale. La prothèse reste en place comme implant mammaire. On recommande que la durée de l’expansion ne dépasse pas six
mois, car les adhérences tissulaires peuvent compliquer le retrait facile du tube de remplissage ou compromettre l’intégrité de la valve. La valve
est prévue pour être auto-étanche dès que le tube est retiré.
Types de raccord et de dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage :
Chaque prothèse est fournie avec deux systèmes de raccord et deux dômes d’injection.
• Systèmes de raccord (pour plus de renseignements, consulter les rubriques AVERTISSEMENTS et PRÉCAUTIONS)
1. Le raccord True-Lock™ de Mentor ne nécessite pas de nœud de suture (Figure 2; pour plus de renseignements, consulter la rubrique
« Raccord True-Lock » se trouvant dans l’emballage du raccord et du dôme).
Figure 2 : Raccord True-Lock
1. Le raccord en acier inoxydable nécessite qu’un fil de suture soit lié autour du tube et du raccord pour assurer une connexion solide
(Figure 3).
Figure 3 : Raccord en acier inoxydable
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 48 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
48
11867-00
• Dômes d’injection/orifices de remplissage (Figure 4; utilisés pour une implantation sous-cutanée temporaire)
1. Le dôme de micro-injection peut être utilisé lorsque l’on souhaite une palpabilité moindre. Ce dôme est conçu pour supporter jusqu’à
10 injections au total. On suggère de placer le dôme dans un emplacement relativement superficiel pour faciliter l’identification et l’accès
au cours des procédures ultérieures de remplissage. Le gonflement est réalisé à l’aide d’une solution saline isotonique stérile. Utiliser une
aiguille biseautée de 12 ° standard ou à ailettes de calibre 23 (ou moins). Il convient d’être extrêmement vigilant pour ne perforer que le
centre de la surface supérieure du dôme de micro-injection.
2 Le dôme d’injection standard possède un diamètre et une hauteur supérieurs à ceux du dôme de micro-injection et peut supporter jusqu’à
20 injections au total.
C
A
B
Figure 4 : Dôme d’injection
A - Zone d’injection, B - Tube relié à l’implant, C - Aiguille à ailettes [non fournie]
Types d’implants disponibles :
1. Prothèse d’expansion/implant mammaire Round Becker 25 Siltex®
Volume de gel : 25 % du volume nominal de l’implant
Matériau de remplissage : gel cohésif I® (standard)
TABLEAU 1. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Round Becker 25 Siltex® en gel cohésif I®
Gammes de volume final
Volume nominal
Volume total
Nº de référence
Volume nominal
Volume total de
de solution
Volume de gel
de gel-solution
catalogue
de l’implant
solution saline
saline
saline
354-1500
150 cc
110 cc
40 cc
85-150 cc
125-190 cc
354-2000
200 cc
150 cc
50 cc
125-200 cc
175-250 cc
354-2500
250 cc
190 cc
60 cc
165-255 cc
225-315 cc
354-3000
300 cc
225 cc
75 cc
200-300 cc
275-375 cc
354-3500
350 cc
260 cc
90 cc
235-350 cc
325-440 cc
354-4000
400 cc
300 cc
100 cc
275-400 cc
375-500 cc
354-5000
500 cc
375 cc
125 cc
350-500 cc
475-625 cc
354-6000
600 cc
450 cc
150 cc
425-600 cc
575-750 cc
354-7000
700 cc
525 cc
175 cc
500-700 cc
675-875 cc
354-8000
800 cc
600 cc
200 cc
575-800 cc
775-1 000 cc
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 49 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
49
2. Prothèse d’expansion/implant mammaire Round Becker 50 Siltex®
Volume de gel : 50 % du volume nominal de l’implant
Matériau de remplissage en gel cohésif I® (standard)
TABLEAU 2. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Round Becker 50 Siltex® en gel cohésif I®
Gammes de volume final
Volume nominal
Volume total
Nº de référence
Volume nominal
Volume
Volume total de
de solution
de gel-solution
catalogue
de l’implant
de gel
solution saline
saline
saline
354-1515
300 cc
150 cc
150 cc
150-200 cc
300-350 cc
354-2020
400 cc
200 cc
200 cc
200-300 cc
400-500 cc
354-2525
500 cc
250 cc
250 cc
250-350 cc
500-600 cc
354-3030
600 cc
300 cc
300 cc
300-425 cc
600-725 cc
354-3535
700 cc
350 cc
350 cc
350-500 cc
700-850 cc
3. Prothèse d’expansion/implant mammaire Contour Profile Becker 35 Siltex®
Volume de gel : 35 % du volume nominal de l’implant
Matériau de remplissage : gel cohésif II® (moyen)
TABLEAU 3. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Contour Profile Becker 35 Siltex® en gel cohésif II®
Volumes temporaires
d'expansion excessive*
Volumes finaux
Nº de
Volume
Volume
Volume de
Volume
Volume total
Volume total
Volume total
référence
nominal de
nominal de
gel
maximal de
de gel-solution de solution
de gel-solution
catalogue
l’implant
solution saline
solution saline saline
saline
saline
324-0955
145 ccm
95 ccm
50 ccm
120 ccm
170 ccm
85-95 ccm
135-145 ccm
324-1055
195 ccm
125 ccm
70 ccm
155 ccm
225 ccm
110-125 ccm
180-195 ccm
324-1155
255 ccm
165 ccm
90 ccm
205 ccm
295 ccm
145-165 ccm
235-255 ccm
324-1205
290 ccm
190 ccm
100 ccm
235 ccm
335 ccm
170-190 ccm
270-290 ccm
324-1255
325 ccm
215 ccm
110 ccm
270 ccm
380 ccm
190-215 ccm
300-325 ccm
324-1305
365 ccm
240 ccm
125 ccm
300 ccm
425 ccm
215-240 ccm
340-365 ccm
324-1355
400 ccm
270 ccm
130 ccm
335 ccm
465 ccm
240-270 ccm
370-400 ccm
324-1405
460 ccm
300 ccm
160 ccm
375 ccm
535 ccm
270-300 ccm
430-460 ccm
324-1505
565 ccm
370 ccm
195 ccm
460 ccm
655 ccm
330-370 ccm
525-565 ccm
324-1605
685 ccm
445 ccm
240 ccm
555 ccm
795 ccm
440-445 ccm
640-685 ccm
MODE D’EMPLOI
(Pour plus de renseignements sur les implants mammaires de Becker, consulter les rubriques AVERTISSEMENTS et PRÉCAUTIONS.)
Procédure de test pour les implants mammaires de Becker
Immédiatement avant son utilisation, la prothèse doit faire l’objet de tests pour vérifier son imperméabilité et l’intégrité de son enveloppe. À l’aide
du tube de remplissage, gonfler partiellement la prothèse avec de l’air ou de la solution saline, en prenant soin de ne pas endommager le tube.
Examiner la prothèse et vérifier qu’elle ne présente pas de signes d’écoulement et que l’intégrité de l’enveloppe externe est préservée en la
manipulant avec fermeté à la main. Évacuer l’air de la prothèse avant de procéder au remplissage.
Procédure de remplissage et de connexion
1. Avant d’insérer la prothèse dans la loge préparée chirurgicalement, la dégonfler entièrement.
2. Plier la prothèse et l’insérer dans la loge préparée chirurgicalement. (Certains chirurgiens préfèrent remplir partiellement la prothèse avant
de la poser.) Quelle que soit la méthode utilisée, l’évacuation de l’air contenu dans l’implant et le tube de remplissage comme indiqué à
l’étape 1 réduira la quantité d’air à évacuer lors de l’étape 4.
3. Utiliser une seringue remplie d’une SOLUTION INJECTABLE DE CHLORURE DE SODIUM USP, STÉRILE ET APYROGÈNE pour gonfler
la prothèse jusqu’au volume recommandé. Un embout Luer et une valve de contrôle sont fournis afin de faciliter le remplissage
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 50 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
50
11867-00
peropératoire de la prothèse et ne doivent pas être implantés (Figure 5). La valve de contrôle bidirectionnelle incluse s’ouvre lorsque la
seringue est connectée et se referme lorsque la seringue est retirée. La valve de contrôle bidirectionnelle doit être reliée à l’embout Luer
du tube de remplissage avant d’ajouter du liquide à l’implant. SEULE doit être utilisée une SOLUTION INJECTABLE DE CHLORURE
DE SODIUM USP, STÉRILE ET APYROGÈNE, prélevée dans son contenant d’origine..
Figure 5 : Embout Luer et valve de contrôle bidirectionnelle
ATTENTION : La prothèse ne doit pas être remplie à un volume inférieur ou supérieur à celui indiqué (consulter les tableaux de
recommandation relatifs à l’expansion figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT). La prothèse doit être remplie jusqu’à la
« gamme de volume final » avant de retirer le tube de remplissage.
4. Tout air captif peut être éliminé à l’aide de la seringue de remplissage connectée. Tout air résiduel finira par être diffusé et absorbé par les
tissus.
REMARQUE : S’il est nécessaire d’ajuster le volume au cours de l’intervention, l’ajout ou le retrait de solution doit être effectué conformément
aux étapes 3 et 4.
5. En l’absence d’ajustement postopératoire de la prothèse, le tube de remplissage doit être enlevé. La valve auto-étanche se fermera pour
former l’implant à long terme.
6. Si un ajustement après l’intervention est nécessaire, relier le tube de remplissage au dôme d’injection après avoir ajusté le tube de
remplissage et enlevé l’embout Luer et la valve de contrôle. Raccorder le tube de remplissage au dôme d’injection souhaité à l’aide de l’un
des raccords fournis avec le dôme d’injection (consulter la rubrique Types de raccord et de dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage).
Il convient de veiller à adapter la longueur du tube de façon à ce qu’il ne s’entortille pas ni ne raccourcisse au fur et à mesure de
l’expansion de l’implant.
REMARQUE : Si le choix se porte sur le dôme d’injection standard ou le dôme de micro-injection doté d’un raccord en acier inoxydable, un
matériel de suture non résorbable doit être noué autour du tube et du raccord (Figure 3) pour assurer une connexion solide. Il est important
d’attacher solidement au raccord les deux côtés, proximal et distal, du tube de remplissage, de sorte que l’ensemble de la structure de
l’orifice de remplissage (tube de remplissage et orifice de remplissage/dôme d’injection) soit ultérieurement retiré de la patiente. Il convient
d’être vigilant lors de la fixation du tube au raccord à l’aide de ligatures, de façon à éviter de sectionner ou d’obstruer le tube ou le raccord.
(Consulter les instructions « Dômes d’injection avec systèmes de raccord » inclues dans l’emballage du raccord et du dôme.)
Une fois le dôme d’injection relié au tube de remplissage, la structure porte le nom de structure de l’orifice de remplissage.
ATTENTION : L’utilisation de pinces coupantes ou hémostatiques pour faciliter le processus de connexion et de suture est CONTREINDIQUÉE, car un endommagement du tube ou du raccord peut entraîner un dégonflement de la prothèse.
REMARQUE : Le mode d’emploi du raccord True-Lock figure dans les instructions « Dômes d’injection avec systèmes de raccord » situées
dans l’emballage du raccord et du dôme. Lire attentivement le mode d’emploi avant d’utiliser ce système de raccordement. Il est important
d’assembler solidement les deux côtés du tube de remplissage au raccord de façon à ce que la totalité du tube de remplissage soit enlevée lors
du retrait du dôme d’injection de la patiente (pour plus de renseignements, consulter les rubriques AVERTISSEMENTS et PRÉCAUTIONS).
On conseille de placer la structure de l’orifice de remplissage (dôme d’injection et tube de remplissage) en position haute dans le tissu souscutané adjacent au dispositif pour faciliter l’identification et l’accès au cours d’un remplissage ultérieur. L’orifice de remplissage est en général
placé contre la paroi thoracique sous le bras, bien que d’autres emplacements soient possibles en fonction des préférences du chirurgien et de
la patiente.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 51 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
51
Le dôme doit être placé à au moins 7,62 cm (3 pouces) de la prothèse pour éviter tout dommage du dispositif au cours du remplissage
postopératoire. Le gonflement est réalisé à l’aide d’une SOLUTION INJECTABLE DE CHLORURE DE SODIUM USP, STÉRILE ET
APYROGÈNE. Utiliser une aiguille à ailettes ou standard de calibre 23 (ou moins). Il convient d’être extrêmement vigilant pour ne perforer que
le centre de la surface supérieure du dôme d’injection en formant un angle de 90° ± 30° par rapport à la surface supérieure (Figure 6).
Figure 6 : Surface supérieure du dôme d’injection
Avant de fermer les incisions chirurgicales, confirmer que la prothèse est fonctionnelle. Cela peut être réalisé en insérant dans le dôme
d’injection l’aiguille à ailettes de calibre 23 montée sur une seringue, puis en perfusant ou en retirant la solution et en observant un
gonflement/dégonflement adéquat de la prothèse. ATTENTION : au moment de la fermeture de la plaie, il convient d’être extrêmement
vigilant afin de ne pas endommager la prothèse avec les instruments chirurgicaux. La pose préalable de sutures profondes peut contribuer
à éviter le contact par inadvertance du produit avec les aiguilles de suture et donc un éventuel endommagement de la prothèse.
Procédure d’expansion postopératoire
1. Utiliser une seringue remplie d’une SOLUTION INJECTABLE DE CHLORURE DE SODIUM USP, STÉRILE ET APYROGÈNE, prélevée
dans son contenant d’origine, afin de gonfler la prothèse jusqu’au volume recommandé (consulter les tableaux de recommandation relatifs
à l’expansion figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT).
2. La patiente doit être surveillée au cours de la période d’ajustement du volume, afin de prévenir la formation d’escarres, une nécrose, la
déhiscence de la plaie et d’autres complications associées à l’expansion des tissus. Si, à tout moment, les tissus sus-jacents présentent
l’un de ces symptômes, le volume de la prothèse doit être réduit en inversant les procédures de remplissage et en retirant du liquide de
celle-ci. Si les signes persistent, la prothèse doit être enlevée.
(Consulter les renseignements complémentaires figurant dans les rubriques AVERTISSEMENTS et PRÉCAUTIONS)
ATTENTION : Le volume d’expansion final ne doit pas être inférieur au volume minimal recommandé ou supérieur au volume maximal
recommandé (consulter les tableaux de recommandation relatifs à l’expansion figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT). Une
prothèse insuffisamment remplie peut se gondoler, se plier ou se plisser, ce qui peut entraîner une défaillance du produit et, ultérieurement, un
dégonflement et/ou une rupture de la prothèse. Un gonflement au-delà du volume maximum recommandé peut également provoquer une
défaillance due à des plis ou à la rupture de l’enveloppe.
REMARQUE : On recommande que la durée de l’expansion ne dépasse pas six mois, car les adhérences tissulaires peuvent compliquer le
retrait facile du tube de remplissage ou compromettre l’intégrité de la valve. Il peut en résulter un endommagement de l’implant. Mentor
recommande que les ajustements périodiques du volume s’étendent sur une période de six mois, en fonction des besoins spécifiques de
chaque patiente et du jugement professionnel du médecin. Lorsque le résultat souhaité de l’expansion est obtenu, le tube de remplissage et le
dôme d’injection doivent être enlevés.
Pour les recommandations relatives à l’expansion, consulter les tableaux suivants figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE
L’IMPLANT :
Tableau 1. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Round Becker 25 Siltex® à gel cohésif I®
Tableau 2. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Round Becker 50 Siltex® à gel cohésif I®
Tableau 3. Spécifications concernant la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire Contour Profile Becker 35 Siltex® à gel cohésif II®
7.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 52 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
52
11867-00
Retrait de la structure de l’orifice de remplissage (dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage relié au tube de remplissage)
Une fois l’expansion terminée, la structure de l’orifice de remplissage (dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage et tube de remplissage) doit être
retirée avec précaution de la double valve Becker.
REMARQUE : L’implant doit être rempli jusqu’à la « gamme de volume final » (consulter les tableaux de recommandation relatifs à l’expansion
figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT) avant de retirer la structure de l’orifice de remplissage. Le tube doit être retiré de
l’implant avant de séparer le dôme d’injection du tube.
a. Pratiquer une petite incision à l’emplacement du dôme d’injection/orifice de remplissage.
b. Il est important de saisir la tubulure au-delà du dôme d’injection et du raccord et le plus près possible de l’implant. Éviter d’utiliser
des instruments qui pourraient endommager le tube de remplissage et entraîner une rupture du tube, une rétraction du tube dans la loge et
un dégonflement ultérieur et/ou une rupture ultérieure du dispositif. Le dôme d’injection doit toujours être relié au tube de remplissage au
cours du retrait de ce dernier de la double valve de l’implant.
c. Poser l’autre main sur l’implant ajustable pour vérifier qu’il reste bien en place pendant le retrait du tube de remplissage.
d. Exercer un mouvement de traction lent et régulier lors du retrait du tube de remplissage. S’il devient blanc, le relâcher et le saisir à
nouveau plus près de l’implant. Exercer de nouveau un mouvement de traction lent et régulier pour retirer le tube.
e. Masser délicatement l’implant ajustable et la valve tout en retirant le tube; le retrait en sera facilité. Vous, ou votre patiente, pouvez avoir la
sensation que l’implant bouge dans sa loge lors du retrait du tube de remplissage. C’est une sensation normale.
f.
La double valve de l’implant est prévue pour être auto-étanche dès que le tube est retiré.
g. L’extrémité du tube retiré devrait présenter une « entaille » indiquant qu’il a été enlevé au point voulu et qu’il a été complètement retiré.
ATTENTION : Une interposition de tissu peut survenir lorsqu’on utilise le raccord raccord True-Lock. Les chirurgiens doivent anticiper le
besoin de découper la capsule avant de retirer le tube de remplissage et le dôme d’injection. Saisir le tube au-delà du raccord et le retirer
avant d’enlever le dôme d’injection.
(Consulter les renseignements complémentaires dans les rubriques AVERTISSEMENTS et PRÉCAUTIONS)
Procédure d’enregistrement pour la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire de Becker
Chaque implant mammaire est fourni avec deux étiquettes de dossier patiente sur lesquelles figurent le numéro de référence catalogue, le
numéro de lot, ainsi que le numéro de série de cet implant. Les étiquettes de dossier patiente sont rattachées à l’étiquette située à l’intérieur de
l’emballage du produit. Pour remplir la carte d’identification de la patiente, coller une étiquette de dossier patiente pour chaque implant au dos
de la carte d’identification de la patiente. Les autres étiquettes doivent être conservées dans le dossier de la patiente. La position de l’implant
(côté gauche ou droit), la date de l’intervention chirurgicale ainsi que le volume de remplissage (résultats de l’expansion) de chaque implant
mammaire doivent figurer sur l’étiquette. Si on ne dispose pas d’étiquette de dossier patiente, le numéro de lot, le numéro de référence
catalogue ainsi que la description de l’implant doivent être inscrits manuellement à partir de l’étiquette apposée sur l’implant. De plus, le volume
de remplissage (résultats de l’expansion) doit être consigné à la main si on ne dispose pas d’étiquette de dossier patiente.
INDICATIONS
Les prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires Mentor MemoryGel® Siltex® sont indiqués pour les patientes dans les cas suivants (procédure) :
• Reconstruction mammaire. La reconstruction mammaire comprend la reconstruction mammaire primaire, qui permet de remplacer les
tissus mammaires retirés en raison d’un cancer ou d’un traumatisme ou qui ne se sont pas développés correctement en raison d’une
anomalie mammaire grave. La reconstruction mammaire comprend également une nouvelle intervention chirurgicale destinée à corriger ou à
améliorer les résultats d’une première reconstruction.
CONTRE-INDICATIONS
Groupes de patientes pour lesquelles le produit est contre-indiqué :
• Femmes souffrant d’une infection évolutive, quelle que soit sa localisation;
• Femmes atteintes d’un cancer ou d’une affection précancéreuse qui n’ont pas reçu un traitement approprié;
• Femmes enceintes ou qui allaitent.
AVERTISSEMENTS
1. Comment éviter d’endommager l’implant au cours d’une intervention chirurgicale, d’un traitement médical ou d’actes médicaux
Des événements iatrogènes dont un médecin ou un chirurgien est involontairement à l’origine, ou résultant d’un traitement ou d’un acte médical,
peuvent contribuer à la défaillance prématurée de l’implant.
• La prothèse ne doit pas être en contact avec des instruments pointus, tels que des scalpels ou des aiguilles, au cours de la pose de l’implant
ou d’autres interventions chirurgicales. Les patientes doivent demander à leurs autres médecins traitants de tenir compte de cet
avertissement.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 53 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
53
• La technique de pose d’une prothèse remplie de gel est très différente de celle d’un implant rempli de solution saline. S’assurer de ne pas
exercer une force excessive sur une zone réduite de l’enveloppe lors de l’insertion de la prothèse à travers l’incision. Exercer au contraire
une force sur une surface aussi large que possible de l’implant lors de son insertion. Éviter de mettre la prothèse en place en la poussant
avec un ou deux doigts sur une zone restreinte, car cela peut affaiblir l’enveloppe à cet endroit.
• La longueur de l’incision doit être adéquate pour s’adapter à la forme, au volume et au profil de l’implant. La taille de l’incision sera plus
longue qu’elle ne le serait dans le cas d’une augmentation avec implant rempli de solution saline. Ainsi, le risque de pression excessive sur
l’implant au cours de son insertion est réduit.
• Les limites anatomiques périaréolaire et axillaire des sites d’incision peuvent gêner l’insertion de l’implant, augmentant ainsi le risque de
l’endommager.
• Éviter de créer des plissements sur la prothèse au cours de sa pose ou lors d’autres interventions (p. ex. une reprise chirurgicale). Une
pratique courante consiste à passer votre doigt autour de l’implant avant de refermer l’incision afin de s’assurer qu’il est plat et ne présente
pas de plissements. Il est plus difficile de contrôler la présence de plissements lorsque l’implantation est sous-musculaire.
• Une contracture capsulaire ne doit pas être traitée par capsulotomie fermée ou forte compression externe, car cela endommagerait
probablement l’implant ou entraînerait sa rupture, des plis ou des hématomes.
• Il faut prendre soin de ne pas endommager l’enveloppe de l’implant lors d’interventions ultérieures, telles qu’une capsulotomie ouverte, une
révision de la loge, l’aspiration d’un hématome/sérome, une biopsie et une lumpectomie. Le repositionnement de l’implant au cours
d’interventions ultérieures doit faire l’objet d’un examen attentif de la part de l’équipe médicale; il faut également prendre soin de ne pas
contaminer l’implant. Une force excessive exercée au cours d’interventions ultérieures peut fragiliser localement l’enveloppe de l’implant,
diminuant ainsi les performances de la prothèse.
• Ne pas mettre l’implant en contact avec des instruments de cautérisation.
• Ne pas plonger l’implant dans de la Betadine®. En cas d’utilisation de Betadine dans la loge, s’assurer qu’elle est abondamment rincée afin
qu’aucune solution résiduelle ne reste dans la loge.
• Ne pas modifier les implants ou essayer de réparer ou d’insérer un implant endommagé.
• Ne pas réutiliser ou restériliser une prothèse préalablement implantée. Les implants mammaires sont à usage unique.
• Ne pas placer plus d’un implant par loge.
• Ne pas utiliser l’approche périombilicale pour poser l’implant.
• Ne pas introduire ou injecter de médicaments ou autres substances dans l’implant. L’intégrité du produit peut être compromise en cas
d’injections à travers l’enveloppe de l’implant, ce qui provoquerait des écoulements puis son dégonflement et/ou sa rupture.
• Un gonflement excessif de la prothèse peut entraîner une nécrose ou une thrombose tissulaire.
• Le volume d’expansion final ne doit pas être inférieur au volume minimal recommandé ou supérieur au volume maximal recommandé
(consulter les tableaux de recommandation relatifs à l’expansion figurant dans la rubrique DESCRIPTION DE L’IMPLANT). Une prothèse
insuffisamment remplie peut se gondoler, se plier ou se plisser, ce qui peut entraîner une défaillance du produit et, ultérieurement, un
dégonflement et/ou une rupture de la prothèse. Un gonflement au-delà du volume maximal recommandé peut également provoquer une
défaillance due à des plis ou à la rupture de l’enveloppe.
2. Diathermie à micro-ondes
La diathermie à micro-ondes est contre-indiquée pour les patientes ayant des implants mammaires, car il est prouvé qu’elle provoque une
nécrose tissulaire, une érosion cutanée et l’extrusion de l’implant.
PRÉCAUTIONS
1. Populations particulières
L’innocuité et l’efficacité des implants mammaires n’ont pas été prouvées chez les patientes atteintes des affections suivantes :
• Maladies auto-immunes (p. ex. le lupus et la sclérodermie);
• Système immunitaire affaibli (p. ex. par la prise actuelle d’un traitement immuno-suppressif);
• Patientes souffrant de pathologies ou prenant des médicaments qui interfèrent avec la capacité de cicatrisation de la plaie (p. ex. diabète mal
contrôlé ou corticothérapie) ou la coagulation sanguine (tels qu’un traitement simultané à base de coumadin);
• Mauvaise circulation au niveau des tissus mammaires ou des tissus sus-jacents;
• Patientes traitées par radiothérapie;
• Diagnostic clinique d’une dépression ou d’un autre trouble mental, y compris peur d’une dysmorphie corporelle et troubles de l’alimentation.
Veuillez conseiller à la patiente de parler de ses antécédents de troubles mentaux avec vous avant toute opération. Il est conseillé aux
patientes atteintes de dépression ou d’un autre trouble mental d’attendre la guérison ou la stabilisation de leur état avant d’entreprendre une
implantation mammaire.
Il pourrait exister d’autres patientes dont les antécédents médicaux sont compliqués et qui, selon le chirurgien, présentent des facteurs de
risque ne permettant pas d'établir l'innocuité et l’efficacité de l’implant mammaire. Comme lors de n’importe quelle intervention, vous devez
examiner les antécédents médicaux de votre patiente afin de vous assurer qu’elle est une bonne candidate à la pose d’un implant mammaire.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 54 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
54
11867-00
2. Précautions chirurgicales
• Intégrité de la prothèse – Immédiatement avant son utilisation, la prothèse doit faire l’objet de tests pour vérifier son imperméabilité et
l’intégrité de son enveloppe. Le test peut être réalisé en manipulant doucement la prothèse avec la main et les doigts tout en examinant
attentivement s’il existe des zones de ruptures ou d’écoulement.
• Technique chirurgicale – La mise en place d’implants mammaires remplis de gel exige le recours à diverses techniques chirurgicales. ll
appartient donc au chirurgien d’utiliser la méthode qu’il juge la mieux adaptée à sa patiente, conformément à la fiche technique du produit. Il
est conseillé de disposer de plusieurs tailles d’implants mammaires dans le bloc opératoire au moment de l’intervention pour pouvoir choisir
la taille d’implant appropriée. Un implant de rechange doit également être disponible.
• Choix de l’implant
Voici quelques paramètres importants concernant l’intervention et la taille de l’implant :
• La taille de l’implant doit correspondre aux dimensions de la paroi thoracique de la patiente, y compris à la largeur de la base, tout en
gardant à l’esprit la laxité du tissu et la projection de l’implant.
• Il est nécessaire de discuter longuement avec la patiente, en se servant de toutes les aides visuelles appropriées, telles que des images,
des calibres d’implants mammaires ou autres, pour clarifier leurs objectifs et réduire l’incidence de réinterventions pour une modification de
taille.
• Les implants peuvent être plus palpables pour les raisons suivantes : implants texturés, implants plus volumineux, position sousglandulaire et quantité insuffisante de tissus ou de peau pour recouvrir l’implant.
• Le tissu disponible doit recouvrir l’implant de manière adéquate.
• Un rapport indique que les implants de très grand volume (> 350 cc) peuvent augmenter le risque de complications, telles que l’extrusion
de l’implant, un hématome, une infection, des plis palpables au niveau de l’implant et des plissements visibles de la peau exigeant une
chirurgie correctrice3.
• Choix de la position de l’implant
• La création d’une loge sèche aux contours bien définis et dont le volume et la symétrie sont adéquats permet de poser l’implant à plat sur
une surface lisse.
• Dans le cas d’une implantation sous-musculaire, l’intervention peut durer plus longtemps, la période de rétablissement peut être plus
longue et plus douloureuse, et il peut être plus difficile de procéder à une réintervention que dans le cas d’une implantation sousglandulaire. En revanche, les implants sous-musculaires peuvent être moins palpables et provoquer moins fréquemment une contracture
capsulaire4; il est également plus facile de réaliser une mammographie. De plus, une implantation sous-musculaire peut être préférable si
les tissus mammaires de la patientes sont minces ou affaiblis.
• Dans le cas d’une implantation sous-glandulaire, l’intervention peut être plus courte, le rétablissement plus court et moins douloureux, et
l’implant plus facile d’accès lors d’une réintervention que dans le cas d’une implantation sous-musculaire. Toutefois, les implants sousglandulaires peuvent être plus palpables et provoquer plus fréquemment une contracture capsulaire3, 5; il est également plus difficile de
réaliser une mammographie.
• Maintien de l’hémostase/prévention de l’accumulation de fluides
• Il est important d’assurer une hémostase minutieuse afin d’empêcher la formation d’un hématome postopératoire. En cas de saignements
abondants persistants, la pose de l’implant doit être retardée jusqu’à ce que le saignement soit maîtrisé. Il faut procéder avec soin à
l’évacuation postopératoire d’un hématome ou d’un sérome pour éviter de contaminer l’implant mammaire ou de l’endommager en raison
d’instruments pointus, d’aiguilles ou d’une rétraction.
• Procédure d’enregistrement
• Chaque implant mammaire est fourni avec deux étiquettes de dossier patiente sur lesquelles figurent le numéro de référence catalogue, le
numéro de lot, ainsi que le numéro de série de cet implant. Les étiquettes de dossier patiente sont rattachées à l’étiquette située à
l’intérieur de l’emballage du produit. Pour remplir la carte d’identification de la patiente, coller une étiquette de dossier patiente pour
chaque implant au dos de la carte d’identification de la patiente. L’autre étiquette doit être conservée dans le dossier de la patiente. La
position de l’implant (côté gauche ou droit), la date de l’intervention chirurgicale ainsi que le volume de remplissage (résultats de
l’expansion) de chaque implant mammaire doivent figurer sur l’étiquette. Si on ne dispose pas d’étiquette de dossier patiente, le numéro
de lot, le numéro de référence catalogue ainsi que la description de l’implant doivent être inscrits manuellement à partir de l’étiquette de
l’implant. De plus, le volume de remplissage (résultats de l’expansion) de chaque implant mammaire doit être consigné à la main si on ne
dispose pas d’étiquette de dossier patiente.
• Soins postopératoires
• Vous devez indiquer à la patiente qu’elle ressentira probablement une fatigue et une douleur pendant plusieurs jours après l’intervention,
et que ses seins seront probablement enflés et sensibles au toucher pendant un mois ou plus. Vous devez également lui préciser qu’elle
pourrait ressentir une tension de la poitrine en attendant que sa peau s’adapte à la nouvelle taille de ses seins. Pendant au moins
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 55 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
55
plusieurs semaines, la patiente devra éviter toute activité ardue qui pourrait élever son pouls ou sa tension artérielle. Elle devrait pouvoir
retourner au travail dans les quelques jours suivant l’intervention. Il est également recommandé de se masser les seins le cas échéant.
• Précautions supplémentaires concernant les prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires MemoryGel® Siltex®
• La double valve auto-étanche de la gamme d’implants mammaires de Becker est unique et peut être inconnue du chirurgien. Le tube de
remplissage est inséré dans la prothèse au moment de la fabrication et doit être manipulé avec précaution afin d’éviter tout déplacement
accidentel de son emplacement prévu. Ne pas saisir l’implant par son tube de remplissage.
• L’enveloppe, le tube de remplissage et le dôme d’injection en élastomère de silicone peuvent être facilement sectionnés par un scalpel ou
se rompre suite à une pression excessive, une manipulation avec des instruments non tranchants ou la pénétration d’une aiguille. Cela
entraînera un dégonflement et/ou une rupture de l’implant. L’intégrité structurelle de toutes les prothèses doit être vérifiée avec soin avant
et pendant la pose de l’implant.
• Le tube de remplissage doit être enlevé en premier lors du retrait du tube de remplissage et du dôme d’injection (structure de
l’orifice de remplissage). Saisir le tube de remplissage au-delà du raccord pour éviter que le dôme d’injection ne se détache du tube de
remplissage. Ne pas exercer de tension soudaine ou excessive sur le tube de remplissage au cours du retrait. Éviter d’utiliser des
instruments qui pourraient endommager le tube de remplissage et entraîner une rupture du tube, une rétraction du tube dans la loge et un
dégonflement ultérieur et/ou une rupture ultérieure du dispositif.
• Une interposition de tissu peut survenir lors de l’utilisation du raccord True-Lock. Les chirurgiens doivent anticiper le besoin de découper la
capsule avant de retirer le tube de remplissage et le dôme d’injection. Saisir le tube au-delà du raccord et le retirer avant d’enlever le dôme
d’injection.
• Le tube, qui relie l’implant au dôme d’injection, doit avoir une taille adéquate pour éviter qu’il ne s’entortille. Il est important de bien relier le
tube de remplissage au raccord pour éviter qu’ils ne se détachent. Il est possible que la prothèse ne se gonfle pas en raison d’un
entortillement du tube, d’un écoulement, de la séparation des composants ou d’injections qui ne pénètrent pas dans le dôme d’injection.
• Il faut être extrêmement viligant lorsqu’on connecte le tube de remplissage au raccord. Le tube peut facilement être endommagé par les
instruments chirurgicaux (p. ex. lors d’un contact avec des forceps). Il est donc préférable de ne pas utiliser de tels instruments.
• Les chirurgiens doivent contrôler la position du dôme d’injection avant d’ajouter ou de retirer du liquide.
• Un risque de contamination existe lorsque du liquide est ajouté ou soustrait à la prothèse. Utiliser une technique aseptique lors de
l’introduction de la solution saline dans l’implant; il est recommandé de se servir d’un contenant de solution saline stérile, à usage unique.
FACTEURS IMPORTANTS À ABORDER AVEC LES PATIENTES LORS DE LA CONSULTATION MÉDICALE
La pose d’un implant mammaire est une intervention non urgente; la patiente doit être correctement conseillée sur les risques et les avantages
de ces produits et interventions. Vous devez demander à votre patiente de lire la notice destinée à la patiente concernant la reconstruction.
Vous devez lire la notice destinée à la patiente dans son intégralité. La notice constitue le premier moyen de diffusion de renseignements sur les
risques et les avantages pour aider votre patiente à prendre une décision éclairée concernant son intervention de reconstruction primaire ou de
révision de reconstruction (selon le cas); toutefois, elle n’a pas pour objectif de remplacer une consultation avec vous. Il faut conseiller à la
patiente de prendre le temps nécessaire (en général une à deux semaines) pour lire et réfléchir à ces renseignements, avant de prendre la
décision de se faire opérer ou non, à moins qu’il ne soit nécessaire de procéder à l’opération sans tarder pour des raisons médicales.
Avant l’intervention, vous et votre patiente devrez signer le formulaire d’Attestation du consentement éclairé. Le formulaire se trouve sur la
dernière page de la notice destinée à la patiente. En signant le formulaire, la patiente indique qu’elle a parfaitement compris les renseignements
fournis sur la notice destinée à la patiente. Le formulaire doit être conservé dans le dossier clinique permanent de la patiente.
Vous trouverez ci-dessous certains facteurs importants relatifs à l’utilisation d’implants mammaires remplis de gel de silicone dont vos patientes
doivent avoir connaissance. La section 1.4 de la notice destinée à la patiente contient une liste plus détaillée des facteurs importants pour les
patientes.
• Rupture – La rupture d’un implant mammaire en gel de silicone passe souvent inaperçue (c.-à-d. que la patiente ne ressent aucun
symptôme et ne perçoit aucun signe physique de modification de l’implant). Elle est rarement symptomatique.
Veuillez suivre les six étapes suivantes pour dépister une rupture silencieuse :
1. Auto-examen des seins;
2. Nouveau symptôme ou signe soupçonné;
3. L’examen physique par le médecin, lors d’une visite de routine ou suivant la manifestation de nouveaux symptômes et signes, donne
lieu à un examen plus approfondi;
4. Une échographie et/ou une mammographie de l’implant et du sein concerné doivent être effectués;
5. Examen par IRM si l’échographie n’est pas concluante. L’IRM doit être effectuée dans un centre équipé d’une antenne sein munie d’un
aimant d’au moins 1,5 tesla. L’IRM doit être interprétée par un radiologue qui connaît les ruptures d’implants;
6. Si l’échographie, la mammographie et/ou l’IRM décèle des signes d’une rupture, vous devez conseiller à votre patiente de se faire
retirer son implant.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 56 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
56
11867-00
• Explantation – Les implants mammaires ont une durée de vie limitée; les patientes devront probablement se faire retirer leur implant, avec
ou sans remplacement, au cours de leur vie. Lors de l’explantion d’implants sans remplacement, les modifications apportées aux seins de la
patiente peuvent être irréversibles. Les taux de complications sont plus élevés à la suite d’une chirurgie de révision (retrait sans
remplacement).
• Réintervention – la patiente devra probablement subir d’autres interventions chirurgicales (seins et/ou implants), en raison d’une rupture,
d’autres complications ou de résultats esthétiques non satisfaisants. Les patientes doivent savoir que le risque de complications ultérieures
est plus important lors d’une chirurgie de révision que lors d’une reconstruction primaire. L’intégrité de l’enveloppe peut être involontairement
compromise au cours d’une réintervention, ce qui peut entraîner une défaillance du produit.
• Infection – Les signes d’infection aiguë signalés liés aux implants mammaires comprennent un érythème, une sensibilité, une accumulation
de fluide, une douleur et de la fièvre. Comme dans le cas d’autres interventions invasives, quelques rares cas de syndrome de choc toxique
ont été constatés suivant la pose d’implants. Ce syndrome engage le pronostic vital. Les symptômes du syndrome de choc toxique se
manifestent de façon soudaine. Ils comprennent : une forte fièvre (102 °F, 38,8 °C ou plus), des vomissements, une diarrhée, des éruptions
cutanées ressemblant à un coup de soleil, des yeux rouges, des vertiges, des étourdissements, des douleurs musculaires et des baisses de
tension artérielle pouvant provoquer des évanouissements. En présence de l’un ou de plusieurs de ces symptômes, les patientes doivent
consulter immédiatement un médecin. Il établira un diagnostic et leur prescrira un traitement adéquat.
• Techniques de palpation mammaire – Les patientes doivent procéder à un auto-examen mensuel de leurs seins. Elles doivent apprendre
comment différencier l’implant des tissus mammaires. La patiente ne doit pas trop manipuler ou comprimer l’implant. Il faut indiquer à la
patiente que la présence de masses, de douleurs persistantes, d’un gonflement, d’un durcissement ou d’une modification de la forme de
l’implant peut indiquer une rupture. Si la patiente présente l’un de ces signes, elle doit les signaler et sans doute passer une IRM afin de
déterminer si l’implant s’est rompu.
• Mammographie – Il faut demander aux patientes de passer des mammographies de routine conformément aux recommandations de leur
médecin traitant. Il faut insister sur l’importance de passer de tels examens. Les patientes doivent signaler la présence, le type et
l’emplacement de leurs implants au personnel chargé de leur faire passer la mammographie. Les patientes doivent demander une
mammographie diagnostique plutôt qu’une mammographie de dépistage, car elle implique un plus grand nombre de clichés. Les implants
mammaires peuvent compliquer l’interprétation des clichés mammographiques en obscurcissant les tissus mammaires sous-jacents et/ou
en compressant les tissus sus-jacents. Pour visualiser correctement les tissus mammaires dans le sein implanté, il est nécessaire de se
rendre dans des centres de mammographie agréés dont le personnel est formé aux techniques d’imagerie en présence d’implants
mammaires et qui utilise des techniques de déplacement. Les recommandations actuelles sur les mammographies préopératoires ou de
dépistage sont les mêmes pour les femmes ayant des implants mammaires ou non. Une mammographie doit être effectuée avant
l’intervention chirurgicale et un cliché mammaire doit être pris à la suite de l’opération afin de servir de référence pour les futures
mammographies de routine.
• Lactation – La pose d’un implant mammaire peut compromettre la capacité à allaiter correctement, en réduisant ou en éliminant la
production de lait.
• Éviter d’endommager l’implant lors d’un traitement - Les patients doivent informer leurs autres médecins traitants de la présence de leurs
implants afin de réduire le risque de les endommager.
• Tabac – L’usage du tabac pourrait entraver le processus de cicatrisation.
• Radiothérapie du sein – Mentor n’a pas testé les effets in vivo de la radiothérapie chez les patientes portant des implants mammaires.
Selon la documentation scientifique, la radiothérapie peut accroître le risque de contracture capsulaire, de nécrose et d’extrusion de
l’implant; il est donc nécessaire de considérer avec soin la série de traitements à suivre. On peut répondre au défi posé par l’augmentation
du taux de ces complications à l’aide des techniques de reconstruction qui conviennent6,7.
• Santé mentale et intervention non urgente – Il est important que toutes les patientes souhaitant subir une intervention non urgente aient
des attentes réalistes privilégiant l’amélioration plutôt que la perfection. Avant toute opération, vous devez demander à votre patiente de
parler ouvertement de ses antécédents de troubles mentaux ou de dépression.
• Effets à long terme – Mentor poursuivra ses études de base sur les implants ronds MemoryGel® et sur les implants CPG pendant 10 ans,
ainsi que l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits (pour plus de renseignements, consulter les rubriques spécifiques de la
brochure relatives aux études cliniques). En outre, Mentor a entrepris une étude post-approbation distincte de 10 ans, aux États-Unis et au
Canada, pour répondre aux questions précises qui n’ont pas été traitées de manière exhaustive lors de l’étude de base sur les implants
ronds en gel de silicone, ainsi que pour fournir une évaluation réaliste de certains critères. Voici quelques critères d’évaluation étudiés au
cours de la vaste étude post-approbation : complications localisées à long terme, affections du tissu conjonctif et signes et symptômes liés,
troubles neurologiques, signes et symptômes neurologiques, troubles chez la descendance, troubles de reproduction et d’allaitement,
cancer, suicide, difficultés pour la mammographie et conformité et résultats de l’IRM. Mentor révisera ses notices au besoin, en tenant
compte des résultats de ses études cliniques. Vous devez également informer vos patientes de tout nouveau renseignement concernant
l’innocuité à mesure qu’il sera connu.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 57 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
57
ÉTUDES CLINIQUES DE MENTOR
L’innocuité et l’efficacité des implants Mentor en gel de silicone MemoryGel® ont été étudiés au cours d’études cliniques multicentriques
ouvertes, dénommées étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone et étude de base sur les implants CPG. De plus, l’innocuité des
implants ronds MemoryGel® et des prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires ronds de Becker a été étudiée lors d’une vaste étude
(complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits.
Les taux d’événements indésirables relevés au cours des études cliniques de Mentor figurent dans la prochaine rubrique. De manière générale,
les résultats de l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone, de l’étude de base sur les implants CPG et de l’étude (complémentaire)
sur la disponibilité des produits démontrent que ces prothèses sont sûres et efficaces pour les patientes subissant une reconstruction
mammaire. Les taux de complications enregistrés au cours des études de base sont en général comparables ou inférieurs à ceux enregistrés
au cours de l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits.
Il est difficile de tirer des conclusions à partir des comparaisons des taux de complications relevés au cours des études de base et de l’étude
(complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits, en raison des différences en matière de conception et d’analyse des données de ces études.
L’ étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits est menée selon un protocole clinique limité qui requiert des paramètres spécifiques,
mais dont les contrôles sont un peu moins contraignants que ceux normalement requis lors d’essais d’exemption des dispositifs de recherche
(à savoir, les études « de base »). Les données suivantes peuvent permettre d’expliquer les différences des taux de complications :
• Le calendrier des visites des patientes dans le cadre de l’étude et les formulaires de signalement des cas est différent d’une étude à l’autre.
• Des complications bénignes telles que l’asymétrie, une douleur mammaire, les altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon et un plissement sont
exclues des taux de complications de l’étude de base présentée dans cette brochure.
• Les patientes ayant un implant de Becker sont des patientes qui subissent une reconstruction en une seule étape et souffrent de
complications supplémentaires associées à une phase d’expansion, ainsi qu’à la présence d’un implant mammaire.
L’ensemble de la gamme d’implants MemoryGel®, y compris les implants de Becker, est fabriqué à partir des mêmes matières premières et
leurs indications de reconstruction sont identiques. Les données cliniques présentées dans cette brochure établissent donc un profil d’innocuité
et d’efficacité global pour l’ensemble des implants MemoryGel®.
ÉVÉNEMENTS INDÉSIRABLES
Les implants de Becker sont utilisés depuis longtemps dans le monde entier et l’innocuité des implants ronds de Becker a été étudiée durant
plus de 16 ans dans le cadre de l’étude clinique (complémentaire) en cours sur la disponibilité des produits, approuvée par la FDA aux ÉtatsUnis. Aucun effet indésirable grave et non envisagé résultant de la prothèse n’a été signalé. Les complications signalées correspondent au type
de complications mentionnées dans d’autres études sur les implants mammaires en gel de silicone.
Les publications scientifiques rendent également compte de preuves cliniques de l’innocuité et de l’efficacité des implants de Becker pour la
reconstruction mammaire7,8,9,10,11,12.Ces études ont révélé que les implants de Becker sont associés à des taux de complications inférieurs ou
comparables à ceux d’autres implants mammaires, et que le taux de satisfaction des patientes est élevé. De plus, Guay et Haykal13 ont décrit
les avantages de la prothèse de Becker dans le cas d’une reconstruction mammaire en une seule étape.
Les complications associées à la prothèse d’expansion/l’implant mammaire de Becker correspondent au type de complications associées à
d’autres prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires en une seule étape, aux prothèses d’expansion tissulaire en deux étapes avec implants et
aux reconstructions tissulaires autologues. D’après les publications scientifiques, le taux de contracture capsulaire des prothèses d’expansion/
implants permanents de Becker (3 à 29 %) est comparable aux taux observés lors de reconstructions en deux étapes (10 à 29 %)14,15. Les
reconstructions de Becker en une seule étape n’engendrent pas de complications liées à l’intervention telles qu’une hernie abdominale, une
nécrose du lambeau et la cosmésie du site donneur, contrairement aux reconstructions mammaires autologues (à savoir avec un lambeau de
grand droit abdominal). De bons résultats esthétiques avec de faibles taux de complications ont été relevés lors de l’utilisation de prothèses
d’expansion/implants en une seule étape, bien que le choix des patientes et une dissection correcte de la poche sous-musculaire y soient pour
beaucoup16. La prothèse de Becker associée à des reconstructions autologues par lambeau peut produire de bons résultats esthétiques chez
les patientes prenant un traitement adjuvant, en utilisant un long lambeau sans peau superflue et en assurant un suivi rigoureux pendant et
après la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie15.
Voici une description des événements indésirables potentiels pouvant survenir avec un implant mammaire rempli de gel de silicone. Pour les
taux d’événements indésirables ou les résultats propres aux implants Mentor, consulter les rubriques relatives aux études cliniques dans cette
brochure. Les taux d’événements indésirables figurant dans ces rubriques sont tirés des études cliniques portant sur l'utilisation des implants
ronds MemoryGel®, des implants CPG et des prothèses rondes de Becker. L’ensemble de la gamme d’implants MemoryGel®, y compris les
implants de Becker, est fabriqué à partir des mêmes matières premières et leurs indications de reconstruction sont identiques. Ces données
cliniques établissent donc un profil d’innocuité et d’efficacité global pour l’ensemble des implants MemoryGel®.
Les événements indésirables potentiels pouvant survenir avec la pose d’un implant mammaire rempli de gel de silicone sont les suivants :
rupture de l’implant, contracture capsulaire, réintervention, retrait de l’implant, douleur, altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon et du sein,
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 58 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
58
11867-00
infection, cicatrice, asymétrie, plissement, déplacement/migration de l’implant, palpabilité/visibilité de l’implant, difficultés d’allaitement,
hématome/sérome, extrusion de l’implant, retard de cicatrisation, atrophie du tissu mammaire/déformation de la paroi thoracique, calcifications
et adénopathie.
Les taux d’événements indésirables figurant dans ces sections sont tirés de la documentation publiée et des études cliniques de Mentor sur
l'utilisation des implants ronds MemoryGel®, des implants CPG et de la prothèse d’expansion/implant mammaire de Becker.
• Rupture
Les implants mammaires ne durent pas toute une vie. Ils se rompent lorsque l’enveloppe est déchirée ou trouée. La rupture peut se produire à
tout moment suivant l’implantation, mais il est plus probable qu’elle se produise après plusieurs années.
Les ruptures d’implants en gel de silicone passent le plus souvent inaperçues. Cela signifie que la plupart du temps, ni vous ni votre patiente ne
saurez que l’enveloppe de l’implant est déchirée ou trouée. Cependant, la rupture d’implants en gel de silicone pourrait déclencher certains
symptômes, notamment : nodules durs ou masses autour de l’implant ou au niveau de l’aisselle, modification ou diminution du volume ou de la
forme du sein ou de l’implant, douleur, fourmillement, gonflement, engourdissement, sensation de brûlure ou durcissement du sein.
Voici quelques causes possibles de la rupture d’un implant : endommagement par des instruments chirurgicaux, pression et fragilisation de
l’implant lors de la pose, pliage ou plissement de l’enveloppe de l’implant, pression excessive sur les seins (p. ex. par capsulotomie fermée,
consulter la rubrique AVERTISSEMENTS), traumatisme, compression au cours de la mammographie et contracture capsulaire grave. Les
implants mammaires peuvent également simplement s’user avec le temps. Des études menées en laboratoire ont permis d’identifier certains
types de rupture des produits Mentor. Cependant, il n’est pas certain que ces études aient permis d’identifier toutes les causes de rupture. Ces
études en laboratoire se poursuivent pendant l’étude post-approbation.
Des renseignements supplémentaires sur l’innocuité ont également été obtenus à partir de l’étude réalisée par Sharpe/Collis au Royaume-Uni,
et des publications scientifiques, pour évaluer le taux de rupture à long terme et les conséquences de la rupture. Les publications sur le sujet,
qui renfermaient le plus de renseignements disponibles sur les conséquences d’une rupture, ont également servi à évaluer d’autres
complications potentiellement associées aux implants mammaires en gel de silicone. Vous trouverez les références des principales publications
dans le présent document.
Rupture – Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone
L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone portait sur 251 femmes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 60 femmes
ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Parmi les 251 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 134 ont participé à la sous-étude IRM
et 97 d’entre elles ont subi un dépistage IRM pour une rupture silencieuse au bout de quatre ans. Le taux de rupture était de 3,1 % chez les
patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire sur quatre ans. Il y avait 1 patiente avec rupture d’implant soupçonnée selon l’IRM, qui est
décédée. Dans le groupe de reconstruction, il y avait 2 patientes avec rupture d’implant soupçonnée selon l’IRM, qui ont appris au moment de
l’explantation que les implants étaient toujours intacts. Parmi les 60 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, 28 ont participé à la
sous-étude IRM et 18 ont subi un dépistage IRM. Le taux de rupture était de 0 % chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction
sur quatre ans. Aucun cas de rupture n’a été confirmé chez les patientes ne participant pas à la sous-étude IRM. L’étude de base sur les
implants ronds en gel de silicone est en cours; dix années de suivi sont prévues pour définir le taux de rupture à long terme des implants Mentor.
Des renseignements supplémentaires sur le taux d’incidence estimé d’une rupture d’implant MemoryGel® sont fournis par une série limitée de
données de suivi à long terme provenant d’une étude sur l’IRM menée par Sharpe et Collis au Royaume-Uni. Dans cette étude, les implants
texturés MemoryGel®, posés par un même médecin sous les glandes mammaires de 101 patientes suivies pendant 4 à 12 ans, ont été
examinés par IRM pour rechercher une rupture, avec confirmation par explantation. Les résultats ont montré qu’à 12 ans, le taux cumulé estimé
de ruptures silencieuses était de 15 % pour les patientes et de 9 % pour les implants. À 12 ans, le taux cumulé (estimation) par implant varie de
9 à 19 %. Par patiente, à 12 ans, le taux cumulé (estimation) varie de 15,1 à 24,5 %. Ces données coïncident avec celles d’une étude publiée
portant sur les ruptures, selon l’IRM, d’implants mammaires en gel de silicone de différents fabricants17.
Rupture – Étude de base sur les implants CPG
L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG portait sur 191 femmes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 68 femmes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction. Aucune rupture n’a été signalée dans la cohorte suivie ou non suivie par IRM, chez les patientes ayant subi la
reconstruction primaire ou de révision sur trois ans. Parmi les 191 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 74 ont participé à la sousétude IRM et 56 d’entre elles ont subi un dépistage IRM pour une rupture silencieuse au bout de deux ans. En ce qui concerne les patientes de
la cohorte IRM ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, le taux de rupture était de 0 % sur trois ans. Parmi les 68 patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction, 37 ont participé à la sous-étude IRM et 31 ont subi un dépistage IRM au bout de deux ans. Le taux de rupture chez
les 37 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction s’élevait à 0 % sur trois ans. L’étude de base sur les implants CPG est en cours; dix
années de suivi sont prévues pour définir le taux de rupture à long terme des implants Mentor.
Rupture – Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits
L’innocuité des implants ronds MemoryGel® et de Becker a été étudiée durant plus de 16 ans dans le cadre de l’étude clinique (complémentaire)
en cours sur la disponibilité des produits approuvée par la FDA aux États-Unis. Cette étude porte sur : 9 227 patientes ayant subi une
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 59 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
59
reconstruction primaire et 3 008 ayant subi une révision de reconstruction avec des implants de Becker; 57 828 patientes ayant subi une
reconstruction primaire et 18 941 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction avec des implants ronds MemoryGel®. Chaque patiente
est suivie pendant cinq ans.
Implant rond de Becker
Au bout de cinq ans, l’implant s’est rompu chez 8 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 10 % des patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction.
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Au bout de cinq ans, l’implant s’est rompu chez 3 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 5 % des patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction.
Conséquences d’une rupture d’implant sur la santé
En cas de rupture, le gel de silicone peut rester dans la capsule du tissu cicatriciel entourant l’implant (rupture intracapsulaire), s’épancher hors
de la capsule (rupture extracapsulaire) ou migrer vers des parties plus éloignées du corps (migration du gel). Aucun cas de rupture
extracapsulaire d’implants mammaires ronds ou CPG MemoryGel® de Mentor n’a été observé dans les études de base de Mentor sur les
implants ronds en gel de silicone ou sur les implants CPG, ni dans l’étude clinique de suivi limité à long terme menée par Sharpe et Collis au
Royaume-Uni et portant sur les prothèses MemoryGel® de Mentor.
Les études menées auprès de femmes danoises soumises à des IRM et portant des implants de fabricant et de modèle variés, ont révélé que
trois ruptures d’implants sur quatre sont de nature intracapsulaire, tandis qu’une rupture sur quatre est de nature extracapsulaire18. Les ruptures
extracapsulaires découlent surtout d’une capsulotomie fermée (consulter la rubrique AVERTISSEMENTS) ou d’un traumatisme de la région
thoracique. Par exemple, la fréquence de ruptures extracapsulaires était significativement plus élevée (14,7 %) chez les femmes danoises
soumises à une capsulotomie fermée, par rapport à celles n’ayant pas subi une telle intervention18. Dans le cadre d’une étude menée auprès de
femmes britanniques, on a observé chez l’une des patientes des siliconomes bilatéraux graves et des ruptures extracapsulaires bilatérales
importantes, à la suite d’une fracture au sternum causée par un accident de voiture19.
Une rupture intracapsulaire peut évoluer vers une rupture extracapsulaire, voire au-delà. Les études menées auprès de femmes danoises ont
montré qu’au cours d’une période de deux ans, environ 10 % des ruptures intracapsulaires ont évoluées en rupture extracapsulaire, selon
l’IRM20. Environ la moitié des femmes dont les ruptures d’implant sont passées d’intracapsulaires à extracapsulaires ont indiqué que le sein
affecté avait subi un traumatisme au cours de cette période ou qu’elles avaient procédé à une mammographie. Dans les autres cas, aucune
cause tangible n’a été évoquée. Chez les femmes atteintes d’une rupture extracapsulaire, la quantité de silicone épanchée en dehors de la
capsule de tissu cicatriciel sur 2 ans a augmenté chez environ 14 % de ces femmes. Ce type de problèmes n’est pas spécifique aux implants de
Mentor. En effet, ils sont associés à de nombreux modèles d’implants en silicone provenant de différents fabricants.
Les conséquences d’une rupture d’implant sur la santé n’ont pas été déterminées avec précision. De rares cas de migration du gel vers des
tissus environnants (tels que la paroi thoracique, l’aisselle ou la paroi abdominale supérieure) ou d’autres parties du corps plus éloignées (bras,
aine), ont été rapportés. Dans quelques cas, l’épanchement a endommagé un nerf, entraîné la formation de granulomes ou lésé des tissus en
contact direct avec le gel. On a signalé la présence de silicone dans le foie de patientes ayant des implants mammaires en silicone. On a
également signalé une migration du gel en silicone aux ganglions lymphatiques de l’aisselle entraînant une adénopathie, même chez les
femmes ne présentant aucun signe de rupture, comme expliqué plus loin21. Les femmes affectées avaient des implants de modèle et de
fabricant variés.
Les complications mammaires locales rapportées dans les publications scientifiques et associées à une rupture comprennent un durcissement
du sein, une modification du volume ou de la forme du sein et une douleur mammaire20. Ces symptômes ne sont pas propres à une rupture et
se manifestent également chez les femmes ayant une contracture capsulaire. La plupart des patientes danoises de ces études qui ont conservé
leurs implants endommagés pendant deux ans n’ont présenté aucun symptôme.
On s’est inquiété de savoir s’il existe une corrélation entre les ruptures d’implants et la manifestation d’affections rhumatismales ou du tissu
conjonctif, ou de symptômes comme la fatigue ou la fibromyalgie22,23,24,25. Bon nombre d’études épidémiologiques ont examiné plusieurs
groupes importants de femmes dont les implants mammaires sont de modèle et de fabricant variés. Ces études, dans l’ensemble, ne confirment
pas de lien entre la pose d’implants mammaires et un diagnostic de maladie rhumatismale26. À part une seule étude de moindre envergure24,
ces études n’ont pas pu déterminer si les implants mammaires des femmes étaient rompus ou intacts.
Le taux d’autoanticorps de 64 femmes danoises ayant au moins 1 implant rompu selon l’IRM a été observé et comparé à celui de 98 femmes
danoises ayant des implants intacts20. Des analyses sanguines ont été effectuées pour mesurer les anticorps antinucléaires, le facteur
rhumatoïde, ainsi que les anticorps anticardiolipines (immunoglobines G et M), utilisés pour déterminer la présence d’une maladie auto-immune.
Le taux d’autoanticorps des femmes avec une rupture d’implant n’augmente pas si on le compare à celui d’une femme dont les implants sont
intacts. Il n’augmente pas non plus chez les femmes dont la rupture est passée d’intracapsulaire à extracapsulaire sur une période de deux ans.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 60 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
60
11867-00
En réalité, plusieurs femmes ayant un taux mesurable d’un ou de plusieurs anticorps deux ans avant cette étude ne présentaient plus de taux
mesurables lors de l’examen suivant.
Lorsque des signes de ruptures sont observés par IRM (lignes sous-capsulaires, lignes caractéristiques plissées et ondulées, signe de la larme,
signe du trou de serrure ou signe en « C inversé ») ou si la patiente présente des signes ou des symptômes de rupture, vous devez retirer
l’implant ainsi que tout résidu de gel qui pourrait encore se trouver dans la patiente, et remplacer ou non l’implant. Il peut être également
nécessaire de retirer la capsule fibreuse et l’implant au moyen d’une intervention chirurgicale supplémentaire donnant lieu à des coûts
supplémentaires. Si votre patiente présente certains symptômes, comme un durcissement du sein, une modification du volume ou de la forme
du sein ou une douleur mammaire, vous devriez lui recommander de passer une IRM pour détecter une éventuelle rupture4,20.
• Contracture capsulaire
Le tissu cicatriciel (capsule) qui se forme normalement autour de l’implant peut se resserrer au fil du temps et exercer une pression sur l’implant,
le rendant plus ferme et provoquant une contracture capsulaire. Le risque de contracture capsulaire peut augmenter avec le temps. Elle est plus
fréquente suite à une infection, un hématome ou un sérome. La contracture capsulaire survient plus souvent lors d’une chirurgie de révision que
lors de l’implantation initiale. La contracture capsulaire est un facteur de risque non négligeable de rupture d’implant et constitue l’une des
causes principales de réintervention chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction.
Les symptômes de contracture capsulaire peuvent être variés. Cela va d’une légère dureté à des douleurs plus ou moins intenses, en passant
par une distorsion de la forme de l’implant et la palpabilité de l’implant (lorsqu’il peut être détecté au toucher). Selon la gravité, on distingue
quatre degrés de contracture capsulaire. Les niveaux III et IV de la classification de Baker sont considérés comme graves, souvent susceptibles
d’entraîner une intervention supplémentaire pour corriger la contracture :
Niveau I de la classification de Baker :
le sein est normalement lisse et d’apparence naturelle
Niveau II de la classification de Baker :
le sein est un peu ferme, mais a une apparence normale
Niveau III de la classification de Baker :
le sein est ferme et a une apparence anormale
Niveau IV de la classification de Baker :
le sein est dur, douloureux et a une apparence anormale
Contracture capsulaire – Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone
Dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone, le risque de contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV de la classification
de Baker s’élevait à 10,1 % sur quatre ans chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et à 19,7 % chez celles ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction.
Contracture capsulaire – Étude de base sur les implants CPG
Dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, le risque de contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV de la classification de Baker s’élevait
à 6 % sur trois ans chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et à 15,9 % chez celles ayant subi une révision de reconstruction.
Contracture capsulaire – Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits
Implant rond de Becker
Au bout de cinq ans, 12 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 13 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction
ont manifesté une contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de Baker.
Le pourcentage de contractures capsulaires dans les publications scientifiques pour les prothèses d’expansion/implants permanents en une
seule étape varie de 0 à 29 %2,7,8,10,11,12,16,27,28,29. Cela est comparable au taux de 10 à 29 % observé pour une reconstruction traditionnelle
en deux étapes avec expanseur tissulaire30,31.
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Au bout de cinq ans, 8 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 11 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction
ont manifesté une contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de Baker.
Les patientes doivent également être informées du fait qu’une intervention chirurgicale supplémentaire peut être nécessaire en cas de douleur
ou de fermeté excessives; selon les cas, le tissu fibreux de la capsule est retiré ou l’implant est retiré et éventuellement remplacé. Cette
intervention peut entraîner la perte de tissu mammaire. Il est possible que la contracture capsulaire réapparaisse après ces interventions
supplémentaires. La contracture capsulaire pourrait augmenter le risque de rupture4.
• Réintervention
La patiente doit être consciente qu’elle devra probablement subir des interventions chirurgicales supplémentaires (réinterventions). Il arrive que
des patientes souhaitent modifier le volume ou le type de leurs implants, ce qui nécessite une réintervention. Elles peuvent également subir une
nouvelle intervention pour améliorer ou corriger le résultat.
Réintervention – Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone
Le taux de risque d’une réintervention effectuée au moins une fois en quatre ans était de 31,2 % chez les patientes ayant subi une
reconstruction primaire et de 32,8 % chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Une rupture, une contracture capsulaire, une
cicatrice hypertrophique (cicatrice irrégulière qui dépasse la surface de la peau), une asymétrie, une infection et le déplacement des implants,
ainsi que d’autres problèmes, peuvent nécessiter une intervention chirurgicale supplémentaire. Vous trouverez des tableaux sommaires dans la
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 61 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
61
rubrique relative à l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone. Ces tableaux décrivent les causes des réinterventions au
cours des quatre années suivant la pose des implants.
Réintervention – Étude de base sur les implants CPG
Le risque d’une réintervention effectuée au moins une fois en quatre ans était de 34,6 % chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction
primaire et de 24,3 % chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Une rupture, une contracture capsulaire, une cicatrice
hypertrophique (cicatrice irrégulière qui dépasse la surface de la peau), une asymétrie, une infection et le déplacement des implants, ainsi que
d’autres problèmes, peuvent nécessiter une intervention chirurgicale supplémentaire. Vous trouverez des tableaux sommaires dans la rubrique
relative à l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG. Ces tableaux décrivent les causes des réinterventions au cours des trois années
suivant la pose des implants.
Réintervention – Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits
Implant rond de Becker
Après cinq ans, 18 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 11 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont
subi une réintervention. En raison de la conception de l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits, les taux de réintervention ont
été calculés uniquement à partir des données d’intervention supplémentaires.
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Après cinq ans, 7 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 9 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont subi
une réintervention. En raison de la conception de l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits, les taux de réintervention ont été
calculés uniquement à partir des données d’intervention supplémentaires.
• Retrait des implants
Retrait d’implants – Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone
Parmi les 37 femmes (14,7 %) de la cohorte reconstruction primaire ayant subi une explantation, les raisons les plus fréquemment invoquées de
l’explantation au cours des trois ans étaient la modification du volume ou de la forme des seins à la demande de la patiente, une asymétrie et
une contracture capsulaire. Parmi les 10 femmes (16,7 %) de la cohorte révision de reconstruction ayant subi une explantation, les raisons les
plus fréquemment invoquées de l’explantation au cours des trois ans étaient une contracture capsulaire, une asymétrie, la modification du
volume ou de la forme des seins à la demande de la patiente, et une symmastie.
Retrait d’implants – Étude de base sur les implants CPG
Parmi les 26 femmes (13,6 %) de la cohorte reconstruction primaire ayant subi une explantation, les raisons les plus fréquemment invoquées de
l’explantation au cours des trois ans étaient l’asymétrie et la modification du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente. Parmi les 14 femmes
(20,6 %) de la cohorte révision de reconstruction ayant subi une explantation, les raisons les plus fréquemment invoquées de l’explantation au
cours des trois ans étaient l’asymétrie, le plissement et l’insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant.
Retrait des implants – Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits
Implant rond de Becker
Après cinq ans, 18 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 11 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont
fait retirer leur implant.
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Après cinq ans, 11 % des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 13 % des patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont
fait retirer leur implant.
Bien que la plupart des femmes décident de remplacer les implants à la suite de leur retrait, toutes ne le font pas. Si les patientes choisissent de
ne pas remplacer leurs implants, elles doivent savoir que les résultats esthétiques peuvent être difficiles à accepter, tels qu’un capitonnage, des
rides, des plis ou d’autres modifications esthétiques du sein inacceptables et éventuellement permanentes à la suite du retrait de l’implant.
Même si une patiente décide de remplacer ses implants, l’intervention peut entraîner une perte de tissu mammaire. De plus, le remplacement
d’un implant augmente le risque de complications futures pour la patiente. Par exemple, les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction avec
remplacement des implants courent deux fois plus de risques de subir une contracture capsulaire grave que lors de la pose initiale des implants.
Avant de prendre leur décision à l’égard de l’augmentation mammaire initiale, les patientes doivent envisager le risque de devoir remplacer leurs
implants et les conséquences qui s’y rattachent.
• Structure de l’orifice de remplissage
Un faible nombre de complications lié à la structure de l’orifice de remplissage a été signalé dans l’étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la
disponibilité des produits portant sur les implants de Becker, notamment la rupture du tube et du raccord lors du retrait, la migration de l’orifice
de remplissage, un écoulement, une gêne, une douleur ou une infection au site d’injection.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 62 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
62
11867-00
• Douleur
Suivant la pose d’implants, des douleurs plus ou moins fortes et d’une durée variable peuvent survenir. En outre, un volume, un placement, une
technique chirurgicale inappropriés ou une contracture capsulaire peuvent provoquer une douleur. Le chirurgien doit demander à sa patiente de
l’informer en cas de douleur importante ou persistante.
• Altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon et des seins
La sensibilité au niveau du mamelon et du sein peut augmenter ou diminuer après la pose de l’implant; elle disparaît généralement à la suite
d’une mastectomie totale, qui implique l’excision du mamelon, et risque de diminuer considérablement à la suite d’une mastectomie partielle. La
radiothérapie peut également diminuer considérablement la sensibilité dans le reste du sein ou la paroi thoracique. L’emplacement des
implants mammaires au moment de la reconstruction pourrait diminuer davantage la sensibilité de la peau et des tissus mammaires résiduels.
Les altérations peuvent aller d’une extrême sensibilité à une absence de sensibilité du mamelon ou du sein. Bien que certaines de ces
altérations puissent être temporaires, elles peuvent également être permanentes et avoir un effet sur la réaction sexuelle ou la capacité à allaiter
de la patiente.
• Infection
Une infection peut survenir à la suite de n’importe quelle intervention chirurgicale ou pose d’implant. La plupart des infections attribuables à une
intervention surviennent dans les jours ou la semaine qui suit l’opération. Cependant, une infection peut survenir n’importe quand après
l’intervention. En outre, les piercings au niveau des seins et des mamelons peuvent augmenter le risque d'infections. Il est plus difficile de traiter
l’infection d’un tissu avec implant que l’infection d’un tissu sans implant. Si l’infection ne répond pas aux antibiotiques, le retrait de l’implant
pourrait s’avérer nécessaire. Le remplacement de l’implant peut être effectué une fois l’infection résorbée. Comme dans le cas d’autres
interventions chirurgicales, quelques rares cas de syndrome de choc toxique ont été constatés suivant la pose d’implants. Ce syndrome engage
le pronostic vital. Les symptômes du syndrome de choc toxique comprennent l'apparition soudaine de fièvre, de vomissements, d’une diarrhée,
d’évanouissements, d’étourdissements ou d’éruptions cutanées ressemblant à un coup de soleil. En présence de ces symptômes, les patientes
doivent consulter immédiatement un médecin. Il établira un diagnostic et leur prescrira un traitement adéquat.
• Hématome/sérome
Un hématome est une accumulation de sang autour de l’implant, tandis qu’un sérome est une accumulation de liquide autour de l’implant. La
présence d’un hématome ou d’un sérome à la suite de l’intervention risque de causer une infection ou une contracture capsulaire. Les
symptômes d’un hématome ou d’un sérome peuvent consister en un gonflement, une douleur ou des ecchymoses. L’hématome ou le sérome
apparaît généralement peu de temps après l’intervention. Cependant, ils peuvent se manifester n’importe quand à la suite d’une blessure au
sein. Bien que le corps soit en mesure d’absorber de petits hématomes et séromes, une intervention pourrait s’avérer nécessaire dans certains
cas. Elle consiste habituellement à drainer la plaie, et parfois à poser un drain chirurgical provisoire dans la plaie pour assurer une guérison
complète. Ce drainage chirurgical risque de laisser une petite cicatrice. Le drainage peut provoquer une rupture de l’implant si ce dernier est
endommagé au cours de la procédure de drainage.
• Résultats insatisfaisants
Vous pourriez observer des résultats insatisfaisants, tels qu’un plissement, une asymétrie, un déplacement ou une migration de l’implant, un
volume incorrect, une palpabilité/visibilité de l’implant, une déformation de la cicatrice ou une cicatrice hypertrophique. Certains de ces résultats
peuvent provoquer une gêne. La pose d’implants mammaires peut ne pas corriger totalement une asymétrie préexistante. On pourrait vous
proposer une intervention chirurgicale de révision pour que vous soyez satisfaite des résultats, mais vous devrez alors prendre en compte des
facteurs supplémentaires et être consciente des risques encourus. Il est possible de minimiser des résultats insatisfaisants, sans garantie de
succès, grâce à une planification préopératoire minutieuse et une technique chirurgicale appropriée.
• Complications relatives à l’allaitement
Des difficultés d’allaitement peuvent survenir à la suite d’une chirurgie mammaire. Si vous avez recours à une approche périaréolaire, vous
courez davantage le risque d’avoir des difficultés à allaiter.
• Calcifications dans les tissus entourant l’implant
Des calcifications peuvent se former dans la capsule fibreuse entourant l’implant. Les symptômes peuvent être une douleur et une fermeté. Les
calcifications sont repérables à l’aide d’une mammographie et peuvent être interprétées à tort comme un cancer. Une biopsie ou un retrait de
l’implant peuvent donc être nécessaires pour différencier des calcifications d’un cancer. L’intervention supplémentaire visant à examiner ou à
exciser les calcifications peut endommager les implants. Les calcifications peuvent se produire chez les patientes ayant subi une réduction
mammaire, ayant développé un hématome et même chez les femmes n’ayant subi aucune chirurgie mammaire. Le risque de formation de
calcifications augmente considérablement avec l’âge.
• Extrusion
Une extrusion peut se produire lorsque la plaie n’a pas cicatrisé ou que le tissu mammaire qui recouvre les implants s’affaiblit. La radiothérapie
augmente les risques d’extrusion. L’extrusion donne lieu à une intervention supplémentaire et au retrait éventuel de l’implant, causant ainsi des
cicatrices supplémentaires ou une perte de tissus mammaires.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 63 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
63
• Nécrose
Une nécrose peut empêcher ou retarder la guérison de la plaie et exige une intervention correctrice pouvant causer des cicatrices
supplémentaires ou une perte de tissus mammaires. Le retrait de l’implant pourrait également s’avérer nécessaire. Les facteurs augmentant le
risque de nécrose sont l’infection, l’utilisation de stéroïdes, le tabagisme, la chimiothérapie, la radiothérapie, et la thermothérapie ou un
traitement par le froid trop extrêmes.
• Retard de cicatrisation
Le processus de cicatrisation pourrait être prolongé chez certaines patientes. L’usage du tabac pourrait entraver le processus de cicatrisation.
Un retard de cicatrisation pourrait accroître le risque d’infection, d’extrusion et de nécrose. La durée de cicatrisation varie selon le type
d’intervention chirurgicale et d’incision.
• Atrophie du tissu mammaire/déformation de la paroi thoracique
La pression de l’implant mammaire peut causer une atrophie du tissu mammaire (l’implant devient plus visible et plus palpable) et une
déformation de la paroi thoracique. Cela peut survenir alors que les implants sont en place ou suite au retrait des implants sans remplacement.
Ces deux événements indésirables peuvent nécessiter de nouvelles interventions chirurgicales ou entraîner un capitonnage ou des plis
mammaires inacceptables.
• Adénopathie
Des publications scientifiques ont lié l’adénopathie aux implants mammaires en gel de silicone aussi bien intacts que rompus. Les résultats
d’une étude révèlent des réactions tissulaires indésirables, des granulomes et la présence de silicone dans les ganglions lymphatiques de
l’aisselle de femmes ayant des implants mammaires intacts ou rompus21. Ces constatations ont été observées chez des femmes ayant des
implants de modèle et de fabricant variés.
Autres troubles rapportés
D’autres troubles ont été rapportés dans la littérature chez les femmes ayant des implants mammaires en gel de silicone. Bon nombre de ces
troubles ont fait l’objet d’études visant à déterminer s’ils étaient liés aux implants mammaires. Bien qu’aucune corrélation n’ait été établie entre
les implants mammaires et les troubles indiqués ci-après, vous devriez en prendre connaissance. De plus, il est possible que nous déterminions
à l’avenir d’autres risques, à présent inconnus, qui seraient associés aux implants mammaires. Les références ici citées comprennent des
données obtenues de patientes ayant subi une augmentation ou une reconstruction mammaire, et ayant des implants de modèle et de fabricant
variés.
• Affection du tissu conjonctif
Les affections du tissu conjonctif comprennent le lupus, la sclérodermie et l’arthrite rhumatoïde. La fibromyalgie est un trouble caractérisé par
des douleurs chroniques des muscles et des tissus mous entourant les articulations, accompagnées d’une sensibilité à des endroits précis du
corps. Ce trouble est souvent accompagné de fatigue. De nombreuses études épidémiologiques, publiées, se sont penchées sur les liens qui
pourraient exister entre la pose d’implants mammaires et les affections typiques ou définies du tissu conjonctif. La taille de l’étude exigée pour
écarter de façon concluante les faibles risques d’affections du tissu conjonctif (°‹2) chez les femmes ayant des implants en gel de silicone se
voudrait très importante4,23,24,25,32,33,34,35,36,37. Les études publiées révèlent, dans l’ensemble, qu’il n’existe pas de lien significatif entre les
implants mammaires et le risque de développer une affection typique ou définie du tissu conjonctif4,33,34,35. Ces études ne font pas la distinction
entre les femmes ayant des implants intacts et celles dont les implants se sont rompus. Une seule étude a comparé les diagnostics et les
symptômes des affections du tissu conjonctif chez les femmes ayant des implants intacts et chez celles ayant des implants endommagés par
une rupture silencieuse. Toutefois, l’étude était trop petite pour permettre d’écarter un faible risque24.
• Signes et symptômes des affections du tissu conjonctif
Des rapports ont également établi un lien entre la pose d’implants mammaires en silicone et plusieurs symptômes et signes rhumatismaux, tels
qu’une fatigue, un épuisement, des douleurs et des gonflements articulaires, des douleurs et des crampes musculaires, des fourmillements, des
engourdissements, une faiblesse et des éruptions cutanées. Les comités d’experts scientifiques et les rapports n’ont trouvé aucune preuve d’un
profil particulier de symptômes et de signes chez les femmes ayant des implants mammaires en gel de silicone4,22,38,39,40. La manifestation de
ces symptômes et signes rhumatismaux ne signifie pas nécessairement que la patiente est atteinte d’une affection du tissu conjonctif; cela dit,
vous devriez indiquer à votre patiente qu’elle peut présenter ces symptômes et signes à la suite d’une implantation mammaire. Si une patiente
présente une aggravation de ces signes ou symptômes, vous devriez l’orienter vers un rhumatologue pour déterminer s’ils sont attribuables à un
trouble du tissu conjonctif ou à une maladie auto-immune.
• Immunotoxicité
Aucune preuve scientifique n’a démontré que le silicone peut provoquer des réactions d’hypersensibilité chez l’homme. Toutefois, des tests
effectués sur des animaux ont indiqué que le gel de silicone pouvait avoir un effet adjuvant. Le mécanisme biologique et la signification clinique
de ces constatations observées dans des modèles animaux demeurent inconnus.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 64 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
64
11867-00
• Cancer
Cancer du sein – Les rapports médicaux indiquent que les patientes ayant des implants mammaires ne courent pas un plus grand risque de
développer le cancer du sein que celles n’ayant pas d’implant mammaire41,42,43,44,45. Certains rapports suggèrent que les implants mammaires
pourraient entraver le dépistage du cancer du sein par mammographie ou biopsie; cependant, d’autres rapports médicaux publiés indiquent que
les implants mammaires ne retardent pas sensiblement le dépistage du cancer du sein et n’affectent pas négativement la survie au cancer chez
les patientes ayant des implants mammaires41,45,46,47,48.
Cancer du cerveau – Une étude a révélé un nombre plus élevé de cancers du cerveau chez les femmes ayant des implants mammaires par
rapport à la population générale49. Cependant, le taux de cancer du cerveau n’était pas significativement plus élevé chez les femmes ayant des
implants mammaires que chez celles ayant subi d’autres types de chirurgies esthétiques. Un autre rapport publié récemment et qui porte sur
quatre études importantes auprès de femmes ayant subi une implantation esthétique a conclu que les données probantes ne confirment pas de
corrélation entre le cancer du cerveau et les implants mammaires50.
Cancer des voies respiratoires et du poumon – Une étude rapporte un taux accru de cancers des voies respiratoires/du poumon chez les
femmes ayant des implants mammaires49. D’autres études menées en Suède et au Danemark ont révélé qu’il est plus probable que les femmes
optant pour une augmentation mammaire soient fumeuses, par rapport aux femmes optant pour une réduction mammaire ou un autre type de
chirurgie esthétique51,52,53.
Cancer du col de l’utérus et de la vulve – Une étude rapporte un taux accru de cancers du col de l’utérus/de la vulve chez les femmes ayant des
implants mammaires49. La cause de cette augmentation reste inconnue.
Lymphomes, y compris le lymphome anaplasique à grandes cellules (ALCL) – Des renseignements tirés d’exposés de cas
publiés54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71 et d’un graphique d’observations rétrospectives suggèrent une corrélation possible entre
les implants mammaires et les très rares cas d’ALCL dans le sein. Ces constatations doivent être considérées comme « préliminaires et
hypothétiques »; elles ne sont pas suffisamment étayées pour conclure que les femmes porteuses d’implants mammaires sont susceptibles de
souffir d’ALCL et doivent donner lieu à des recherches plus approfondies71. Des cas d’ALCL dans le sein ont également été signalés chez des
femmes sans implant mammaire70,72. Une étude publiée72 ainsi que de récents comptes-rendus sur une recherche68 en cours indiquent que la
plupart des cas identifiés à ce jour, chez des patientes portant des implants mammaires, étaient des séromes tardifs. En présence de séromes
tardifs, la recherche en cours conseille d’effectuer une exploration ouverte avec capsulectomie totale et analyse pathologique (y compris une
immunohistochimie spécifique) pour éradiquer l’ALCL. Tous les résultats pertinents concernant des cas liés aux prothèses Mentor ont été portés
à la connaissance de Mentor (p. ex. temps d’évolution clinique, signes ou symptômes, analyse immunohistologique, type d’implant, texture,
antécédents de la patiente en matière d’implants, etc.)
Autres types de cancers – Une étude effectuée rapporte un taux accru de cancers de l’estomac et de leucémies chez les femmes ayant des
implants mammaires, par rapport à la population générale49. Cependant, en comparant ce taux à celui des femmes ayant subi d’autres types de
chirurgie esthétique, cette augmentation n’est pas significative.
• Maladies, signes et symptômes neurologiques
Certaines femmes portant des implants mammaires se sont plaintes de symptômes neurologiques (troubles de la vision, des sensations et de la
force musculaire, difficultés à marcher, problèmes d’équilibre, de concentration ou de mémoire) ou de maladies (sclérose en plaques) qui, selon
elles, pourraient être liés à leurs implants. Un groupe d’experts scientifiques a trouvé que les données probantes révélant un lien entre des
symptômes ou des maladies neurologiques et les implants mammaires étaient insuffisantes ou sans fondement4.
• Suicide
Plusieurs études ont observé un taux accru de suicides chez les femmes ayant des implants mammaires73,74,75,76. La raison de l’accroissement
observé est inconnue, mais on a constaté que les femmes ayant des implants mammaires avaient, avant l’intervention, un taux accru
d’hospitalisation attribuable à des causes psychiatriques, par rapport aux femmes ayant une réduction mammaire ou à la population générale
de femmes danoises74.
• Effets sur l’enfant
À l’heure actuelle, on ne sait pas si une petite quantité de silicone peut s’échapper de l’enveloppe de l’implant et s’infiltrer dans le lait maternel
lors de l’allaitement. Même s’il n’existe pas actuellement de méthode servant à évaluer de façon fiable le taux de silicone dans le lait maternel,
une étude mesurant les niveaux de silicone (à partir d’un de ses composants) n’a pas décelé de niveaux plus élevés de silicone dans le lait de
femmes ayant des implants en gel de silicone, par rapport au lait de femmes sans implant77.
En outre, des préoccupations ont été soulevées à l’égard des effets néfastes possibles sur les bébés de femmes ayant des implants. Deux
études ayant été menées chez l’homme ont constaté que le risque global d’anomalies congénitales n’est pas plus élevé chez les enfants nés
après que leur mère a eu recours à une implantation mammaire78,79. Bien qu’une troisième étude ait rapporté un faible poids à la naissance,
d’autres facteurs (par exemple, un faible poids de la mère avant la grossesse) auraient pu en être la cause80. L’auteur de cette étude propose
d’autres recherches axées sur la santé du nourrisson.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 65 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
65
• Conséquences éventuelles de fuite du gel sur la santé
Il a été déterminé que de petites quantités de platine (état d’oxydation égal à zéro) et de composants de silicone de faible poids moléculaire
peuvent diffuser (« suinter ») à partir de l’enveloppe intacte d’un implant4,81. Les études effectuées sur les implants restés implantés pendant
une période prolongée ont démontré qu’une telle fuite pourrait contribuer au développement d’une contracture capsulaire4 et d’une
adénopathie82. En revanche, d’autres données probantes contredisent le fait qu’une fuite de gel est un important facteur de contracture
capsulaire et autres complications locales. En effet, les taux de complications suivant la pose d’implants en gel de silicone sont semblables ou
inférieurs à ceux suivant la pose d’implants remplis de solution saline. Les implants mammaires remplis de solution saline ne contiennent pas de
gel de silicone et, par conséquent, la fuite de gel n’est pas un problème pour ce type de produits. De plus, des tests toxicologiques ont révélé
que le silicone utilisé dans les implants Mentor n’entraîne aucune réaction toxique lorsqu’il est administré en grande quantité à des animaux de
laboratoire. Il est aussi important de noter que les études rapportées dans la littérature ont démontré que la faible concentration de platine
contenue dans les implants mammaires affiche un état d’oxydation égal à zéro (le plus biocompatible)83. En outre, deux études distinctes
commanditées par Mentor ont démontré que la faible concentration de platine contenue dans ses implants mammaires est dans un état
d’oxydation égal à zéro (le plus biocompatible).
Mentor a effectué un test en laboratoire pour analyser les taux de silicone et de platine (utilisés dans le processus de fabrication) qui pourraient
passer à travers les implants intacts et s’infiltrer dans le corps. La méthode de test a été conçue pour simuler le mieux possible des conditions
dans l’organisme à proximité d’un implant intact. Les résultats indiquent que seuls le platine ainsi que les silicones de faible poids moléculaire,
D4, D5 et D6, ont fuit dans le sérum en quantités mesurables. Au total, 4,7 microgrammes de ces trois silicones de poids moléculaire faible ont
été décelés. Les niveaux de platine s’élevaient à 4,1 microgrammes au bout de 60 jours, délai après lequel un équilibre a été atteint, sans plus
de platine extrait de la prothèse. Plus de 99 % du platine et des silicones de faible poids moléculaire sont restés dans les implants. Globalement,
les données probantes disponibles indiquent que le taux extrêmement bas de fuites de gel d’un implant n’a aucune conséquence clinique.
• Autres facteurs à prendre en compte pour les prothèses d’expansion/implants mammaires MemoryGel® Siltex® de Becker
Complications liées à des facteurs de prédisposition
Une analyse des taux de complications et leur corrélation avec de possibles facteurs de prédisposition lors de l’utilisation de la prothèse
d’expansion/de l’implant mammaire de Becker chez 111 patientes (120 implants) a été menée par Camilleri et coll.12. L’étude portait sur des
patientes ayant subi une mastectomie (90), souffrant d’une asymétrie congénitale (16), d’une asymétrie acquise (3) ou d’une rupture d’implant
(2). Trente-sept patientes étaient de grosses fumeuses (> 20 cigarettes par jour) et 28 avaient déjà été traitées par radiothérapie adjuvante.
Les prothèses de Becker ont été placées en position rétro-pectorale (74), à l’aide d’un lambeau de grand dorsal (36) ou en position rétroglandulaire (10). Des analyses statistiques montrent qu’un fort tabagisme et une radiothérapie adjuvante préalable constituaient des facteurs de
prédisposition importants pour une nécrose cutanée (p y 0,05).
Une contracture capsulaire grave de niveau III ou IV selon la classification de Baker a été détectée chez 10 patientes (9 %) faisant l’objet d’un
suivi. Les auteurs ont attribué ce faible taux au processus d’expansion excessive, qui inhibe la fonction du myofibroblaste12. De plus, la vitesse
d’expansion et le degré d’expansion excessive n’ont pas eu de conséquence sur les taux de contracture capsulaire, similaires à ceux observés
lors d’une reconstruction en deux étapes14. Les auteurs ont conclu que la reconstruction mammaire à l’aide de la prothèse de Becker est une
solution fiable par rapport à d’autres méthodes de reconstruction, bien que le choix correct des patientes soit essentiel pour obtenir des résultats
satisfaisants.
Le rapport d’Eskenazi portant sur 14 ans de suivi de 322 reconstructions mammaires consécutives à l’aide des prothèses d’expansion/implants
Mentor de Becker et Spectrum a montré qu’il est possible de conserver la souplesse du sein même en cas de radiothérapie postopératoire15. La
solution pour conserver la souplesse d’un sein irradié est d’utiliser un long lambeau sans peau superflue et d’assurer un suivi rigoureux pendant
et après la chimiothérapie et la radiothérapie.
Eskenazi a également remarqué que les forces de mouvement et de gravité influencent fortement les résultats à court et à long terme15. La
prévision de ces forces doit être prise en compte pour parvenir à un résultat symétrique lors d’une reconstruction en une seule étape. Il s’agit ici
du facteur le plus difficile et le plus subtil qui influence la courbe d’apprentissage chirurgical de cette technique. L’importance de facteurs extrachirurgicaux peut donc jouer un rôle dans l’asymétrie de reconstructions en une seule étape. De plus, Eskenazi a remarqué qu’en choisissant
correctement le site d’incision pour la biopsie et en réalisant un débridement agressif et précoce des lambeaux, on disposait de suffisamment de
peau pour l’ensemble des reconstructions (aucun lambeau de grand dorsal n’est nécessaire). Cela montre que la planification préalable de
l’intervention, à la fois par le chirurgien généraliste et le plasticien dans le cas de reconstructions en une seule étape, peut fortement influencer
l’ampleur de l’intervention choisie et son résultat.
Reconstruction immédiate ou reconstruction différée – Complications
Une étude menée par Mandrekas et coll. a comparé les résultats de 19 reconstructions mammaires immédiates et de 25 reconstructions
mammaires différées à l’aide de prothèse d’expansion/implant (Cox-Uphoff, États-Unis). Toutes les patientes ont reçu un diagnostic de cancer
du sein étayé par une biopsie et traité à l’aide d’une mastectomie modifiée ou radicale. Des complications sont survenues dans les deux
groupes de patientes : au total, 15 patientes ont souffert de 16 complications. Lors du suivi à 12 mois, 16 % (3 patientes) du groupe de
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 66 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
66
11867-00
reconstruction immédiate et 28 % (7 patientes) du groupe de reconstruction différée ont subi une contracture capsulaire de niveau II à IV selon
la classification de Baker. Un test de Mantel-Haenszel a montré un résultat non significatif (p = 0,46), ce qui signifie que la gravité de la
contracture capsulaire, selon la classification de Baker, était similaire dans les deux groupes. Cette observation s’est limitée à ce petit
échantillon. Les auteurs affirment que si l’échantillon avait été plus large, la contracture capsulaire aurait été plus grave dans la cohorte
reconstruction différée. Au total, 7 des 19 patientes (37 %) ayant subi une reconstruction immédiate ont eu des complications, contre 9 des
25 patientes (36 %) dans le groupe de reconstruction différée. Le nombre d’années de suivi maximal de cette série était de sept ans; les auteurs
considèrent donc que les résultats esthétiques sont excellents.
ÉTUDE DE BASE DE MENTOR SUR LES IMPLANTS RONDS EN GEL DE SILICONE
L’innocuité et l’efficacité des implants ronds en gel de silicone de Mentor ont été étudiées au cours d’une étude clinique multicentrique ouverte,
dénommée étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone.
Des renseignements supplémentaires sur l’innocuité ont également été obtenus à partir de l’étude réalisée par Sharpe/Collis au Royaume-Uni,
et des publications scientifiques, pour évaluer le taux de rupture à long terme et les conséquences de la rupture pour ce produit. Les
publications sur le sujet, qui renfermaient le plus de renseignements disponibles sur les conséquences d’une rupture, ont également servi à
évaluer d’autres complications potentiellement associées aux implants mammaires en gel de silicone. Vous trouverez les références des
principales publications dans le présent document.
Les résultats de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone indiquent que le risque d’une quelconque complication
(y compris une réintervention) à un moment donné durant les quatre ans suivant l’implantation mammaire est de 52 % pour les patientes ayant
subi une reconstruction primaire et de 55 % pour les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Les renseignements fournis ci-après
expliquent en détail les complications et les bénéfices possibles de l’intervention pour vos patientes.
Conception de l’étude :
L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone est menée sur 10 ans pour évaluer l’innocuité et l’efficacité parmi les
patientes ayant subi une intervention d’augmentation ou de reconstruction, ou de révision (augmentation et reconstruction). L’étude de base de
Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone porte sur 1 008 patientes, dont 552 patientes ayant subi une augmentation primaire,
145 patientes ayant subi une révision d’augmentation, 251 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 60 patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction. Voici les données concernant le sous-ensemble de patientes ayant subi une reconstruction (reconstruction primaire
et révision de reconstruction).
Les antécédents médicaux des patientes ont été recueillis au début de l’étude. Le suivi des patientes s’effectue après six mois, puis tous les ans
pendant 10 ans. Les examens IRM destinés à détecter une rupture silencieuse chez un sous-ensemble de patientes sont planifiés au bout de 1,
2, 4, 6, 8 et 10 ans. Les évaluations de l’innocuité comprennent les taux de complications et de réintervention. Les évaluations de l’efficacité
comprennent des mesures de la satisfaction et de la qualité de vie des patientes. Les résultats obtenus au bout de quatre ans pour les patientes
ayant subi une reconstruction sont en cours d’analyse; l’étude se poursuit actuellement. Mentor mettra régulièrement à jour cette notice à
mesure que d’autres renseignements supplémentaires seront disponibles.
Enregistrement des patientes et profil démographique initial :
L’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone portait sur 251 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 60 ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction. Les taux de suivi au bout de quatre ans pour les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction et une révision de
reconstruction sont respectivement de 87 % et 77 %.
Cent trente quatre patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 28 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction font partie de la
cohorte IRM, ce qui signifie qu’elles sont soumises à des IRM pour le dépistage de rupture silencieuse au bout de 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 et 10 ans. À
l’heure actuelle, des IRM ont été effectuées au bout de 1, 2 et 4 ans, et les taux de suivi à 4 ans pour les cohortes IRM de reconstruction et de
révision de reconstruction étaient respectivement de 76 % et 64 %.
Caractéristiques démographiques de l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone :
Cohorte reconstruction
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 92 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 3 % d’origine afro-américaine et 5 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 45 ans et 69 % des patientes étaient mariées. Soixante-dix-neuf pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 93 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 3 % d’origine afro-américaine et 4 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 51 ans et 67 % des patientes étaient mariées. Soixante-quinze pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Concernant les facteurs chirurgicaux au début de l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone, chez les patientes ayant subi une
reconstruction primaire, les prothèses les plus fréquemment posées étaient des implants à surface texturée, le site d’incision le plus répandu
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 67 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
67
était la cicatrice de mastectomie et le site d’implantation le plus fréquent était l’implantation sous-musculaire. Chez les patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction, les prothèses les plus fréquemment posées étaient des implants à surface lisse, le site d’incision le plus répandu
était la cicatrice de mastectomie et le site d’implantation le plus fréquent était l’implantation sous-musculaire.
Résultats d’efficacité de l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone :
L’efficacité a été évaluée en fonction de la satisfaction et de la qualité de vie des patientes. L’évaluation effectuée pour mesurer le taux de
satisfaction était fondée sur une seule question : « La patiente subirait-elle de nouveau cette implantation mammaire? ». La qualité de vie a été
évaluée à l’aide de l’échelle d’estime de soi de Rosenberg, du questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle, de l’échelle Tennessee du
concept de soi, du questionnaire SF-36 et du questionnaire Functional Living Index of Cancer.
Patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire :
Parmi les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 155 (62 %) sur un total de 251 ont pris part à l’analyse du tour de poitrine à quatre
ans. Parmi ces 155 patientes, l’augmentation moyenne du tour de poitrine était de 3,6 centimètres.
Au bout de quatre ans, 189 (75 %) des 251 patientes participantes ont répondu à la question de satisfaction. Sur ces 189 patientes, 185 (98 %)
ont déclaré à leur chirurgien être prêtes à subir de nouveau cette intervention.
Quant à la qualité de vie quatre ans après la reconstruction primaire, aucun changement n’a été noté selon l’échelle d’estime de soi de
Rosenberg ou le Functional Living Index of Cancer. L’échelle Tennessee du concept de soi est un sondage auquel la patiente doit répondre afin
d’évaluer l’image qu’elle a d’elle-même, ainsi que ce qu’elle fait, aime et ressent. Aucun changement n’a été observé dans le score global de
cette échelle. Aucun changement n’a été observé dans le score global du questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle. Le score concernant
la poitrine sur le questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle s’est considérablement amélioré. Le questionnaire SF-36 englobe des
échelles mesurant la santé mentale et physique. Sept des dix scores SF-36 étaient similaires avant et après l’intervention. Après avoir pris en
compte les effets du vieillissement, aucun des dix scores n’a révélé un changement moyen global significatif par rapport aux scores en début
d’étude.
Patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction :
Parmi les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, 36 (60 %) sur un total de 60 ont pris part à l’analyse du tour de poitrine à quatre
ans. Parmi ces patientes, l’augmentation moyenne du tour de poitrine était de 3,8 centimètres.
Au bout de quatre ans, 40 (67 %) des 60 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont répondu à la question de satisfaction. Sur ces
40 patientes, 37 (93 %) ont déclaré à leur chirurgien être prêtes à subir de nouveau cette intervention.
Quant à la qualité de vie quatre ans après la révision de reconstruction, aucun changement n’a été noté selon l’échelle d’estime de soi de
Rosenberg ou l’échelle Tennessee du concept de soi. Aucun changement significatif n’a été observé dans le score du questionnaire
d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle, après avoir pris en compte les effets du vieillissement. Le score de la sous-échelle d’attractivité sexuelle du
questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle s’est nettemment amélioré au fil du temps. Le questionnaire SF-36 englobe des échelles
mesurant la santé mentale et physique. Les scores de la plupart des dix échelles ont enregistré une baisse au fil du temps. Après avoir pris en
compte les effets du vieillissement, seuls deux des scores ont révélé des changements moyens globaux significatifs.
Résultats d’innocuité - Complications :
L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone d’une durée de dix ans se poursuit. Toutes les patientes disponibles pour
effectuer un suivi ont été examinées au bout de quatre ans. Les complications décelées dans la cohorte reconstruction primaire et révision de
reconstruction figurent dans les tableaux 1a et 1b ci-dessous. Remarque : les complications sont définies comme des événements indésirables
liés à la pose d’un implant mammaire, aux implants mammaires ou à la région mammaire ainsi qu’aux maladies polysystémiques.
TABLEAU 1a. Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone : taux cumulés sur quatre ans de risque d’événements
indésirables apparus pour la première fois selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour
le groupe de reconstruction primaire
N = 251 patientes
Principales complications
IC
Réintervention
31,2
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de Baker
10,1
6,8; 14,9
7,9
5,1; 12,1
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement par une prothèse d’étude
25,7; 37,6
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement par un matériel inconnu
1,1
0,3; 4,2
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
7,8
4,9; 12,4
Infection
6,2
3,8; 10,0
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 68 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
68
11867-00
3,1
Rupture1
Complications > 1 %2
1,0; 9,5
%
IC
Autre (non esthétique)3
8,3
5,3; 13,0
Asymétrie4
7,6
4,8; 12,0
Ptose
6,3
3,7; 10,7
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
6,3
3,9; 10,3
Sérome
4,8
2,8; 8,4
Masse dans le sein
4,1
2,2; 7,9
Plissement4
3,1
1,5; 6,6
Douleur mammaire4
2,2
0,9; 5,1
Cancer du sein récurrent5
2,2
0,9; 5,3
Altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon4
2,1
0,9; 5,1
Mauvaise position/déplacement de l’implant
2,1
0,9; 5,0
Maladie métastatique
1,8
0,7; 4,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II selon la classification de Baker avec intervention chirurgicale
1,8
0,7; 4,7
Extrusion (intact)
1,6
0,6; 4,3
Nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein
1,4
0,5; 4,4
Hématome
1,3
0,4; 3,9
Nouveau diagnostic d’une affection rhumatismale
1,1
0,3; 4,6
1 Dans le groupe de reconstruction, il y a eu 1 patiente avec rupture d’implant soupçonnée selon l’IRM, qui est décédée, et 2 patientes avec rupture d’implant
soupçonnée selon l’IRM, qui ont appris au moment de l’explantation que les implants étaient toujours intacts après quatre ans.
2
Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % : altérations de la sensibilité du sein, sensation de brûlure dans le mamelon, contracture
capsulaire suite à une radiothérapie, thrombose veineuse profonde, retard de cicatrisation, métastases distantes (sternum, dos et foie), distorsion de la forme du sein
sans lien avec une contracture capsulaire, cicatrices vicieuses à la suite d’une mastectomie, blessure externe sans lien avec l’implant mammaire, perte d’ampleur, perte
de définition du pli inframammaire, adénopathie, spasmes musculaires, nécrose, complications au niveau du mamelon, sensation occasionnelle de brûlure cutanée,
éruption cutanée, rougeur, lésion cutanée, abcès de la suture, complications chirurgicales reliées à la technique, suture « Benelli » serrée et larges cicatrices.
3 Toute complication autre que la ptose, la cicatrisation hypertrophique, l’asymétrie ou le plissement.
4
Les complications bénignes ont été exclues.
5 Le taux de récurrence générale du cancer du sein rapporté dans la documentation médicale est compris entre 5 et 25 %85,86,87.
TABLEAU 1b. Étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone : taux cumulés sur quatre ans de risque d’événements
indésirables selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de
reprise-reconstruction
N = 60 patientes
Principales complications
%
IC
Réintervention
32,8
22,2; 46,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV
19,7
11,4; 32,9
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement par une prothèse d’étude
8,6
3,7; 19,4
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement par un matériel inconnu
2,3
0,3; 15,4
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
7,9
2,9; 20,2
Infection
0
-
Rupture
0
-
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 69 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
69
Complications > 1 %
Asymétrie2
%
IC
13,2
6,4; 26,1
Ptose
7,3
2,8; 18,5
Plissement2
6,9
2,6; 17,3
Masse dans le sein
5,2
1,7; 15,3
Mauvaise position/déplacement de l’implant
5,1
1,7; 15,0
Granulome
5,0
1,6; 14,7
Complications chirurgicales reliées à la technique
5,1
1,7; 15,1
Altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon2
3,9
1,0; 14,9
Douleur mammaire2
3,4
0,9; 12,9
Hématome
3,4
0,9; 13,0
Nouveau diagnostic d’une affection rhumatismale
3,4
0,9; 12,9
Symmastie
3,4
0,9; 12,8
Cicatrice rétractée
2,4
0,4; 16,1
Douleur
2,0
0,3; 13,6
Blessure secondaire lors d’un mouvement
1,9
0,3; 12,7
Altérations de la sensibilité du sein
1,9
0,3; 12,4
Manque de projection
1,9
0,3; 12,9
Perte de définition du pli
1,9
0,3; 12,4
Intervention non prévue liée au mamelon
1,8
0,3; 11,8
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
1,8
0,3; 11,8
Engourdissement des deux mains pendant la nuit
1,8
0,3; 11,8
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II avec intervention chirurgicale
1,8
0,3; 11,8
Irritation des cicatrices mammaires
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Sérome
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Inflammation
1,7
0,2; 11,4
Cancer du sein récurrent
1,7
0,2; 11,4
Nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein
1,7
0,2; 11,4
Retard de cicatrisation
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Blessure externe sans lien avec l’implant mammaire
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Déchirure de la capsule
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Extrusion (intact)
1,7
0,2; 11,3
Kyste folliculaire
1,7
0,2; 11,4
1 Aucune complication ne s’est manifestée à un taux < 1 %.
2
Les complications bénignes ont été exclues.
Résultats d’innocuité – Principales raisons de la réintervention :
Ce chapitre aborde les principales raisons de la réintervention. Les pourcentages ne prennent pas en compte les interventions et les
réinterventions secondaires planifiées. Si plusieurs raisons de réintervention ont été indiquées, la hiérarchie établie était : rupture/dégonflement,
infection, contracture capsulaire, nécrose/extrusion, hématome/sérome, retard de cicatrisation, douleur mammaire, mauvaise position de
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 70 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
70
11867-00
l’implant, plissement, palpabilité/visibilité, asymétrie, ptose, cicatrisation, complications au niveau du mamelon, blessure due à la prothèse/
blessure iatrogène, masse cancéreuse dans le sein, biopsie, et modification de la forme et du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente.
166 interventions chirurgicales supplémentaires ont été effectuées lors de 92 réinterventions sur 75 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction
primaire. L’asymétrie (20 % des 92 réinterventions) constituait la principale raison des réinterventions exécutées au cours des quatre ans. Le
tableau 2a ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons des réinterventions (après la pose initiale de l’implant) effectuées au cours des quatre ans
chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire.
TABLEAU 2a. Principales raisons de la réintervention au cours des quatre ans pour le groupe ayant subi une
reconstruction primaire
Raison de la réintervention
n
% (sur 92 réinterventions)
Asymétrie
18
Biopsie
13
14,1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II, III, IV selon la classification de Baker
14
15,2
Mauvaise position de l’implant
Modification de la forme ou du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente
19,6
8
8,7
11
12,0
Infection
4
4,3
Cicatrisation/cicatrisation hypertrophique
5
5,4
Ptose mammaire (affaissement)
3
3,3
Hématome/sérome
3
3,3
Cancer du sein
4
4,3
Extrusion d’implant intact
2
2,2
Retard de cicatrisation
1
1,1
Douleur mammaire
3
3,3
Palpabilité ou visibilité de l’implant
1
1,1
Spasmes musculaires
1
1,1
Perte d’ampleur
1
1,1
92
100
Total
59 interventions chirurgicales supplémentaires ont été effectuées lors de 28 réinterventions sur 19 patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction. La biopsie (29 % des 28 réinterventions) constituait la principale raison des réinterventions exécutées au cours des quatre ans.
Le tableau 2b ci-dessous illustre la principale raison de chaque réintervention (après la pose initiale de l’implant) effectuée au cours des quatre
ans chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction.
TABLEAU 2b. Principales raisons de la réintervention au cours des quatre ans pour le groupe ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction
Raison de la réintervention
n
% (sur 28 réinterventions)
Biopsie
8
28,6
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de Baker
4
14,3
Mauvaise position de l’implant
2
7,1
Ptose mammaire (affaissement)
2
‘7,1
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
2
7,1
Rupture soupçonnée1
1
3,6
Asymétrie
1
3,6
Cancer du sein
1
3,6
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 71 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
71
Extrusion d’implant intact
1
Hématome/sérome
1
3,6
3,6
Modification de la forme ou du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente
1
3,6
Douleur mammaire
1
3,6
Plissement
1
3,6
Déchirure de la capsule
1
3,6
Nodule palpable
1
3,6
28
100
Total
1 L’implant retiré était intact (non rompu).
Résultats d’innocuité – Raisons du retrait de l’implant :
Le tableau 3a ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons du retrait de l’implant observées dans l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de
silicone au cours des quatre ans, chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire. Parmi les 251 patientes ayant subi une
reconstruction primaire, 37 (15 %) se sont fait retirer 50 implants au cours des quatre ans de suivi dans le cadre de l’étude de base sur les
implants ronds en gel de silicone. Sur les 50 implants de reconstruction primaire retirés, 25 (50 %) ont été remplacés. La plupart des retraits
d’implants chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire ont été effectués à la demande de la patiente (36 % des 50 retraits d’implants).
TABLEAU 3a. Principales raisons du retrait de l’implant au cours des quatre ans pour le groupe ayant subi une reconstruction primaire
Raison du retrait
n
% (sur 50 retraits)
Modification de la forme ou du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente
18
36,0
Asymétrie
11
22,0
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II, III, IV selon la classification de Baker
7
14,0
Mauvaise position de l’implant
3
6,0
Douleur mammaire
2
4,0
Extrusion d’implant intact
2
4,0
Infection
2
4,0
Hématome
1
2,0
Manque de projection
1
2,0
Spasmes musculaires
1
2,0
Cancer du sein récurrent
1
2,0
Ptose
1
2,0
Total
50
100
Le tableau 3b ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons du retrait de l’implant observées dans l’étude de base sur les implants ronds en gel de
silicone au cours des quatre ans, chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Parmi les 60 patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction, 10 (17 %) se sont fait retirer 13 implants au cours des quatre ans de suivi dans le cadre de l’étude de base sur les implants ronds
en gel de silicone. Sur les 13 implants retirés, 7 (54 %) ont été remplacés. Une contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de
Baker constituait la principale raison du retrait des implants (31 % des 13 retraits d’implants) chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 72 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
72
11867-00
TABLEAU 3b. Principales raisons du retrait de l’implant au cours des quatre ans pour le groupe ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction
Raison du retrait
n
% (sur 13 retraits)
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la classification de Baker
4
Asymétrie
2
15,4
Modification de la forme ou du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente
2
15,4
Symmastie
2
15,4
Douleur mammaire
1
7,7
Extrusion d’implants intacts
1
7,7
Déchirure de la cavité
Total
30,8
1
7,7
13
100
Autres résultats cliniques
Vous trouverez ci-dessous un sommaire des résultats cliniques de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone,
concernant les affections du tissu conjonctif et les signes et symptômes liés, le cancer, les complications liées à la lactation et à la reproduction,
et le suicide. Mentor mène une étude post-approbation sur dix ans afin de mieux évaluer ces problèmes, parmi d’autres, qui pourraient survenir
chez les patientes concernées.
Diagnostics des affections du tissu conjonctif
Dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone, un rhumatologue a diagnostiqué une nouvelle affection du tissu
conjonctif chez deux patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et deux autres ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Ces diagnostics
correspondaient à deux cas de fibromyalgie à un an, un cas de pyoderma gangrenosum à un an et un cas de névrome de Morton à trois ans.
Ces données doivent être interprétées avec précaution, étant donné qu’aucun groupe de comparaison similaire de femmes sans implants
mammaires n’a été observé.
Signes et symptômes des affections du tissu conjonctif
On a recueilli des données sur les symptômes et signes rapportés par plus de 100 patientes, dont 50 ayant précisé des symptômes
rhumatismaux. En établissant un lien de comparaison avant la pose des implants, on a constaté une augmentation significative des symptômes
de douleur articulaire et de crampes musculaires fréquentes chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction mammaire primaire, ainsi qu’une
augmentation de douleur combinée chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Ces augmentations ne sont pas liées au
simple vieillissement. L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone n’avait pas pour objectif d’évaluer les relations de
cause à effet, puisqu'aucun groupe de comparaison de femmes sans implant n’a été observé, et que d’autres facteurs, tels que la prise de
médicaments et le style de vie/conditionnement physique n’ont pas été pris en compte. Par conséquent, le lien entre la présence des implants et
l’augmentation de ces symptômes n’a pas pu être déterminé. Votre patiente doit néanmoins être consciente du fait qu’une augmentation de ces
symptômes pourrait se manifester après la pose des implants.
Cancer
Parmi les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 3 patientes (1,2 %) se sont vues poser un nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein et
5 patientes (2 %) ont été victimes d’une récidive du cancer du sein. Parmi les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, une patiente
(1,7 %) s’est vue poser un nouveau diagnostic du cancer du sein et une patiente (1,7 %) a subi une récidive du cancer du sein. Aucun autre
cancer, tel qu’un cancer du cerveau, des voies respiratoires, du col de l’utérus ou de la vulve, n’a été signalé dans aucun rapport.
Complications liées à la lactation
La seule patiente (0,4 %) ayant subi une reconstruction primaire qui a tenté d’allaiter n’a éprouvé aucune difficulté de lactation. Parmi les
patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, aucune patiente n’a tenté d’allaiter.
Complications liées à la reproduction
Parmi les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 4 patientes (1,6 %) ont été victimes d’une fausse couche. Aucune fausse couche n’a
été signalée parmi les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction.
Suicide
Aucun suicide n’a été déclaré au cours des quatre ans dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants ronds en gel de silicone..
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 73 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
73
ÉTUDE DE BASE DE MENTOR SUR LES IMPLANTS ANATOMIQUES (CPG) (ÉTUDE DE BASE SUR LES IMPLANTS CPG)
L’innocuité et l’efficacité de l’implant mammaire anatomique (CPG) MemoryGel® de Mentor ont été étudiées au cours d’une étude clinique
multicentrique ouverte, dénommée étude de base sur les implants CPG.
Des renseignements supplémentaires sur l’innocuité ont également été obtenus à partir des publications scientifiques, pour évaluer le taux de
rupture à long terme de ces implants et les conséquences d’une telle rupture. Les publications sur le sujet, qui offraient le plus de
renseignements sur les conséquences d’une rupture, ont également servi à évaluer d’autres complications probables associées aux implants
ronds en gel de silicone et aux implants CPG. Vous trouverez les références des principales publications dans le présent document.
Les résultats de l’étude de base sur les implants CPG indiquent que le risque d’une quelconque complication ou réintervention à un moment
donné durant les trois ans suivant l’implantation mammaire est de 48 % pour les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et de 51 %
pour les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Les renseignements fournis ci-après expliquent en détail les complications et les
bénéfices possibles de l’intervention pour vos patientes.
Conception de l’étude :
L’étude de base sur les implants CPG a été menée sur 10 ans pour évaluer l'innocuité et l’efficacité de ces implants chez les patientes ayant
subi une intervention d'augmentation ou de reconstruction, ou de révision (augmentation et reconstruction). L’étude de base sur les implants
CPG portait sur 955 patientes, y compris 572 patientes ayant subi une augmentation, 124 patientes ayant subi une révision d’augmentation, 191
patientes ayant subi une reconstruction et 68 ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Voici les données concernant le sous-ensemble de
patientes ayant subi une reconstruction (reconstruction primaire et révision de reconstruction).
Les antécédents médicaux des patientes ont été recueillis au début de l’étude. Le suivi des patientes s’effectue après 10 semaines, puis tous
les ans pendant 10 ans. Les examens IRM destinés à détecter une rupture silencieuse chez un sous-ensemble de patientes sont planifiés au
bout de 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 et 10 ans. Les évaluations de l’innocuité comprennent les taux de complications et de réintervention. Les évaluations de
l’efficacité comprennent des mesures de la satisfaction et de la qualité de vie des patientes. Les résultats obtenus au bout de trois ans sont en
cours d’analyse; l’étude se poursuit actuellement. Mentor mettra régulièrement à jour cette notice à mesure que d’autres renseignements seront
disponibles.
Enregistrement des patientes et profil démographique initial :
L’étude de base sur les implants CPG portait sur 191 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction et 68 patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction. Les taux de suivi au bout de trois ans pour les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction et une révision de reconstruction étaient
respectivement de 90 % et 89 %.
Soixante-quatorze patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 37 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction font partie de la
cohorte IRM, ce qui signifie qu’elles sont soumises à des IRM pour le dépistage de rupture silencieuse au bout de 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 et 10 ans. À
l’heure actuelle, des IRM ont été réalisées au bout de 1 et 2 ans, et les taux de suivi à 2 ans pour les cohortes IRM de reconstruction primaire et
de révision de reconstruction étaient respectivement de 81 % et 86 %.
Caractéristiques démographiques de l’étude sur les implants CPG :
Cohorte reconstruction
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 94 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 5 % d’origine afro-américaine et 1 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 48 ans et 76 % des patientes étaient mariées. Quatre-vingt-trois pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 97 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 2 % d’origine afro-américaine et 1 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 53 ans et 69 % des patientes étaient mariées. Quatre-vingt-un pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
En ce qui concerne les facteurs chirurgicaux au début de l’étude de base sur les implants CPG, le site d’incision le plus répandu était la cicatrice
de mastectomie et le site d’implantation le plus fréquent était l’implantation sous-musculaire, qu’il s’agisse d’une reconstruction primaire, ou
d’une révision de reconstruction.
Résultats d’efficacité de l’étude de base sur les implants CPG :
L’efficacité a été évaluée en fonction de la satisfaction de la patiente, de l’image qu’elle a de son corps et de son estime de soi. L’évaluation
effectuée par Mentor pour mesurer le taux de satisfaction était fondée sur une seule question : « La patiente subirait-elle de nouveau cette
implantation mammaire? ». Les critères de l’image du corps et de l’estime de soi ont été évalués à l’aide de l’échelle d’estime de soi de
Rosenberg, du questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle, de l’échelle Tennessee du concept de soi, du questionnaire SF-36 et du
questionnaire d’évaluation des seins (BEQ).
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 74 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
74
11867-00
Patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire : parmi les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 150 (79 %) sur un total de
191 ont pris part à l’analyse du tour de poitrine à trois ans. Parmi ces 150 patientes, l’augmentation moyenne du tour de poitrine était de
0,8 centimètre, indiquant le rétablissement du monticule mammaire.
L’évaluation effectuée par Mentor pour mesurer le taux de satisfaction était fondée sur une seule question : « La patiente subirait-elle de
nouveau cette implantation mammaire? ». Après trois ans, 158 (83 %) des 191 patientes participantes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire
ont répondu à cette question. Sur ces 158 patientes, 148 (94 %) ont déclaré à leur chirurgien être prêtes à subir de nouveau cette intervention.
Concernant la qualité de vie trois ans après la reconstruction primaire, aucun changement n’a été noté sur l’échelle d’estime de soi de
Rosenberg ou dans le score global du questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle. Cependant, le score concernant la poitrine sur le
questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle s’est considérablement amélioré. Le questionnaire SF-36 englobe des échelles mesurant la
santé mentale et physique. Les scores obtenus sur les échelles d’évaluation du fonctionnement physique, de la santé mentale et de la vitalité se
sont considérablement améliorés. Le questionnaire d’évaluation des seins (BEQ) a été mis au point pour évaluer la satisfaction et la qualité de
vie des patientes ayant subi une intervention mammaire. Lorsqu’on a demandé aux patientes si elles étaient satisfaites de l’apparence générale
de leurs seins, la grande majorité de celles ayant subi une reconstruction primaire (75,3 %) a affirmé être très satisfaite ou moyennement
satisfaite des résultats. Chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, on a pu constater une amélioration considérable des trois
facteurs suivants : 1) bien-être lorsque partiellement habillée; 2) bien-être lorsque complètement habillée; 3) satisfaction relative à l’apparence
des seins.
Patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction : parmi les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, 51 (75 %) sur un total de
68 ont pris part à l’analyse du tour de poitrine à trois ans. Parmi ces patientes, l’augmentation moyenne du tour de poitrine était de
0,8 centimètre.
L’évaluation effectuée par Mentor pour mesurer le taux de satisfaction était fondée sur une seule question : « La patiente subirait-elle de
nouveau cette implantation mammaire? » Après trois ans, 51 (75 %) des 68 patientes participantes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction ont
répondu à la question. Sur ces 51 patientes, 48 (94 %) ont déclaré à leur chirurgien être prêtes à subir de nouveau cette intervention.
Concernant la qualité de vie trois ans après la révision de reconstruction, aucun changement n’a été noté sur l’échelle d’estime de soi de
Rosenberg, l’échelle SF-36 ou dans le score global du questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle. Cependant, le score concernant la
poitrine sur le questionnaire d’évaluation de l’estime corporelle s’est considérablement amélioré avec le temps. Lorsqu’on a demandé aux
patientes si elles étaient satisfaites de l’apparence générale de leurs seins, la grande majorité de celles ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction (60,3 %) a affirmé être très satisfaite ou moyennement satisfaite des résultats. Chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction, on a pu constater une amélioration considérable des trois facteurs suivants : 1) bien-être lorsque partiellement habillée;
2) bien-être lorsque complètement habillée; 3) satisfaction relative à l’apparence des seins.
Résultats d’innocuité – Complications :
L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, d’une durée de dix ans, se poursuit. Les complications décelées dans les cohortes
reconstruction et révision de reconstruction figurent dans les tableaux 4a et 4b ci-dessous. Remarque : les complications sont définies comme
des événements indésirables liés à la pose de l’implant mammaire, aux implants mammaires ou à la région mammaire, ainsi qu’aux maladies
polysystémiques.
TABLEAU 4a. Étude de base sur les implants CPG : taux cumulés sur trois ans de risque d’événements indésirables apparus pour la
première fois selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de reconstruction primaire
N = 191 patientes
Principales complications
%
IC
Toute réintervention
34,6
28,2; 42,0
Retrait sans remplacement
7,9
4,8; 13,1
Retrait et remplacement par une prothèse d’étude
6,6
3,8; 11,4
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III et IV selon la classification de Baker
6,0
3,3; 11,0
Infection
2,2
0,8; 5,8
Rotation de l’implant
3,5
1,6; 7,6
0
-
Rupture
Complications non esthétiques = 1 %1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III selon la classification de Baker
5,0
2,5; 9,9
Manque de projection
4,6
2,3; 9,1
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 75 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
75
Excès de tissu
3,3
1,5; 7,2
Sérome
2,7
1,1; 6,4
Irritation/inflammation
2,7
1,1; 6,3
Altérations de la sensibilité du mamelon2
2,3
0,9; 6,1
Cicatrisation
2,3
0,9; 5,9
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
2,2
0,8; 5,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II selon la classification de Baker avec intervention
chirurgicale
1,7
0,6; 5,3
Cancer du sein récurrent
1,7
0,5; 5,1
Douleur mammaire2
1,7
0,5; 5,0
Contracture capsulaire de niveau IV selon la classification de Baker
1,6
0,5; 4,9
Masse/kyste
1,5
0,4; 6,0
Nouveau diagnostic d’une affection rhumatismale
1,1
0,3; 4,4
Perte de définition du pli inframammaire
1,1
0,3; 4,3
Retard de cicatrisation2
1,0
0,3; 4,1
1 Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % :
masse dans le sein/kyste mammaire sans lien avec l’implant mammaire, altérations de la sensibilité du sein, blessure externe sans lien avec les implants mammaires,
maladie métastatique, nécrose, complication au niveau du mamelon, insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant, cloques cutanées, lésion cutanée, complication de la
suture, œdème excessif, tension de la peau recouvrant l’implant, déhiscence de la plaie et démangeaison au niveau de la plaie.
2 Les complications bénignes ont été exclues.
TABLEAU 4b. Étude de base sur les implants CPG : taux cumulés sur trois ans de risque d’événements indésirables selon la
méthode de Kaplan-Meier (’intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de révision de reconstruction
N = 68 patientes
Principales complications
%
IC
Toute réintervention
24,3
15,7; 36,7
Retrait sans remplacement
17,6
10,1; 29,5
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III et IV selon la classification de Baker
15,9
8,5; 28,9
Retrait et remplacement par une prothèse d’étude
4,4
1,4; 13,1
Infection
3,0
0,8; 11,4
Rotation de l’implant
1,5
0,2; 10,4
0
-
Rupture
Complications non esthétiques = 1 %1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III selon la classification de Baker
15,9
8,5; 28,9
Manque de projection
12,7
6,2; 25,1
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
6,3
2,4; 15,9
Insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant2
5,0
1,6; 14,8
Sérome
4,6
1,5; 13,5
Palpabilité de l’implant2
4,2
1,0; 16,1
Irritation/inflammation
3,0
0,8; 11,3
Douleur mammaire2
1,9
0,3; 12,9
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 76 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
76
11867-00
Excès de tissu
1,6
0,2; 11,1
Maladie métastatique
1,6
0,2; 10,9
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II selon la classification de Baker avec intervention
chirurgicale
1,5
0,2; 10,4
Paresthésie cutanée
1,5
0,2; 10,4
Tension de la peau recouvrant l’implant
1,5
0,2; 10,4
Cancer du sein récurrent
1,5
0,2; 10,3
Cicatrisation
1,5
0,2; 10,3
Atrophie du muscle pectoral
1,5
0,2; 10,1
Hématome
1,5
0,2; 10,0
Œdème excessif
1,5
0,2; 10,0
Érythème
1,5
0,2; 10,0
Perte de définition du pli inframammaire
1,5
0,2; 10,0
1 Aucune complication ne s’est manifestée à un taux < 1 %.
2
Les complications bénignes ont été exclues.
Résultats d’innocuité – Principales raisons de la réintervention :
Ce chapitre aborde les principales raisons de la réintervention. Les pourcentages ne prennent pas en compte les interventions et les
réinterventions secondaires planifiées. Si plusieurs raisons de réintervention ont été indiquées, la hiérarchie établie était : rupture/dégonflement,
rupture soupçonnée, infection, granulome, irritation/inflammation, contracture capsulaire de niveau II selon la classification de Baker avec
intervention chirurgicale, contracture capsulaire de niveau III selon la classification de Baker, contracture capsulaire de niveau IV selon la
classification de Baker, contracture capsulaire, extrusion, extrusion/nécrose, hématome, hématome/sérome, sérome, retard de cicatrisation,
déhiscence de la plaie, douleur mammaire, douleur mammaire non associée à une autre complication, mauvaise position de l’implant,
déplacement de l’implant, rotation de l’implant, plissement, palpabilité/visibilité de l’implant, asymétrie, ptose, cicatrice hypertrophique, cicatrice,
complication au niveau du mamelon, complications au niveau du mamelon, blessure due à la prothèse/blessure iatrogène, cancer du sein,
nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein, nouveau diagnostic d’affection rhumatismale (préciser lorsque cela s’avère nécessaire), masse dans le
sein/kyste mammaire sans lien avec l’implant mammaire, masse dans le sein/kyste mammaire, calcification, biopsie, insatisfaction de la
patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins, modification de la forme et du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente, insatisfaction
quant à la position de l’implant, modification du volume à la demande de la patiente, modification du volume du sein sur évaluation médicale
seulement, manque de projection, excès de tissu, perte de définition du pli inframmamaire ou autre.
126 interventions chirurgicales supplémentaires ont été effectuées lors de 73 réinterventions sur 64 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction
primaire. L’asymétrie (12 % des 73 réinterventions) constituait la principale raison des réinterventions exécutées au cours des trois ans. Le
tableau 5a ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons des réinterventions (après la pose initiale de l’implant) effectuées au cours des trois ans
chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire.
TABLEAU 5a. Principales raisons de la réintervention au cours des trois ans pour la cohorte ayant subi une reconstruction primaire
Raison de la réintervention
% (sur 73
réinterventions)
n
Asymétrie
9
Excès de tissu
7
12,3
9,6
Insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant
6
8,2
Cicatrisation
4
5,5
Modification du volume du sein à la demande de la patiente
4
5,5
Modification du volume du sein (évaluation médicale seulement)
4
5,5
Plissement
4
5,5
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 77 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
77
Manque de projection
3
Rotation de l’implant
3
4,1
Masse dans le sein/kyste mammaire sans lien avec un implant mammaire
2
2,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III
2
2,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau IV
2
2,7
Extrusion de l’implant
2
2,7
Masse/kyste
2
2,7
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
2
2,7
Cancer du sein récurrent
2
2,7
Sérome
2
2,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II avec intervention chirurgicale
1
1,4
Retard de cicatrisation
1
1,4
Infection
1
1,4
Complication au niveau du mamelon
1
1,4
Lésion cutanée
1
1,4
Raison inconnue
8
11,0
73
100
Total
4,1
48 interventions chirurgicales supplémentaires ont été effectuées lors de 18 réinterventions sur 16 patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction. Le plissement (17 % des 18 interventions) constituait la principale raison des réinterventions exécutées au cours des trois ans.
Le tableau 5b ci-dessous illustre la principale raison de chaque réintervention (après la pose initiale de l’implant) effectuée au cours des trois
ans chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction.
TABLEAU 5b. Principales raisons de la réintervention au cours des trois ans pour la cohorte ayant subi une révision de reconstruction
Raison de la réintervention
% (sur 18
réinterventions)
n
Plissement
3
Asymétrie
2
11,1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III
2
11,1
Modification du volume du sein à la demande de la patiente
2
11,1
Insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant
2
11,1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II avec intervention chirurgicale
1
5,6
Douleur mammaire
1
5,6
Manque de projection
1
5,6
Infection
1
5,6
Nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein
1
5,6
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
1
5,6
Sérome
1
5,6
18
100
Total
16,7
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 78 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
78
11867-00
Résultats d’innocuité – Raisons du retrait de l’implant :
Le tableau 6a ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons du retrait de l’implant observées dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG
au cours des trois ans, chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire. Parmi les 191 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction
primaire, 26 (13,6 %) se sont fait retirer 34 implants au cours des trois ans de suivi dans le cadre de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants
CPG. Sur les 34 implants de reconstruction primaire retirés, 12 (35 %) ont été remplacés. L’asymétrie et la modification du volume des seins à
la demande de la patiente constituaient les principales raisons du retrait des implants (17,6 % des 34 retraits d’implants) chez les patientes
ayant subi une reconstruction primaire.
TABLEAU 6a. Principales raisons du retrait de l’implant au cours des trois ans pour la cohorte reconstruction primaire
Raison du retrait
n
% (sur 34 retraits)
Asymétrie
6
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
4
17,6
11,8
Modification du volume du sein à la demande de la patiente
6
17,6
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV
3
8,8
Modification du volume du sein (évaluation médicale seulement)
4
11,8
Manque de projection
4
11,8
Plissement
3
8,8
Extrusion de l’implant
1
2,9
Infection
1
2,9
Rotation de l’implant
1
2,9
Raison inconnue
1
2,9
34
100
Total
Le tableau 6b ci-dessous illustre les principales raisons du retrait de l’implant observées dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG
au cours des trois ans, chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction. Parmi les 68 patientes ayant subi une révision de
reconstruction, 14 (20 %) se sont fait retirer 22 implants au cours des trois ans de suivi dans le cadre de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les
implants CPG. Sur les 22 implants retirés, 4 (18 %) ont été remplacés. L’asymétrie, l’insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant, et le
plissement constituaient les principales raisons du retrait des implants (18 % des 22 retraits d’implants) chez les patientes ayant subi une
révision de reconstruction.
TABLEAU 6b. Principales raisons du retrait de l’implant au cours des trois ans pour la cohorte révision de reconstruction
Raison du retrait
n
% (sur 22 retraits)
Asymétrie
4
Plissement
4
18,2
18,2
Insatisfaction quant à la position de l’implant
4
18,2
Modification du volume des seins à la demande de la patiente
2
9,1
Manque de projection
2
9,1
Infection
1
4,5
Nouveau diagnostic de cancer du sein
1
4,5
Sérome
1
4,5
Contracture capsulaire de niveau II avec intervention chirurgicale
1
4,5
Douleur mammaire
1
4,5
Insatisfaction de la patiente quant à l’apparence esthétique des seins
1
4,5
22
100
Total
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 79 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
79
Autres résultats cliniques
Vous trouverez ci-dessous un sommaire des résultats cliniques de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, concernant les affections du
tissu conjonctif et les signes et symptômes liés, le cancer, les affections neurologiques, les signes et symptômes neurologiques, les
complications liées à la lactation et à la reproduction, et le suicide. Mentor mène une étude post-approbation sur dix ans concernant les implants
ronds en gel de silicone afin de mieux évaluer ces problèmes, parmi d’autres, qui pourraient survenir chez les patientes concernées.
Affections du tissu conjonctif
Dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, un rhumatologue a diagnostiqué une nouvelle affection du tissu conjonctif chez deux
patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire. Ces diagnostics correspondaient à 1 cas de polyarthrite rhumatoïde à 10 mois et 1 cas
d’arthrite réactionnelle à 11 mois. Ces données doivent être interprétées avec précaution, étant donné qu’aucun groupe de comparaison
similaire de femmes sans implants mammaires n’a été observé.
Signes et symptômes des affections du tissu conjonctif
On a recueilli des données sur les symptômes et signes rapportés par plus de 100 patientes, dont 50 ayant précisé des symptômes rhumatismaux.
En établissant un lien de comparaison avant la pose des implants, on n’a constaté aucune augmentation ou diminution significative chez les
patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire ou une révision de reconstruction. L’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG n’avait pas
pour objectif d’évaluer les relations de cause à effet, puisque aucun groupe de comparaison de femmes sans implant n’a été observé, et que
d’autres facteurs, tels que la prise de médicaments et le style de vie/conditionnement physique n’ont pas été pris en compte. Par conséquent, les
patientes doivent être conscientes du fait qu’une augmentation de ces symptômes pourrait se manifester après la pose des implants.
Cancer
Parmi les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 3 patientes (1,6 %) ont reçu un diagnostic de récidive du cancer du sein; parmi les
patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction, 1 patiente (1,5 %) a reçu un diagnostic de récidive du cancer du sein. Aucun nouveau cas
n’a été signalé chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction et aucun cas d’autre cancer, tel qu’un cancer du cerveau, des voies
respiratoires, du col de l’utérus ou de la vulve, n’a été mentionné dans aucun rapport.
Maladies, signes et symptômes neurologiques
Au cours de l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, des données concernant des affections, des signes et des symptômes
neurologiques signalés par les patientes ont été recueillies lors de chaque visite postopératoire. Les symptômes neurologiques comprennent
une faiblesse, un engourdissement des pieds, un tintement dans les oreilles et une fatigue. Les chercheurs ont également réalisé un examen
physique lors de chaque visite postopératoire.
Après trois ans, aucun rapport ne signalait d’affections neurologiques. En établissant un lien de comparaison avant la pose des implants, on n’a
constaté aucune augmentation significative de signes et de symptômes neurologiques chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire
ou une révision de reconstruction.
Complications liées à la lactation
Aucune des patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire ou une révision de reconstruction n’a tenté d’allaiter.
Complications liées à la reproduction
Dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG, aucune fausse couche n’a été déclarée au cours des trois ans.
Suicide
Aucun suicide n’a été déclaré au cours des trois ans dans l’étude de base de Mentor sur les implants CPG.
ÉTUDE (COMPLÉMENTAIRE) DE MENTOR SUR LA DISPONIBILITÉ DES PRODUITS
L’innocuité des implants ronds de Becker a été étudiée durant plus de 16 ans dans le cadre de l’étude actuelle (complémentaire) sur la
disponibilité des produits, approuvée par la FDA aux États-Unis, qui a pour objectif de recueillir des données relatives à l’innocuité durant cinq
ans provenant de patientes ayant subi une reconstruction. L’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits recueille également des
données relatives à l’innocuité concernant l’utilisation des implants ronds MemoryGel®. Aucun effet indésirable grave et non envisagé résultant
de la prothèse n’a été signalé. Les complications signalées correspondent au type de complications mentionnées dans d’autres études sur les
implants mammaires (se reporter à la rubrique Études cliniques de Mentor).
Conception de l’étude :
L’étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits avait pour objectif de recueillir des données relatives à l’innocuité durant
cinq ans sur les implants ronds MemoryGel® et de Becker. Cette étude est menée selon un protocole clinique limité qui requiert des paramètres
spécifiques, mais dont les contrôles sont un peu moins contraignants que ceux normalement requis lors d’essais d’exemption des dispositifs de
recherche (à savoir, les études « de base »). L’objectif de cette étude est de recueillir des données concernant les événements à court terme
survenant suite à la pose d’un implant, afin de compléter les données recueillies lors d’études « de base » plus approfondies sur les implants
ronds et anatomiques (CPG) MemoryGel®. L’étude comprend une période de participation de 15 ans, qui a débuté en 1992, et une période de
suivi de la patiente de cinq ans. Les visites de suivi sont planifiées à 1, 3 et 5 ans après la pose de l’implant. Mentor mettra régulièrement à jour
cette brochure à mesure que d’autres renseignements supplémentaires seront disponibles.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 80 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
80
11867-00
L'étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits porte sur : 9 227 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire,
3 008 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction et 681 patientes ayant subi une révision d’augmentation avec des prothèses de
Becker; ainsi que 57 828 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire, 18 491 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction et
60 290 patientes ayant subi une révision d’augmentation avec des prothèses rondes MemoryGel®. Voici les données concernant le sousensemble de patientes ayant subi une reconstruction (reconstruction primaire et révision de reconstruction).
Enregistrement des patientes et profil démographique initial :
L'étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits porte sur : 9 227 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et 3 008
ayant subi une révision de reconstruction avec des prothèses de Becker; 57 828 patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire et
18 941 patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction avec des prothèses MemoryGel®.
Cohorte reconstruction primaire avec l’implant rond de Becker
Les taux de suivi à 1, 3 et 5 ans pour les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire étaient respectivement de 54, 33 et 21 %.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction avec l’implant rond de Becker
Les taux de suivi à 1, 3 et 5 ans pour les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction étaient respectivement de 53, 32 et 19 %.
Cohorte reconstruction primaire avec l’implant rond MemoryGel®
Les taux de suivi à 1, 3 et 5 ans pour les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire étaient respectivement de 35, 25 et 18 %.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction avec l’implant rond MemoryGel®
Les taux de suivi à 1, 3 et 5 ans pour les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction étaient respectivement de 39, 29 et 19 %.
Caractéristiques démographiques de l’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits :
Cohorte reconstruction primaire avec l’implant rond de Becker
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 88 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 5 % d’origine afro-américaine et 7 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 50 ans et 68 % des patientes étaient mariées. Soixante-douze pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction avec l’implant rond de Becker
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 91 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 3 % d’origine afro-américaine et 6 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 52 ans et 67 % des patientes étaient mariées. Soixante-quatorze pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Cohorte reconstruction primaire avec l’implant rond MemoryGel®
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 88 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 3 % d’origine afro-américaine et 9 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 43 ans et 64 % des patientes étaient mariées. Quatre-vingts pour cent
avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Cohorte révision de reconstruction avec l’implant rond MemoryGel®
En ce qui concerne l’origine ethnique, 91 % des patientes étaient d’origine caucasienne, 2 % d’origine afro-américaine et 6 % étaient d’une
autre origine ethnique. L’âge moyen au moment de l’intervention était de 50 ans et 66 % des patientes étaient mariées. Soixante-dix-sept pour
cent avaient au moins atteint le niveau d’éducation supérieure.
Résultats d’innocuité – Complications :
L’étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits de Mentor assure un suivi des patientes à 1, 3 et 5 ans. Les complications survenues
dans les cohortes reconstruction primaire et révision de reconstruction figurent dans les tableaux ci-dessous.
Implant rond de Becker
TABLEAU 7a. Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits – Implant rond de Becker : taux de risque d’événements
indésirables selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de reconstruction primaire
1 an
N = 5 465
Principales complications1
3 ans
N = 2 786
5 ans
N = 1 127
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Réintervention2
8,0
7,3; 8,8
12,6
11,3; 13,9
17,7
15,3; 20,1
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la
classification de Baker
3,8
3,2; 4,4
8,0
6,9; 9,1
12,1
10,0; 14,2
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement
5,0
4,4; 5,6
7,7
6,7; 8,8
9,1
7,3; 10,9
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
2,5
2,1; 3,0
4,7
3,9; 5,6
8,9
7,0; 10,7
Infection
1,3
1,0; 1,7
1,8
1,3; 2,3
2,3
1,4; 3,2
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 81 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
81
Rupture
1,9
1,5; 2,3
3,8
3,1; 4,6
24,2
7,5
5,8; 9,2
%
IC
22,5; 26,0
34,6
31,6; 37,6
Complications > 1 %3
Asymétrie
11,3
10,4; 12,2
Douleur mammaire
3,4
2,9; 4,0
7,8
6,7; 8,9
11,7
9,7; 13,8
Calcification
<1
-
1,0
0,6; 1,4
2,3
1,4; 3,3
Retard de cicatrisation
1,1
0,8; 1,4
1,5
1,0; 1,9
1,4
0,7; 2,1
Extrusion
<1
-
<1
-
1,0
0,4; 1,6
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
1,4
1,0; 1,7
3,8
3,0; 4,6
5,4
3,9; 6,8
Irritation/inflammation
1,2
0,8; 1,5
2,2
1,6; 2,7
2,8
1,8; 3,9
Adénopathie
<1
-
<1
-
1,4
0,6; 2,1
Sérome
<1
-
1,3
0,9; 1,8
<1
-
Plissement
4,1
3,5; 4,7
11,3
10,0; 12,5
18,3
15,8; 20,8
Autre
2,0
1,6; 2,4
3,8
3,0; 4,6
6,1
4,5; 7,6
1 N = patientes revenues pour au moins une visite postopératoire
2
Chirurgies supplémentaires, à l’exception des interventions réalisées pour une reconstruction planifiée en plusieurs étapes (révision du mamelon, reconstruction en
plusieurs étapes et interventions par lambeau)
Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % : hématome, nécrose
3
TABLEAU 7b. Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits – Implant rond de Becker : taux de risque d’événements
indésirables selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de révision de
reconstruction
1 an
N = 1 819
Principales complications1
3 ans
N = 980
5 ans
N = 409
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Réintervention2
5,6
4,5; 6,6
9,4
7,5; 11,3
11,1
7,9; 14,3
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la
classification de Baker
2,3
1,6; 3,1
5,9
4,3; 7,5
12,7
9,1; 16,3
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement
2,8
2,0; 3,6
3,4
2,2; 4,5
6,6
4,0; 9,1
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
1,6
1,0; 2,2
3,2
2,0; 4,4
4,7
2,4; 7,0
Infection
1,0
0,6; 1,5
1,5
0,7; 2,3
1,6
0,3; 2,8
2,1
1,4; 2,7
4,9
3,5; 6,3
10,4
7,1; 13,6
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Asymétrie
11,7
10,2; 13,3
27,6
24,6; 30,5
34,2
29,2; 39,2
Douleur mammaire
3,7
2,8; 4,6
9,4
7,4; 11,3
14,0
10,4; 17,7
Calcification
0,1
0,0; 0,3
1,2
0,4; 1,9
2,0
0,5; 3,6
Retard de cicatrisation
<1
-
1,3
0,6; 2,0
1,3
0,2; 2,5
0,2; 2,5
Rupture
Complications > 1 %3
Hématome
<1
-
<1
-
1,4
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
1,0
0,5; 1,5
2,1
1,1; 3,1
2,5
0,9; 4,1
Irritation/inflammation
1,3
0,8; 1,9
1,7
0,9; 2,6
2,4
0,9; 4,0
Adénopathie
<1
-
<1
-
1,9
0,4; 3,3
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 82 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
82
11867-00
Sérome
<1
-
1,4
0,7; 2,2
1,4
0,2; 2,7
Plissement
5,0
3,9; 6,1
13,2
10,9; 15,4
17,1
13,2; 21,1
Autre
1,6
1,0; 2,2
4,1
2,8; 5,4
4,8
2,5; 7,0
1 N = patientes revenues pour au moins une visite postopératoire
2 Chirurgies supplémentaires, à l’exception des interventions réalisées pour une reconstruction planifiée en plusieurs étapes (révision du mamelon, reconstruction en
plusieurs étapes et interventions par lambeau)
Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % : extrusion, nécrose
3
Implant rond MemoryGel®
TABLEAU 7c. Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits – Implant rond MemoryGel® : taux de risque
d’événements indésirables selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de
reconstruction primaire
1 an
N = 24 019
Principales complications1
Réintervention2
3 ans
N = 10 024
5 ans
N = 3 635
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
3,1
2,9; 3,3
4,8
4,4; 5,2
6,7
5,9; 7,6
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la
classification de Baker
2,0
1,8; 2,2
5,1
4,6; 5,6
7,5
6,6; 8,5
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement
2,5
2,3; 2,7
4,9
4,4; 5,3
6,7
5,8; 7,5
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
1,2
1,1; 1,4
2,6
2,2; 2,9
4,2
3,4; 4,9
Infection
0,4
0,3; 0,5
0,7
0,5; 0,9
0,7
0,5; 1,0
0,4
0,3; 0,4
1,4
1,2; 1,6
2,9
2,3; 3,5
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Asymétrie
6,8
6,5; 7,2
15,4
14,7; 16,2
23,1
21,7; 24,6
Douleur mammaire
2,4
2,2; 2,6
6,1
5,6; 6,6
8,9
7,9; 10,0
Retard de cicatrisation
<1
-
<1
-
1,2
0,8; 1,5
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
1,4
1,3; 1,6
2,9
2,5; 3,2
3,7
3,0; 4,3
Rupture
Complications > 1 %3
Irritation/inflammation
<1
-
<1
-
1,2
0,8; 1,6
Plissement
2,6
2,4; 2,8
7,7
7,2; 8,3
13,4
12,2; 14,6
Autre
1,5
1,4; 1,7
2,7
2,4; 3,0
3,6
2,9; 4,3
1 N = patientes revenues pour au moins une visite postopératoire
2 Chirurgies supplémentaires, à l’exception des interventions réalisées pour une reconstruction planifiée en plusieurs étapes (révision du mamelon, reconstruction en
plusieurs étapes et interventions par lambeau)
3 Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % : calcification, extrusion, hématome, adénopathie, nécrose, sérome
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 83 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
83
TABLEAU 7d. Étude (complémentaire) sur la disponibilité des produits – Implant rond MemoryGel® : taux de risque
d’événements indésirables selon la méthode de Kaplan-Meier (intervalle de confiance à 95 %), par patiente, pour le groupe de
révision de reconstruction
1 an
N = 8 980
Principales complications1
3 ans
N = 4 885
5 ans
N = 2 203
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Réintervention2
3,5
3,1; 3,8
5,8
5,1; 6,4
8,5
7,3; 9,7
Contracture capsulaire de niveau III/IV selon la
classification de Baker
2,9
2,5; 3,2
7,5
6,7; 8,3
11,4
10,0; 12,8
Retrait de l’implant et remplacement
2,8
2,4; 3,1
5,1
4,5; 5,7
7,7
6,5; 8,9
Retrait de l’implant sans remplacement
1,6
1,3; 1,8
3,0
2,5; 3,5
5,3
4,3; 6,4
Infection
0,6
0,5; 0,8
0,9
0,7; 1,2
1,3
0,8; 1,8
0,7
0,5; 0,9
2,2
1,8; 2,7
5,3
4,2; 6,3
%
IC
%
IC
%
IC
Asymétrie
8,9
8,3; 9,5
18,8
17,7; 20,0
25,8
23,8; 27,7
Douleur mammaire
3,7
3,3; 4,1
8,8
8,0; 9,7
12,6
11,1; 14,1
Calcification
<1
-
<1
-
1,2
0,7; 1,7
Hématome
<1
-
<1
-
1,3
0,8; 1,8
Cicatrisation hypertrophique
1,0
0,7; 1,2
2,4
2,0; 2,9
3,0
2,3; 3,8
Irritation/inflammation
<1
-
1,6
1,2; 1,9
2,4
1,7; 3,1
Rupture
Complications > 1 %3
Sérome
<1
-
<1
-
1,1
0,6; 1,6
Plissement
4,6
4,1; 5,0
11,4
10,4; 12,3
17,4
15,7; 19,1
Autre
1,8
1,5; 2,0
3,3
2,8; 3,9
4,8
3,8; 5,7
1 N = patientes revenues pour au moins une visite postopératoire
2 Chirurgies supplémentaires, à l’exception des interventions réalisées pour une reconstruction planifiée en plusieurs étapes (révision du mamelon, reconstruction en
plusieurs étapes et interventions par lambeau)
Les complications suivantes se sont manifestées à un taux inférieur à 1 % : retard de cicatrisation, extrusion, adénopathie, nécrose
3
Résultats d’innocuité – Raisons du retrait d’implant :
Implant rond de Becker
Les principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire étaient une infection (22,8 % des
retraits) et une contracture capsulaire (22 % des retraits).
TABLEAU 8a. Implant rond de Becker : principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant pour la cohorte reconstruction primaire (années 1 à 16)
Raison
Asymétrie
N = 1 591 retraits
61 (3,8 %)
Biopsie
0 (0,0 %)
Douleur mammaire
33 (2,1 %)
Cancer/traitement du cancer
Contracture capsulaire
5 (0,3 %)
350 (22,0 %)
Retard de cicatrisation/inflammation
36 (2,3 %)
Hématome/sérome
18 (1,1 %)
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 84 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
84
11867-00
Infection
363 (22,8 %)
Écoulement/rupture/dégonflement
230 (14,5 %)
Migration
2 (0,1 %)
Nécrose/extrusion
58 (3,6 %)
Palpabilité/visibilité
38 (2,4 %)
Modification de la taille et de l’implant à la
demande de la patiente
100 (6,3 %)
Seconde étape planifiée
0 (0,0 %)
Ptose
0 (0,0 %)
Révision de reconstruction
48 (3,0 %)
Cicatrisation
2 (0,1 %)
Traumatisme
0 (0,0 %)
Plissement/vagues
26 (1,6 %)
Autre
49 (3,1 %)
172 (10,8 %)
Non disponible1
1 Aucun renseignement fourni par le médecin
Les principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction étaient une contracture capsulaire
(21,4 % des retraits), une infection (21,2 % des retraits) et un écoulement/une rupture/un dégonflement (20,2 %).
TABLEAU 8b. Implant rond de Becker : principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant pour la cohorte révision de reconstruction
(années 1 à 16)
Raison
N = 397 retraits
Asymétrie
4 (1,0 %)
Biopsie
0 (0,0 %)
Douleur mammaire
8 (2,0 %)
Cancer/traitement du cancer
1 (0,3 %)
Contracture capsulaire
85 (21,4 %)
Retard de cicatrisation/inflammation
10 (2,5 %)
Hématome/sérome
8 (2,0 %)
Infection
84 (21,2 %)
Écoulement/rupture/dégonflement
80 (20,2 %)
Migration
0 (0,0 %)
Nécrose/extrusion
3 (0,8 %)
Palpabilité/visibilité
11 (2,8 %)
Modification de la taille et de l’implant à la
demande de la patiente
20 (5,0 %)
Seconde étape planifiée
1 (0,3 %)
Ptose
1 (0,3 %)
Révision de reconstruction
7 (1,8 %)
Cicatrisation
1 (0,3 %)
Traumatisme
0 (0,0 %)
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 85 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
85
Plissement/vagues
18 (4,5 %)
Autre
10 (2,5 %)
Non disponible1
45 (11,3 %)
1 Aucun renseignement fourni par le médecin
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Les principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant chez les patientes ayant subi une reconstruction primaire étaient une contracture capsulaire
(37,8 % des retraits) et une infection (13,7 % des retraits).
TABLEAU 8c. Implant rond MemoryGel® : principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant pour la cohorte reconstruction primaire
(années 1 à 16)
Raison
Asymétrie
N = 3 618 retraits
214 (5,9 %)
Biopsie
0 (0,0 %)
Douleur mammaire
55 (1,5 %)
Cancer/traitement du cancer
Contracture capsulaire
Retard de cicatrisation/inflammation
Hématome/sérome
43 (1,2 %)
1 369 (37,8 %)
54 (1,5 %)
30 (0,8 %)
Infection
497 (13,7 %)
Écoulement/rupture/dégonflement
289 (8,0 %)
Migration
7 (0,2 %)
Nécrose/extrusion
96 (2,7 %)
Palpabilité/visibilité
64 (1,8 %)
Modification de la taille et de l’implant à la
demande de la patiente
320 (8,8 %)
Seconde étape planifiée
1 (0,0 %)
Ptose
4 (0,1 %)
Révision de reconstruction
44 (1,2 %)
Cicatrisation
7 (0,2 %)
Traumatisme
1 (0,0 %)
Plissement/vagues
61 (1,7 %)
Autre
Non disponible1
1
Aucun renseignement fourni par le médecin
95 (2,6 %)
367 (10,1 %)
Les principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant chez les patientes ayant subi une révision de reconstruction étaient une contracture capsulaire
(37,5 % des retraits), un écoulement/une rupture/un dégonflement (12,2 %) et une infection (11,7 % des retraits).
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 86 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
86
11867-00
TABLEAU 8d. Implant rond MemoryGel® : principales raisons d’un retrait de l’implant pour la cohorte révision de reconstruction
(années 1 à 16)
Raison
Asymétrie
N = 1 696 retraits
85 (5,0 %)
Biopsie
0 (0,0 %)
Douleur mammaire
42 (2,5 %)
Cancer/traitement du cancer
Contracture capsulaire
Retard de cicatrisation/inflammation
Hématome/sérome
6 (0,4 %)
636 (37,5 %)
30 (1,8 %)
21 (1,2 %)
Infection
198 (11,7 %)
Écoulement/rupture/dégonflement
207 (12,2 %)
Migration
3 (0,2 %)
Nécrose/extrusion
20 (1,2 %)
Palpabilité/visibilité
15 (0,9 %)
Modification de la taille et de l’implant à la
demande de la patiente
110 (6,5 %)
Seconde étape planifiée
0 (0,0 %)
Ptose
2 (0,1 %)
Révision de reconstruction
23 (1,4 %)
Cicatrisation
2 (0,1 %)
Traumatisme
0 (0,0 %)
Plissement/vagues
36 (2,1 %)
Autre
Non disponible1
52 (3,1 %)
208 (12,3 %)
1 Aucun renseignement fourni par le médecin
Autres résultats cliniques
L’étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits est conçue pour déterminer les complications en matière d’innocuité à court
terme. Bien que les affections et les symptômes rhumatismaux et du tissu conjonctif ne soient pas au cœur de cette étude, ces données sont
recueillies au début de l’étude ainsi qu’au cours des visites à 3 et 5 ans après l’intervention. Aucune disposition n’est prévue sur le formulaire de
départ ou sur le formulaire postopératoire pour indiquer si un rhumatologue a été consulté et confirmé un syndrome ou un symptôme
rhumatismal. Tous les syndromes et symptômes liés à une affection du tissu conjonctif y sont donc consignés.
Implant rond de Becker
Dans l’étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits, l’affection rhumatismale la plus souvent rapportée par les patientes
avec un implant de Becker était la polyarthrite rhumatoïde (1 %), et le syndrome rhumatismal le plus couramment signalé par ces patientes était
la fibromyalgie (0,9 %).
Implant rond MemoryGel®
Dans l’étude (complémentaire) de Mentor sur la disponibilité des produits, l’affection rhumatismale la plus souvent signalée parmi les patientes
avec un implant MemoryGel® était la polyarthrite rhumatoïde (0,8 %), et les syndromes rhumatismaux les plus couramment signalés par ces
patientes étaient la fibromyalgie et le phénomène de Raynaud (0,9 et 0,7 % respectivement).
Mentor mène une étude de post-approbation concernant les implants ronds en gel sur dix ans afin de mieux évaluer ces problèmes, parmi
d’autres qui pourraient survenir chez les patientes du groupe.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 87 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
87
CARTE D’IDENTIFICATION DE L’IMPLANT
Une carte d’identification de la patiente est fournie avec chaque implant mammaire rempli de gel de silicone. Pour remplir la carte d’identification
de la patiente, coller un autocollant d’identification d’implant, pour chaque implant, au dos de la carte. Les autocollants sont situés sur l’étiquette
figurant à l’intérieur de l’emballage du produit. Si on ne dispose pas d’autocollant, le numéro de lot, le numéro de référence catalogue ainsi que
la description de l’implant doivent être inscrits manuellement à partir de l’étiquette de l’implant. De plus, le volume de remplissage (résultats de
l’expansion) doit être consigné à la main si on ne dispose pas d’étiquette de dossier patiente. Ces cartes doivent être remises aux patientes afin
qu’elles puissent s’y reporter.
AUTORISATION DE RETOUR DES PRODUITS
• Clients canadiens
Une autorisation de retour des produits devra être obtenue auprès de Mentor, une branche de Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une
division de Johnson & Johnson inc. Veuillez composer le +1 (800) 668-6069 ou communiquer avec votre représentant Mentor local.
Les prothèses peuvent être envoyées à l’adresse suivante :
Mentor, une branche de Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une division de Johnson & Johnson inc.
200 Whitehall Drive
Markham (Ontario)
Canada L3R 0T5
COMMENT SIGNALER DES PROBLÈMES LIÉS À UN IMPLANT
Mentor exige que toute complication ou explantation liée à l’utilisation de cette prothèse lui soit immédiatement signalée. Veuillez vous reporter
au processus d’autorisation de retour des produits pour obtenir des instructions et des renseignements concernant le retour du produit
concerné.
Politique sur le remplacement des produits et garanties limitées
Vous trouverez ci-dessous une description de l’aide disponible dans le cadre de la politique de Mentor sur le remplacement à vie des produits,
ainsi que la garantie limitée Avantage de Mentor.
Politique de Mentor sur le remplacement gratuit à vie des produits
• S’applique automatiquement à toutes les porteuses d’implants mammaires de Mentor.
• Vous êtes candidate à un remplacement gratuit d’1 ou 2 implants mammaires de même type et de n’importe quelle taille, quelque soit l’âge
de l’implant, lorsque le dégonflement ou la rupture ont été confirmés.
La garantie Avantage de Mentor est gratuite pour toutes les patientes possédant un implant mammaire Mentor rempli de solution saline ou de
gel de silicone. Lorsque les garanties limitées s’appliquent, Mentor assure ce qui suit :
• Politique sur le remplacement à vie des produits*
• 10 ans et une aide financière pouvant aller jusqu’à 1 200 $ CAN pour les frais de salle d’opération, d’anesthésie et les frais chirurgicaux qui
ne sont pas couverts par l’assurance**
• Remplacement gratuit de l’implant controlatéral (du côté opposé) à la demande du chirurgien.
• Modalités irrévocables.
Il est important que la patiente conserve une copie de sa garantie limitée Avantage de Mentor dans ses propres dossiers pour garantir la
validation de sa participation.
Produits couverts
Le régime de protection Avantage de Mentor s’applique à tous les implants mammaires de Mentor implantés au Canada après le 1er mai 2005†,
sous réserve que :
• Les implants aient été posés conformément à la fiche d’accompagnement de Mentor, en vigueur à la date d’implantation, ainsi qu’à toute
autre fiche de renseignements ou instructions publiées par Mentor;
• L’implantation ait été effectuée par un chirurgien qualifié et autorisé, selon les procédures chirurgicales acceptées.
*Politique sur le remplacement à vie des produits : Mentor prévoit le remplacement gratuit d’un produit Mentor de même taille et de même type ou de type équivalent à
celui de l’implant d’origine et ce, tout au long de la vie de la patiente. Un style d’implant différent peut être choisi à la demande du chirurgien (frais applicables selon la
différence de prix catalogue des produits). Se reporter à la garantie limitée Avantage de Mentor pour connaître les critères d’admissibilité et obtenir des détails
concernant ce régime de protection.
** On accordera la priorité de paiement aux frais de la salle d’opération et de l’anesthésie. Pour avoir droit à une assistance financière, vous devez signer une décharge.
†
Pour les implants mammaires implantés avant cette date, communiquez avec Mentor Worldwide pour connaître tout terme de la garantie applicable.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 88 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
88
11867-00
Phénomènes couverts
Le régime de protection Avantage de Mentor s’applique dans les cas suivants :
• Dégonflement dû à des plis, à un traumatisme chez la patiente ou à une cause inconnue
• Perte d’intégrité de la valve
• D’autres phénomènes de perte d’intégrité de l’enveloppe pourraient également être couverts par ce programme. Mentor se réserve le droit
de déterminer si d’autres phénomènes spécifiques doivent être pris en compte.
Phénomènes non couverts
Le régime de protection Avantage de Mentor ne s’applique pas dans les cas suivants :
• Retrait d’implants intacts en raison d’une contracture capsulaire, de plissements ou de vagues.
• Perte de l’intégrité structurelle de l’enveloppe résultant de réinterventions ou d’une capsulotomie ouverte ou fermée (compression manuelle).
• Retrait d’implants intacts pour modification de la taille.
Demande d’aide financière
• Pour présenter une demande de remplacement de produit ou d’aide financière au titre du régime Avantage de Mentor, le chirurgien doit
communiquer avec Mentor, une branche de Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une division de Johnson & Johnson inc., avant de
procéder au remplacement.
• Les demandes d’aide financière exigent le renvoi d’une décharge de responsabilité spécifique à la patiente, dûment remplie et signée.
• Dans le cas d’une demande de remplacement ou d’aide financière, le chirurgien doit envoyer à Mentor le ou les implants mammaires
explantés et désinfectés, dans les six mois suivant la date de l’explantation, à l’adresse suivante :
Mentor, une branche de Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une division de Johnson & Johnson inc. 200 Whitehall Drive
Markham (Ontario)
Canada L3R 0T5
• Une aide financière sera octroyée après réception, vérification et approbation de la demande complétée, y compris la réception du produit
explanté et de la décharge générale dûment remplie par la patiente.
La présente est un sommaire de la garantie limitée Avantage de Mentor. Il ne s’agit que d’un survol et non pas d’une description exhaustive du
régime de protection. Pour obtenir une copie du libellé intégral de la garantie limitée Avantage de Mentor pour les implants mammaires remplis
de gel de silicone ou de solution saline, veuillez appeler Mentor ou communiquer avec la société par écrit à l’adresse ci-après :
Mentor, une branche de Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une division de Johnson & Johnson inc.
200 Whitehall Drive
Markham (Ontario)
Canada L3R 0T5
+1 (800) 668-6069
Vous pouvez également vous procurer une copie complète des régimes de protection sur le site www.mentorwwllc.com .
IL NE S’AGIT QUE DE GARANTIES LIMITÉES QUI SONT ASSUJETTIES AUX MODALITÉS STIPULÉES ET EXPLIQUÉES DANS LES
GARANTIES LIMITÉES CONCERNÉES DE MENTOR. TOUTES LES AUTRES GARANTIES, QU’ELLES SOIENT EXPRESSES OU
IMPLICITES, PAR APPLICATION DE LOIS OU AUTRE, Y COMPRIS, MAIS SANS S’Y LIMITER, LES GARANTIES IMPLICITES DE QUALITÉ
MARCHANDE ET D’APTITUDE À L’EMPLOI, SONT EXCLUES.
Mentor se réserve le droit d’annuler, de modifier ou de réviser les modalités du régime de protection Avantage de Mentor. Toute résiliation,
révision ou modification n’aura aucune incidence sur les modalités stipulées dans le régime de protection Avantage de Mentor des personnes
déjà assurées.
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 89 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
89
Pour joindre le service clientèle, veuillez
communiquer avec Mentor, une branche de
Johnson & Johnson Medical Products, une
division de Johnson & Johnson inc., en
composant le +1 (800) 668-6069 ou
communiquez avec votre représentant Mentor
local.
www.mentorwwllc.com
Fabricant
Mentor Medical Systems B.V.
Zernikedreef 2
2333 CL Leiden
Pays-Bas
(+31) 71 7513600
DÉFINITIONS DES SYMBOLES FIGURANT SUR LES NOTICES :
QTY 1
Quantité : une unité
Sein gauche
L’implant mammaire est posé dans le sein gauche
Sein droit
L’implant mammaire est posé dans le sein droit
Date de l’implant
Date de la pose de l’implant
Nom de la patiente
Nom de la patiente
Nom du chirurgien
Nom du chirurgien
Adresse
Adresse du chirurgien
Téléphone
Numéro de téléphone du chirurgien
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 90 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
90
11867-00
RÉFÉRENCES
1 Guay N (University of Ottawa), Haykal S (University of Toronto). Delayed Implant Single Stage Breast Cancer Reconstruction, juillet 2009 (prépublication).
2 Berrino P, Casabona F, Santi P. Long-term advantages of permanent expandable implants in breast aesthetic surgery. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1998;101:1964.
3
Henriksen, T.F., et coll. 2005. Surgical intervention and capsular contracture after breast augmentation: a prospective study of risk factors. Ann. Plast. Surg . 54(4):343-51.
Bondurant, S., V.L. Ernster et R. Herdman, Éds. 2000. Safety of silicone breast implants. Committee on the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants, Division of Health
Promotion and Disease Prevention, Institute of Medicine. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.
5 Par exemple : Kulmala, I., et coll. 2004. Local complications after cosmetic breast implant surgery in Finland. Ann. Plast. Surg. 53(5):413-9.
6 Spear, S.L. et K. Schwarz. 2006. Prosthetic reconstruction in the radiated breast. Dans : Surgery of the Breast: Principles and Art, 2nd Edition. Spear, S.L. (éd.)
Philadelphia, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 529.
7 Eskenazi, L.B. 2007. New options for immediate reconstruction: achieving optimal results with adjustable implants in a single stage. Plast Reconstr Surg. 119(1):28-37.
8
Hsieh, F. et coll. 2009. Experience with the Mentor Contour Profile Becker-35 expandable implants in reconstructive breast surgery. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg.
[Publication électronique avant impression].
9 Gui, G.P., et coll. 2003. Immediate breast reconstruction using biodimensional anatomical permanent expander implants: a prospective analysis of outcome and
patient satisfaction. Plast Reconstr Surg. 111(1):125-40.
10
Berry, M.G., et coll. 1998. An audit of outcome including patient satisfaction with immediate breast reconstruction performed by breast surgeons. Ann R Coll Surg
Engl. 80(3):173-7.
11 Bortul, M. et coll. 1997. Immediate reconstruction after radical mastectomy using Becker's prosthesis: long-term results. Ann Ital Chir. 68(1):49-54. [Article en italien].
12
Camilleri, I.G. et coll. 1996. A review of 120 Becker permanent tissue expanders in reconstruction of the breast. Br J Plast Surg. 49(6):346-51.
13 Guay, N.A. et S. Haykal. 2009. Delayed Implant Single Stage Breast Reconstruction. En attente de publication.
14
Holmes JD. Capsular contraction after breast reconstruction with tissue expansion. Br J Plast Surg. 1989;83:845-851.
15 Eskenazi, L.B. 2007. New options for immediate reconstruction: achieving optimal results with adjustable implants in a single stage. Plast Reconstr Surg. 119(1):28-37.
16 Hunter-Smith, DJ, Laurie SWS. Breast reconstruction using permanent tissue expanders. Aust N.Z. J. Surg. 1995;65:492-495.
17
Hölmich, L.R., et coll. 2003a. Incidence of silicone breast implant rupture. Arch Surg. 138:801-6.
18 Hölmich, L.R., et coll. 2001. Prevalence of silicone breast implant rupture among Danish women. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 108(4):848-58.
19
Collis, N. et D.T. Sharpe. 2000. Silicone gel-filled breast implant integrity: A retrospective review of 478 consecutively explanted implants. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 105:1979-85.
20 Hölmich, L.R., et coll. 2004. Untreated silicone breast implant rupture. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114:204-14.
21 Katzin, W.E., et coll. 2005. Pathology of lymph nodes from patients with breast implants: a histologic and spectroscopic evaluation. Am J Surg Pathol.29(4):506-11.
22
Berner, I., M., et coll. 2002. Comparative examination of complaints of patients with breast-cancer with and without silicone implants. Eur. J Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod.
Biol. 102:61-66.
23 Brown, S.L., et coll. 2001. Silicone gel breast implant rupture, extracapsular silicone, and health status in a population of women. J. Rheumatol. 28:996-1003.
24
Hölmich, L.R., et coll. 2003b. Self-reported diseases and symptoms by rupture status among unselected Danish women with cosmetic silicone breast implants. Plast.
Reconstr. Surg. 111:723-32.
25 Wolfe, F. et J. Anderson. 1999. Silicone filled breast implants and the risk of fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. J. Rheumatol. 26:2025-28.
26
Hölmich, L.R., et coll. 2007. Breast implant rupture and connective tissue disease: A review of the literature. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 120 (Suppl. 1):62S-69S.
27 Cicchetti S, Leone MS, Franchelli S, Santi PL. One-stage breast reconstruction using McGhan style 150 biodimensional expanders: A review of 107 implants with six
years experience. J Plast Reconst Aesthe Surg. 2006;59:1037-1042.
28 Mahdi S, Jones T, Nicklin S, McGeorge DD. Expandable anatomical implants in breast reconstructions : a prospective study. Br Jour Plast Surg. 1998;51:425-430.
29
Peyser PM, Abel JA, Straker VF, Hall VL, Rainsbury RM. Ultra-conservative skin-sparing ‘keyhole’ mastectomy and immediate breast and areola reconstruction. Ann
R Coll Surg Engl. 2000;82:227-235.
30 Collis N, Sharpe DT. Breast reconstruction by tissue expansion – A retrospective technical review of 197 two-stage delayed reconstructions following mastectomy for
malignant breast disease in 189 patients. Br J Plast Surg. 2000;52:37-41.
31
Holmes JD. Capsular contraction after breast reconstruction with tissue expansion. Br J Plast Surg. 1989;83:845-851.
32 Brinton, L.A., et coll. 2004. Risk of connective tissue disorders among breast implant patients. Am. J. Epidemiol. 160(7):619-27.
33
Janowsky, E.C., et coll. 2000. Meta-Analyses of the Relation Between Silicone Breast Implants and the Risk of Connective-Tissue Diseases. N. Engl. J. Med.
342(11):781-90.
34
Lipworth, L.R.E., et coll. 2004. Silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease: An updated review of the epidemiologic evidence. Ann. Plast. Surg. 52:598-601.
35
Tugwell, P., et coll. 2001. Do silicone breast implants cause rheumatologic disorders? A systematic review for a court-appointed national science panel. Arthritis
Rheum. (11):2477-84.
36 Weisman, M.H., et coll. 1988. Connective-tissue disease following breast augmentation: A preliminary test of the human adjuvant tissue hypothesis. Plast. Reconstr.
Surg. 82(4):626-30.
37 Williams, H.J., et coll. 1997. Breast implants in patients with differentiated and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Arthritis and Rheumatism 40(3):437-40.
38 Breiting, V.B., et coll. 2004. Long-term health status of Danish women with silicone breast implants. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114:217-26.
39
Fryzek, J.P., et coll. 2001. Self-reported symptoms among women after cosmetic breast implant and breast reduction surgery. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 107:206-13.
4
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 91 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
11867-00
91
40 Kjøller, K., et coll. 2004. Self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants. Ann Plast
Surg. 52(1):1-7.
41 Brinton, L.A., et coll. 2000. Breast cancer following augmentation mammoplasty (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 11(9):819-27. J. Long Term Eff. Med.
42
Implants. 12(4):271-9.
Bryant, H., et Brasher, P. 1995. Breast implants and breast cancer--reanalysis of a linkage study. N. Engl. J. Med. 332(23):1535-9.
43 Deapen, D.M., et coll. 1997. Are breast implants anticarcinogenic? A 14-year follow-up of the Los Angeles Study. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 1997 99(5):1346-53.
44 Herdman, R.C., et coll. 2001. Silicone breast implants and cancer. Cancer Invest. 2001;19(8):821-32.
45 Pukkala, E., et coll. 2002. Incidence of breast and other cancers among Finnish women with cosmetic breast implants, 1970-1999. J. Long Term Eff. Med. Implants
12(4):271-9.
46 Deapen, D., et coll. 2000. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among patients with prior breast implants. Plast Reconstr Surg. 105(2):535-40.
47
Jakubietz, M.G., et coll. 2004. Breast augmentation: Cancer concerns and mammography – A literature review. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 113:117e-122e.
48 Miglioretti, D.L., et coll. 2004. Effect of breast augmentation on the accuracy of mammography and cancer characteristics. JAMA 291(4):442-50.
49 Brinton, LA., et coll. 2001b. Cancer risk at sites other than the breast following augmentation mammoplasty. Ann. Epidemiol. 11:248-56.
50 McLaughlin, J.K. et L. Lipworth. 2004. Brain cancer and cosmetic breast implants: A review of the epidemiological evidence. Ann.
51 Cook, L.S. 1997. Characteristics of women with and without breast augmentation. J. Amer. Med. Assoc. 20:1612-7.
Plast. Surg. 52(2):15-17.
52 Fryzek, J.P., et coll. 2000. Characteristics of women with cosmetic breast augmentation surgery compared with breast reduction surgery patients and women in the
general population of Sweden. Ann Plast Surg. 45(4):349-56.
Kjøller K., et coll. 2003. Characteristics of women with cosmetic breast implants compared with women with other types of cosmetic surgery and population-based
controls in Denmark. Ann Plast Surg. 50(1):6-12.
54 Keech, J.A., Jr. et B.J. Creech. 1997. Anaplastic T-cell lymphoma in proximity to a saline-filled breast implant. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 100(2):554-555
55
Gaudet, G., J.W. Friedberg, A. Weng, G.S. Pinkus et A.S. Freedman. 2002. Breast lymphoma associated with breast implants: Two case-reports and a review of the
literature. Leukemia Lymphoma 43:115-119.
56
Sahoo, S., P.P. Rosen, R. M. Feddersen, D.S. Viswanatha, D.A. Clark et A. Chadburn. 2003. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a silicone breast implant
capsule: A case report and review of the literature. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 127(3):e115-e118.
57 Fritzsche, F.R., S. Pahl, I. Petersen, M. Burkhardt, A. Dankof, M. Dietel et G. Kristiansen. 2006. Anaplastic large-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the breast in
periprosthetic localization 32 years after treatment for primary breast cancer – A case report. Virchows Arch. 449:561-564.
58 Olack, B., R. Gupta et G.S. Brooks. 2007. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a saline breast implant capsule after tissue expander breast reconstruction. Ann.
Plast. Surg. 59(1):56-57.
59 Gualco, G. et C.E. Bacchi. 2008. B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of the breast: Clinical-pathological features of 53 cases. Int. J. Surg. Pathol. 16(4):407-413.
60 Guo, H.Y., X.M. Xhao, J. Li et X.C. Hu. 2008. Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the breast: Eight-year follow-up experience. Int. J. Hematol. 87(5):491-497.
61
Miranda, R.N., L. Lin, S.S. Talwalkar, J.T. Manning et L.J. Medeiros. 2009. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma involving the breast: a clinicopathologic study of 6 cases
and review of the literature. Arch. Pathol. Lab Med. 133(9):1383-1390.
62 Newman, M.K., N.J. Zemmel, A.Z. Bandak et B.J. Kaplan. 2008. Primary breast lymphoma in a patient with silicone breast implants: a case report and review of the
literature. J. Plast. Reconstr. Aesthet. Surg. 61(7):822-825
63 Roden, A.C., W.R. Macon, G.L. Keeney, J.L. Myers, A.L. Feldman et A. Dogan. 2008. Seroma-associated primary anaplastic large-cell lymphoma adjacent to breast
implants: an indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Mod. Pathol. 21(4):455-463.
64 Wong, A.K., J. Lopategui, S. Clancy, D. Kulber S. Bose. 2008. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma associated with a breast implant capsule: a case report and review of
the literature. Am. J. Surg. Pathol. 32(8):1265-1268.
65 Alobeid, B., D.W. Sevilla, M.B. El-Tamer, V.V. Murty, D.G. Savage et G. Bhagat. 2009. Aggressive presentation of breast implant-associated ALK-1 negative
anaplastic large cell lymphoma with bilateral axillary lymph node involvement. Leuk. Lymphoma 50(5):831-833.
66 Bishara, M.R., C. Ross et M. Sur. 2009. Case report: Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising in reconstruction mammoplasty capsule of saline
filled breast implant after radical mastectomy for breast cancer: An unusual case presentation. Diagn. Pathol. 4:11-16.
67 Gualco, G., L. Chioato, W.J. Harrington, Jr., L.M. Weiss et C.E. Bacchi. 2009. Primary and secondary T-cell lymphomas of the breast: Clinico-pathologic features of
11 cases. Appl. Immunohistochem. Mol. Morphol. 17(4):301-306.
68
Brody, G., D. Deapen, P. Gill, A. Epstein, S. Martin et W. Elatra. 2010. T-cell non Hodgkins anaplastic lymphoma associated with one style of breast implants.
Résumé. American Association of Plastic Surgeons 89th Annual Meeting, 22 mars. http://www.aaps1921.org/abstracts/2010/4.cgi (consulté en ligne le 2 février
2010).
69
Li, S. et A.K. Lee. 2010. Case report: Silicone implant and primary breast ALK1-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma, fact or fiction? Int. J. Clin. Exp. Pathol.
3(1):117-127.
70
Daneshbod, Y., A. Oryan, H.N. Khojasteh, A. Rasekhi, N. Ahmadi et M. Mohammadianpanah. 2010. Primary ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the
breast: A case report and review of the literature. J. Pediatr. Hematol. Oncol. 32:e75-e78.
71 Evens, A.M. et B.C.-H. Chiu. 2008. The challenges of epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. JAMA 300(17):2059-2061.
72 de Jong, D., W.L. Vasmel, J.P. de Boer, G. Verhave, E. Barbe, M.K. Casparie et F. E. van Leeuwen. 2008. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in women with breast
implants. JAMA 300(17):2030-2035.
73
Brinton, L.A., et coll. 2001a. Mortality among augmentation mammoplasty patients. Epidemiol. 12(3):321-6.
74
Jacobsen, P.H., et coll. 2004. Mortality and suicide among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants. Arch. Int. med. 164(22):2450-5.
53
11867-00_Canada_BeckerPIDS_01DEC2010_FINAL.fm Page 92 Friday, September 23, 2011 1:17 PM
92
11867-00
75 Koot, V., et coll. 2003. Total and cost specific mortality among Swedish women with cosmetic breast implants: prospective study. Br. J. Med. 326(7388):527-8.
76 Pukkala, E., et coll. 2003. Causes of death among Finnish women with cosmetic breast implants, 1971-2001. Ann. Plast. Surg. 51(4):339-42.
77
Lugowski, S.J., et coll. 2000. Analysis of silicon in human tissues with special reference to silicone breast implants. J. Trace Elem. Med. Biol. 14(1):31-42.
78 Kjøller, K., et coll. 2002. Health outcomes in offspring of Danish mothers with cosmetic breast implants. Ann. Plast. Surg. 48:238-45.
79 Signorello, L.B., et coll. 2001. Offspring health risk after cosmetic breast implantation in Sweden. Ann. Plast. Surg. 46:279-86.
80 Hemminki, E., et coll. 2004. Births and perinatal health of infants among women who have had silicone breast implantation in Finland, 1967-2000. Acta Obstet
Gynecol Scand. 83(12):1135-40.
81 Flassbeck, D.B., et coll. 2003. Determination of siloxanes, silicon, and platinum in tissues of women with silicone gel-filled implants. Anal Bioanal Chem. 375(3):356-62.
82
Katzin, W.E., et coll. 2005. Pathology of lymph nodes from patients with breast implants: a histologic and spectroscopic evaluation. Am J Surg Pathol.29(4):506-11.
83 Stein, J., et coll. 1999. In situ determination of the active catalyst in hydrosilylation reactions using highly reactive Pt(0) catalyst precursors. J. Am. Chem. Soc.
121(15):3693-3703. Chandra, G., et coll. 1987. A convenient and novel route to bis(alkyne)platinum(0) and other platinum(0) complexes from Speier’s hydrosilylation
catalyst. Organometallics. 6:191-2. Lappert, M.F. and Scott, F.P.A. 1995. The reaction pathway from Speier’s to Karstedt’s hydrosilylation catalyst. J. Organomet.
Chem. 492(2):C11-C13. Lewis, L.N., et coll. 1995. Mechanism of formation of platinum(0) complexes containing silicon-vinyl ligands. Organometallics. 14:2202-13.
84 Mandrekas AD, Zambacos GJ, Katsantoni PN. Immediate and delayed breast reconstruction with permanent tissue expanders. Br J Plast Surg. 1995;48:572-578.
85 Bartelink, H., et coll. 2001. Recurrence rates after treatment of breast cancer with standard radiotherapy with or without additional radiation. NEJM 345:1378-87.
86 Jagsi, R., et coll. 2005. Locoregional recurrence rates and prognostic factors for failure in node-negative patients treated with mastectomy: Implications for
postmastectomy radiation. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 62(4):1035-39.
87 National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine. 2005. Medline Plus ® Medical Encyclopedia: Breast Cancer (disponible sur
http://nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/print/ency/article/00913.htm)