Revenue from real estate Tirer des revenus des biens immobiliers

Commentaires

Transcription

Revenue from real estate Tirer des revenus des biens immobiliers
Spring/Printemps
2013
PM #40065075
IN THIS ISSUE:
Revenue from real estate
Tirer des revenus
des biens immobiliers
L E A D I N G A C A D E M I C R E TA I L I N G
INTO THE FUTURE
The world of higher education, and the college store itself, is undergoing
rapid, unprecedented change. That’s why offering students additional
course materials options, including more affordable options such as textbook
rental, is more important than ever. Your campus demands a college store
that is a reflection not only of your brand, but of your vision; a college store
that delivers world-class customer satisfaction while never losing sight
of the needs of the local community; a college store that delivers value
to students, faculty, fans and alumni as well as revenue to the bottom line.
Since 1873, Follett has provided industry-leading products, services and college store
management expertise. Today, we are more committed than ever to supporting the mission
of higher education, with forward-looking textbook rental, digital textbook and ecommerce
services and solutions that enhance the accessibility and affordability of higher education.
www.follettofcanada.ca
Professionally managed college & university bookstores
Identifying and converting potential can be challenging, especially in volatile
markets. It requires conviction, discipline and a focus on the long-term.
At Standard Life Investments, we understand the value of potential.
With expertise across a wide range of asset classes, backed
by our distinctive Focus on Change investment philosophy, we constantly think
ahead and strive to anticipate change before it happens. This forward-thinking
approach helps our clients look to the future with confidence.
Take a long-term view today at standardlifeinvestments.ca
The value of an investment may fall as well as rise and is not guaranteed.
Potential.
Delivered.
Equities . Fixed Income . Real Estate . Multi-asset . Private Equity
Standard Life Investments Inc., with offices in Calgary, Montréal and Toronto, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Standard Life Investments Limited. Standard Life Investments
Limited is registered in Scotland (SC123321) at 1 George Street, Edinburgh EH2 2LL. Standard Life Investments Limited is authorized and regulated in the UK by the Financial
Services Authority. Calls may be monitored and/or recorded to protect both you and us and help with our training. © [2012] Standard Life, images reproduced under licence.
Canadian Association of University
Business Officers
Association canadienne du personnel
administratif universitaire
320 – 350 rue Albert Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 1B1
Tel./Tél.: (613) 230-6760
Fax/Téléc.: (613) 563-7739
[email protected]/[email protected]
Executive Director/Directrice générale
Nathalie Laporte
Editor
Craig Kelman
SPRING/PRINTEMPS 2013
Features
VOLUME 21 • NUMBER 2 | VOLUME 21 • NUMÉRO 2
Articles
Taxes: To self-assess or not to self-assess....................................................................................................... 22
Faculty Bargaining Services:
Critical issues in bargaining for academic staff ....................................................................................... 24
Land as a revenue generator for
Canadian universities and colleges.................................................................................................................... 27
Les propriétés foncières:
une source de revenus pour les universités et collèges canadiens ................................................... 32
Assistant Editor
Christine Hanlon
Art Production
Kristy Unrau
Marketing Manager
Al Whalen
37
Advertising Coordinator
Stefanie Ingram
Publications Mail Agreement #40065075
Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:
email: [email protected]
Published four times a year on behalf of the
Canadian Association of University Business Officers
(CAUBO) by
Publié quatre fois par année pour l’Association
canadienne du personnel administratif universitaire
(ACPAU) par
Departments
Third Floor - 2020 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0K4
Tel: 866-985-9780
Fax: 866-985-9799
www.kelman.ca
[email protected]
Chroniques
Executive Director’s Message .................................................................................................................................... 7
Message de la directrice générale .............................................................................................................................. 8
Green Notes .............................................................................................................................................................................. 9
People Moves ....................................................................................................................................................................... 10
Meet our Members .......................................................................................................................................................... 13
Rencontrez nos membres .............................................................................................................................................. 14
The views expressed in this publication are the responsibility of the
publisher and do not necessarily reflect the views
of the officers or members of the Canadian Association
of University Business Officers.
Les opinions exprimées dans cette publication sont la
responsabilité de l’éditeur et ne reflètent pas nécessairement celles des
dirigeants ou des membres de l’Association canadienne du personnel
administratif universitaire.
© 2013 Craig Kelman & Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.
The contents of this publication may not be reproduced by any means,
in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the publisher.
© Craig Kelman & Associates Ltd., 2013. Tous droits réservés.
Cette publication ne peut être reproduite, en tout ou en partie, par
quelque moyen que ce soit, sans autorisation écrite préalable de l’éditeur.
Professional Development/Perfectionnement Professionnel ......................................................... 17
Campus Profiles/Profils campus ............................................................................................................................. 18
Executive Director’s Message
Sharing ideas and solutions
By Nathalie Laporte
I
am sure that it will not come as a surprise that, when I travel around Canada
and speak with CAUBO members,
resource constraints are often the main
topic of conversation. With provincial and
federal governments trimming budgets
across the country, university administrators must constantly re-evaluate their own
budgets, seek best practices and determine how to maximize assets and revenues
wherever possible.
In pursuit of our mission of promoting and supporting professional management and effective leadership in the
administrative affairs of Canadian universities, CAUBO endeavours to provide
effective and efficient support to our
members, as they manage the difficult
and growing issue of inadequate funding. We have the perfect opportunity to
do so at our annual conference, where
members can share best practices with
one another and learn how administrators at other institutions in Canada and
elsewhere in the world are innovating
and making changes in order to cope
with the current challenging fi nancial
environment. The 2013 conference program appears in this issue of University
Manager; I encourage you to join us in
Hamilton, Ontario from June 15-18 to
take full advantage of this opportunity
to network and share knowledge and
insights with peers, hear new ideas and
perspectives from keynote and plenary
speakers, Qualit y and Productivit y
Award winners and concurrent session
presenters, and talk about the tough
questions. From common problems, perhaps extraordinary solutions may arise.
On page 27 of this issue of University
Manager, you can also read the fi rst in a
planned series of feature articles that will
investigate how Canadian universities
and their administrators are identifying and pursuing new and alternative
sources of revenue generation in order
to compensate for reduced or inadequate
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
funding. The opening article in the series
highlights how universities across the
country are using surplus land assets to
generate new revenues, and explores the
different forms their efforts are taking.
Future articles in the series will delve
into other non-traditional and innovative
sources of revenue generation for universities. If your institution is using its existing
assets to generate revenues in a creative
way in order to offset reduced funding, we
would love to hear about it and possibly
feature your idea or project in a future
article. Feel free to contact me any time at
[email protected]
I hope to see you in Hamilton in June.
“CAUBO endeavours to provide effective
and efficient support to our members,
as they manage the difficult and growing
issue of inadequate funding.”
Servicing universities
and colleges in office
furniture solutions
Solutions en aménagement
de bureau pour les universités
et les collèges
T 418.833.0047 F 418.830.0081
[email protected]
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
7
Message de la directrice générale
Échange d’idées
et de solutions
Board of Directors ~ 2012-2013
Conseil d’administration
Matthew Nowakowski
President/Président
Directeur général, Service des finances
Université de Montréal
(514) 343-7153 Fax/Téléc. : (514) 343-6608
[email protected]
Dave Button
Vice-President/Vice-président
Vice-President (Administration)
University of Regina
(306) 585-4386 Fax/Téléc. : (306) 585-5255
[email protected]
Ken Burt
Secretary-Treasurer/Secrétaire-trésorier
Dalhousie University
(902) 494-3862 Fax/Téléc. : (902) 494-2022
[email protected]
James Butler
Past President/Président sortant
Vice-President, Finance & Administration
Wilfrid Laurier University
(519) 884-0710 x2248
Fax/Téléc. : (519) 886-8645
[email protected]
Nathalie Laporte
Executive Director/Directrice générale
(613) 230-6760, x268 Fax/Téléc. : (613) 563-7739
[email protected]
Directors / Administrateurs
Gary Bradshaw
Associate Vice-President,
Administration and Finance
Grenfell Campus,
Memorial University of Newfoundland
(709) 637-6251 Fax/Téléc. : (709) 637-6239
[email protected]
Lisa Castle
Associate Vice-President, Human Resources
The University of British Columbia
(604) 822-8120 Fax/Téléc. : (604) 822-8134
[email protected]
Michael Di Grappa
Vice-Principal (Finance and Administration)
McGill University
(514) 398-2883 Fax/Téléc. : (514) 398-5902
[email protected]
Josée Germain
Vice-rectrice à l’administration et aux finances
Université Laval
(418) 656-3988 Fax/Téléc. : (418) 656-3300
[email protected]
Gayle Gorrill
Vice-President, Finance and Operations
University of Victoria
(250) 721-7018 Fax/Téléc. : (250) 721-6677
[email protected]
Gitta Kulczycki
Vice-President (Resources and Operations)
Western University
(519) 661-3114 x83114 Fax/Téléc. : (519) 661-3139
[email protected]
Lucie Mercier-Gauthier
Associate Vice-President, Student Services
University of Ottawa
(613) 562-5740 Fax/Téléc. : (613) 562-5107
[email protected]
Eric Tufts
Vice-recteur à l'administration
Université Sainte-Anne
(902) 769-2114 x7309 Fax/Téléc. : (902) 769-3120
[email protected]
Par Nathalie Laporte
L
’un des principaux sujets de conversation abordés lors de mes échanges avec
les membres de l’ACPAU au cours de
la dernière année est sans nul doute celui
des contraintes financières. Cela n’a rien
d’étonnant. Les gouvernements fédéral et
provinciaux compriment leurs budgets, ce
qui amène les administrateurs universitaires à constamment réévaluer leurs propres
budgets, trouver des pratiques exemplaires
et déterminer comment optimiser autant
que possible les actifs ainsi que les revenus
générés par leur établissement.
Dans l’optique de sa mission, qui consiste à promouvoir et à appuyer la gestion
professionnelle et le leadership efficace dans
l’administration des universités canadiennes,
l’ACPAU s’emploie à fournir à ses membres
des outils efficaces et efficients pour les aider
à résoudre le difficile problème du sousfinancement, qui ne cesse de s’accentuer.
Notre congrès annuel constitue une occasion tout indiquée pour ce faire : les membres peuvent se renseigner mutuellement
sur leurs pratiques exemplaires et aussi
découvrir comment certains administrateurs
d’autres établissements au Canada et dans le
monde innovent et changent leurs façons de
faire afin de s’adapter au contexte financier
actuel. Le programme du congrès 2013 est
inclus dans la présente édition de Gestion
universitaire.
Je vous encourage à vous joindre à nous à
Hamilton, en Ontario, du 15 au 18 juin, afin
de pleinement tirer parti de cette occasion
de réseauter et de mettre en commun des
connaissances, de découvrir des points de
vue différents, d’entendre des idées et des
perspectives nouvelles exprimées par le conférencier principal, les conférenciers des plénières, les lauréats des prix de la qualité et de
la productivité tout comme les conférenciers
des séances parallèles. On y discutera aussi
de questions épineuses. Des discussions sur
les problèmes courants, il jaillira peut-être
des solutions extraordinaires.
Par ailleurs, à la page 32 du présent
numéro de Gestion universitaire, vous pourrez lire le premier d’une série d’articles dans
lesquels nous explorerons les moyens dont se
servent les universités canadiennes et leurs
administrateurs pour trouver et exploiter des
sources de revenus nouvelles et originales
afin de compenser les réductions de revenus
ou le financement inadéquat.
Dans le premier article de la série, nous
verrons comment des universités canadiennes exploitent les terrains qu’elles
n’utilisent pas pour générer des revenus et
les différentes formes que prennent leurs
initiatives dans ce sens.
Les prochains articles de la série traiteront
d’autres sources de revenus non traditionnelles pour les universités. Si votre établissement utilise ses actifs de façon créative pour
en tirer des revenus et compenser des pertes
de financement, faites-nous-en part. Qui sait,
votre idée ou projet pourrait être l’objet d’un
futur article. N’hésitez pas à communiquer
avec moi, à [email protected]
Au plaisir de vous rencontrer à Hamilton,
en juin!
“L’ACPAU s’emploie à fournir à ses membres des outils
efficaces et efficients pour les aider à résoudre le
difficile problème du sous-financement.”
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Green Notes
AWARD-WINNING ENVIRONMENTAL ACHIEVEMENT
The University of Calgary (U of C) took home the City of Calgary’s Environmental Achievement Award for its sustainability
efforts, including reducing waste and increasing water and energy
efficiency. U of C is also the first institution in Alberta to receive
a Silver rating under the Sustainability Tracking Assessment and
Rating System.
MEMORIAL WASTE AUDIT DIGS INTO TRASH
A joint project between the Sustainability Office and the Department
of Geography, Memorial University’s recent waste audit involved
teams of students and staff inspecting the contents of garbage
receptacles in 13 locations on the St. John’s campus. The discovery
of large amounts of paper is prompting the university to make a
variety of recycling bins more readily accessible.
UVIC’S CERTIFIED CLIMATE LEADER
The Sustainability Coordinator with the University of Victoria’s
Office of Campus Planning and Sustainability, Rita Fromholt,
recently completed training with Al Gore to become a certified
‘climate leader’ and deliver Gore’s updated climate change presentation to audiences on campus and in the community.
SFU LAUNCHES AN OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY
Simon Fraser University is advancing its commitment to green
leadership by establishing an Office of Sustainability. Sustainability
SFU, a student group started in 2003 to improve sustainability on
campus, recently became an independent non-profit organization,
financed through student fees. Also this year, the two-year-old ad
hoc Sustainability Network officially became SFU’s hub for all sustainability leadership and engagement, encompassing academics,
research, students, facilities and operations. The sustainability office
will link these entities and help coordinate their various efforts.
WESTERN U BOARD APPROVES SUSTAINABILITY
STRATEGY
Western University's board of governors recently approved the
Creating a Sustainable Western Experience strategy. The report
sets out five and ten-year goals, and stresses the need to embed
sustainability into every aspect of campus culture. Among those
goals are items calling for educational opportunities and the pursuit
of research related to sustainability, as well as commitments to purchasing sustainable products and developing green infrastructure
on campus. The strategy highlights Western’s continued effort
to minimize its ecological footprint while enhancing ecosystem
services on campus.
UNB ESTABLISHES CREIGHTON CONSERVATION
FOREST
The University of New Brunswick has set boundaries for its Creighton Conservation Forest (CCF) – a portion of the university's
heritage lands that was set aside for conservation in 2011 – within
the UNB Woodlot. About half of the 3,800 acre woodlot will be protected from retail development in perpetuity, and used for teaching,
undergraduate research, and recreation. Forest management will
continue in designated areas as a means of facilitating the teaching
and research component.
USHERBROOKE LEADS GLOBAL SURVEY
The Université de Sherbrooke has placed first in Canada and sixth
worldwide in a global sustainability survey by the University of
Indonesia. The UI GreenMetric Ranking of World Universities
2012 rated 215 participating institutions from 49 countries based
on six categories: green statistics, energy and climate change, waste
management, water usage, transportation, and education. Other
Canadian universities listed in the ranking are uOttawa (#14), York
U (#15), uLaval (#42), SFU (#77), and Acadia (#146).
If you would like your institution’s ‘green’ projects to be featured in an upcoming issue of University Manager,
please send your information to Green Notes at [email protected]
40 years of providing FEE-ONLY™ customized
financial counsel to executives and employees
through group seminars, individual financial
planning and online solutions.
www.tewealth.com/employers • 1-888-505-8608
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
9
People Moves Appointments
Ilene Busch-Vishniac was installed as the
University of Saskatchewan’s (U of S) ninth
President on October 27, 2012, succeeding
Peter MacKinnon. She previously served for
five years as Provost at McMaster University
before joining the U of S.
Andrew Konowalchuk has been appointed
Associate Vice-President (Administration)
at the University of Manitoba (U of M),
effective March 11, 2013. Konowalchuk
will join the U of M from the Winnipeg
Regional Health Authority, where he served
as Regional Director, Capital Planning.
David Wheeler has been appointed President of Cape Breton University, effective
April 2013. Wheeler is currently Pro ViceChancellor (Sustainability) and Executive
Dean of Business at the University of Plymouth (UK).
Melanie J. Humphreys has been appointed
President of The King's University College
(UC) in Edmonton, effective July 1, 2013.
Humphreys will join The King's UC from
Illinois-based Wheaton College, where
she is currently the Dean of Student Care
and Services.
Jamie Cassels has been appointed President of the University of Victoria (UVic),
effective July 1, 2013. Cassels was VicePresident Academic and Provost at UVic
from 2001 to 2010, and before that, Dean
of Law.
In Memoriam
Dr. Bernie MacDonald, former
Vice-President Administration and
Co-President of Nova Scotia Agricultural
College passed away on January 15, 2013.
Dr. MacDonald had recently retired after
18 years of service to the institution.
MacDonald started as the vice-president
of administration at the college in 1994
and worked on a number of projects
throughout his career, including the
Atlantic Poultry Centre. Before beginning
at the agricultural college, MacDonald
taught for nearly 20 years at the Nova
Scotia Teachers College, as well as many
years in a secondary school.
Recognition
On October 2, former University of Saskatchewan President Peter MacKinnon
was awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws
from Dalhousie University.
Retirement
Darrell Cochrane, Controller at Dalhousie
University and member of the CAUBO
Finance Committee for five years, retired
from Dalhousie University effective
March 4, 2013 after 29 years of service,
all in Financial Services. He joined
Dalhousie’s Financial Services Department
in 1984. In 2010, Darrell was honored with
CAUBO’s Ken Clements Distinguished
Administrator Award, recognizing his
extraordinary leadership as well as his
contributions to the association and to
all member institutions drawing on the
services offered through CAUBO.
Please send information regarding
appointments, retirements etc. to the
CAUBO National Office,
[email protected]
Investing with
Passion, Perspective & Purpose
for Canadian institutional investors
& non-profit organizations
VANCOUVER • CALGARY • TORONTO • MONTREAL
1-888-880-5588 • [email protected]
Phillips, Hager & North Investment Management is an operating division within RBC Global Asset Management Inc., an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary
of Royal Bank of Canada. ® / ™ Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. © RBC Global Asset Management Inc., 2012. ICI205157
10
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
solid performance
THROUGH UP
AND DOWN
MARKETS.
FRANKLIN TEMPLETON
INSTITUTIONAL BALANCED TRUST
For over 25 years, Franklin Templeton has been delivering high quality
balanced solutions for pensions, foundations and endowments in Canada.
Category leader in Canadian balanced mandates*
Performance
Quartile
1 Year
3 Year
5 Year
7 Year
10 Year
11.03%
8.69%
5.64%
5.43%
7.40%
1
1
1
1
1
To learn more about Franklin Templeton’s Canadian balanced solutions, contact
Duane Green, Head of Institutional–Canada, at [email protected]
or visit ftinstitutional.ca.
*Source: Mercer database, December 2012. Securities of the Franklin Templeton Institutional Balanced Trust are only available for purchase by investors who can purchase
in reliance upon applicable prospectus exemptions. Franklin Templeton Institutional Balanced Trust is not guaranteed, its value changes frequently and past performance
may not be repeated. Returns shown are gross of fees. Franklin Templeton Institutional is part of Franklin Templeton Investments Corp.
© 2013 Franklin Templeton Investments Corp. All rights reserved.
Real estate from
the ground up.
We know the
opportunities.
Real estate investments are playing a
growing role in both DB and DC plan
portfolios — and the demand for investment
stability and diversity continues to rise.
We can help. Invesco’s real estate team is
on the ground worldwide, with more than
347 employees in 12 countries. It’s the kind
of bottom-up, local-market intelligence that
can provide your plan with superior real
estate solutions — through both REITs and
direct private real estate arrangements.
Singular focus. Exceptional solutions.
With a 30-year track record and a senior
management team that has worked together
for more than 15 years, you can expect a
proven investment process and exceptional
management stability.
Call us at 416.324.7442 or visit
www.institutional.invesco.ca.
Whether your focus is the U.S., Europe,
Asia or global, we can help you tailor a real
estate strategy to meet your plan’s needs.
Find out more about our institutional strategies.
All data as at December 31, 2012. Invesco® and all associated trademarks are trademarks of Invesco Holding Company Limited, used under licence.
© Invesco Canada Ltd., 2012
Meet our Members
RICHARD FLORIZONE
Working across sectors
Dalhousie University’s incoming president, Richard Florizone, was the
University of Saskatchewan’s Vice-President (Finance & Resources) for seven
years, the last of which included a secondment as Senior Adviser to the World
Bank Group's International Finance Corporation. With a PhD in Physics from
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Florizone has also worked as the
Director, Strategic Initiatives for Bombardier Aerospace and as a consultant with
the Boston Consulting Group. The 45-year-old serves as Director of the Waterloo
Institute for Nanotechnology and the Institute for Research on Public Policy, and
has been a Policy Fellow of the University of Saskatchewan’s Johnson-Shoyama
Graduate School of Public Policy since October 2008.
How does an academic with a PhD in physics become a strategic planning consultant
in the first place?
Behind my rather unusual path is a driving
curiosity, about both the natural world and
society. While pursuing my PhD in physics
with an international team at a laboratory
in Germany, I concluded that I am as curious about interactions between people as
between atoms. I was just as interested
in how that collaboration of people came
together, and how we could work more
effectively, because that was part of the science, part of the same picture. The way we
worked as a team would impact the questions we would be able to address and the
quality of science we would be able to do.
When you are pursuing academic inquiry,
money, resources and organization are all
interesting parts of the puzzle.
Some would describe your rise through the
world of business and university administration as meteoric. How would you explain it?
There has been a lot of good fortune or
grace, hard work and focus, and the support and encouragement of others. The
longer my career, the more I appreciate
that third one. The extent to which we rely
on the support of others, such as staff and
mentors, is phenomenal and humbling.
That is why I increasingly try to focus on
how we can encourage and develop others.
What do you feel motivates or drives you?
I love the fact that most university teaching
and research initiatives have deep roots in
all sectors of society. Whether it is in the
sciences, humanities, social sciences, or
professions, universities are not just about
a narrow definition of academic inquiry.
They are also about engaging with community, to bring those ideas to life and
make a real difference.
In my own career, I am drawn toward
using my skills and experiences to make the
most meaningful contribution possible. I am
excited and humbled by the opportunity to
try doing that at Dalhousie.
How has your past experience prepared you
for your upcoming role at Dalhousie?
I believe that the solution to challenges
facing institutions and society will be
found among disciplines and among
institutions across different sectors and
interests. Take Dalhousie’s work in oceans
research, for example. It encompasses academic interests, public policy issues – provincial, regional, federal and international
– and industry interests related to fisheries
and natural resources.
One of the strengths I hope to bring is a
unique mix of experience across different
sectors. I started my career in academia,
where I developed an understanding,
appreciation and affection for universities,
followed by experience in other sectors,
including industry and government. In my
role as Director with the Canadian Light
Source Synchrotron, my background as a
physicist gave me a deep appreciation of
the fundamental science being done there
and of the interests of researchers, faculty,
students and staff. My background in public
policy has helped me engage with government – provincially, federally and locally
– and understand their interests. Having a
background in industry has helped me in
discussions about industrial strategy and
building partnerships with private sector
entities. I hope my experience puts me in
a place where I can navigate some of those
boundaries and help create opportunities
and partnerships to help Dal continue
moving forward.
What do you foresee as the greatest challenge in your new position and in the university sector as a whole?
At the moment, finances are on everyone’s
mind across the sector. The big question for
society is how to balance the need to limit
public spending while also investing in
the next generation. It is both a challenge
and an opportunity. As much as there is a
need to be prudent with public finances,
there is a real recognition of the need to
continue investing in research, innovation
and teaching to address some of the grand
“The big question for society is how to balance the need to limit
public spending while also investing in the next generation.”
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
13
Meet our Members
challenges facing society, whether they be
in health, energy, food, public policy or
culture. I believe that, in 10 to 20 years,
Canadian universities like Dalhousie will
only have grown in their importance and
impact.
What do you think universities could learn
from the private sector and vice versa?
The private and university sectors have
distinct cultures, strengths and weaknesses. It is an asset to understand and
have experienced them both. Businesses
are often driven by action. Universities
are fundamentally driven by ideas. We
have such a love and respect for ideas that
sometimes we can be challenged in bringing those ideas to life.
On the flip side, in the private sector,
there is a focus on action. Where companies
can learn from universities is in the area
of thoughtfulness. Universities excel in
effectively integrating multiple perspectives.
What are you most looking forward to as
president at Dalhousie University?
I cannot wait to get started because there
is so much to build upon. Along with
almost 200 years of history, Dalhousie has
a higher percentage of out-of-province
students than any other major research
university in the country. It is also firmly
rooted in Halifax and Nova Scotia, offering
programs and initiatives that serve the
Maritime region. Dal has a tremendous
impact regionally, nationally and globally
and I am excited to be part of that diversity.
I am also looking forward to getting to
know everyone and working with them.
The welcome has been very warm.
What do you do in any spare time you
may have?
I am looking forward to putting my boat in
the water once we get to Halifax. Recently,
I started kite boarding, a sport that offers
the thrill of sailing in a portable package.
As a family (we have two girls, aged
fi ve and eight), we like to spend a lot
of time outdoors. This is something
else that excites us about Nova Scotia:
the landscape is spectacular. We have a
camper and are looking forward to using
it.
Rencontrez nos membres
RICHARD FLORIZONE
Un bagage multisectoriel
Le recteur qui entrera en fonction sous peu à la Dalhousie University, Richard
Florizone, a été vice-recteur aux finances et aux ressources de la University of
Saskatchewan pendant sept ans. Au cours de la dernière année, en vertu d’un
prêt de service, il a agi comme conseiller principal auprès de l’International
Finance Corporation, un institut membre du Groupe de la Banque mondiale.
Titulaire d’un doctorat en physique du Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
M. Florizone a occupé les postes de directeur des initiatives stratégiques chez
Bombardier Aéronautique et de consultant au service du Boston Consulting
Group. Aujourd’hui, à 45 ans, il cumule aussi les fonctions de directeur du
Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology et de l’Institut de recherche en politiques
publiques. Par ailleurs, il est Policy Fellow de la Johnson-Shoyama Graduate
School of Public Policy de la University of Saskatchewan depuis octobre 2008.
Comment un universitaire titulaire d’un
doctorat en physique en vient-il à devenir
consultant en planification stratégique?
Le fil conducteur de mon parcours
inhabituel est ma grande curiosité, tant
à l’égard du monde qui nous entoure que
de la société. Pendant que je travaillais
avec une équipe internationale dans
un laboratoire en Allemagne, dans le
cadre de mon doctorat en physique, j’ai
constaté que les interactions entre les gens
éveillaient ma curiosité aussi bien que les
14
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
interactions entre les atomes. La façon
dont la collaboration entre les personnes
s’était établie m’intéressait autant que
de trouver des moyens de travailler plus
efficacement. Au fond, ces questions
relèvent de la science, ces éléments forment
un tout. Notre mode de fonctionnement en
équipe allait avoir des répercussions sur les
questions auxquelles nous allions pouvoir
nous attaquer et sur la qualité des travaux
scientifiques que nous serions en mesure
de faire. Dans le contexte de la recherche
universitaire, l’argent, les ressources et
l’organisation sont tous des éléments
intéressants de l’équation.
Certains qualifient de phénoménale votre
ascension dans le monde des affaires et de
l’administration universitaire. Comment
l’expliquez-vous?
Par divers facteurs : beaucoup d’heureux
hasards, l’effort et la concentration, de
même que l’appui et l’encouragement de
mon entourage. À mesure que j’avance
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
“La question fondamentale qui se pose pour la société est de
trouver un juste équilibre entre la nécessité de limiter les dépenses
publiques et celle d’investir dans la prochaine génération.”
dans ma carrière, j’apprécie encore davantage ce dernier volet. C’est incroyable à
quel point nous nous appuyons sur les
autres, que ce soit le personnel ou des
mentors; j’en tire une leçon d’humilité.
C’est pour cette raison que j’essaie de plus
en plus de me concentrer sur la recherche
de moyens pour encourager les autres et
les aider à s’épanouir.
Qu’est-ce qui vous motive ou vous anime?
J’adore le fait que la plupart des initiatives
liées à l’enseignement et à la recherche universitaires sont profondément enracinées
dans tous les secteurs de la société. Qu’il
s’agisse de sciences, de sciences humaines
et sociales ou de professions, les universités vont au-delà de la stricte définition de
la recherche universitaire. Elles ont aussi
comme but de s’engager dans la collectivité, de donner vie aux idées et de faire
bouger les choses.
Dans ma carrière, je suis poussé par
la volonté d’utiliser mes compétences et
mon expérience de manière à apporter une
contribution qui soit la plus significative
possible. Je suis emballé d’avoir l’occasion
de le faire à Dalhousie, et humble devant
cette perspective.
En quoi votre expérience passée vous a-telle préparé à assumer votre nouveau rôle
à Dalhousie?
Je crois qu’on trouvera les solutions
aux défis auxquels sont confrontés les
établissements et la société en général dans
des disciplines et des établissements se
rattachant à divers secteurs et domaines
d’intérêt. Prenons les travaux de recherche
sur les océans qui se font à Dalhousie,
par exemple. Ils présentent un intérêt
scientifique, touchent aux politiques
publiques – régionales, provinciales,
fédérales et internationales – et concernent
les intérêts des industries qui reposent sur
la pêche et les ressources naturelles.
L’une des forces que j’espère apporter
à l’établissement est un amalgame unique
d’expériences acquises dans différents
secteurs. J’ai commencé ma carrière dans
le milieu universitaire, où j’ai appris à
comprendre et à apprécier les universités.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Ensuite, j’ai accumulé de l’expérience
dans d’autres secteurs, y compris le milieu
industriel et le secteur gouvernemental.
Lorsque j’étais directeur du Centre
canadien de rayonnement synchrotron,
mon bagage de physicien m’a permis de
bien saisir la recherche fondamentale qui
s’y déroulait de même que les intérêts
des chercheurs, des professeurs, des
étudiants et du personnel. Mon bagage
dans le domaine des politiques publiques
m’a aidé à nouer des liens avec les divers
paliers de gouvernement – au fédéral,
au provincial et auprès des autorités
locales – et à comprendre leurs intérêts.
Quant à mon bagage industriel, il m’a
servi dans les discussions au sujet de
stratégies industrielles et la création de
partenariats avec des entreprises privées.
J’espère que mon expérience m’amènera à
explorer certaines de ces sphères, qu’elle
contribuera à ouvrir des portes et à tisser
des partenariats qui aideront Dalhousie à
continuer d’aller de l’avant.
Quel est le plus grand défi que vous prévoyez devoir relever dans votre nouveau
rôle et dans le secteur universitaire de
manière générale?
Pour l’heure, les finances préoccupent
tous les intervenants du secteur. La question fondamentale qui se pose pour la
société est de trouver un juste équilibre
entre la nécessité de limiter les dépenses
publiques et celle d’investir dans la
prochaine génération. C’est à la fois un
obstacle et une occasion à saisir. Autant il
faut être prudent en matière de finances
publiques, autant on observe une prise
de conscience réelle quant à la nécessité
de continuer d’investir dans la recherche,
l’innovation et l’enseignement pour relever les grands défis auxquels la société
est confrontée, qu’il s’agisse de santé,
d’énergie, d’alimentation, de politique
publique ou de culture. Je crois que dans 10
à 20 ans, les universités canadiennes telles
que Dalhousie n’auront fait que croître en
importance et en rayonnement.
À votre avis, que pourraient apprendre les
universités du secteur privé et vice versa?
Le secteur privé et le milieu universitaire
ont chacun leur propre culture, leurs propres forces et faiblesses. Le fait de comprendre et d’avoir touché les deux environnements constitue un atout. Les entreprises
sont souvent orientées vers l’action, tandis
que les universités sont fondamentalement
mobilisées par des idées. Nous avons tant
d’amour et de respect pour les idées que,
parfois, il faut se faire rappeler de les concrétiser.
À l’inverse, dans le secteur privé, on met
l’accent sur l’action. Là où les entreprises
pourraient s’inspirer des universités,
c’est dans la réflexion approfondie. Les
universités excellent lorsqu’il est question
d’intégrer efficacement de multiples
perspectives.
Qu’est-ce qui vous réjouit le plus à l’idée
d’entreprendre votre mandat de recteur de
la Dalhousie University?
Il me tarde de me mettre à la tâche, car il
y a tant de choses en place sur lesquelles
on peut bâtir. Dalhousie, qui cumule près
de 200 ans d’histoire, est l’université de
recherche canadienne qui présente la plus
forte proportion d’étudiants provenant
de l’extérieur de la province. Aussi, elle
est solidement enracinée à Halifax et en
Nouvelle-Écosse, offrant des programmes
et des initiatives qui s’adressent à toute
la région des Maritimes. Dalhousie a de
fortes retombées dans la région, au pays et
à l’étranger. Je suis ravi de faire partie de
cette diversité. Je prendrai plaisir à apprendre à connaître les gens et à travailler avec
eux. J’ai été accueilli très chaleureusement.
Que faites-vous dans vos temps libres?
J’ai hâte de mettre mon bateau à l’eau, une
fois que nous serons installés à Halifax.
Récemment, j’ai commencé à faire du surf
cerf-volant, un sport aussi grisant que la
voile, mais en version portable.
En famille (nous avons deux filles, âgées
de cinq et huit ans), nous aimons passer
beaucoup de temps en plein air. Voilà un
autre aspect de la Nouvelle-Écosse qui nous
séduit : les paysages sont spectaculaires.
Nous avons un véhicule récréatif et anticipons avec joie l’occasion de l’utiliser.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
15
UPCOMING OPPORTUNITIES
Don’t miss out on these targeted, practical and effective
professional development opportunities offered at great member
prices. Visit www.caubo.ca to learn more about these activities.
ACTIVITÉS À VENIR
Ne manquez pas ces activités de perfectionnement professionnel ciblées,
pratiques et efficaces, qui sont offertes à nos membres à des prix avantageux!
Allez à www.acpau.ca pour en apprendre davantage sur ces activités.
Cours en ligne (projet pilote)
L’entreprise de recherche : notions fondamentales
(en anglais)
29 avril au 28 juin 2013
Online Course (pilot)
Fundamentals of the Research Enterprise
April 29 – June 28, 2013
Annual Conference
CAUBO 2013: All The Right Moves
Hamilton, Ontario
June 15 – 18, 2013
Congrès annuel
ACPAU 2013 : Maîtrisez votre échiquier
Hamilton, Ontario
15 juin au 18 juin 2013
CAUBO Live Learning Centre
Recorded content from CAUBO 2012 and CAUBO 2011 annual
conferences
Available anytime at
http://caubo.sclivelearningcenter.com
Live Learning Centre de l’ACPAU
Contenu enregistré à l’occasion des congrès annuels de l’ACPAU,
en 2012 et 2011
Accessible en tout temps à : http://
caubo.sclivelearningcenter.com
RECOGNITION
AWA R D S
Beginning at the 2013 Hamilton conference in June, CAUBO’s
Volunteer Recognition Awards will be presented in a special
ceremony on Tuesday morning, rather than during the President’s
Dinner and Dance as in previous years. Join us as we celebrate the
outstanding contributions of our valued volunteers.
Write an article
and you c
for U
ould
nive
rsity
wi n
Manager
$1000!
University Manager publisher, Craig Kelman &
Associates, is sponsoring a $1000 annual award
for the best article written by a CAUBO member
for UM. Articles will be reviewed by the CAUBO
Editorial Advisory Group, with this year’s winning
author selected in December and announced in
the January 2014 issue of the magazine. Every
CAUBO member who submits an article to UM
in 2013 will be eligible to win. If you have a great
idea for an article you would be willing and able
to write for UM, please contact Alison Larabie
Chase, CAUBO’s Communications Coordinator, at
[email protected] A list of recently-published
article topics is available upon request.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
À compter du congrès 2013, qui aura lieu en juin, l’ACPAU
remettra les prix de reconnaissance des bénévoles à l’occasion
d’une cérémonie spéciale, le mardi matin, plutôt qu’au cours du
banquet et de la soirée dansante du président, comme c’était le
cas ces dernières années. Soyez des nôtres pour souligner les
contributions remarquables de nos précieux bénévoles.
PR I X DE
RECONNAISSANCE
Craig Kelman & Associates, la maison d’édition
qui publie la revue Gestion universitaire, remettra
un prix annuel de 1 000 $ pour le meilleur article
rédigé par un membre de l’ACPAU à l’intention
de cette revue. Les articles seront évalués par
le groupe consultatif de rédaction de l’ACPAU.
Le récipiendaire de cette année sera choisi en
décembre et le nom de l’auteur sera diffusé dans le
numéro de janvier 2014. Tout membre de l’ACPAU
qui présente un article pour la revue GU en 2013
sera admissible. Si vous avez une idée géniale
pour un article que vous êtes disposé à écrire et
en mesure de le faire, veuillez communiquer avec
Alison Larabie Chase, coordonnatrice des communications, à [email protected] Une liste
des sujets ayant récemment fait l’objet d’un article
vous sera transmise sur demande.
Gestion universitaire
revue
a
l
r
u
o
ner 1 000 $!
Rédigez un article p
z gag
et vous pou
rrie
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
17
Campus Profiles
Location: Brandon, Manitoba
Student population: 2913
Number of faculty: 241
Number of staff (FTEs): 172.33
Approximate size of campus (hectares): 10.7
Total revenue budget: $58 million
Senior administrator (also the contact person):
Scott Lamont, Vice-President, Finance and Administration
Lieu : Brandon, Manitoba
Population étudiante : 2 913
Nombre de professeurs : 241
Nombre d’autres membres du personnel (ETP) : 172,33
Superficie approximative du campus (hectares) : 10,7
Budget total de revenus : 58 millions de dollars
Administratreur principal (également personne-ressource) :
Scott Lamont, vice-recteur aux finances et à l’administration
What sets your institution apart
from other institutions in your region?
Primarily an undergraduate institution, Brandon University (BU) is renowned for its liberal arts, social sciences
and science programs, as well as professional and artistic
programming. In particular, BU is recognized nationally
and internationally for its music, psychiatric nursing, and
Aboriginal education programs.
Qu’est-ce qui distingue votre établissement des autres de votre région?
Principalement axée sur les programmes de premier cycle, la Brandon University (BU) est réputée pour ses programmes de formation
générale, de sciences sociales et de sciences, de même que pour ses
programmes professionnels et artistiques. Plus particulièrement, la BU
a acquis une notoriété nationale et internationale pour ses programmes
de musique, de soins infirmiers psychiatriques et d’enseignement
autochtone.
Name one major achievement in the last year.
Building on a legacy that at one point saw 25% to 30% of its
students identified as Aboriginal, BU has reinvigorated its
Indigenous Peoples’ Centre on campus and hired a Director
of Aboriginal Initiatives, a Learning Skills Specialist and a
Student Success Officer, with the goal of recruiting and supporting Aboriginal students. BU has been working with the
Manitoba Métis Federation, which helps fund some of the
services and provides Métis student scholarships. In conjunction with the Southern Chiefs, and the Manitoba First
Nation Education Resource Center (MFNERC), BU recently
began offering an ongoing Aboriginal languages program
of Dakota, Ojibway, Cree and Michif, while the Faculty of
Education is developing Aboriginal language immersion
education training.
Décrivez un exploit accompli au cours de la dernière année.
Misant sur ses antécédents, soit le fait qu’à une certaine époque, de
25 % à 30 % de l’effectif étudiant provenait du milieu autochtone, la
BU a revitalisé son centre pour Autochtones et embauché un directeur
des initiatives autochtones, un spécialiste de l’apprentissage et un conseiller à la réussite dans le but de recruter et de soutenir les étudiants
autochtones. La BU collabore avec la Manitoba Métis Federation, qui
contribue au financement de certains services et offre des bourses aux
étudiants métis. De concert avec la Southern Chiefs’ Organization et le
Manitoba First Nation Education Resource Center (MFNERC), la BU
a récemment commencé à offrir un programme de langues autochtones, soit le dakota, l’ojibwa, le cri et le michif, tandis que la Faculté
de l’éducation s’affaire à concevoir un programme d’immersion en
langue autochtone.
Name one highlight of your
institution’s sustainability initiatives.
An early adopter of energy use efficiency studies, BU commissioned a review of electricity and natural gas usage leading
to energy saving renovations with a return-on-investment
of 3.5 years and ongoing savings of 22%. Brandon’s waste
diversion rate of 44% is set to increase, with a pilot program
currently underway for recycling organic materials.
18
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Citez un fait saillant des activités de votre établissement en matière
de développement durable. Dès les préludes des études sur l’efficacité
énergétique, la BU a commandé une analyse de sa consommation
d’électricité et de gaz naturel, qui a conduit à des rénovations visant à
économiser l’énergie. Résultat : un retour sur investissement au bout
de 3,5 ans et des économies de 22 % qui se maintiennent. Le taux de
revalorisation des déchets de Brandon, actuellement de 44 %, est appelé
à augmenter grâce au programme pilote en cours sur le recyclage des
matières organiques.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Profils Campus
What can we look for in the coming year from your institution?
BU is in the final stages of construction of its Healthy Living
Centre, funded by federal, provincial and municipal governments as well as a capital campaign. With double the previous
space, the new facility is open to the community and includes
three full-sized gymnasiums, an indoor track, and a cardio
fitness centre. The University is also hoping to move forward
with a new affordable housing development for studentheaded families, a $14 million project that has already passed
the first phase of approvals.
Location: Edmonton, Alberta (and Augustana Campus in
Camrose, Alberta)
Student population: 38,300
Number of faculty: 4,890 FTEs
Number of staff: 6,576 FTEs
Approximate size of campus (HA): Main campus: 92.2,
Campus Saint Jean: 6.2, Augustana Campus: 18.2, Edmonton Research Station/South Campus: 243.3
Total revenue budget: $1,705.6 million
Senior administrator (also the contact person): Phyllis
M. Clark, Vice-President (Finance and Administration)
What sets your institution
apart from other institutions in your region?
Distinguished by prominent national and international
partnerships, the University of Alberta (U of A) is Alberta’s flagship institution. A $25 million grant from the
Li Ka Shing Foundation made possible the Li Ka Shing
Institute of Virology and its recent Hepatitis C vaccine
breakthrough. Meanwhile, a partnership with Germany’s
Helmholtz Association is facilitating research collaboration in energy and the environment, infectious diseases,
prion/protein folding diseases, and terrestrial and ecosystem resource informatics. The U of A is also one of
three institutions involved in the Canada-India Research
Collaboration, focusing on health, safety and sustainability
in rural areas of both countries. New research collaborations are underway in virology with several Chinese
universities, and in energy and environmental research
with Tsinghua University.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Quels sont les projets de votre établissement pour la prochaine année?
La BU en est aux étapes finales de la construction de son Healthy
Living Centre, dont les fonds proviennent du fédéral, du provincial
et du municipal ainsi que d’une campagne de financement. Les
nouvelles installations, dont la superficie a doublé, sont ouvertes au
public. On y trouve trois grands gymnases, une piste intérieure et un
centre d’entraînement cardio. L’Université espère aussi concrétiser
un projet domiciliaire abordable pour accueillir les parents étudiants
et leur famille, un projet de 14 millions de dollars qui a déjà passé la
première étape d’approbation.
Lieu : Edmonton, Alberta (et campus Augustana à Camrose, Alberta)
Population étudiante : 38 300
Nombre de professeurs : 4 890 ETP
Nombre d’autres membres du personnel : 6 576 ETP
Superficie approximative du campus (hectares) : campus principal :
92,2, campus Saint-Jean : 6,2, campus Augustana : 18,2, Edmonton
Research Station et South Campus : 243,3
Budget total de revenus : 1 705,6 millions de dollars
Administratrice principale (également personne-ressource) :
Phyllis M. Clark, vice-rectrice aux fi nances et à l’administration
Qu’est-ce qui distingue votre
établissement des autres de votre région?
Reconnue pour ses partenariats nationaux et internationaux
d’envergure, la University of Alberta (U of A) est le fleuron des
établissements albertains. Une subvention de 25 millions de dollars de
la Li Ka Shing Foundation a permis de créer le Li Ka Shing Institute
of Virology, qui a récemment fait une percée dans la recherche sur le
vaccin contre l’hépatite C. Par ailleurs, un partenariat conclu avec la
Helmholtz Association, un organisme de recherche allemand, favorise
la collaboration dans les travaux de recherche portant sur l’énergie et
l’environnement, les maladies infectieuses, le repliement de la protéine prion ainsi que l’informatique appliquée aux ressources terrestres
et aux écosystèmes. La U of A figure parmi les trois établissements
qui participent au centre de collaboration en recherche Canada-Inde,
axé sur la santé, la sécurité et le développement durable dans les
régions rurales des deux pays. De nouveaux liens de collaboration
en recherche dans le domaine de la virologie sont en voie de se tisser
avec plusieurs universités chinoises; aussi, la recherche en énergie et
en environnement se fait en collaboration avec l’Université Tsinghua.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
19
Campus Profiles
Name one major achievement in the last year.
Under the direction of a very dynamic Chief Information
Officer, 82 email systems were converted to one uniform
system, with strong document-sharing capabilities and no
need for new infrastructure.
Décrivez un exploit accompli au cours de la dernière année.
Sous la gouverne d’un dirigeant principal de l’information très
dynamique, 82 systèmes de courriel ont été convertis en un système
unique doté de fonctions poussées de partage de documents, et ce,
sans recourir à une nouvelle infrastructure.
Name one highlight of your
institution’s sustainability initiatives.
In 2008, the U of A started a campus-wide sustainability
initiative, launching the Office of Sustainability the following year. Its first Sustainability Plan earned the institution a
Silver Rating from the Sustainability Tracking Assessment
and Rating System, second of 21 Canadian institutions rated
by STARS. Featuring fi rst-rate research and recycling, the
U of A has been recognized as one of the country’s overall
greenest employers for four years running.
Citez un fait saillant des activités de votre
établissement en matière de développement durable.
En 2008, la U of A a lancé une initiative de développement durable à
l’échelle du campus et inauguré un Bureau du développement durable
l’année suivante. Son premier plan de développement durable a valu
à l’établissement la cote argent selon le système STARS (Sustainability
Tracking Assessment and Rating System), ce qui le place au 2e rang
des 21 établissements canadiens reconnus par ce système. Grâce à
ses travaux de recherche et à ses initiatives de recyclage de premier
plan, la U of A s’est inscrite au palmarès des employeurs les plus
écologiques du pays quatre années d’affilée.
What can we look for in the
coming year from your institution?
Both from an academic and administrative perspective,
the U of A will be placing emphasis on graduate students
and the systems supporting them, including revamping
the registration process. The institution is also entering
into a partnership with Udacity to deliver an experimental
online course. On the administrative side, U of A will be
undertaking results-based budgeting – how to tie programs
to the budget to fulfill the mandate of the provincial oversight ministry. Other developments include building a
new state-of-the-art recreation facility on the main campus
and continuing to move forward with document imaging,
electronic approvals and other web-based digitization, as
well as with risk-management service development, one of
the university’s pillars of excellence.
mhpm.com
Managing Risk. Maximizing Opportunity.
National leaders in postsecondary education projects
20
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Quels sont les projets de votre établissement pour la prochaine année?
Tant du point de vue de l’enseignement que de l’administration, la U of
A mettra l’accent sur les étudiants des cycles supérieurs et les systèmes
destinés à les soutenir, y compris la refonte du processus d’inscription.
Aussi, l’établissement s’apprête à conclure un partenariat avec Udacity
pour offrir un premier cours en ligne à titre expérimental. En matière
d’administration, la U of A passera à la budgétisation axée sur les
résultats, c’est-à-dire comment rattacher les programmes au budget, et
ce, afin de répondre aux exigences du ministère provincial. Parmi les
autres projets à venir, citons la construction d’un nouveau centre de loisirs
ultramoderne sur le campus principal et la suite des démarches en vue
d’intégrer l’imagerie documentaire, les approbations électroniques et
d’autres formes de numérisation reposant sur le Web. À cela s’ajoute le
développement continu du service de gestion du risque, l’un des piliers
d’excellence de l’Université.
Cairns Family Health and
Bioscience Research Complex
Brock University
Minimiser les risques. Maximiser les bénéfices.
Leaders nationaux dans des
projets d’études post-secondaires
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Taxes
To self-assess or not to
self-assess: When to pay
GST/HST on imported services
A
By Gary Pike, Associate Director, Financial and Administrative Services, Memorial University of Newfoundland
and a member of the CAUBO Taxes Committee
s Canadian universities
increasingly receive services
from foreign companies, the need to
correctly self-assess Goods and Services
Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax (GST/HST)
has become important to protect a
university from the risk of unpaid GST/
HST. Tax legislation can be complicated.
To ensure that the rules set out by the
Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA) are
followed, it is often necessary to conduct
extensive research or incur costly fees
to get answers to specific tax questions.
CAUBO member institutions have access
to two free resources that can help them
find those answers quickly: the CAUBO
Income Tax Guide and the CAUBO Goods
and Services Tax Guide, both available
on CAUBO’s website. This article
summarizes information contained in the
CAUBO GST Guide about self-assessment
of GST/HST on imported services, as well
as some research conducted using the
Knotia products that are available for an
additional fee.
The rules that govern the GST/
HST indicate that, when a service is
provided to a Canadian resident by a
non-registered, non-resident vendor that
does not carry on business in Canada,
it is an imported service. In theory, the
taxation of an imported service is no
different than the taxation of a regular
service performed in Canada. However,
a service imported into Canada cannot be
practically taxed at the border in the same
manner as imported goods. Therefore,
when a service is imported into Canada,
GST/HST may need to be self-assessed.
There are exceptions. Some common
e x a m p l e s w h e re G S T / H S T s e l f -
assessment is not required on an imported
service are as follows:
• The vendor is a GST/HST registrant
and the supply is deemed to be made
in Canada. In this case, the applicable
GST/HST will be charged by the
vendor.
• The imported service is acquired
for use exclusively (90% or more) in
commercial activities carried on by
the university (e.g. a retail operation
of a university). In this case, since the
university would be entitled to a full
Input Tax Credit (ITC) because the
service is used in commercial activities,
CRA does not require self-assessment,
except if the university uses the special
quick method.
• The imported service is acquired for
use or supply exclusively in activities
entirely undertaken outside Canada,
the activities do not form part of a
business carried on in Canada, or an
adventure or a concern in the nature
of trade engaged in Canada.
• The situation involves an exempt, zerorated, or prescribed service.
When you self-assess, the payment of GST/
HST is due within the reporting period
that includes the day the consideration
is paid or payable (whichever is earlier).
Did you know:
common services that require
self-assessment of GST/HST
The following are examples of some
common services imported by universities
that may require self-assessment of GST/
HST:
• Software licenses (including electronic
books and other intangible
property), where the university is
entitled to use the property in Canada.
• Commission fees paid to vendors for
recruiting students. If the service is
provided by a registered Canadian
company, GST/HST will usually be
charged on the invoice. However, if
a foreign company is hired, often it
is not a GST/HST registrant. It then
“In theory, the taxation of an imported service is no different than the
taxation of a regular service performed in Canada. However, a service
imported into Canada cannot be practically taxed at the border in the same
manner as imported goods.”
22
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
“A key question in determining the need for self-assessment of
GST/HST is whether or not the GST/HST would be applicable if the imported
service was provided by a GST/HST registered vendor.”
•
•
•
•
becomes the university’s responsibility
to determine if GST/HST is applicable.
Even though the company hired
performs the work outside of
Canada, the service provided (i.e., the
recruitment of a student) is viewed as
a supply of a service to the Canadian
university and, therefore, subject to
GST/HST.
Membership fees, where the
memberships offers benefits in Canada.
Research and other consulting services
wholly or partially performed in
Canada by a non-registrant, nonresident vendor that does not carry
on a business in Canada.
Research services wholly performed
outside of Canada, where the results
are used in activity in Canada;
Training services provided outside
of Canada. Normally, a university is
not required to self-assess for most
personal services entirely consumed
outside of Canada by its employees
(e.g., meals, hotels) with one exception
– training services. Where a university
pays or reimburses an employee for
training costs, the university must
self-assess GST/HST even when the
training occurs entirely outside of
Canada.
• Advertising services in a foreign
journal for a Canadian job position.
The CRA taxes imported services to
ensure that individuals engaged in
non-commercial activities cannot avoid
paying tax on services received for use
in Canada by acquiring the services
from someone outside of Canada. A key
question in determining the need for selfassessment of GST/HST is whether or
not the GST/HST would be applicable
if the imported service was provided
by a GST/HST registered vendor. For
example, if a university contracts with
a local architectural firm to design a
new building, GST/HST would be
applicable on any consulting fees. If
the architectural fi rm was hired from
the US to do the same work, GST/HST
would still apply, even if the majority
of the design work was completed in
the US, because the service is supplied
in Canada and, therefore, an imported
service. If the US firm is not a GST/HST
registrant, you have to self-assess.
Taxation rules can be complex.
The circumstances and facts in each
situation should be reviewed carefully
to ensure a university makes the right
decision to self-assess or not. Often,
the answers to common situations can
be found in the CAUBO tax guides;
however, in unique situations, or if you
are not sure, it is always best to seek
professional advice.
It’s time for
new ideas.
Fiscal Sustainability.
kpmg.ca/education
© 2012 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent
member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
23
Faculty Bargaining Services (FBS)
Critical issues in bargaining
for academic staff
By Jonathan Rittenhouse, Field Officer, Faculty Bargaining Services
I
n an overview of the university sector
bargaining landscape last year, I wrote:
As Canadian universities are so highly
unionized, and with tenure, seniority
and student employment now so fully
embedded within their collective agreements, collective bargaining will be one
of the many arenas where universities'
financial sustainability will be tested
and more highly scrutinized than in
the past.
Since that was written, the scrutiny and
critique have intensified in ways that demonstrate the many challenges universities
face in order to successfully determine
their own strategies for sustainability. For
example:
• the 2012 student boycott/strike in
Quebec forestalling long-planned-for
tuition fee increases and emboldening
other student associations (e.g.,CFSOntario) to push for tuition fee
restraint, rollbacks or elimination;
24
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
• provincial government actions affecting
university bargaining through government mandates (British Columbia),
ministerial directives (Ontario, New
Brunswick), reduced funding (Alberta,
Nova Scotia, Quebec), or provincial
public-sector guidelines (Manitoba);
• the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) and its equivalent provincial associations ramping
up their actions to publicly question
management's abilities to govern and
bargain appropriately – threatening
institutional censure or announcing
bargaining alerts (the first in a decade
at CAUT); and
• national unions with university locals
(CUPE, PSAC, CSN) and their equivalent provincial public sector unions
emphasizing coordinated bargaining
strategies and successfully certifying
more casual or contingently-funded
employees on campuses.
Of particular note, for the first time in
its 50-year history, CUPE organized a
National Bargaining Conference in February 2013.
While strikes with academic staff were
mostly avoided this bargaining year, the
recent strike at St. Francis Xavier University
exemplifies the difficult circumstances in
which universities bargain. While a longterm deal was secured, the university will
be in a significant deficit and, with the
province capping tuition, having previously reduced grants and projecting zero or
minimal funding increases, sustainability
will be the number one challenge.
The across-the-board (ATB) increases
negotiated this past year with full-time
faculty have averaged 2% for 2012-13,
though the average ATB increase for 201213 (negotiated over the past few years) was
just over 2.3%. However, in those provinces
(Newfoundland and Labrador, Saskatchewan) where ATB increases for 2012-13
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
were above the national average, governments have been consistently signaling both
wage restraint and government funding
restraint. Again, financial sustainability is
critical across the country.
Attempts by universities to look at their
principal cost drivers (i.e., salaries and benefits) have led them to focus on these critical
issues at the bargaining table:
• employee contribution rates to pension
plans and all existing pension benefits;
and
• performance review (particularly in light
of non-mandatory retirement) and career
progress compensation (to better reflect
institutional strategic goals and reduce
its 1.5-2.5% annual costs).
Other issues that have recently been
addressed in bargaining by management
and that have implications beyond their
local contexts include:
• developing teaching-stream appointments (positions that now exist in every
province and in every type of university);
• cost-sharing post-retirement health and
dental benefits with employees (an acute
liability concern in central Canada);
• increasing provost oversight of tenure
and promotion procedures (to ensure
institutional consistency); and
• improving or simplifying conflict
resolution procedures (to reduce
grievances/arbitrations and to better
manage complicated inter-member disputes).
With almost all provincial governments
now budgeting in cost containment or cost
reduction mode, vis-à-vis their public sectors, Faculty Bargaining Services (FBS) will
not only be preparing a comprehensive
report on the subject of sustainability, but
will also host an international conference
on the topic of sustainability in October
2014 in conjunction with British, Australian and American colleagues.
During its nearly 10-year existence,
FBS has evolved significantly to respond
to members' needs:
• from its sole emphasis on full-time faculty (it now includes all academic staff),
to its original searchable database (it
has added settlement summaries, arbitration decisions and a host of annually
updated tables and reports); and
• from its original focus on CAUT model
clauses (it has moved from analysis of
CAUT policies to developing its own
robust set of Best Practice Reports,
providing specific recommendations
and self-audit questions), to its Annual
Workshop and National Bargaining
Workshop (it has added an In-House
Bargaining Workshop to fit local needs,
a Constructive Academic Relations
Workshop to serve deans, faculty relations officers and human resources
professionals responsible for contract
administration, and an In-House Workshop for Boards of Governors on the
role of Governors in academic collective
bargaining.
FBS will continue to develop and adapt.
There are plans to further develop its
delivery platform (an FBS Information
Repository mobile app) and its analysis
service (a collective agreement audit). FBS
will help to match the sustainability challenges universities face with the appropriate information, analysis and training so
critical to their future and their institutional autonomy.
Celebrating 25 years of
protecting universities.
Since 1988, CURIE has been the insurance and risk
management provider of choice among universities.
Formed by universities at the peak of the liability
insurance crisis to stabilize premium costs and offer
custom coverage for Canadian universities, CURIE
is Canada’s only non-profit reciprocal specializing
in universities. We at CURIE along with our Board of
Directors would like to recognize the founding members
for their vision and thank our current members for their
support and trust in CURIE over the last 25 years.
www.curie.org
•
905.336.3366
Canadian Universities Reciprocal Insurance Exchange
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
25
Your budget does more when
your facility consumes less.
Siemens can help your facility become smarter, more efficient and green.
www.siemens.ca/energyservices
Operations can account for 60% of the life cycle cost of a
building, so managing energy and operational efficiency
is critical to maintaining your facility’s overall value. And
it gets harder with age. Siemens energy experts can help
your facility do more for less. We take the time to
understand your operations and long-term business
requirements. We then provide answers tailored to meet
your specific needs and budget constraints. With
strategies, systems, services and financing options
designed to maximize building performance, we can
help your building reach peak efficiency at any stage in
its life cycle. Greater efficiency means less waste, an
improved environmental impact and more for your
bottom line.
Answers for Canada.
Land as a revenue generator for
Canadian universities and colleges
BY CHRISTINE HANLON
F
aced with constrained funding from tuition and the public
purse, Canadian universities are
increasingly looking to optimize the
use of their existing assets. One option
involves using surplus land to generate
revenue. “When the university decided
that it was going to develop some of its
surplus land, it was partly because the
traditional revenue streams were at risk,”
says John Bigger, Manager, Real Estate and
Property Development at the University
of New Brunswick (UNB). The university
receives lease revenue from a research
park and a recently developed retail power
centre.
In fact, universities from coast to coast
are leasing their land to developers for
everything from commercial to residential to retail development. With its Village
by the Arboretum adult lifestyle community, two research parks and Stone Road
retail lands, the University of Guelph (U
of Guelph) encompasses all three facets.
The institution receives approximately $4
million annually in revenue from its real
estate operations for the Heritage Trust
endowment, which now stands at $82 million. After more than 20 years, this income
stream reflects a steady-state operation
with almost all of the lands the university
allocated to the Trust having been devel-
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
oped under long-term lease arrangements
or, in some cases, sold. Meanwhile, at
Simon Fraser University (SFU), the successful UniverCity residential development has contributed $25 million to the
SFU Endowment Fund since its launch
10 years ago.
ALIGNING WITH
THE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION
SFU acquired the Burnaby Mountain property through a land swap with the City
of Burnaby. UNB, on the other hand, is
a partner in a research park located on a
4,000-acre parcel of land granted to the
institution in 1800 by King George III.
Other universities, such as Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU), have decided to
purchase adjacent land for revenue-generating leasing and development. “After all
the mortgage expenses are paid, we are
making from $200,000 to $300,000 a year
in profit,” says Jim Butler, Vice-President,
Administration, at WLU.
He adds that, although generating revenue was an important goal, the acquisition
of the 12 apartment buildings in two city
blocks had to align with the university’s
overall mission to be viable. “It was a major
acquisition that provided us with longterm land banking,” says Butler, adding
that developers were swarming to take
advantage of the economic activity created
by the university. “We are land-locked,
so we needed to be proactive. We are not
investing in real estate just for the pure joy
of getting a good return. Our mission is an
academic mission. But why not be paid at
the same time?”
Bigger agrees that development needs
to be tied to the university’s mission.
“Revenue is not the single driving factor
for a university development project,” he
says, pointing out that a research park is
inextricably tied to a university’s research
agenda.
But, in some circumstances, universities are expending so much of their time,
resources and land to meet their mission as
institutions of teaching and learning that
the possibility of using land as a source of
revenue is remote at best. This is particularly true for Quebec universities, which
have virtually no non-core land assets
while being faced with a 30% increase in
enrolment over the past seven years. “Yes,
we have square footage and plots of land,”
says Jean Richard, Director of Facilities
Management for Laval University. “In the
long run, our goal is to plan for development that will benefit all those who use
our campus. Right now our priority is
not the sale of land or the development of
commercial buildings for lease.”
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
27
U N I V E R S I T I E S A R E H E L D TO A H I G H E R S TA N DA R D T H A N T H E
P R I VAT E S E C TO R . A S A R E S U LT, L A R G E D E V E LO P M E N T P R OJ E C T S
REQUIRE THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF DUE DILIGENCE AND RESEARCH.
To date, British Columbia’s situation
has been quite different. At SFU, for
instance, the driver for developing land
using multi-family housing was the fact
that the university is located on the top
of a mountain surrounded by parkland.
“This was a way of bringing the community to us and making some money in the
meantime,” explains Pat Hibbitts, SFU’s
Vice-President, Finance & Administration.
The UniverCity Development includes
one segment that gives priority access for
newly hired faculty and staff to 60 units
sold at 20% below market value.
Along with generating revenue, providing incentives for attracting and retaining
faculty, staff and students is part of the
rationale behind land development for
several universities. “There is no question
in our mind that, if you enhance the overall
university experience, it will aid in attracting students, faculty and administration,”
confirms James Robertson, President and
CEO of the University of Calgary’s (U of
C’s) West Campus Development Trust. The
plan is to lease land transferred to the U
of C from the Province of Alberta in 1995
for a residential/mixed use development
adjacent to the main campus.
LAYING THE GROUNDWORK
“It took a long time to get traction for
a plan both the province and the Board
of Governors would support,” says Bob
Ellard, Vice-President, Facilities Management and Development at the U of C. “At
the time, there was nobody responsible
for this portfolio at the university.” He
underlines the importance of designating
a champion with the time, resources and
knowledge to move a land management/
development agenda forward.
Hired to spearhead the project because
28
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
of his background in the development
industry, Ellard had the right vocabulary to
talk to the Board of Governors (BOG) and
the master planning consultants who were
hired to provide advice for moving forward. Laying the groundwork took three
and a half years. “What the board wanted
to do and what the province agreed to
were aligned, but not perfectly aligned,
so adjustments had to be made,” recalls
Ellard. The BOG’s primary interest was
determining the risk – both financial and
reputational – to the university and having
an approach that would mitigate exposure
to that risk. At the same time, the BOG
demanded a clear understanding of project parameters, including the expected
financial return. In 2006, the U of C commissioned the West Campus Master Plan
to address these issues in consultation with
the city and the community.
Universities, says UNB’s Bigger, are
held to a higher standard than the private sector. As a result, large development
projects require the highest level of due
diligence and research. “Making sure you
are doing it right is the key,” says Bigger.
A thorough assessment of all core and noncore land precedes any decision on using
land to generate revenue.
Accordingly, UNB hired a consultant to
prepare The University of New Brunswick
Land Management Strategy, approved by
the BOG in October 2003. This comprehensive strategy details the guiding principles
for the management of university land
assets and outlines policy areas to ensure
the fulfillment of institutional goals and
the strategic plan. It also highlights the
future direction of land management and
ensures that UNB is achieving the best
return on its land holdings while fulfilling
its institutional mission.
DETERMINING HIGHEST
AND BEST USE
Highest and best use is the litmus test for
any plans made for a specific parcel of
land. At the University of Guelph (U of G),
a Real Estate Development Committee was
charged with determining the highest and
best use of the institution’s surplus land.
Depending on the particular qualities of a
parcel of land, the highest and best use was
determined to be either sale or lease, with
each designation approved by the Board
of Governors.
“We went through the full governance
process,” echoes WLU’s Butler. “The board
was kept informed every step of the way
and provided with the necessary financial
and legal data.” By leveraging its borrowing for capital projects, the university
was able to arrange for a low-interest,
no-down-payment loan, so that the lease
payments from developers are virtually
pure profit.
By leasing rather than selling, institutions create land endowments that generate revenue on an ongoing basis. “If you
sell, you receive a huge amount up front to
put in the university coffers, but the land is
gone,” UNB’s Bigger points out. “Leasing
is also attractive to developers. Because
they do not tie up capital to purchase the
land, they can invest more money in buildings and infrastructure.”
At the same time, because universities, by nature, are more risk-averse than
institutions in the private sector, dealing
with developers directly would be difficult
and unwieldy. “Land management and
development is not a core business of the
university,” notes Bigger.
Universities are not rapid decision
makers, adds Hibbitts at SFU. “You cannot
make decisions related to real estate –
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITIES FROM COAST TO COAST ARE LEASING
THEIR LAND TO DEVELOPERS FOR EVERYTHING FROM
C O M M E R C I A L T O R E S I D E N T I A L T O R E TA I L D E V E L O P M E N T.
which moves really fast – inside that kind
of organization,” she says. Instead, it is
necessary to have an organization that is
more nimble and business-oriented.
CREATING
ARM’S-LENGTH MANAGEMENT
In 2001, SFU established a UniverCity
Trust, with a small staff, and a board populated with members who have expertise in
the real estate industry as well as representatives of the university. “The trust needs
to be a completely separate entity,” says
Hibbitts. “At the same time, the trust needs
to know what the university is thinking.”
After visiting SFU to study its model,
the U of C formed the West Campus Development Trust in 2011 with a volunteer
board. “We chose to make it arm’s-length
from the university, but the university
is the beneficiary of everything it does,”
explains Ellard, adding that the board
hired James Robertson as CEO in February
2012. “Rather than adding responsibilities
to an existing administrator’s portfolio,
it is more logical to obtain that expertise
and then hive it off in an independent
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
entity that can do what it knows best. The
important thing is to have a board and
management team that is focused on this
project as a core output or objective.”
Ellard points out that the trust has
its own set of policies as well as a separate payroll and information technology
system. “For the most part, the trust shadows the university system,” adds Robertson. “But we are not inherent in university
policy. We must adopt our own.”
WLU is also planning on studying
the option – among others – of organizing a separate trust based, in part, on the
structure it studied when it also visited
SFU. Significant work had already taken
place prior to the acquisition of the two
blocks abutting the university, including
a re-examination of the residence business
model and the hiring of a full-time real
estate specialist. At a retreat on March 18,
university administrators further defined
the specialist’s authority relative to entering into partnerships and financing.
Meanwhile, the U of Guelph’s Heritage Trust, established by the institution
in 1991, is overseen by a Board of Trustees
(BOT), which has the authority to make
decisions about the properties on behalf
of the BOG. The BOT includes volunteers
with the necessary real estate background
and expertise to sit on the BOT’s Real Estate
Development Committee. Once a year, the
BOT presents its real estate budget and
business plan to the BOG for approval,
including proposals for major changes,
such as adjustments in designation of land
from ‘for lease’ to ‘for sale,’ or vice versa.
INVOLVING ALL STAKEHOLDERS
At the U of C, the West Campus Development Trust board is composed of university
executive leadership team members, development industry leaders, the corporation’s
CEO, a faculty representative, a student
representative, and a member from the
South Shaganappi Area Strategic Planning
Group, which represents the five communities surrounding the west campus lands.
Similarly, SFU elected to have members
of the community, students and faculty
members on the BOT of its UniverCity
development. “It gave members of each of
those populations a voice,” notes Hibbitts.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
29
UNB quickly realized how important it was to involve all stakeholders in the planning process when faculty expressed concern
about development on ecologically sensitive areas of its Woodlot
property. “Inviting stakeholders to be part of the process is key,”
says Bigger. “You have to have continuous dialogue throughout
the entire process.” In response to concerns, the university struck
the Creighton Conservation Forest Advisory Committee, which
includes members from the various faculties as well as students,
administrators and community members, and provides advice
to the BOG.
Meanwhile, the U of C’s West Campus Development Trust
board hired a consulting team to work with a variety of stakeholders (including the City of Calgary) and established a Stakeholder
Working Group that will be heavily engaged in the planning
and design of the residential/mixed use community. Eventually,
broader consultation with community will take place in the form
of four open houses. “Our goal is to be transparent, accessible
and responsive to concerns,” says the CEO. “The conversation
will continue for years.”
Presently, the Stakeholder Working Group is helping guide an
updated Campus Master Plan that will work at a more detailed
level while maintaining the overall vision of the original Master
Plan, which included such principles as environmental excellence and sustainability. The development is also committed to
providing a variety of housing options to respond to the needs of
a broad cross-section of the community. This is tied directly to the
U of C’s strategic mission of enhancing the university experience
both as an educational facility and a public facility, by providing
greater opportunities for students, staff and faculty to live in close
proximity to the institution. At the same time, the development
harmonizes with the surrounding communities in a way that
completes them.
DEFINING ROLES AND GOALS
Ultimately, the role of the executive and BOT is to define a clear
mission and goals for management/development of the revenuegenerating land. At SFU, those goals are to have 10,000 public
residences on the mountain where the university is located, with
30% to 40% of residents having some connection to the university.
At the same time, the Trust has established strict sustainable planning guidelines for development.
UNB is creating strict architectural guidelines for residential
development and defining complementary mixed-use development, while setting aside 1,700 to 1,800 acres to be held in perpetuity for teaching and research. These detailed plans align with
UNB’s Land Management Strategy. “You have to know your goals,
strategically and financially,” says Bigger.
“There is a requirement for a significant financial return to go
back to the university,” echoes Robertson at U of C’s West Campus
Development Trust. Like many universities, the U of C will be
using the revenue for strategic initiatives.
“SFU has been careful to endow the money and not to use it
for operating expenses or anything else for which the provincial
government or tuition would pay,” says Hibbitts, adding that the
distinction is critical. “We have taken an asset land and turned it
into an asset endowment.”
The U of Guelph has been equally careful in defining to what
ends revenue from the Heritage Trust endowment is used. After
covering any costs disbursed to develop a Heritage property for
use, income generated from the Trust properties is assigned to the
Heritage endowment fund. Now that development of the properties is almost complete, with leases ongoing for at least another
30
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Students
University
of Calgary
Business
Community
Community
University
of Calgary
Developers
WCDT
Faculty
West Campus Development (WCDT)
• Independent Organization
• Lease land from U of C
• Sublease land to developer
• Self-Financed
25 to 30 years, the endowment is anticipated to grow from this
steady stream of revenue, along with investment income from
the endowment.
Based on a formula prescribed in the trust document, disbursements from the Heritage Trust endowment are very conservative
so as to protect and grow the base capital. Totaling approximately
$20 million to date, payouts have been used for very focused strategic investments, rather than flowing into the operating budget.
As a result, in recent years when no disbursements were available
under the formula due to the economic downturn, the risk to the
university was manageable.
Nonetheless, there is no gain without risks. The importance
is to understand and manage them. “We are aware of the risks,”
notes Ellard at the U of C, “ and have taken them into account.”
Risk assessment is essential, and even more so when venturing into uncharted territory. Universities using land to generate
revenue may be a relatively new phenomenon in certain communities. But, it is the type of initiative that is likely only to grow
as universities and colleges across the country continue to look
beyond traditional sources to successfully generate revenue.
Is your institution using its land assets to generate
new revenues? Continue the conversation in the
CAUBO CyberCommunity! Go to www.caubo.ca and
log in, then click on CyberCommunity and search
for “Land as revenue generator.”
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Enhanced version of University
Manager now available online.
Version améliorée de Gestion
universitaire maintenant en ligne.
Beginning with this issue of University Manager, the
online version posted to the CAUBO website will feature
some new enhancements, including:
À compter du présent numéro de Gestion universitaire, la
version en ligne versée sur le site Web de l’ACPAU comporte des
améliorations, notamment :
1. a realistic reading experience, with flip-through
pages, the sounds of turning pages, and even
shading along the spine all enhance your reading
experience;
2. mobile, iPad, and iPhone compatibility as well as
eReader output for devices such as Kindle, Nook
and iBooks;
3. a thumbnail-style navigation panel that allows
you to view the entire publication at once;
4. the ability to share this digital publication with
friends and colleagues via social networks,
including Facebook and Twitter, or via email or
Google;
5. active hyperlinks that connect you with all
websites and email addresses contained in the
publication, including advertiser websites;
6. active internal links that connect you to specific
stories from the front cover and contents page;
7. searchable and zoomable content that allows
you to search the entire issue for specific words,
phrases, subjects, etc.; and
8. the ability to add personal notes and bookmarks
throughout each issue, making UM’s content more
useful than ever.
1. Une expérience de lecture réaliste : voyez les pages tourner,
entendez le son des pages qu’on tourne, remarquez l’ombre près
de la reliure; tout cela enrichit votre expérience de lecture.
2. Une application mobile compatible iPad et iPhone et un format
de sortie eReader pour les appareils tels que Kindle, Nook et
iBooks.
3. Un panneau de navigation de type vignettes qui permet de
voir l’ensemble de la publication en un coup d’œil.
4. La capacité de partager cette publication numérique avec
des amis et des collègues par l’entremise de réseaux sociaux,
y compris Facebook et Twitter, ou encore par courriel ou
Google.
5. Des hyperliens actifs qui permettent d’accéder à tous les sites
Web et d’utiliser toutes les adresses courriel qui figurent dans la
publication, y compris les sites Web des annonceurs.
6. Des liens internes actifs qui permettent d’aller directement à des
articles spécifiques à partir de la page couverture ou de la table
des matières.
7. La possibilité d’effectuer une recherche ou de zoomer sur le
contenu, ce qui permet de chercher des mots, des expressions
ou des sujets spécifiques dans tout le numéro.
8. La capacité d’ajouter des notes personnelles et des signets
dans chaque numéro, ce qui rend le contenu de Gestion
universitaire encore plus utile que jamais.
Be sure to check out the
new enhanced online University Manager at
http://www.caubo.ca/content/university-manager-repository
Prenez le temps de découvrir
la version améliorée de la revue
Gestion universitaire en ligne, au
http://www.caubo.ca/content/university-manager-repository
Les propriétés foncières : une source de revenus
pour les universités et collèges canadiens
PA R C H R I S T I N E H A N LO N
D
evant les difficultés qui entourent
le financement provenant des
droits de scolarité et des deniers
publics, les universités canadiennes
cherchent de plus en plus à optimiser
l’utilisation de leurs actifs. L’une des
options consiste à tirer des revenus des terrains excédentaires. « Lorsque l’Université
a décidé de mettre en valeur certains de
ses terrains en surplus, c’était en partie
parce que les sources traditionnelles de
revenus étaient menacées », explique John
Bigger, directeur, Immobilier et Propriétés,
de la University of New Brunswick (UNB).
L’Université perçoit des revenus de location d’un parc de recherche et d’un mégacentre commercial ouvert récemment.
De fait, d’un océan à l’autre, les universités louent leurs propriétés foncières
à des promoteurs pour des projets de
toutes natures, qu’ils soient à caractère
commercial, résidentiel ou liés à la vente
au détail. La University of Guelph (U of
Guelph) exploite ces trois facettes. En effet,
on y trouve le Village by the Arboretum,
secteur résidentiel pour adultes, deux
parcs de recherche ainsi que des terrains
sur Stone Road qui sont consacrés à la
vente au détail. De ces activités immobilières, l’établissement touche chaque
année des revenus d’environ 4 millions
de dollars, qui sont versés dans le fonds
de dotation Heritage Trust, dont le solde
s’élève maintenant à 82 millions de dollars.
Instaurée il y a plus de 20 ans, cette source
de revenus est maintenant stable, la plupart des terrains confiés par l’Université
à la fiducie ayant été exploités en vertu
32
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
d’un bail à long terme ou, dans certains
cas, vendus. Ailleurs, à la Simon Fraser
University (SFU), le complexe résidentiel
UniverCity, un projet gagnant, a permis
d’amasser 25 millions de dollars dans le
fonds de dotation de la SFU depuis son
inauguration il y a 10 ans.
ARRIMAGE À LA MISSION DE
L’UNIVERSITÉ
La SFU est devenue propriétaire du territoire de Burnaby Mountain à la suite d’un
échange de terrains avec la municipalité
de Burnaby. Pour sa part, la UNB est un
partenaire du parc de recherche installé
sur une parcelle de 4 000 acres qui avait été
octroyée à l’établissement par le roi George
III en 1800. D’autres universités, comme
la Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU), ont
décidé d’acheter des terrains adjacents pour
les exploiter et en tirer des revenus de
location. « Une fois déduits tous les frais
de remboursement hypothécaire, il reste
des profits de 200 000 $ à 300 000 $ par
année », indique Jim Butler, vice-recteur à
l’administration de la WLU.
Il ajoute que, bien que la génération de revenus constituait un objectif
important, l’acquisition de 12 immeubles d’appartements occupant deux îlots
urbains devait s’arrimer à la mission globale de l’Université pour être considérée
comme une initiative viable. « Il s’agissait
d’une acquisition d’envergure qui nous
permettait de constituer des réserves foncières à long terme », explique Jim Butler,
ajoutant que les promoteurs étaient nombreux à vouloir tirer parti de l’activité
engendrée par la présence de l’Université.
« Nous sommes entourés de terrains.
Nous devions donc être proactifs. Nous
n’investissons pas dans l’immobilier par
simple plaisir d’obtenir de bons rendements. Notre mission fondamentale porte
sur l’enseignement et la recherche, certes,
mais pourquoi ne pas toucher des revenus
par la même occasion? »
John Bigger est également d’avis que les
projets immobiliers doivent se rattacher à
la mission d’une université. « Les revenus
ne doivent pas constituer le seul mobile
d’un projet immobilier universitaire », ditil, soulignant que la présence d’un parc de
recherche s’arrime parfaitement à la mission de recherche de l’université.
Par ailleurs, dans certaines circonstances, il arrive que les universités consacrent tant de ressources et de temps à
concrétiser leur mission d’enseignement
et d’apprentissage que la possibilité de
tirer des revenus de leurs terrains s’avère
plutôt mince. Ce principe s’applique particulièrement aux universités québécoises,
qui ne possèdent que très peu de biens
fonciers non essentiels et qui ont pourtant vu leur effectif étudiant augmenter de
30 % au cours des sept dernières années.
« Oui, nous disposons d’espaces et de lots »,
reconnaît Jean Richard, directeur du Service
des immeubles de l’Université Laval. « À
long terme, notre objectif est de planifier
des projets qui bénéficieraient à tous ceux
qui utilisent notre campus. Mais à l’heure
actuelle, notre priorité n’est pas de vendre
des terrains ni de construire des immeubles
commerciaux en vue de les louer. »
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
En Colombie-Britannique, la situation a été sensiblement différente jusqu’à
maintenant. Par exemple, à la SFU, ce qui
a motivé l’aménagement d’habitations
multifamiliales est le fait que l’Université
se situe sur une montagne, entourée de
parcs. « Il s’agissait d’une façon de rapprocher la collectivité de notre établissement, tout en tirant des revenus de cette
démarche », explique Pat Hibbitts, vicerectrice aux finances et à l’administration
de la SFU. Au complexe résidentiel UniverCity, on a prévu une section de 60
unités offertes en priorité aux nouveaux
professeurs et autres membres du personnel, et ce, à 20 % de moins que la valeur
du marché.
Pour plusieurs universités, les projets immobiliers, en plus de générer des
revenus, constituent des mesures incitatives destinées à attirer professeurs, autres
membres du personnel et étudiants. « Il
ne fait aucun doute que si vous améliorez l’expérience universitaire de manière
globale, cela aidera à attirer des étudiants,
des professeurs et des administrateurs »,
confirme James Robertson, président et
chef de la direction de la West Campus
Development Trust de la University of
Calgary (U of C). Le projet consiste à louer
des terres qui ont été cédées à la U of C
par la province de l’Alberta en 1995 pour
aménager une zone résidentielle mixte à
proximité du campus.
POSE DES PREMIERS JALONS
« Il en a fallu du temps avant qu’un plan
reçoive un appui solide tant de la province
que du conseil des gouverneurs », raconte
Bob Ellard, vice-recteur à la gestion des
installations et aux projets de développement de la U of C. « À l’époque, il n’y
avait pas de responsable de ce volet à
l’Université. » Il souligne l’importance de
nommer un porteur de dossier qui ait le
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
temps, les ressources et les connaissances
nécessaires pour faire avancer les projets
de gestion et d’aménagement fonciers.
Recruté pour piloter ce projet grâce à
son expérience dans le domaine immobilier, Bob Ellard possédait tout le vocabulaire approprié pour s’adresser tant au
conseil des gouverneurs qu’aux consultants en planification générale embauchés
pour donner leur avis sur le projet. Ce travail préparatoire s’est échelonné sur trois
ans et demi. « Ce que le conseil voulait et
ce que la province voulait concordaient
en gros, mais pas parfaitement, alors il a
fallu faire des ajustements », relate Bob
Ellard. La principale préoccupation du
conseil était de déterminer le risque – tant
financier que sur le plan de l’atteinte à la
réputation – encouru par l’Université et
d’adopter une approche qui atténuerait
ce risque. De même, le conseil exigeait de
bien comprendre les paramètres du projet,
y compris le rendement attendu. En 2006,
la U of C a demandé l’élaboration d’un
plan directeur pour son campus ouest, le
West Campus Master Plan, afin d’étudier
toutes ces questions en collaboration avec
la municipalité et la collectivité.
Selon John Bigger, de la UNB, les
universités sont tenues de respecter des
normes plus élevées encore que dans le
secteur privé. Résultat : pour les grands
projets immobiliers, il faut pousser à
l’extrême la vigilance et les recherches.
« Il est crucial de veiller à bien faire les
choses », indique John Bigger. On procède
à une évaluation exhaustive de toutes
les parcelles de terres essentielles et non
essentielles avant de décider d’utiliser des
terrains pour en tirer des revenus.
Ainsi, la UNB a retenu les services
d’un consultant pour préparer la stratégie
d’aménagement foncier de la University
of New Brunswick, qui a été approuvée
par le conseil des gouverneurs en octobre
2003. Cette stratégie très détaillée définit
les principes directeurs à appliquer à la
gestion des biens fonciers de l’Université
et décrit des éléments à inclure dans les
politiques afi n de répondre aux objectifs de l’établissement et de respecter le
plan stratégique. La stratégie inclut aussi
l’orientation à donner à l’aménagement
foncier et veille à ce que la UNB obtienne
le rendement optimal pour ses avoirs fonciers tout en remplissant sa mission.
DÉTERMINATION DE
L’UTILISATION OPTIMALE
L’utilisation optimale constitue le facteur
décisif de n’importe quel projet touchant
une parcelle de terre spécifique. À la University of Guelph (U of G), on a confié à
un comité de développement immobilier
le mandat de déterminer comment utiliser les terrains en surplus de la façon la
plus fructueuse et la plus rationnelle possible. Selon les caractéristiques de chaque
parcelle, l’utilisation optimale pouvait
se traduire par la vente ou la location;
chaque décision a reçu l’aval du conseil
des gouverneurs.
« Nous avons respecté toutes les étapes
du processus de gouvernance », ajoute
dans le même ordre d’idées Jim Butler, de
la WLU. « À toutes les étapes, le conseil a
été tenu informé et s’est vu transmettre les
données financières et juridiques nécessaires. » Tirant parti de ses emprunts pour
des projets d’immobilisations, l’Université
a pu obtenir un prêt à faible taux d’intérêt,
sans mise de fonds, de sorte que les
sommes perçues en loyers des promoteurs
représentent presque des profits purs.
En optant pour louer plutôt que
vendre leurs terrains, les établissements
constituent des dotations foncières qui
génèrent des revenus de façon continue.
« Si vous vendez, vous touchez une forte
somme d’un coup et la placez dans les
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
33
of Guelph, instaurée par l’établissement
en 1991, est supervisée par un conseil de
fiduciaires qui a le pouvoir de prendre des
décisions au sujet des propriétés au nom
du conseil des gouverneurs. Le conseil des
fiduciaires compte des bénévoles ayant
l’expérience et l’expertise nécessaires pour
siéger à son comité de développement
immobilier. Une fois par année, le conseil
des fiduciaires présente au conseil des gouverneurs un budget et un plan d’affaires
concernant l’immobilier pour approbation.
Cette démarche inclut des propositions en
vue de changements majeurs, par exemple,
convertir le statut d’une parcelle « à louer »
au statut « à vendre », ou vice versa.
coffres de l’Université, mais vous n’avez
plus le terrain », indique John Bigger, de la
UNB. «La location constitue aussi un attrait
pour les promoteurs car, étant donné qu’ils
n’ont pas à consacrer de capitaux à l’achat
de terrains, ils peuvent investir davantage
dans les bâtiments et l’infrastructure. »
De même, parce que les universités, de
par leur nature, redoutent davantage les
risques que le secteur privé, les interactions
directes avec les promoteurs sont plus
ardues et compliquées. « La gestion foncière
et le développement ne constituent pas des
activités fondamentales d’une université »,
fait observer John Bigger.
Les universités ne prennent pas de
décisions rapidement, ajoute Pat Hibbitts,
de la SFU. « On ne peut pas prendre des
décisions qui touchent l’immobilier – un
secteur où les choses bougent vraiment
vite – au sein d’un tel établissement »,
explique-t-elle. Il faut plutôt compter sur
une organisation plus preste, au diapason
des affaires.
MISE EN PLACE D’UNE ÉQUIPE DE
DIRECTION INDÉPENDANTE
En 2001, la SFU a créé une fiducie, la UniverCity Trust, et l’a dotée d’une petite
équipe de personnel ainsi que d’un conseil d’administration formé de membres
ayant de l’expérience dans l’immobilier
et de représentants de l’Université. « La
fiducie doit être une entité complètement
distincte », affirme Pat Hibbitts. « Par ailleurs, la fiducie doit être au fait de ce que
l’Université pense. »
Après une visite à la SFU pour étudier
le modèle utilisé, la U of C a formé la West
Campus Development Trust en 2011, et lui
34
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
a rattaché un conseil formé de bénévoles.
« Nous avons choisi d’en faire une entité
indépendante de l’Université, mais cette
dernière est bénéficiaire de tout ce que
la fiducie produit », explique Bob Ellard,
ajoutant que le conseil a nommé James
Robertson chef de la direction en février 2012.
« Plutôt que d’ajouter des responsabilités au
portefeuille d’un administrateur en place, il
est plus logique de trouver cette expertise et
d’opter pour l’essaimage, c’est-à-dire créer
une entité indépendante qui œuvre dans son
domaine de prédilection. Ce qui importe,
c’est d’avoir un conseil et une équipe de
direction vraiment centrés sur le projet, qui
y voient un objectif fondamental. »
Bob Ellard souligne que la fiducie dispose de ses propres politiques ainsi que
d’un système de paie et d’un système informatique distincts. « Dans une large mesure,
la fiducie reflète le système de l’Université »,
ajoute James Robertson. « Mais nous ne
sommes pas visés par les politiques de
l’Université, alors nous pouvons adopter
nos propres politiques. »
La WLU envisage – entre autres –
l’idée de constituer elle aussi une fiducie
distincte fondée sur la structure observée
à la SFU. Des travaux importants avaient
été menés avant l’acquisition de deux
immeubles adjacents à l’Université, dont
la réévaluation du modèle d’affaires
relatif aux résidences et l’embauche d’un
spécialiste en immobilier à temps plein.
Au cours d’une journée de réflexion qui a
eu lieu le 18 mars, les administrateurs de
l’Université ont précisé les pouvoirs du
spécialiste pour ce qui est de conclure des
partenariats et d’obtenir du financement.
Pour sa part, la Heritage Trust de la U
PARTICIPATION DE TOUTES LES
PARTIES PRENANTES
À la U of C, le conseil de la West Campus
Development Trust est composé de
membres de l’équipe de la haute direction
de l’Université, de leaders du secteur
immobilier, du chef de la direction de
l’organisme, d’un représentant du corps
professoral, d’un représentant étudiant et
d’un membre du South Shaganappi Area
Strategic Planning Group, qui représente
les intérêts des cinq communautés
avoisinant les terrains du campus ouest.
De façon analogue, la SFU a choisi
d’accueillir au conseil des fiduciaires de
son complexe UniverCity des membres
de la communauté, des étudiants et des
professeurs. « Ainsi, toutes ces populations
ont voix au chapitre », résume Pat Hibbitts.
La UNB a tôt fait de se rendre compte de
l’importance d’intégrer toutes les parties
prenantes au processus de planification
lorsque des membres du corps professoral
ont exprimé leur inquiétude de voir
des chantiers s’élever dans des zones
écologiquement fragiles de la terre à bois
de l’Université. « Il est essentiel d’inviter
les divers intervenants touchés à participer
au processus », indique John Bigger. « Il
faut maintenir le dialogue tout au long
du processus. » En réponse aux points
soulevés, l’Université a mis sur pied le
Creighton Conservation Forest Advisory
Committee. Ce comité consultatif
regroupant des membres de diverses
facultés ainsi que des administrateurs et
des membres de la communauté a comme
mandat de donner son avis au conseil des
gouverneurs.
Pour sa part, le conseil de la West
Campus Development Trust de la U of
C a embauché une équipe de consultants
chargée de travailler avec diverses parties
prenantes (y compris la Ville de Calgary)
et a créé un groupe de travail des parties
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
prenantes, qui participera très activement
à la planification et à la conception de
la communauté résidentielle mixte.
Ultérieurement, on procédera à une
consultation plus vaste de la collectivité
en tenant quatre activités portes ouvertes.
« Notre objectif est d’être transparents,
a c c e s s i b l e s e t d e r é p o n d re a u x
préoccupations des gens, indique le chef
de la direction. Le dialogue se poursuivra
pendant des années. »
À l’heure actuelle, le groupe de travail
des parties prenantes aide à orienter
la mise à jour du plan directeur, qui
précisera des détails tout en reflétant la
vision du plan directeur d’origine. On
trouvait dans ce dernier des principes tels
que l’excellence en environnement et le
développement durable. Les responsables
du développement s’engagent aussi à
fournir diverses options d’hébergement
pour répondre aux besoins d’un large
éventail de groupes présents dans
la communauté. Cette approche est
directement liée à la mission stratégique
de la U of C, à savoir bonifier l’expérience
universitaire, tant du point de vue de ses
installations d’enseignement que de ses
installations publiques, en multipliant
les possibilités offertes aux étudiants,
au personnel et aux professeurs pour
s’établir à proximité de l’établissement. Le
développement se fait en harmonie avec les
collectivités environnantes et apporte à ces
dernières des éléments complémentaires.
DÉFINITION DES RÔLES
ET DES OBJECTIFS
En dernier ressort, le rôle de la direction et
du conseil de fiduciaires consiste à définir
une mission claire ainsi que des objectifs
de gestion et de développement pour le
terrain générateur de revenus. À la SFU,
les objectifs sont les suivants : avoir 10 000
résidences publiques sur la montagne où
se trouve l’Université, dont 30 à 40 % des
occupants ont un lien quelconque avec
l’établissement. La fiducie a adopté dès
l’étape de planification des lignes directrices strictes en matière de développement
durable.
La UNB est en voie d’adopter des
lignes directrices strictes concernant
l’architecture des projets résidentiels et
de définir un usage mixte complémentaire,
tout en constituant une réserve de 1
700 à 1 800 acres dédiée à perpétuité à
l’enseignement et à la recherche. Les plans
détaillés respectent la stratégie de gestion
foncière de la UNB. « Vous devez connaître
vos objectifs, tant du point stratégique que
financier », indique John Bigger.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
James Robertson, de la West Campus
Development Trust de la U of C,
abonde dans le même sens : « Il faut
que l’Université en tire un rendement
substantiel. » À l’instar de nombreuses
universités, la U of C utilisera les
revenus pour concrétiser des initiatives
stratégiques.
« La SFU a pris le soin de verser les
sommes dans un fonds de dotation, de ne
pas les utiliser pour payer des dépenses
d’exploitation ou toute autre dépense
que les subventions du gouvernement
provincial ou les droits de scolarité
couvrent normalement », indique Pat
Hibbitts, ajoutant que cette distinction
est cruciale. «Nous avons pris un actif
foncier et l’avons transformé en un fonds
de dotation rattaché à un actif. »
La U of Guelph a mis autant de soin
à définir les fins auxquelles seraient
consacrés les revenus du fonds de dotation
Heritage Trust. Une fois déduits les coûts
de mise en valeur d’une propriété en
fiducie, les revenus générés sont versés
dans le fonds de dotation. Maintenant
que les projets de développement sont
presque terminés et que des baux sont
en vigueur pour au moins 20 à 25 ans, le
fonds de dotation devrait croître grâce
à un apport de revenus stable et aux
revenus de placement.
Calculés d’après une formule contenue
dans l’un des documents de la Heritage Trust,
les décaissements du fonds de dotation sont
très modérés, ce qui garantit la croissance
du capital. Totalisant à ce jour environ 20
millions de dollars, les décaissements ont
servi à des investissements stratégiques
très ciblés plutôt que d’être versés au
budget de fonctionnement. Ainsi, au cours
des récentes années de ralentissement
économique, lorsqu’on n’a pas pu décaisser
pour respecter la formule de calcul, les
risques encourus par l’Université ont été
gérables.
Il n’en demeure pas moins que les possibilités de gains sont toujours assorties de
risques. Il est important de les comprendre
et de les gérer. « Nous sommes conscients
des risques », indique Bob Ellard, de la U of
C, « et nous en avons tenu compte. »
L’évaluation du risque est une étape
essentielle. Elle l’est d’autant plus lorsqu’on
s’aventure en terrain inconnu. Les
universités qui se servent de leurs terrains
pour générer des revenus représentent
peut-être un phénomène relativement
nouveau dans certains milieux. Toutefois,
ce type d’initiatives est vraisemblablement
appelé à croître, puisque les universités et
les collèges partout au pays continuent
de chercher des sources de revenus non
traditionnelles.
Votre établissement utilise-t-il ses propriétés foncières comme source
de revenus supplémentaires? Poursuivez la conversation dans la
CyberCommunauté de l'ACPAU! Connectez-vous sur www.acpau.ca,
entrez dans la CyberCommunauté, puis recherchez le groupe « Les
propriétés foncières : une source de revenus ».
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
35
By understanding risk,
you can in fact manage it.
WE KNOW RISK is an important strategic focus for
organizations like yours. It’s why understanding and
managing risk has been the key focus for us at
Russell Investments.
In today’s dynamic and complex environment, a
clear governance model, integrated strategy, and
timely implementation define our fiduciary solutions.
Whether you seek to achieve specific funding
objectives or spending policies, you’ll find it
worthwhile talking to us.
Dexton Blackstock,
Director, Head of Institutional Business Development,
T: 416.640.6202 | Email: [email protected]
www.russell.com/ManageRisk
Russell Investments and the Russell Investments logo are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Frank Russell Company, used under a license by Russell Investments Canada Limited. Copyright Russell
Investments Canada Limited 2013. All rights reserved. This material is proprietary and may not be reproduced, transferred, or distributed in any form without prior written permission from Russell Investments.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2012
2013
37
2013
WELCOME TO
HAMILTON
From June 15-18, 2013, McMaster University has the pleasure
of welcoming you to Hamilton, Ontario for the 70 th CAUBO
Annual Conference.
Situated on the shores of Lake Ontario and at the center
of the Golden Horseshoe, the thriving port city of Hamilton is
located midway between Toronto and Niagara Falls. Hamilton
is well known for its industrial strength and now, a propensity
for forging new dreams. Strategic leadership has transformed
Hamilton’s skyline from steel industry to a city of great minds in
technology, art and education. The theme ‘All the Right Moves’
reflects on the savvy, skill and passion of those who meet need
with solution… and challenge with opportunity. McMaster
University invites you to learn, grow, plan and strategize future
winning moves in post-secondary education.
The CAUBO 2013 Pre-conference Seminars and Annual
Conference will take place at the Hamilton Convention Centre.
The host hotel is the Sheraton Hamilton, with overfl ow room
blocks at the Crowne Plaza Hamilton and the Staybridge Suites
Hamilton-Downtown. Visit the conference website (click the
link from www.caubo.ca ) for up-to-date information about
hotel room availability.
What would a conference be without some time to kick back,
relax and network with friends and colleagues? Our hosts have
planned several social events that will highlight Hamilton’s rich
history, natural beauty and unique geography while showcasing
some of the area’s local musical and culinary talents.
French content
We are pleased to offer three concurrent sessions in French at
this year’s conference. In addition, simultaneous interpretation
in French will be available for the Opening Keynote speaker
on Sunday afternoon and for both the Monday and Tuesday
plenary speakers.
OUR HOST
McMaster University
McMaster University is consistently ranked as one of the top 100 universities in
the world. With a student population of more than 24,000, the Hamilton, Ontariobased university is renowned for its innovative approaches to teaching, learning
and discovery. In its 125-year history, McMaster pioneered problem-based learning
and has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to student success, service and
community engagement. The research enterprise is consistently ranked as one of the
top three in Canada, garnering more than $390 million annually. With more than
156,000 alumni in 140 countries, McMaster’s reach is truly global.
CAUBO and the Organizing Committee members are pleased to welcome you to
Hamilton, Ontario!
CAUBO 2013 Local Organizing Committee members:
Roger Couldrey, Honorary Chair
Deidre Henne and Nancy Gray, Co-Chairs
Gord Arbeau
Kathleen Blackwood
Bob Dunn
Larry Marsh
Doris McGuire
Susan Mitchell
Diana Parker
Kate Whalen
Mohamed Attalla
Betty Chung
Stacey Farkas
Debbie Martin
Wanda McKenna
Lisa Morine
Terry Sullivan
Tourism Hamilton
Jill Axisa
Angelo DiLettera
Kelly Fisher
Karen McGlynn
Cathie Miller
Albert Ng
Matt Terry
REGISTER NOW: Visit our website www.caubo.ca and follow the links to CAUBO
2013 ‘All the Right Moves.’ The website will be updated regularly to keep you
informed of any changes or additions to the conference program.
NEW! Wireless Internet access sponsored by OfficeMax Grand & Toy
Complimentary wireless Internet access will be provided for delegates’ use in the
Hamilton Convention Centre on Saturday, June 15, Monday, June 17 and Tuesday, June 18.
The high-quality educational content at the CAUBO Annual Conference is the result of months of work on the part of a group of
dedicated volunteers that make up the eight Conference Coordination Teams. We thank them for their hard work and commitment:
Rae-Ann Aldridge
Mohamed Attalla
Mary Aylesworth
Anne Baxter
Darren Becks
Deborah Collis
Rob Cooper
38
Martin Coutts
Swavek Czapinski
Daniel Doran
Mike Drane
Sharon Farnell
Peter Gee
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Bruce Gorman
Lyndsay Green
Murray Griffith
David Head
Robert Inglis
Kelly Kummerfield
Dan Langham
Anthony (Tony) Lennie
Rob MacCormack
Donna Mueller
Rosie Parnass
Mary Paul
Ron Proulx
Christina Sass-Kortsak
Daryl Schacher
Tom Smith
Colin Spinney
Philip Stack
Margaret Sterns
Dan Swerhone
Daniel Therrien
Victoria Wakefield
Hugh Warren
Heather Woermke
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
PRE-CONFERENCE SEMINARS
GREEN INITIATIVES 2013
ARAMARK Higher Education returns as the official CAUBO 2013
Sustainability Sponsor. As an organization, ARAMARK is proud to
support these important initiatives.
CAUBO and the CAUBO 2013 Organizing Committee are committed
to pursuing a greener conference. The following green initiatives are
being implemented at the conference:
• Recycling name badge holders.
• Printing conference materials on recycled paper.
• No paper handouts — all presentations submitted in
advance of the conference will be available online at
CAUBO's website.
• Menus that feature locally grown foods and seasonal
products (where possible).
• Use of bulk dispensers and china at breaks to reduce waste.
• Water jugs and glasses will be available in each of the
meeting rooms at the Hamilton Convention Centre.
• Sustainable development topics in the program.
• Encouraging our exhibitors to offer environmentally sound
door prizes, reduce printed materials and demonstrate their
contribution to sustainability on campuses.
• In lieu of speaker gifts, CAUBO will again be making a
donation to a not-for-profit organization. This year, the
committee has chosen to support Hamilton Food Share.
• In the spirit of wellness, attendees are invited to join a
complimentary Zumba class on Monday June 17 and
Tuesday June 18 from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m.
PLEASE REGISTER SEPARATELY FOR THESE SEMINARS ON THE CAUBO
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM.
Please note that the pre-conference seminars will be paperless this year.
Presentation slides and other information will be made available online prior
to the seminar.
Pre-conference sessions will be held at the
Hamilton Convention Centre.
ACADEMIC MANAGERS’ SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Administrative Leadership Development
Nancy Buschert, Program Manager, Centre for Continuing Education,
McMaster University
Pamela Cant, Assistant Vice-President, Human Resources, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Linda Pickard, Instructor and Program Designer, McMaster University
Tracey Taylor-O’Reilly, Director, Centre for Continuing Education, McMaster
University
Melanie Will, Manager, Organizational Development & Learning, Wilfrid
Laurier University
In recent years, many university administrative functions have been devolved
to academic units, requiring faculties and schools to establish professional
administrative roles to direct and manage these functions. These roles are
critical to achieving the objectives of the academic unit that align with the
strategic priorities of the institution. A well-defined leadership development
program is vital in supporting these roles. Learn about several awardwinning programs developed at Laurier and McMaster: Laurier’s Leadership
Development Program, based around their Employee Success Factors which
identify and articulate key workplace behaviours and values that drive
organizational success; and McMaster’s Certificate in Advanced Leadership &
Management (CALM) and New Manager Orientation Program (NMOP).
Aligning Budget and Curriculum by Defining Instructional Costs
Jessica Davenport Williams, Assistant Dean for Budget and Planning,
School of Fine and Performing Arts, Columbia College Chicago
Eliza Nichols, Associate Professor, Department of History, Humanities and
Social Sciences, Columbia College Chicago
Sayma Riaz, Assistant Dean for Budget and Planning, School of Fine and
Performing Arts, Columbia College Chicago
Defining instructional costs can help to better align budget and curriculum
while providing transparency for faculty and administrators. The dean and
administrators at Columbia College in Chicago engaged with faculty to
implement a budget process that allocates resources based on curricular
needs. Under this model, budget requests must be submitted along with a
rationale that links expenses to the curriculum. Hear how administrators and
faculty collaborated to focus on student learning, identify true instructional
costs, and eliminate the worst practices of ‘rollover’ budgeting.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
39
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
Faculty Bargaining Services and Engaging
Academic Managers in the Faculty Bargaining Process
Alexander (Sandy) Darling, Director of Research and Field Officer, Faculty
Bargaining Services
Jasmine Walsh, Director, Academic Staff Relations, Dalhousie University
Once a collective agreement has been ratified, the task of implementation
often falls to the manager of the academic unit. This panel will explore ways
in which administrative staff in academic units can become more engaged
in the bargaining process, from negotiation to implementation. This session
will also provide an overview of the services provided by Faculty Bargaining
Services.
Managing Change and Organizational Transformation
for Academic Services at Wilfrid Laurier University
Tom Buckley, Assistant Vice-President, Academic Services, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Pamela Cant, Assistant Vice-President, Human Resources, Wilfrid Laurier
University
As Laurier has grown from a single-campus, primarily undergraduate
institution to a multi-campus comprehensive university, the structure,
functions and operations for units within academic services needed
realignment and renewal in order to support the university now and in the
future. Explore the stages of a successful change initiative, from strategic
planning through to organizational design and transition management, with
a focus on the people involved in the change. Hear about the principles used
to guide decisions to centralize functions on one campus versus distributing
them on several campuses, and learn strategies for understanding client
needs and engaging staff in design and implementation.
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Establishing Energy Master Planning for Universities
Mohamed Attalla, Assistant Vice-President (Facility Services), McMaster
University
Glenn Brenan, Director of Operations, Facilities Management Department,
University of Victoria
Denis Mondou, Director, Utilities and Energy Management, Facilities
Operations and Development, McGill University
Society expects universities to be leaders in sustainability. The cost of
energy continues to escalate and budget limitations increase the urgency
to implement changes to energy use. In order to meet these challenges,
universities need Energy Master Plans. Three Canadian universities will
highlight the different approaches they have used to establish their
institutions’ Plans. Hear about their approaches, methodologies, targets, and
achieved outcomes.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
2013
Budget Reduction Strategies: A Facilities Management
Approach at Three Canadian Universities
Liliana LeVesconte, Senior Financial Officer, Facilities and Operations,
University of Alberta
Susan Miller, Manager, Finance and Administrative Services, Facilities
Management, University of Victoria
Dan Swerhone, Director, Operations and Maintenance, University of
Saskatchewan
In response to the current financial environment, Facilities Management
departments across the country are implementing budget reduction
strategies. Panelists from three universities will describe the approaches
they took and the results of these efforts, including considerations that were
applied to single-year and multiple-year reduction strategies, how service
level reductions were communicated to clients, how use of ‘one-time’ funds
can assist with service delivery changes, how reduced revenues from projects
and ancillaries can be addressed, and how Service Level Agreements can
streamline the administrative workload.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
Design Standards and Guidelines: Maximizing Their Value
Keith Hollands, Associate Director, Design and Technical Standards,
Planning and Project Delivery, University of Alberta
Lorraine Mercier, Director, Design Services, McGill University
Andrew Wallace, Associate Director, Space Management and Planning,
Facilities Management, University of Saskatchewan
It is now common for universities across Canada to use standards and
guidelines to define and communicate requirements for the design of their
facilities. These documents ideally function both as a source of clear and
consistent information for consultants engaged in building design, and as
reference material for university employees who manage and maintain these
facilities. This panel will examine the processes used at three institutions to
maximize the value of university design standards and guidelines. Learn how
such standards and guidelines are developed, approved, communicated,
enforced, and maintained, and about their value, scope of application, and
limitations.
Due Diligence in Ensuring Universities’ Health and Safety
Responsibilities to Contract Workers
Dan Swerhone, Director, Operations and Maintenance, University of
Saskatchewan
Hugh Warren, Executive Director, Operations and Maintenance, University
of Alberta
Étienne Yelle, Construction Safety Manager, Facilities Operations and
Development, University Services, McGill University
Due to changes in Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) legislation, universities
must now take on increased supervisory roles and responsibilities with
regard to contract workers. Explore scenarios where contractors work in and
around staff and students and with university tradespeople, and learn about
methods to inform contractors of hazards and safety processes that are in
place on campuses, documentation programs used to support due diligence
requirements, and the impact of these additional efforts on staffing needs.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
41
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
HR Issues in Facilities Management:
Recruitment, Retention and Retirement
Richard Courtois, Senior Manager Human Resources, Area Personnel Office,
University Services, McGill University
Tony Maltais, Director of Trades for Operations and Maintenance, Facilities
and Operations, University of Alberta
Christine Matheson, Associate Director, Administration, Facilities
Management, Dalhousie University
Dan Swerhone, Director, Operations and Maintenance, University of
Saskatchewan
Facing dwindling resources, increasingly complex buildings and services,
and a high volume of work requests, Facilities Management (FM) teams
need the proper blend of experience, expertise and leadership in order to
succeed. Hear panelists assess competitiveness from a regional perspective
with regard to attracting and retaining FM professionals, tradespeople, and
workers, and review career development opportunities within FM. Explore the
impact of anticipated retirements and the challenges inherent in replacing
lost skills and building familiarity and organizational knowledge, and learn
about succession planning and apprenticeship programs that can help FM
departments deal with these HR issues.
FINANCE SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Tales of Success:
Demystifying Financial Information and Financial Processes
Ray McNichol, Director, Financial Services, The University of British Columbia
Daniel Therrien, University Controller, Financial Services, Concordia University
Variations in financial literacy can be a barrier to communication and
collaboration. Boosting the understanding of people outside the finance
sphere helps promote trust, achieve objectives, and garner acceptance and
support for change within an institution. Initiatives launched by Concordia
University and the University of British Columbia addressed this literacy gap
by helping campus stakeholders better understand financial information
and processes, accountability and governance. Learn about what they did
and why they did it, the positive results they have achieved, and some
practical tips and ideas to take back to your institution.
Indicators of University Financial Health – An Ontario Initiative
Denis Cossette, Associate Vice-President, Financial Resources, University of
Ottawa
Pierre Piché, Controller and Director, Financial Services, University of
Toronto
As calls for greater accountability and transparency continue unabated, useful
indicators are needed to assess, evaluate and monitor the overall financial
health of the higher education sector. The Council of Finance Officers (COFO)
has developed indicators to help universities create strategies to efficiently
manage institutional risk, as well as sector ratios that can be used as
benchmarks for institutional analysis. Learn more about indicators that can be
used to assess an institution’s debt burden, debt affordability, debt capacity,
and financial strengths, and examine the strengths and weaknesses of a
composite financial index.
42
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Proposed Changes to Not-for-Profit Accounting Standards
Martin Coutts, Associate Vice-President, Finance and Supply Management
Services, University of Alberta
Jim Keates, Principal, Public Sector Accounting Board
The Accounting Standards Board and the Public Sector Accounting Board
propose to revise and improve current standards for reporting by not-forprofit organizations (NPOs). These revisions will apply to universities using
the not-for-profit standards as their primary source of generally accepted
accounting principles. As the first major step in developing improved
standards, a Statement of Principles was recently released and feedback
sought from the community. This feedback will guide revisions to be reflected
in detailed exposure drafts. Learn more about the proposed principles and
their potential impact on accounting and financial reporting for private and
public sector NPOs.
FIUC Update
George Dew, Senior Analyst, CAUBO
Low Dollar Value Expenses – Containing Cost While Meeting
Granting Agency Requirements
France Boucher, Assistant Director, Research, Trust and Endowment,
Financial Resources, University of Ottawa
Angela Cummings, Senior Financial Monitoring and Policy Control Officer,
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
Robert Potvin, Acting Team Leader, Financial Monitoring and Awards
Administration, NSERC/SSHRC
Low-dollar-value expenses can be challenging for universities to track and
manage, as they are associated with a high volume of transactions and
significant compliance requirements. Institutions need to balance the cost of
controlling these transactions with the requirements of granting agencies.
Two agency representatives and a representative from the community at
large will share examples of ways to more efficiently manage low-dollar-value
expenses while complying with agency requirements. Participants will be
encouraged to share any solutions they have implemented at their institutions
to help strike this balance.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
HUMAN RESOURCES SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Think Like a Leader
Teal McAteer, Associate Professor, Human Resources & Management,
DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University
This highly interactive session will focus on understanding and adjusting
the connections between how we think and an assortment of effective and
ineffective leadership behaviours. Learn how our thinking styles significantly
impact our ability to build and manage relationships, deal with stress and
time management, manage change, resolve conflict, and function in groups
with varying dynamics. Participants will have an opportunity to identify
areas requiring improvement and develop practical implementation steps to
achieve positive change in these areas.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Innovative Banking
Solutions For
Universities
Our team of specialized relationship managers
combine the knowledge and expertise to provide you
with a customized suite of financial solutions designed
to streamline administration and lower your costs.
Visit our team of university-focused product and
investment specialists at the caubO conference from
June 15-18 in Hamilton, Ontario
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Rick McIntyre
Director, MUShA
Global Transaction Banking
44 King Street West
Toronto, Ontario M5h 1h1
Tel: (416) 775-0864
Fax: (416) 933-2553
[email protected]
® Registered trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia.
Solutions Bancaires
Innovantes Pour
Les Universités
Notre équipe de directeurs spécialisés, relations
d’affaires possèdent les connaissances et l’expertise
pour vous fournir une gamme personnalisée de
solutions financières conçues pour simplifier
l’administration et réduire les coûts de votre institution.
Venez rencontrer notre équipe de spécialistes en
placements et en produits pour universités au congrès
de l’acpau, du 15 au 18 juin à Hamilton (Ontario).
POUR PLUS D’INFORMATION, COMMUNIQUEZ AVEC :
Rick McIntyre
Directeur, MUEhA
Transactions Bancaires Mondiales
44, Rue King Ouest
Toronto (Ontario) M5h 1h1
Tél: (416) 775-0864
Fax: (416) 933-2553
[email protected]
MD
Marque déposée de La Banque de Nouvelle-Écosse.
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
Building Succession and Leadership Development
Programs for Business Managers
Rosie Parnass, Director of Organizational Development and Learning Centre,
and Quality of Work-Life Advisor, University of Toronto
Best Practice organizations understand the importance of carrying out
targeted leadership development in setting up future leadership strength.
Explore insights gained at the University of Toronto over the last four years
as it developed and implemented an approach that addresses the need to
engage and retain high potential staff so that they are prepared to meet
future leadership needs, and learn about the many results already being
observed as a consequence of this approach. Participants will be invited to
share feedback regarding how their institutions are handling this challenge
so that they may learn from one another.
The National Standard on Psychological Health and
Safety in the Workplace: What Does It Mean for You?
Mary Ann Baynton, Principal, Mary Ann Baynton & Associates Consulting
and Program Director, Great-West Life Centre for Mental Health in the
Workplace
A psychologically healthy and safe workplace is defined in the National
Standard as one that "promotes workers' psychological well-being and
actively works to prevent harm to worker psychological health, including in
negligent, reckless or intentional ways." A Psychological Health and Safety
Management System (PHSMS) is similar to other management systems and
can be integrated with existing policies and processes. It does not need to
involve a significant financial investment or a wholesale change in processes,
policies or procedures. Learn what the standard entails and where to access
resources to help you successfully assess and address psychological health
and safety.
Benchmarking Survey Report
CAUBO HR Committee
Presentation of the results of the HR Benchmarking survey.
INTERNAL AUDIT SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Cultural Audit Assessment at Universities
Michael Ramsay, Senior Manager and Practice Lead, Human Capital
Southwestern Ontario, Deloitte
The Globe and Mail has said of universities that “the complexities of mixing
business and academics expose them to financial cheats.” Deloitte’s recently
developed culture audit method may be an effective way of assessing the
cultural norms, values and beliefs of an organization. The tone set at the
top of an organization and the effectiveness of the network of controls play
critical roles in establishing a risk-intelligent culture. A cultural audit can
help management shape an ethical climate within the organization and help
directors assess the effectiveness of internal controls. Learn how to use a
cultural audit to help protect your university from fraud.
CAUBO Fraud Survey Report
CAUBO Internal Audit Committee
Presentation of the results of the CAUBO Fraud Survey.
44
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Boosting Internal Audit Value through Risk-Based Planning
Nancy Chase, Partner, Advisory, KPMG LLP
Using the University of Ottawa as an example, explore a practical approach
to the development of risk-based audit plans that are aligned with the
organization’s objectives and Enterprise Risk Management frameworks that
take into account management’s appetite for risk.
Auditing IT Transformation Projects
Robert Cooper, Chief Risk Officer, McMaster University
Raj Devadas, Senior Manager, Advisory, Risk Consulting, KPMG
Sandy A. McBride, Partner, Management Consulting, KPMG
From an Internal Audit perspective, explore Information Technology (IT)
project risks, the cost of project failure and how auditing can help. Learn
about auditing project management, the project life cycle, and audit
frameworks for IT projects and significant business process/controls redesign.
From a project management perspective, examine challenges, indicators
that a project is at risk, tools for success, measurement criteria, and the
importance of transparency and continuous improvement. Get tips on making
IT projects more effective, prioritizing projects for audit and determining if
benefits are achieved.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
PROCUREMENT SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Building a Sustainable Procurement Process:
McMaster University's Journey
Austin Noronha, Director, Strategic Procurement, McMaster University
Kate Whalen, Senior Manager, University Sustainability, McMaster University
The mission of McMaster University’s Office of Sustainability is to achieve a
culture of sustainability, focused on seven key areas: Education, Energy, Green
Space, Health and Wellness, Transportation, Waste, and Water. McMaster’s
Department of Strategic Procurement worked in collaboration with the Office
of Sustainability to develop a multi-pronged approach to ensure that social,
economic and environmental sustainability components are included in all
bids. Explore the keys to their success, including a Sustainable Procurement
Guide and an addition to both the standard RFP and RFQ templates, wherein
all respondents must submit their commitment to each of the focus areas.
The Negotiable RFP in Action at the University of Toronto
Eddy Jin, Director, Procurement Services, University of Toronto
Diana Magnus, Associate Director, Procurement Services, University of
Toronto
The University of Toronto implemented the Negotiable RFP (NRFP) as a key
competitive procurement mechanism and won the CAUBO First National
Q&P prize for it in 2012. The success of this program can be measured
in substantial increases in policy compliance, adoption, savings and
operational efficiency. Follow U of T’s journey of innovation, see a step-bystep walkthrough of a client’s NRFP project, and discuss the transformative
business design tools that ensured successful implementation. In this
interactive session, key organizational enhancements will be revealed
to provide participants with a winning recipe to help transform their
departments to the NRFP model.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
Front Line Training for Procurement Managers: An Overview
Maureen Sullivan, President, National Education Consulting Inc. (NECI)
One of the most pressing challenges facing university procurement is the
human resource crunch. With many senior practitioners retiring and younger
workers looking to move up, how does one maximize value for the limited
training dollars available? Get an overview of a recent Crown corporation
initiative to assess knowledge gaps of procurement staff and then map those
identified gaps to a semi-customized training program. There will also be an
overview of NECI’s Public Sector Procurement Program and other training
options.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
RISK MANAGEMENT SEMINAR
8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Continental Breakfast
Seminar
Enterprise Risk Management 101
Mark Aiello, Vice-President, Marsh Risk Consulting
A key challenge for many organizations is linking the strategic focus of
traditional ERM, with a senior administration spin, to the operational risks
typically dealt with in other areas of the institution. While ERM focuses
on risks to the institution’s strategic plan, risk management must focus on
operational drivers (root causes). Hear an approach that will help institutions
develop a better linkage between the high-level strategic risks and the
operational drivers, thus fostering a more effective, actionable ERM program.
Explore typical approaches taken in developing ERM frameworks and the
common failings seen in the implementation stages of ERM.
The Risk Management Landscape - A Canadian Perspective
Michael Histed, Director, Office of Risk Management, University of Ottawa
The landscape of risk management is becoming more complex, with North
American institutions striving to compete and succeed in a time of tightening
financial constraints and resources. Organizations such as Marsh Canada
and the Education Advisory Board (EAB) have prepared reports examining
the current overall risk management landscape, best practices and most
prevalent risks at universities. With these reports as background, learn about
the Canadian risk management context and where you can go for more
information. This session will also help set the scene for the seminar, which
will include presentations from Marsh Canada as well as several Canadian
universities who will share best practices.
Enterprise Risk Management and Strategic Planning:
Making the Connection
Philip Stack, Associate Vice-President, Risk Management Services, University
of Alberta
Enterprise risk management (ERM) is all about managing risk in order to
achieve the strategic objectives of the organization. The likelihood of an
institution achieving its strategic goals is directly linked to its ability to
take on and manage risk. Learn about ERM’s key concepts and relevant
frameworks, how it can be linked to your strategic plan, and why this linkage
is important, illustrated by the University of Alberta’s model, including
examples of structure, processes and reporting templates.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Alternative Models for Identifying and Ranking Institutional Risks
Mark Aiello, Vice-President, Marsh Risk Consulting (Moderator)
Danielle Barrette, Director of Business Services and Risk Management,
University of Sherbrooke
John Lammey, Associate Director, Risk and Insurance, Office of Risk
Management, University of Ottawa
Debbie Sabatino, Senior Manager, Enterprise Risk, McMaster University
Making a commitment to enterprise risk management and identifying
and ranking risks can seem daunting. It is important that the process for
developing a risk register at the institutional or faculty level be palatable
to all participants in the process. Panelists will share valuable tips from
three different institutions on how they have successfully developed and
maintained their risk registries.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
STU BUDDEN TREASURY AND INVESTMENT SEMINAR
7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Breakfast (please note early start time)
Seminar
Economic Outlook - A Short, Medium and Long-Term Perspective
Michael Strauss, Chief Investment Strategist and Chief Economist,
Commonfund
A review of short, medium and long-term economic prospects from a global
perspective.
Responsible Investing – Applying the Theory
Robert Inglis, Controller, Mount Allison University
Brian O’Neill, Interim Director, Investment Services, Queen's University
Betsy Springer, Director, Pension Fund Management, Carleton University
The issue of responsible investing has gained renewed attention as the theory
evolves from screening stocks to incorporating environmental, social and
governance (ESG) factors into the investment decision-making process. Plan
sponsors are asking themselves whether responsible investing policies should
be incorporated into their own investment policies and practices, and whether
doing so conflicts with fiduciary duty. A panel of representatives from three
universities will discuss the different approaches to responsible investing
taken by their institutions, as well as related implementation issues.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
45
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
2012 CAUBO Investment Survey
Susan Service, Director, Pensions and Investments, University of Victoria
Presentation of the results of the 2012 CAUBO Investment Survey.
Evaluating a Manager
Laurie Lawson, Treasurer, York University
John Limeburner, Treasurer and Executive Director, Investments, McGill
University
Explore how to evaluate a manager once the search and implementation
process is complete. This is a follow-up to the 2012 session covering various
manager search processes.
Moderated Roundtable Discussion
(Closed session for university delegates only)
CAUBO ‘THE NIGHT BEFORE’
CAUBO GARY BOURNE MEMORIAL DART
TOURNAMENT
6:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Marketplace, Student Centre, McMaster University
$50 per player/spectator
Looking for a great time? The legendary Gary Bourne Memorial Dart
Tournament is the place to be on Saturday night. Open to players of all skill
levels, this tourney is always an exciting evening, filled with laughter and
friendly competition – a perfect opportunity to connect with old friends and
meet new ones while enjoying delicious food and drink.
The tournament is limited to 60 participants (30 teams of two) so early
registration is encouraged. Registrations are being accepted for both
individuals and teams. Registration includes shuttle service, food, and a fun
evening of darts and relaxation with friends and colleagues. Attire for the
evening will be casual.
WINE EVENT
6:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
The Great Hall, McMaster University Club
$55 per person
Join us for an outstanding evening of flavours from the Niagara Region. Savour
a variety of wines from a number of renowned nearby vineyards, thoughtfully
paired with delicious local foods.
The University Club is set in the lovely historic core of McMaster University
where you will enjoy a beautiful view of Faculty Hollow and the campus grounds
as you relax and catch up with your colleagues over a glass of wine and a tasty
bite.
Space is limited, so be sure to register early. Registration includes shuttle
service, hors d’oeuvres and wine. Attire for the evening will be business casual.
46
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
SUNDAY, JUNE 16
CAUBO GOLF TOURNAMENT
Approximately 6:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. (tee time tournament format)
Copetown Woods Golf Club, Copetown, ON
$135 per person
This year’s golf tournament will be held at Copetown Woods Golf Club, one of
the finest championship courses in southwestern Ontario. Opened in 2003, this
18-hole course features rolling landscapes, naturally sandy soil, and breathtaking
scenery. At 6965 yards, par 72, the course provides an ideal setting for a
challenging round of golf. For more information, please visit
www.copetownwoods.com.
The tournament will be held in tee time tournament format (a starting
time will be assigned to each team). Information regarding transportation
and tournament schedule will be sent to registrants a few weeks prior to the
tournament via email.
The registration fee for the golf tournament includes breakfast, lunch,
transportation, green fees, golf cart, prizes for the winners, and a small token of
appreciation for all participants.
If you require rental clubs, please contact the Copetown Woods golf course at
905-627-GOLF (4653) and reference ‘CAUBO Golf Tournament.’
TOUR OF NIAGARA FALLS
8:30 a.m. – 3:45 p.m.
$95 per person
If you've never been to Niagara Falls – or even if you have – here's your
chance for a one-day whirlwind tour of some of the fabulous attractions in
and around the Falls.
8:30 a.m. – Bus departs the Sheraton Hamilton Hotel for travel to Niagara
Falls (approx. 1 hour).
10:00 a.m. – The Maid of the Mist Niagara Falls takes visitors on a boat
tour at the foot of the Falls for a wet and wild view from below the
13-story falls. A recyclable souvenir raincoat is provided free with
admission to help keep you dry from the mist and spray.
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Free time will begin from the Maid of the Mist
Centre at Clifton Hill. Enjoy the local attractions and eat lunch at one
of the many nearby restaurants.
1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Bus travels from Clifton Hill to Jackson-Triggs
Winery.
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. – Winery tour and wine tasting. One of Canada's
most architecturally stunning wineries, Jackson-Triggs invites you to
taste their award-winning wines perfectly paired with cheese and
chocolate. Wine is also available for purchase on-site.
2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. – Bus back to Sheraton Hamilton Hotel.
Cost includes transportation, Maid of the Mist, wine tasting, all taxes and
gratuities. Tour participants will purchase their own lunch at the restaurant of
their choosing. A minimum of 40 people must register in order for the tour to
proceed.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
OPENING CEREMONIES
Welcome Address
4:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
Hamilton Convention Centre
|
Hamilton, Ontario
MONDAY, JUNE 17
All programming will take place at the Hamilton Convention
Centre unless otherwise noted.
ZUMBA
OPENING KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Sponsored by Plastiq
4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Note: Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.
Anticipating the Future and Preparing For It
Sheldon Levy, President and Vice-Chancellor, Ryerson University
The future, to some extent, is unpredictable. However, examining current
trends can help to shed light on what is yet to come. Changes in government
policy, the shifting expectations of students, and the ongoing technological
revolution all have the potential to significantly alter the future reality
of higher education. Sheldon Levy will offer his informed and sometimes
visionary perspective on how these changes are likely to impact the Higher
Education climate and how administrative roles may be impacted as a result.
6:30 a.m. – 7:30 a.m.
Start your day off with a great dance workout that combines salsa, merengue,
mambo, samba and more, all set to hot Latin beats and rhythms guaranteed
to wake up your body and soul.
BREAKFAST
Sponsored by Baker & McKenzie LLP
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
CAUBO ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
PLENARY SPEAKER
CAUBO 26TH ANNUAL QUALITY AND PRODUCTIVITY
AWARDS
Sponsored by Budget Car Rental, Macquarie Equipment Finance Ltd.
and Sun Life Financial
5:45 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
The Q&P Awards are always a highlight of the Conference, honouring and
recognizing the best among many innovative ideas and initiatives that
university administrators create and implement in response to institutional
or community needs. Awards are presented for the three best overall
submissions as well as for the best submission from each of CAUBO’s four
regions: Western Canada, Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada.
WELCOME RECEPTION
Sponsored by Chartwells Education Dining Services
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Liuna Station, Hamilton
Immediately following the opening keynote speaker, we invite you to join us and
our sponsor, Chartwells Education Dining Services, for the Welcome Reception
at Liuna Station, a Hamilton landmark. Built in 1931, this historic Canadian
National Railway building served as a gateway to Canada for thousands of
immigrants. A unique architectural gem, the station’s grounds feature beautiful
gardens and a spectacular fountain.
Guests at the Welcome Reception will be transported back in time to Hamilton
in the 1930s with its rough-and-tumble charm and swagger. A jazz band and
swing dancers will help get you into the mood.
Shuttle service will be provided. Attire for this evening is business casual.
Following the reception, you are encouraged to sample one of Hamilton’s
restaurants. A list of recommended restaurants will be included in your
delegate bag.
48
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
8:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Note: Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.
Information Bombardment: Rising Above the Digital Onslaught
Nick Bontis, Professor, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University
Information bombardment is the single most damaging threat to productivity
— but it doesn't have to be this way. Why not transform this threat into a
sustainable competitive advantage for you and your organization? During this
enlightening and action-packed presentation you will learn how to:
• cope with information bombardment,
• improve your ability to manage change,
• lift productivity and efficiency,
• speed up innovation through collaboration,
• achieve industry leading efficiencies, and
• determine what leadership action you can take tomorrow.
BREAK
Sponsored by Oracle Canada ULC
10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Tradeshow Open
Corporate Presentation by Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
DeGroote School of Business and Sodexo: An Integrated On-Site
Campus Services Partnership in support of Student Engagement
10:05 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
Les indicateurs d'une bonne santé financière :
examen d'une initiative ontarienne (in French)
Denis Cossette, vice-recteur associé aux ressources financières, Université
d’Ottawa
Pierre Piché, directeur et contrôleur, Services financiers, University of Toronto
Note: This session is also being offered in English as 'Indicators of University
Financial Health – An Ontario Intiative' as part of the Finance Pre-Conference
Seminar.
Les exigences en matière de responsabilisation et de transparence continuent
de croître, si bien que des indicateurs concrets sont maintenant nécessaires
pour prendre le pouls de la santé financière globale du secteur. Le Council
of Financial Officers (COFO) a justement établi des indicateurs qui aideront
les universités à mettre sur pied des stratégies efficaces pour gérer les
risques institutionnels ainsi que des référents pour l’analyse institutionnelle
sous forme de ratios par secteur. Au cours de cette séance, les conférenciers
présenteront des indicateurs utiles pour évaluer la dette d’un établissement,
sa capacité financière et d’emprunt et ses forces sur le plan financier, puis
examineront les forces et les faiblesses d’un indice financier composé.
Implementing Business Intelligence in Higher Education –
An Exploration of Concepts and Issues
Dwight Fischer, Assistant Vice-President, Chief Information Officer,
Dalhousie University
Good information is a valuable commodity. Imagine an institution where
information and data flow freely, interfaces are intuitive, and people are trusted
and trained to use data wisely, appropriately and respectfully, with the objective
of improving learning, research and services. That's business intelligence (BI) in
action for higher education. Institutions that use information effectively gain
a strategic advantage. Explore BI concepts and issues including the role of
organizational norms, the need to rethink existing business and data processes,
and how implementing BI can disrupt current practices. Hear examples from
a recent planning process undertaken at Dalhousie to develop a vision and
foundational governance structures for a BI initiative.
Staying Alive in the Procurement Jungle –
Risk Mitigation Strategies for University Managers
Wray Hodgson, Manager, Purchasing, George Brown College
Maureen Sullivan, President, National Education Consulting Inc. (NECI)
Get a high-level overview of the most critical legal and business risks facing
procurement organizations, along with suggested mitigation strategies and
highlights from some of the most recent Supreme Court of Canada decisions.
Discuss the appropriate role for the executive and learn the Six Top Tips for
Successful Procurement.
The Power of a Policy
Joshua Adams, Director, Policy Office and DFA Communications, Cornell
University
Michele Gross, Director, University Policy Program, University of Minnesota
More than twenty years ago, Cornell University and the University of Minnesota
each took a different approach to establish models for developing, promulgating,
maintaining, and reviewing administrative policies. Both now have successful,
sustainable policy programs, largely due to the support of senior leadership
and their reliance on common tools such as templates, review and approval
processes, user input mechanisms, and regular review cycles. Find out how these
institutions approach policy and how you can use these tools to produce effective
administrative policies at your institution.
A Modernized Approach to Tri-Council’s Financial Monitoring Process
Robert Potvin, Acting Team Leader, Financial Monitoring and Awards
Administration, NSERC/SSHRC
Ian Raskin, Supervisor, Post Award Administration and Financial Monitoring,
Canadian Institutes of Health Research
In 2013, the three granting agencies will implement a modernized financial
monitoring review process to ensure adequate coverage of risks associated
with third-party administration of federal grant and award funds, reduce costs,
increase efficiencies, and augment the value of monitoring for all stakeholders.
It will provide the agencies with a consolidated risk-based assessment of
the control framework each institution uses. Institutions will benefit from a
transparent review process that presents results by control criteria, allowing them
to focus on areas of concern. Hear an overview of the new approach, principles,
processes and implications for administering grant and award funds on behalf of
the Agencies.
LUNCH / TRADESHOW OPEN
Models for Managing Fee Charge Back for Facility Department
Services
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Robert J. Carter, Associate Vice-President, Physical Resources, University of Guelph
Janet Hanna, Assistant Director, Administrative Services, Carleton University
Ron Proulx, Executive Director, Facilities Operations and Development,
McGill University
Corporate Presentation by Tribal
12:10 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.
An internal charge back is a mechanism used by organizations to recover
costs related to the provision of a service to one unit by another unit. When
universities charge fees to academic or administrative units for services provided
by other units, it should be done with openness and transparency. Panelists
from two universities currently using charge back systems will discuss the
philosophy behind charge backs, the resource allocation models underpinning
the requirement to charge units for services, the pros and cons of various charge
back models, and effective approaches to managing charge back systems.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
2013
Corporate Presentation by MNP
12:40 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
49
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
Linking Treasury Strategies to Institutional Mission, Vision and Goals
Swavek A. Czapinski, Assistant Treasurer, Finance Department, Treasury,
York University
Treasury departments at universities have wide-ranging and diverse
responsibilities that include managing banking relationships, counterparty
risk, debt issuance and servicing, capital project evaluation, short-term
cash requirement forecasting, and longer-term investment management
for both endowments and pensions. Given the vital importance of these
responsibilities, Treasury strategies must continue to evolve in order to best
support the primary goals of the institution. Hear a review of recent trends,
best practices and lessons learned from the private sector that can be applied
to better align the work of a Treasury department with the vision, mission and
goals of the university it serves.
Dépenses de faible valeur : contenir les coûts tout en respectant les
exigences des organismes subventionnaires (in French)
France Boucher, directrice adjointe, Recherche, fiducie et dotation,
Université d’Ottawa
Angela Cummings, agente principale – contrôle financier et politiques,
Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada
Robert Potvin, chef d’équipe par intérim, Division des finances et de
l’administration des octrois du CRSNG et du CRSH
Note: this session is also being offered in English as 'Low Dollar Value
Expenses' - as part of the Finance Pre-Conference Seminar
Les dépenses de faible valeur sont parfois difficiles à suivre et à gérer,
puisqu’elles sont associées à un grand nombre de transactions et d’exigences
de conformité. Les établissements doivent faire en sorte que les coûts
engendrés par le contrôle de ces transactions respectent les exigences
des organismes subventionnaires. Trois intervenants, dont deux provenant
d’organismes subventionnaires, vont présenter différentes façons de gérer
les dépenses de faible valeur tout en se conformant aux exigences. Les
participants seront aussi invités à partager les solutions trouvées dans leur
propre établissement à cet égard.
Evaluating Workflow Processes to Promote Continuous Quality
Improvement
Christina MacNeil, Director of Finance, Dean’s Office, Faculty of Medicine,
Dalhousie University
Lynn Power, Director, Human Resources, Dalhousie University
Anne Weeden, Assistant Dean, Operations, Dalhousie University
Educational institutions can improve efficiency, effectiveness and flexibility
by adopting a culture of continuous quality improvement. To successfully
build this culture at the institutional level, all members of the organization
need to participate in a critical self-assessment of work flow processes. By
participating in the identification and implementation of new or modified
processes, staff members feel empowered and accountable, processes
become more reliable, and resources used become more transparent. Learn
how to facilitate this participation and explore its benefits, which can include
streamlining and cost savings.
50
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Responsibility Center Management – Is Your Institution Ready to Adopt It?
Jim Butler, Vice President, Finance and Administration, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Larry Goldstein, President, Campus Strategies, LLC
Responsibility Center Management (RCM) is a popular resource
management model that many institutions are moving to adopt. It offers
tremendous benefits for universities willing to cede financial control to
decentralized operating units. However, it is not a panacea and requires
great care in its design and implementation. Discover RCM’s pros and cons,
how it has been successfully deployed by various universities, what has
caused it to fail in other cases, and tips for assessing its viability for your
institution.
Implementing Risk-Based Procurement – A Case Study
Ryan Christensen, Project Manager, Stuart Olsen Dominion Construction Ltd.
Hugh Warren, Executive Director, Operations and Maintenance, University
of Alberta
The University of Alberta used a risk-based approval approach in the
development of a $30M cyclotron built between October 2011 and December
2012. The project was challenging for several reasons, including the technical
nature of the work, the fixed schedule, limited budget, and collaborative
development with several partners. Hear how these challenges were
overcome by using Best Value-Design Build and Integrated Project Delivery to
manage the procurement and delivery process.
Using Enterprise Risk Management to Inform Strategy
Debbie Sabatino, Senior Manager, Enterprise Risk, Office of the Chief Risk
Officer, McMaster University
The enterprise risk management (ERM) framework informs and assists
institutions in decision-making. It is about empowering them to manage
risk. The benefits of ERM are achieved through institution-wide deployment.
Although the framework can be complex and bureaucratic, these concerns
can be managed practically through strategic deployment of ERM. Explore
how existing processes can be enhanced to assist the institution in
envisioning opportunities and challenges to advance its strategic plan and
objectives, identify risks at the right level, and deploy the optimal level of
resources.
BREAK
2:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Tradeshow Open
Corporate Presentation by Siemens Canada Ltd., Building Technologies Division
Siemens Demand Flow / Chiller Optimization
2:50 p.m. – 3:10 p.m.
Attend this educational session and learn how Siemens Demand Flow can
optimize a chilled water system to reduce a plant’s total energy consumption
by 20% - 50%. Demand Flow. Powerful solution. Proven results.
VP Forum
2:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
By invitation only
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
He’s
wondering
how many
lives he’ll
change
He’s not
wondering
if his
furniture
has arrived
He has
Armstrong
armmove.com
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
Changes to CFI’s In-Kind Contribution Guidelines and
Funding Administration Requirements
Christine Charbonneau, Director, Finance, Canada Foundation for
Innovation (CFI)
Since 2010, with input from the community, the CFI has been reflecting on
how best to address the challenges related to in-kind contributions. Get an
update on proposed changes to the guidelines regarding these contributions.
The CFI has also been revisiting its requirements in an attempt to reduce the
administrative burden related to CFI funding. Learn more about the various
options that have been identified and the changes already implemented.
Participants will be challenged to examine their own institutions’ internal
requirements to see if additional changes can be made to reduce the workload.
Lean Process Applied in Higher Education
Michael Ewing, President and CEO, e-Zsigma (Canada) Inc.
Gwen Miller, Financial Analyst, Assistant Vice-President (Financial Services)
Office, University of Saskatchewan
Cindy Taylor, Director, Office of Quality Initiatives, Carleton University
Lean, originally rooted in the manufacturing realm, is finding its way into all
elements of the service sector. Governments, hospitals and many not-forprofits have embraced Lean methodologies in an effort to realize operational
efficiencies and maximize value-added work. Explore what Lean can mean
in the university sector and how some of your colleagues have applied Lean
within their universities.
Enabling the Research Enterprise: An Institutional Challenge, A
National Imperative
Jay Black, Chief Information Officer, Simon Fraser University
Lori MacMullen, Executive Director, CUCCIO
As research and education relies more on computational resources, Canada’s
researchers and educators require a comprehensive, integrated, sustainable
digital infrastructure ecosystem to innovate successfully, bring their results
to the community, and compete internationally. Research, education, and
innovation in Canada are increasingly at risk from the lack of a coherent
digital infrastructure. The issue is not one of magnitude of investment made
by stakeholders, but rather one of coherence, consistency, universality,
and long-term sustainability. We must address both strategic and tactical
issues so that our infrastructure supports digital scholarship and research,
enhances productivity, and contributes to the future wealth and welfare of
all Canadians. Hear an overview of the current challenges and the actions
underway to address them.
52
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Using Core Competencies to Support Talent and Unleash Potential
Bill Isley, Manager, Organizational Learning and Effectiveness, Human
Resource Services, University of Alberta
Cynthia Munro, Training and Development Specialist, Organizational
Learning and Effectiveness, Human Resource Services, University of Alberta
The University of Alberta successfully launched a new core competency-based
learning program aligned to business needs and supported by flexible online
content. Hear about their experience implementing e-learning, learn the
seven key competencies used to launch and position these learning resources,
and explore the challenges and opportunities of reaching all learners.
Unique in Canada – Integrating Human Rights,
Quality Management in Clinical Research, and Audit Services
Please note that the title of this presentation has changed slightly from its originally
announced version. The session description and content have not changed.
Scott Jamieson, Advisor, Quality Management in Clinical Research,
University of Alberta
Wade King, Advisor, Office of Safe Disclosure and Human Rights, University
of Alberta
Mary Persson, Associate Vice-President (Audit and Analysis), University of
Alberta
The notion of an independent, organization-wide compliance, ethics and
audit function is relatively new to higher education. Many universities want
to improve their compliance and audit capabilities while maintaining a
minimal resource commitment. The University of Alberta combined its offices
of safe disclosure, human rights, quality management in clinical research, and
internal audit into a single portfolio, uniquely positioned to offer a universitywide view of risk and control, while providing a safe and effective venue for
the community to discuss concerns in areas such as research, policy, ethics,
discrimination and harassment. Come explore the benefits of this integrated,
cost-effective approach.
PRESIDENT’S RECEPTION, DINNER AND DANCE
Sponsored by Fisher Scientific
6:00 p.m. – midnight
Chedoke AB, Hamilton Convention Centre
Join us and our sponsor, Fisher Scientific, for an elegant evening of fine dining
and the passing of the torch from outgoing CAUBO President Matthew
Nowakowski to incoming President Dave Button.
Following dinner, Parkside Drive, an eight-piece cover band from Toronto,
Ontario, will entertain you. Parkside features a vast repertoire encompassing all
genres including dance, jazz, funk, soul, rock and reggae. Their energetic and
authentic performance style is guaranteed to bring the room to its feet. So get up
out of your seat and onto the dance floor early in the evening because once the
band gets going, it might be hard to find a spot!
The attire for the evening will be business elegance.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
TUESDAY, JUNE 18
All programming will take place at the Hamilton Convention
Centre unless otherwise noted.
ZUMBA
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
6:30 a.m. – 7:30 a.m.
Campus Space: An Asset, a Liability, and an Opportunity
Start your day off with a great dance workout that combines salsa, merengue,
mambo, samba and more, all set to hot Latin beats and rhythms guaranteed
to wake up your body and soul.
Jack K. Colby, Past President, APPA and Assistant Vice-Chancellor for
Facilities Operations, North Carolina State University
E. Lander Medlin, Executive Vice President, APPA
BREAKFAST
Sponsored by Starbucks Coffee Canada
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
PLENARY SPEAKER
Sponsored by PwC
Campus space is the largest single asset in an institutional portfolio, but
may also be its largest liability. Successfully leveraging this asset can
present tremendous opportunities for an institution. Come learn about the
top six space management issues in higher education (including culture)
and the potential benefits to the institution that emerge from better asset
management, and explore the key program components for successful space
management. Case studies will be used to demonstrate current best practices,
and participants will be encouraged to participate in a discussion. This
session’s content is adapted from APPA’s Thought Leaders Series 2012.
8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
CAUBO Volunteer Recognition Awards
The 2013 CAUBO Volunteer Recognition Awards, including the Ken Clements
Distinguished Administrator, Distinguished Service, Leadership in Learning,
and Emerging Leader Awards will be presented.
Rethinking the Traditional University Model:
Stay the Course or Radical Change?
James Bradshaw, Postsecondary Education Reporter, National News, The
Globe and Mail (Moderator)
Ian D. Clark, Professor, School of Public Policy and Governance, University of
Toronto
Pat Hibbitts, Vice-President Finance & Administration, Simon Fraser
University
Rylan Kinnon, Executive Director, Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance
In a moderated discussion, three panelists will debate the relevance and
vitality of our current university model by first responding to the questions: Is
the current university model broken? Are our current approaches to teaching,
research, institutional differentiation and other major issues working
effectively? The panelists will proceed to explore what aspects of the current
model are not working, suggest possible solutions to these challenges, and
finally examine who may be best positioned to help bring about changes that
can improve the health of the Canadian university model.
Note: Simultaneous interpretation will be available for this session.
BREAK
10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Tradeshow Open
Developing a Leadership Culture at Western University
Andrew Fuller, Director, Learning and Development, Western University
Gitta Kulczycki, Vice-President, Resources and Operations, Western
University
Peggy Roffey, Senior Facilitator, Learning and Development, Western
University
Eleven years ago, Western established a unique and still-thriving Leaders’ Forum
where more than 200 academic and administrative leaders come together
several times a year to discuss strategic issues and best practices in leadership.
This has helped Western build a strong leadership culture, develop a shared
understanding among leaders of strategic and operational issues, and foster
mutual respect for both academic and administrative contributions to the
university’s success. Learn how to establish, prepare, present, and promote such
a forum, and how to build and support a cadre of facilitators to ensure effective
dialogue.
Linking the Strategic Plan and the Budget: Laurentian's Experience
Anne-Marie Mawhiney, Special Advisor to the President, Laurentian
University
Carol McAulay, Vice-President, Administration, Laurentian University
Explore the process and people involved in the development of Laurentian
University’s 2012-2017 Strategic Plan, the result of proactive and extensive
consultation with students, faculty, staff, alumni and community leaders.
The plan is ambitious and bold, pointing to emerging priorities in the years
ahead and setting a course for the next period of transformative growth
for the university. In tying its five-year financial planning to the strategic
plan, Laurentian found financial resources to support 40 outcomes linked to
five key goals: student engagement and satisfaction; national recognition;
university of choice; community cohesiveness; and organizational excellence.
Corporate Presentation by Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
DeGroote School of Business and Sodexo: An Integrated On-Site
Campus Services Partnership in support of Student Engagement
10:05 a.m. – 10:25 a.m.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
53
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
Student Mental Health – The Impact and the Response
Michael Histed, Director, Office of Risk Management, University of Ottawa
Robert Quigley, Regional Medical Director, Americas Region, International
SOS Assistance, Inc.
Student mental health is a growing and emerging risk, described by some as an
epidemic that is not unique to any one university. Mental health is of concern on
campus, in the classroom, and in the field, both domestically and internationally.
Explore how this risk is being managed, current standards of duty of care,
legal liabilities related to failure to respond or inappropriate response, typical
responses and best practices, and the capacity of staff and faculty to deal with
situations where a student may be a risk to him/herself and/or others.
Top 10 IT Issues in Higher Education
Dwight Fischer, Assistant Vice-President, Chief Information Officer,
Dalhousie University (Moderator)
Ben Kosic, Partner, Advisory Services, KPMG Canada
Susan Grajek, Vice-President, Data, Research, and Analytics, EDUCAUSE
Oliver Grüter-Andrew, Chief Information Officer, The University of British
Columbia
In this moderated panel session, leading Canadian chief information officers
(CIOs) will respond to the top 10 Information Technology (IT) issues as
identified by EDUCAUSE. Responses will go beyond bits and bytes to focus
on perspectives and strategies. Panelists will explore variations on the top ten
IT issues and share their perspectives and ideas on cloud computing, shared
services, networks, IT costs, investment, staffing and much more. Audience
participation will be encouraged.
LUNCH/CAUBO 2014 PRESENTATION
by the University of Victoria
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
Amélioration des processus : une approche managériale axée sur
l’initiative des gestionnaires (in French)
Joanne Roch, Vice-rectrice à l'administration, Université de Sherbrooke
Jules Chassé, Vice-recteur adjoint aux ressources informationnelles,
Université de Sherbrooke
|
Hamilton, Ontario
A New Era in University Safety: Bringing Strategic Leadership to the
Safety and Risk Services Portfolio at Simon Fraser University
Pat Hibbitts, Vice-President, Finance and Administration, Simon Fraser
University
Terry Waterhouse, Chief Safety Officer, Safety and Risk Services, Simon
Fraser University
Administrative challenges related to campus safety, security, risk management
and emergency response have become more complex. Violent incidents and
increasing health and safety issues all highlight the need for a comprehensive,
integrated response. However, the internal structures of universities can
lead to segregation and fragmentation in service delivery among portfolios
charged with responsibility for these areas. Hear how Simon Fraser University
developed a Safety & Risk Services department in 2011, with the goal of
effectively and efficiently delivering these critically important services. This
interactive session will outline the model, highlight strategic priorities, and
acknowledge the benefits and challenges faced by the university.
Making Pensions More Sustainable
Jim Butler, Vice-President, Finance and Administration, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Allan Shapira, Senior Partner, retirement practice, Aon Hewitt Consulting
Pension benefits are an important part of total compensation in the university
sector. However, delivering these benefits in a sustainable manner has
become a significant challenge. Learn how the various stakeholders define
pension plan sustainability and identify approaches that are being used in the
university sector, or could be used, to address the sustainability issue. Each
approach will be assessed in the context of the sustainability definition. The
issues around transitioning to a sustainable platform will also be addressed.
Privacy Breach – The Positive Impact of a Negative Situation
Janice Johnson, Manager, Office of the Vice-President, Finance and
Operations, University of Victoria
Paul Stokes, Chief Information Officer, University of Victoria
On January 7, 2012, 10,000 employee payroll records were stolen from a
building at the University of Victoria. Explore what is required to ensure a
successful immediate response and how to go from response to review and
then to resolution. Panelists will highlight response strategies, policies, the
differences between electronic and paper data, why records management
is critical, assessment tools, and the role of administrators in this type of
scenario. Success comes down to people, process, communication and
collaboration. It may sound simple, but when people’s emotions are involved
and a large and varied audience (including staff, businesses and outside
organizations) is affected, nothing is simple.
Please note that the speakers for this session will present remotely via
videoconference from the University of Sherbrooke.
Cette présentation effectuera un survol de la démarche utilisée par
l’Université de Sherbrooke afin de permettre à ses gestionnaires de réaliser
plus facilement des projets d’amélioration de processus. Le lien entre la
démarche d’amélioration des processus et les orientations du plan stratégique
de l’Université « Réussir 2010-2015 » sera abordé, ainsi que les structures du
cadre sur lequel une telle démarche repose, soit la composition du comité de
pilotage, les critères utilisés pour la sélection des projets, ainsi que les étapes
de réalisation de ceux-ci suite à leur acceptation. Des exemples de succès
seront présentés, suivi par un échange avec les participants.
54
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
HOW DO YOU TAKE YOURS?
COMMENT LE PRENEZ-VOUS?
No matter how your plan is designed – DB, DC or
hybrid – we have the people, the solutions and the
systems to make life brighter for you and your plan
members.
Quelle que soit la structure de votre régime – PD,
CD ou hybride – nous avons les gens, les solutions
et les systèmes pour vous offrir, à vous et aux
participants de votre régime, une vie plus radieuse.
To find out how we can help, please call Randy
Colwell, Regional Vice-President, 1-877-266-3563,
ext. 4766.
Pour savoir comment nous pouvons vous aider,
appelez Randy Colwell, vice-président régional, au
1-877-266-3563, poste 4766.
Life’s brighter under the sun
La vie est plus radieuse sous le soleil
www.sunlife.ca
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Shared Administrative Services Delivery and
Opportunities for Collaboration
Building Succession and Leadership Development Programs
for Business Managers
Oliver Grüter-Andrew, Chief Information Officer, The University of British
Columbia
Andrew Medd, Senior Manager, Deloitte
Rosie Parnass, Director, Organizational Development and Learning, Human
Resources, University of Toronto
Facing a challenging fiscal environment, BC’s Ministry of Advanced Education
engaged all post-secondary institutions in the province in a review and
assessment of non-academic administrative services delivery, with the aim of
achieving best value and fiscal plan targets through reduced costs, improved
quality, better risk management and enhanced services. The project, led by
Deloitte, seeks to identify opportunities for shared procurement and back office
administrative services, building on the effective practices and cost savings
already achieved by individual institutions and existing collaborative initiatives.
Hear an overview of the project, shared services concepts, and findings of the
opportunity assessment phase.
Financial Sustainability and Collective Bargaining at Canadian
Universities
Sharon Cochran, Director, Faculty Bargaining Services (FBS)
Alexander (Sandy) Darling, Director of Research and Field Officer, Faculty
Bargaining Services (FBS)
Examine the relationship between collective bargaining and the financial
sustainability challenge faced by universities. Participants will be asked for their
input on this issue as they explore the financial threats associated with collective
bargaining and critical success factors related to taking a more strategic approach.
Participant input received during the session will be incorporated into an FBS
discussion paper.
BREAK
2:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
CONCURRENT SESSIONS
3:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
We ask that all delegates pre-select their concurrent sessions, as capacity will
be limited by meeting room size. Please register separately for these sessions
on the registration form. Choose one of the following sessions:
The Role of the Compliance Officer in Post-Award Research
Administration
Diane Johnston, Director, Research Finance, University of Waterloo
Shane Royal, Director, Research Accounting, University of Calgary
The regulatory and reporting regime surrounding research funds entrusted to
universities has become increasingly complex and prescriptive. In response,
many institutions have created the role of compliance officer to monitor
adherence to all related policies and guidelines, and to ensure that the
community understands its financial and administrative accountabilities.
The compliance officer is responsible for identifying, monitoring, and
mitigating risk across the institution. Learn about the compliance officer
role at two universities and how to identify the need for such a role, secure
resources to support it, determine the reporting structure, establish tasks and
responsibilities, and monitor impact and effectiveness.
56
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Learn about the University of Toronto’s succession and leadership
development programs: their evolution, current state, the benefits observed
to date, and how the structure may be transferable to your own institution.
Several past and current participants in these programs will share their
insights and lessons learned. (Note: This session is also being offered as part
of the HR Pre-conference seminar.)
Post-Secondary Business Continuity Planning
Karen Alexander, Emergency Management Co-ordinator, Administration
and Finance, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Adam Conway, Manager, Office of Emergency Management, University of
Alberta
Come learn about a new practical Business Continuity framework, tailored
to the higher education sector, which has been developed by and for
CAUBO members. This matrix framework provides tools for use at both the
unit and institutional level.
A Cross-Functional Team Approach to ERP Redesign at the
University of Calgary
Allen Amyotte, Director, Enterprise Risk Management, University of
Calgary
Bernie Semenjuk, Associate Partner, Global Services, IBM
Achieving consistent governance in a university can be challenging, due
to the decentralized and collegial nature of decision-making and the
requirement to meet the needs of external stakeholders and auditors. To
address these challenges, the University of Calgary launched the Innovative
Support Services (iS2) project in 2011, including an upgrade and redesign
of their PeopleSoft ERP. Learn how a cross-functional team was engaged to
review processes, hierarchy structures and decision rights, why defining the
Delegation of Authority and Signing Authority Matrix were key steps in the
redesign of the system, and how they helped to reinforce accountability.
Do You Know Where Your Students Are?
Managing Risks Associated With Student Travel
Anne Baxter, Director, Risk and Safety Services, University of Lethbridge
Alex Elson, President, International SOS Assistance, Inc.
Robert Quigley, Regional Medical Director, Americas Region, International
SOS Assistance, Inc.
The completion of an academic degree is no longer restricted to the
confines of the classroom. There are many varied and exciting opportunities
for students both in Canada and abroad: field work, internships, exchange
programs, independent study opportunities, study abroad programs and
more. The number of students travelling away from campus in the course
of their educational endeavors has grown exponentially over the last
decade and with this increased mobility there is increased risk. Explore how
universities are managing this risk and what their responsibilities are to
students who are travelling in pursuit of academic initiatives.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
FAREWELL EVENING
REGISTRATION
6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
David Braley Athletic Centre, McMaster University
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES
Please join us at McMaster University’s newest Athletic Centre for an evening of
‘Everything Hamilton.’ Just as delegates were welcomed to the city ‘by train’ at
Liuna Station, come bid it farewell ‘by water’ through a celebration of Hamilton’s
unique water features, from its more than 100 incredible waterfalls to its deepwater port on the southern shore of Lake Ontario. Enjoy delectable local fare and
be entertained by up-and-coming musical talents from around the city. Do not
miss this chance to kick back and relax with friends both new and old before
departing Hamilton.
Shuttle service will be provided. Attire for this evening is business casual.
Pre-Conference Seminars – Saturday, June 15, 2013
Fee includes:
• Attendance at one of eight pre-conference seminars to be held Saturday,
June 15, 2013
• Access to CAUBO’s Live Learning Centre. After the conference, you can
visit the LLC to catch up on sessions from the other seven pre-conference
seminars.
• Breakfast, lunch, a.m. and p.m. breaks
COMPANION PACKAGE
Bringing a guest with you to Hamilton? Take advantage of the companion
package, which includes breakfast on Monday and Tuesday, tickets and
transportation to all three social events (Welcome Reception, President’s
Reception, Dinner and Dance and Farewell Evening).
Sunday, June 16
4:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Opening Ceremonies – Hamilton Convention Centre
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Welcome Reception – Liuna Station
Monday, June 17
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Breakfast – Hamilton Convention Centre
6:00 p.m. – midnight
President’s Reception, Dinner and Dance – Hamilton Convention Centre
Tuesday, June 18
7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
Breakfast – Hamilton Convention Centre
6:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Farewell Evening – McMaster University
TOURISM INFORMATION
About Hamilton
Rich in history and culture and surrounded by spectacular nature, Hamilton is a
city like no other in the region. Unique for its distinctive urban feel and vibrant
arts and culture, Hamilton also boasts deep roots and a proud history. Bounded
by the picturesque southern shores of Lake Ontario and the lush trails of the
Niagara Escarpment, Hamilton offers incredible access to conservation and
recreation lands and amazing waterfalls, and is a natural playground for cyclists,
hikers, boaters and outdoor adventurers. Hamilton wraps around the western tip
of Lake Ontario and is ideally located in the heart of the country’s most popular
travel destinations in Southern Ontario. The city lies halfway between Toronto and
Niagara Falls, making it an ideal destination, an attractive detour or a convenient
stopover.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Academic Managers’ Seminar
Facilities Management Seminar
Finance Seminar
Human Resources Seminar
Internal Audit Seminar
Procurement Seminar
Risk Management Seminar
Stu Budden Treasury & Investment Seminar
Registration Fee
$250
$250
$250
$250
$250
$250
$250
$300
Main Conference – Sunday, June 16 to Tuesday, June 18, 2013
Fee includes:
• Attendance at the Opening Keynote Speaker on Sunday afternoon and all
plenary and concurrent sessions on Monday and Tuesday.
• Access to CAUBO’s Live Learning Centre (LLC). After the conference, you
can visit the LLC to catch up on all of the conference sessions.
• Breakfasts, lunches a.m. and p.m. breaks on Monday and Tuesday
• Access to all social events:
o Welcome Reception- Sunday evening*
o President’s Reception, Dinner and Dance – Monday evening*
o Farewell Event – Tuesday evening*
*Additional tickets may also be purchased for these social events
Member
Non-Member
Until May 1
$710
$945
Optional Events
Dart Tournament
Wine Event
Golf Tournament
Tour of Niagara Falls
$50
$55
$135
$95
Companion Package
$325
As of May 2
$835
$1,055
Please register now by visiting our website
www.caubo.ca – click the link underneath the
All the Right Moves logo on the home page and
follow the registration and payment instructions.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
57
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
Live Learning Centre
Once again this year, CAUBO is offering delegates access to all recorded
conference presentations. Conference sessions will be captured in high-quality
digital format and PowerPoint presentations will be synchronized to the live
audio recordings of the sessions, which will then be posted and delivered
on CAUBO’s Live Learning Centre, linked directly from CAUBO’s website. The
content will be searchable and, where applicable, will include information such
as speaker biographies, learning objectives, speaker notes, handouts, links to
relevant websites, etc.
Launched in 2011, the Live Learning Centre initiative supports CAUBO’s
number one strategic objective of expanding professional development offerings
to our members. Recorded content from the 2012 and 2011 conferences is still
available – visit www.caubo.ca.
ON-SITE REGISTRATION
|
Hamilton, Ontario
John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport in Hamilton (http://www.flyhi.ca/)
hosts WestJet Airlines, which flies to and from over 30 destinations in Canada,
the US and the Caribbean.
Carpooling:
Visit the CAUBO 2013 Carpooling Group on the CAUBO
CyberCommunity, where members planning to attend the conference
can arrange shared transportation between Toronto and Hamilton.
Visit www.caubo.ca, log in, click on CyberCommunity and then go to
the group directory to find and join the group.
Taxis
Several taxi services are available in Hamilton:
Blue Line Taxi
905-525-BLUE
Hamilton Cab
905-777-7777
www.525blue.com
www.hamiltoncab.com
Friday, June 14
Sheraton Hamilton Hotel lobby
4:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
By Rail
If you are planning your trip by rail, VIA Rail Canada serves more than 450
Canadian cities. Hamilton is served by the nearby Aldershot GO Train Station in
Burlington. http://www.viarail.ca/en
Saturday, June 15
Hamilton Convention Centre, 3rd floor
7:15 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
By Car
Hamilton is easily accessed by major and secondary highways, including the
Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), Highways 403, 407, 5, 6, 8 and 20.
Sunday, June 16
Hamilton Convention Centre, 3rd floor
10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
From Toronto:
Follow the QEW toward Hamilton/Niagara
Take Highway 403 West toward Hamilton/Brantford
Monday, June 17
Hamilton Convention Centre, 3rd floor
7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
By Bus
Greyhound Canada and Coach Canada both offer coach service to and from
Hamilton. For travel within the Greater Toronto Area, GO Transit has both bus and
light rail options.
www.greyhound.ca
www.coachcanada.com
www.gotransit.com
Tuesday, June 18
Hamilton Convention Centre, 3rd floor
7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
For further information about registration, please contact Unconventional
Planning at (888) 625-8455 (in North America only) or by e-mail at
[email protected]
DRESS CODE
The dress code for the conference is ‘business casual,’ with the exception of the
President’s Dinner, which is ‘business elegance.’
TRANSPORTATION
By Air
Pearson International Airport (http://www.torontopearson.com/) in Toronto is
45 minutes from Hamilton via Highway 403 and hosts Air Canada flights as
well as many international carriers. Land transportation desks are located in
each terminal to assist travellers with car rental, car services, or other ground
transportation to Hamilton.
Airways Transit Service Limited
Hamilton Limo
Air Canada
WestJet
58
905-689-4460
905-529-5466
1-888-247-2262
1-888-937-8538
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Car Rentals
CAUBO has a national agreement with Budget Car Rental. The CAUBO
agreement offers university members the best available rates when quoting the
ID number listed below. This means you will receive any special rate being offered
if it is lower than the listed ‘university’ rates on the CAUBO website. This could
save you as much as $10 a day.
Please visit http://www.caubo.ca/supplier_contracts/car_rentals/
car_rental_rates or call 1-800-268-8900 for more information. Use the
Reservation ID# A136100 to get the university rate.
ACCOMMODATIONS
The CAUBO 2013 pre-conference Seminars and Annual Conference will take
place at the Hamilton Convention Centre. The official host hotel is the Sheraton
Hamilton, with overflow room blocks at the Crowne Plaza Hamilton and the
Staybridge Suites Hamilton-Downtown. Visit our conference website for up-todate information about accommodations at CAUBO 2013.
www.airwaystransit.com
www.hamiltonlimo.com
www.aircanada.ca
www.westjet.com
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
CONFERENCE SPONSORS
Thank you to all of our sponsors!
CAUBO is grateful for the outstanding support of our sponsors, without whom events such as the Annual
Conference would not be possible. Their valued contributions of time, money, products and services help take
CAUBO 2013 from ordinary to extraordinary.
Principal Partners
Chartwells Education Dining Services
Fisher Scientific
Plastiq
Prestige Partner
PwC
Major Partners
Baker & McKenzie LLP
Oracle Canada ULC
Starbucks Coffee Canada
Official Sustainability Sponsor
ARAMARK Higher Education
Delegate Tote Bag Sponsor
VWR International
Official Wireless Internet Sponsor
OfficeMax Grand & Toy
Associate Partners
Avis & Budget Car Rental
CHERD (Centre for Higher Education
Research and Development)
Knightsbridge Human Capital Solutions
Mercer
Millennium
MNP
Premiere Van Lines
RBC Royal Bank
Ricoh Canada
Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
Spring Global Mail
Sun Life Financial
Towers Watson
Tribal
UNIGLOBE Beacon Travel
Western Union® Business Solutions
60
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Exhibitors
Alertus Technologies
AMJ Campbell Van Lines
ARAMARK Higher Education
Blackboard Inc.
BMO Financial Group
Campus Living Centres
Canadian Campus Communities
The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants
Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
CEDARLANE
Commissionaires
CRi Inc.
CURIE
Ellucian
Follett of Canada Inc.
Foyston, Gordon & Payne Inc.
Higher One
Honeywell
IBM Canada
KnowledgeOne
Les Suites Hotel, Ottawa
Macquarie Equipment Finance
Marsh Canada Limited
MHPM Project Leaders
peerTransfer
Precise ParkLink Inc.
Salto Systems Inc.
The Scion Group
Scotiabank
Sharp's Audio Visual
Siemens Canada Limited,
Building Technologies Division
Staples Advantage
Telecom Computer
TGT Solutions Inc.
United Van Lines-Armstrong
VWR International
Other Contributor
First Student Canada
Gary Bourne Dart Tournament
Greystone Managed Investments Inc.
Wine Event
Legg Mason Global Asset Management
Golf Tournament
KPMG LLP
Additional Golf Tournament Sponsors
Closest to the pin, Men – Commissionaires
Closest to the pin, Women – Commissionaires
Longest Drive, Men – Plastiq
Putting Contest – MNP
Closest to the Rope – Commissionaires
Pre-conference Seminar Sponsors
Aberdeen Asset Management
Aon Hewitt
BDO Canada LLP
Bee-Clean Building Maintenance
BNP Paribas Investment Partners Canada Ltd.
Deloitte
Ernst & Young LLP
Fiera Capital
Greystone Managed Investments Inc.
Hicks Morley LLP
KPMG
MHPM Project Leaders
RPR Environmental
Sun Life Financial
Xerox Canada Ltd
Note: These are the official sponsors at the time
of publishing this issue of University Manager.
Additional sponsors may sign on prior to the start of
the conference.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Superior Measurable Outcomes
Guaranteed.
Guaranteed Outcomes Create Thriving Campuses.
At ARAMARK Higher Education, we become your strategic
partner and align directly with your campus goals to deliver
exceptional Dining and Facility services. We bring our
industry expertise and continuous innovation to deliver
superior measurable outcomes that we guarantee.
To learn how we can help your campus visit
www.aramarkhighered.com or call
Rob McNern at 416.255.6131 ext. 3447.
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
2013
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
SPONSOR PROFILES/PROFILS DE COMMANDITAIRES
ARAMARK HIGHER EDUCATION
‘Guaranteed Outcomes Create Thriving Campuses….’ At ARAMARK, we
become your strategic partner and align directly with your campus goals
to deliver exceptional dining and facility services. We bring our industry
expertise and continuous innovation to deliver superior measurable outcomes
that we guarantee. To learn how we can help your campus, visit www.
aramarkhighered.com or call Rob McNern at 416-255-6131 x 3447.
talent development, career management and workforce management. See
www.knightsbridge.ca.
MERCER
Mercer is a global consulting leader in talent, health, retirement and
investments. With 12 offices across Canada, Mercer helps Canadian
Universities advance the health, wealth and performance of their most vital
asset – their people. Visit www.mercer.ca
AVIS & BUDGET CAR RENTAL
Budget is pleased to be the preferred supplier of CAUBO. With over 320
locations in Canada, Budget offers the biggest fleet coast-to-coast for cars
and truck rentals. Budget has special CAUBO rates, which can be booked
directly on www.caubo.ca
Budget location de voitures a le plaisir d’être le fournisseur préférentiel de
l’ACPAU. Avec plus de 320 succursales au Canada, Budget offre la flotte
la plus imposante au pays pour la location de voitures et camions. Budget
consent des tarifs spéciaux à l’ACPAU; on peut réserver directement à partir
du site Web de l’ACPAU, à www.acpau.ca
BAKER & MCKENZIE LLP
Baker & McKenzie’s Toronto Labour, Employment and Employee Benefits
Law Group has a proven track record working with universities in the
areas of labour relations, employment law, litigation, pension and benefits,
and occupational health and safety. To learn more, please visit www.
bakermckenzie.com.
CHARTWELLS EDUCATION DINING SERVICES
Chartwells' unique partnerships extend beyond providing innovative solutions
which engage students, faculty and staff. They include comprehensive studentfocused initiatives such as local-based food sourcing, customized menus and
brands and expert-led bundling of services and programs. Consistently putting
students first allows Chartwells to enjoy long and successful partnerships with
leading universities and colleges across Canada.
CHERD (CENTRE FOR HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT)
The Centre for Higher Education Research and Development at the University
of Manitoba is Canada’s leading institute dedicated to the professional
development of administrators in post-secondary education. Established in
1987, the centre generates and translates knowledge into practice in the
effective leadership and management of colleges and universities.
MILLENNIUM
Millennium specializes in providing administrative software solutions and
professional services to the international higher education market. Our
Fast Administrative Support Tools (FAST) are secure, web-based solutions
that allow for both collecting and reporting of enterprise data in a single,
secure portal. Millennium’s Professional Services division effectively leads
and coordinates projects within the post-secondary and health sectors to
successfully deliver projects and services to our varied project stakeholders.
Find out more at www.mcsl.com.
MNP
Today’s post-secondary institutions are expected to offer more for less,
while seamlessly factoring variables such as compliance requirements and
rapid economic changes into the equation. At MNP we have a specialized
unit dedicated to reducing risk and optimizing opportunities for educational
bodies. Contact us today at1-877-500-0792 to learn about how we can
assist you, or visit www.mnp.ca.
OFFICEMAX GRAND & TOY
OfficeMax Grand & Toy is a leading provider of workplace products and
solutions serving business-to-business and retail customers in Canada for
over 130 years. From the latest technology, interiors and furniture, everyday
office supplies and facility resources to a wide range of print and document
services, we provide workplace innovation that enables our customers to
work better. A part of the OfficeMax family since 1996, the company has the
expertise and consolidated product and supply chain leadership to provide
customers big and small with a range of superior products and services
across North America.
ORACLE CANADA ULC
Oracle engineers hardware and software to work together in the cloud and
in your data center. For more information about Oracle (NASDAQ:ORCL), visit
www.oracle.com.
FISHER SCIENTIFIC
Fisher Scientific is a major provider of more than 250,000 products and
services to research centres, health care, educational and industrial customers
nation-wide. We serve scientists engaged in biomedical, pharmaceutical,
chemical and other fields of research and development (R & D). Contact us at
www.fishersci.ca or 1-800-234-7437.
KNIGHTSBRIDGE HUMAN CAPITAL SOLUTIONS
Knightsbridge works with organizations to strengthen their most valuable
asset, their people. We help our clients seamlessly recruit, develop, and
optimize talent to create competitive advantage and improve performance.
Knightsbridge is Canada’s leading integrated human capital company, with
over 265 employees in executive search and recruitment, leadership and
62
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
PLASTIQ
Plastiq is an online payment company that enables schools to accept credit
cards at no cost, with little setup and no merchant processing agreements.
Plastiq was created to offer consumers convenient and secure payment
options and has been saving students and their parents time and money.
Learn how you can offer your students a new payment option at www.
plastiq.com.
PREMIERE VAN LINES
As one of North America’s largest moving companies, we offer packaging,
crating and transportation of household goods, laboratories and vehicles
worldwide. Experience the ‘art of moving.’
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
ALL THE RIGHT MOVES
70 TH ANNUAL CAUBO CONFERENCE
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
PWC
At PwC, we build trust and enhance value through a deep understanding of
the issues, challenges and opportunities, leading to result-driven solutions
within higher education. With dedicated professionals in more than 21
Canadian cities, our network provides assurance, tax and consulting and
deals services to public sector and government clients and stakeholders at
all levels–federal, provincial, municipal and aboriginal. For more information,
visit www.pwc.com/ca/publicsector or contact Domenic Belmonte at 416687-8660 or [email protected]
RBC ROYAL BANK
RBC Royal Bank® has a dedicated team of specialists who offer proactive
advice and tailored financial solutions to organizations in the public sector.
RICOH CANADA
Ricoh is a global technology company specializing in office imaging equipment,
production print solutions, document management systems and IT services.
The majority of the company's revenue comes from products, solutions and
services that improve the interaction between people and information. It
is known for the quality of its technology, the exceptional standard of its
customer service and its sustainability initiatives.
SODEXO CANADA, LTD.
Sodexo has been delivering on-site services in Canada for over 40 years.
Recognized as a strategic partner, Sodexo Canada provides a wide range
of quality of life services for clients, their employees and visitors in the
education, corporate, healthcare and remote sites segments. Contact Michael
Masney at [email protected] or 905-632-8592.
SPRING GLOBAL MAIL
Spring Global Mail provides quality alternative postal solutions that are costeffective and designed to exceed our customers' expectations. Our excellent
international distribution services combined with our customized solutions,
such as departmental allocated billing and personalized customer service,
presents us as the best reliable choice for all your international mailing needs.
STARBUCKS COFFEE CANADA
Starbucks offers more ways than ever before to reach your customers and
leverage the power of the Starbucks brands which include: We Proudly Serve
Starbucks®, We’re Serving Seattle’s Best Coffee®, Torrefazione Italia Coffee®
and Tazo® Tea. We provide licensed stores in addition to espresso, brewed
coffee and premium self-serve solutions.
SUN LIFE FINANCIAL
Sun Life Financial is Canada’s leading provider of defined contribution plans
– serving more than 4,500 clients and over one million plan members. We
listen carefully to what our clients say, gaining insights that help us become
better partners. By aligning our goals with them, we are able to deliver
exceptional service, outstanding resources and great experiences. Please visit
our website at www.sunlife.ca.
TOWERS WATSON
Towers Watson is a leading global professional services company that
helps organizations improve performance through effective people, risk and
financial management. With 14,000 associates around the world, we offer
solutions in the areas of employee benefits, talent management, rewards, and
risk and capital management.
Towers Watson est une société mondiale de services professionnels de tout
premier plan qui aide les organisations à améliorer leurs résultats grâce à
une gestion efficace des ressources humaines, des risques et des finances.
Comptant 14 000 associés partout dans le monde, nous offrons des solutions
en matière d'avantages sociaux, de gestion des talents, de rémunération
globale et de gestion des risques et des capitaux.
TRIBAL
Tribal is a leading provider of systems and solutions to the education, training
and learning markets. We build world-leading software and provide education
improvement services both in the UK and overseas. Our student management
systems are streamlining processes in dozens of education institutions around
the world. Find out more at www.tribalgroup.com
UNIGLOBE BEACON TRAVEL
UNIGLOBE Travel provides travel services to institutions and businesses
across Canada and now operates over 750 locations in more than 62
countries worldwide. We offer a boutique level of reservation service that is
fully customizable to meet our clients’ needs. We are experts in assisting our
university clients to save money on travel costs while implementing industry
leading innovative technology solutions that encourage traveler buy-in to a
managed travel program.
VWR INTERNATIONAL
At VWR, we enable science by supplying critical products to the world's
top pharmaceutical, biotech, industrial, educational, and governmental
organizations. We provide our customers with an expansive choice of
premiere products such as chemicals, furniture, equipment, instruments,
apparel and consumables, from a vast group of leading scientific
manufacturers.
WESTERN UNION® BUSINESS SOLUTIONS
You can save your institution and your international students unnecessary
expenses and administrative burdens. Western Union® Business Solutions’
international payments solution is specifically designed for educational
institutions. Simplify the process for sending and receiving international funds
with one solution that offers reliability, comprehensive reporting, and cost
minimization.
La Financière Sun Life, principal fournisseur de régimes CD du Canada, offre
ses services à plus de 4 500 clients et plus d’un million de participants. Nous
écoutons attentivement nos clients, pour mieux les connaître et devenir de
meilleurs partenaires. En alignant nos objectifs sur les leurs, nous leur offrons
un service exceptionnel, des ressources incomparables et une expérience
fantastique. Visitez nous sur www.sunlife.ca.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
63
B IMAÎTRISEZ
E N V E NVOTRE
U E ÉCHIQUIER
À|
2013
HAMILTON
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
Du 15 au 18 juin 2013, la McMaster University sera ravie de vous
accueillir à Hamilton, en Ontario, à l’occasion du 70 e congrès annuel
de l’ACPAU.
Située sur les rives du lac Ontario, au cœur du « Golden
Horseshoe » et à mi-chemin entre Toronto et Niagara Falls, la
dynamique ville portuaire de Hamilton est reconnue comme un
moteur industriel, mais aussi, désormais, comme un tremplin vers de
nouveaux rêves. Grâce à son leadership stratégique, Hamilton a su
élargir ses horizons : on n’y forge plus uniquement l’acier, mais aussi
de grands esprits dans les domaines de la technologie, des arts et
de l’éducation.
À l’occasion du congrès ACPAU 2013, la McMaster University
invite les leaders d’aujourd’hui et de demain à se réunir dans cette
grande ville ontarienne sous le thème « Maîtrisez votre échiquier »
– un hommage au flair, au talent et à la passion de ceux qui voient
dans chaque besoin une solution et dans chaque défi une occasion.
Venez planifier les coups à jouer pour faire évoluer l’enseignement
postsecondaire vers les plus hauts sommets.
Les séminaires précongrès et le congrès ACPAU 2013 auront lieu
au Centre des congrès de Hamilton. L’hôtel officiel du congrès 2013
sera le Sheraton Hamilton Hotel, mais des blocs de chambres ont
aussi été réservés au Crowne Plaza Hamilton et au Staybridge Suites
Hamilton-Downtown. Visitez le site Web du congrès (suivre le lien
sur www.acpau.ca ) pour obtenir de l’information à jour concernant
l’hébergement.
Qui dit congrès dit aussi activités de détente, de loisirs et de
réseautage! Les organisateurs ont prévu cette année plusieurs
activités sociales qui mettront en vedette la riche histoire de Hamilton
de même que sa beauté naturelle et sa géographie unique tout en
valorisant les talents musicaux et culinaires de ses habitants.
Contenu en français
C’est avec plaisir que nous offrons cette année trois séances
parallèles en français. Un service d’interprétation simultanée en
français sera également offert à la conférence d’ouverture de
dimanche après-midi ainsi qu’aux plénières de lundi et de mardi.
Hamilton, Ontario
NOTRE HÔTE
La McMaster University
Bon an mal an, la McMaster University se classe parmi les 100 meilleures universités
au monde et les trois plus grandes universités de recherche au Canada. Pionnière de
l’apprentissage par problèmes, cette université est reconnue pour innover dans les
domaines de l’enseignement, de l’apprentissage et de la recherche. Ayant fêté ses 125
ans en 2012, la McMaster, qui accueille sur son campus de Hamilton, en Ontario, plus
de 24 000 étudiants, se démarque non seulement par son souci constant de la réussite,
mais aussi par la qualité de ses services et son engagement au sein de la collectivité. La
renommée de la McMaster University sur le plan de la recherche lui permet de recevoir
plus de 390 millions de dollars par année. Comptant plus de 156 000 diplômés répartis
dans 140 pays, la McMaster University a véritablement une portée planétaire.
L’ACPAU et les membres du comité organisateur vous souhaitent la bienvenue à
Hamilton, en Ontario.
Membres du comité organisateur du congrès ACPAU 2013 :
Roger Couldrey, président honoraire
Deidre Henne et Nancy Gray, coprésidentes
Gord Arbeau
Kathleen Blackwood
Bob Dunn
Larry Marsh
Doris McGuire
Susan Mitchell
Diana Parker
Kate Whalen
Mohamed Attalla
Betty Chung
Stacey Farkas
Debbie Martin
Wanda McKenna
Lisa Morine
Terry Sullivan
Tourism Hamilton
Jill Axisa
Angelo DiLettera
Kelly Fisher
Karen McGlynn
Cathie Miller
Albert Ng
Matt Terry
INSCRIVEZ-VOUS DÈS MAINTENANT!
Visitez notre site Web à l’adresse www.acpau.ca et suivez les liens menant au congrès
2013, intitulé « Maîtrisez votre échiquier ». Le site Web sera mis à jour régulièrement
pour refléter tout changement ou ajout apporté au programme du congrès.
Accès Internet sans fil commandité par OfficeMax Grand & Toy. Les congressistes
pourront profiter d’un accès Internet sans fil gratuit au Centre des congrès de Hamilton
le samedi 15 juin et les lundi et mardi 17 et 18 juin.
La qualité exceptionnelle du programme du congrès est le fruit de plusieurs mois de labeur de la part d’un groupe dévoué de
bénévoles composant un total de huit équipes de coordination. Nous souhaitons ici tous les remercier bien chaleureusement :
Rae-Ann Aldridge
Mohamed Attalla
Mary Aylesworth
Anne Baxter
Darren Becks
Deborah Collis
Rob Cooper
64
Martin Coutts
Swavek Czapinski
Daniel Doran
Mike Drane
Sharon Farnell
Peter Gee
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Bruce Gorman
Lyndsay Green
Murray Griffith
David Head
Robert Inglis
Kelly Kummerfield
Dan Langham
Anthony (Tony) Lennie
Rob MacCormack
Donna Mueller
Rosie Parnass
Mary Paul
Ron Proulx
Christina Sass-Kortsak
Daryl Schacher
Tom Smith
Colin Spinney
Philip Stack
Margaret Sterns
Dan Swerhone
Daniel Therrien
Victoria Wakefield
Hugh Warren
Heather Woermke
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
SAMEDI 15 JUIN
SÉMINAIRES PRÉCONGRÈS
INITIATIVES VERTES 2013
Cette année encore, ARAMARK Higher Education est le
commanditaire officiel appuyant le développement durable du
congrès. ARAMARK est fière d’appuyer ces importantes initiatives.
L’ACPAU et le comité organisateur du congrès s’emploient à
organiser un événement qui soit le plus respectueux possible de
l’environnement. Voici donc les initiatives à caractère écologique
adoptées pour le congrès cette année :
• Récupération des porte-noms.
• Impression de la documentation du congrès sur du papier
recyclé.
• Pas de documentation de référence sous format
papier – Toutes les présentations reçues avant le congrès
seront versées en ligne sur le site Web de l'ACPAU.
• Menus mettant en valeur des produits locaux et de saison
(dans la mesure du possible).
• Utilisation de distributrices en vrac et de vaisselle non
jetable pour réduire les déchets.
• Des pichets d’eau et des verres seront placés dans toutes
les salles de réunion du Centre des congrès de Hamilton.
• Sujets liés au développement durable abordés dans le
cadre de séances du congrès.
• Nous encourageons les exposants à offrir des prix de
présence écologiques, à réduire la quantité de documents
imprimés et à témoigner de leur contribution à l’égard du
développement durable sur les campus.
• Cette année encore, l’ACPAU fera un don à un organisme
à but non lucratif au lieu de remettre un cadeau aux
conférenciers. Le comité organisateur a choisi d’appuyer cette
année l’organisme Hamilton Food Share.
• Pour favoriser leur mieux-être, les congressistes seront
invités à prendre part à une séance gratuite de danse
aérobique latine les lundi et mardi 17 et 18 juin, de 6 h 30
à 7 h 30.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Veuillez vous inscrire séparément à ces séminaires sur le formulaire d’inscription au
congrès de l’ACPAU.
Veuillez prendre note qu'aucune documentation papier ne sera distribuée cette année
dans le cadre des séminaires précongrès puisque les présentations PowerPoint et les autres
documents utiles seront mis en ligne peu avant l'événement.
Séances offertes en anglais sauf mention contraire.
Les séminaires précongrès se tiendront au Centre des congrès de Hamilton.
SÉMINAIRE À L’INTENTION DES GESTIONNAIRES
ACADÉMIQUES
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
Administrateurs : perfectionnez votre leadership!
Nancy Buschert, gestionnaire de programme, Centre de l’éducation permanente,
McMaster University
Pamela Cant, vice-rectrice adjointe aux ressources humaines, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Linda Pickard, chargée de cours et conceptrice de programmes, McMaster
University
Tracey Taylor-O’Reilly, directrice, Centre de l’éducation permanente, McMaster
University
Melanie Will, directrice, Apprentissage et développement organisationnel, Wilfrid
Laurier University
Ces dernières années, beaucoup de fonctions administratives ont été déléguées aux
unités de recherche et d’enseignement des universités. Pour assurer l’encadrement et
la gestion de ces fonctions, les facultés et écoles ont dû créer des postes administratifs
professionnels essentiels au respect des objectifs de l’unité et des priorités stratégiques
de l’établissement. Dans ce contexte, un programme de développement du leadership
solide est devenu crucial. Cette séance sera l’occasion de découvrir des programmes
exceptionnels : celui de la Wilfrid Laurier University, qui s’appuie sur les facteurs de
réussite des employés pour cerner et souligner les comportements et valeurs sources
de succès; et ceux de la McMaster University, soit le certificat en perfectionnement du
leadership et de la gestion et le programme d’initiation pour nouveaux gestionnaires.
Établir les coûts d’instruction pour mieux arrimer budget et programmes
d’études
Jessica Davenport Williams, vice-doyenne au budget et à la planification, École
des beaux-arts et de la scène, Columbia College Chicago
Eliza Nichols, professeure agrégée, Département d’histoire et de sciences humaines
et sociales, Columbia College Chicago
Sayma Riaz, vice-doyenne au budget et à la planification, École des beaux-arts et
de la scène, Columbia College Chicago
L’établissement des coûts d’instruction est une clé pour arriver à mieux arrimer
budget et programmes d’études tout en faisant preuve de transparence. Le doyen et
les administrateurs du Columbia College de Chicago ont, en association avec le corps
professoral, mis en place un processus budgétaire qui répartit les ressources selon les
besoins des programmes d’études et où chaque dépense proposée doit être justifiée.
Cette séance dévoilera comment ils ont collaboré pour placer l’apprentissage
et les étudiants au cœur de leur démarche, déterminer les coûts d’instruction
réels et éliminer les pratiques les plus problématiques en lien avec le budget par
reconduction.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
65
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Table ronde dirigée
Trois universités canadiennes, trois approches : stratégies de
réduction des coûts liés à la gestion des installations
Les services d’appui à la négociation avec le corps professoral :
engager les gestionnaires académiques dans le processus de
négociation
Liliana LeVesconte, agente financière principale, Gestion des installations,
University of Alberta
Susan Miller, gestionnaire – services financiers et administratifs, Gestion des
installations, University of Victoria
Dan Swerhone, directeur, Exploitation et entretien des bâtiments, University of
Saskatchewan
Alexander Darling, directeur de la recherche et agent régional, Services
d’appui à la négociation avec le corps professoral (SANCP)
Jasmine Walsh, directrice, Relations avec le personnel enseignant, Dalhousie
University
Lorsqu’une convention collective est ratifiée, c’est souvent au gestionnaire
académique qu’il revient de l’appliquer. Au cours de cette séance, le panel
explorera comment le personnel administratif des unités de recherche et
d’enseignement peut s’engager davantage dans le processus de négociation,
des discussions jusqu’à la mise en œuvre. Un survol des services offerts par
les SANCP sera aussi proposé.
Gestion du changement et transformation organisationnelle :
le cas des services aux étudiants à la Wilfrid Laurier University
Tom Buckley, vice-recteur adjoint aux services aux étudiants, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Pamela Cant, vice-rectrice adjointe aux ressources humaines, Wilfrid Laurier
University
L’expansion de la Wilfrid Laurier University, devenue un grand établissement
des plus polyvalents, a nécessité une transformation considérable des unités
des services aux étudiants sur le plan de la structure, des fonctions et des
opérations. Vous découvrirez dans cette séance les étapes de cette initiative
réussie qui s’est effectuée en placent la personne au cœur du changement,
de la planification stratégique et organisationnelle à la gestion de la
transition. La décision de centraliser ou non les fonctions sur un seul campus
sera analysée et des stratégies pour mieux cerner les besoins de la clientèle et
engager le personnel dans le processus de planification et de mise en œuvre
seront présentées.
SÉMINAIRE SUR LA GESTION DES INSTALLATIONS
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
Le contexte financier actuel pousse les services de gestion des installations des
universités canadiennes à se doter de stratégies de réduction des coûts. Les
panélistes décriront les approches privilégiées dans leur établissement respectif,
de même que les résultats obtenus et les réflexions qui ont orienté les stratégies
établies sur une ou plusieurs années. La façon dont les coupures au niveau des
services ont été communiquées aux clients, la création de fonds « exceptionnels »
pour modifier la prestation des services, la réaction face à la diminution des
revenus générés par les projets et les activités auxiliaires et l’utilisation des
ententes de niveau de service pour rationaliser la charge de travail administratif
seront aussi abordées.
Table ronde dirigée
Normes et lignes directrices relatives à la conception :
comment les optimiser
Keith Hollands, directeur adjoint – conception et normalisation technique,
Planification et exécution de projets, University of Alberta
Lorraine Mercier, directrice, Services de conception, Université McGill
Andrew Wallace, directeur adjoint, Gestion et planification de l’espace,
Division de la gestion des installations, University of Saskatchewan
Il est maintenant courant pour les universités canadiennes d’établir des
normes et lignes directrices pour définir et communiquer les exigences liées à
la conception de leurs installations. Idéalement, ces documents sont à la fois
une source d’information claire et précise pour les consultants chargés de la
conception des bâtiments et une référence pour les employés qui ensuite les
gèrent et les entretiennent. Le panel se penchera sur l’optimisation des normes
et lignes directrices relatives à la conception dans trois universités. De multiples
aspects seront abordés : élaboration, approbation, communication, application,
mise à jour, utilité, portée et limites.
Se doter d’un plan directeur en matière d’énergie
Faire preuve de diligence en matière de santé et sécurité :
les responsabilités des universités envers les contractuels
Mohamed Attalla, vice-recteur adjoint, Services aux installations, McMaster
University
Glenn Brenan, directeur de l’exploitation, Services de gestion des
installations, University of Victoria
Denis Mondou, directeur, Gestion des services d’utilité et de l’énergie,
Gestion et développement des installations, Université McGill
Dan Swerhone, directeur, Exploitation et entretien des bâtiments, University
of Saskatchewan
Hugh Warren, directeur général, Exploitation et entretien des bâtiments,
University of Alberta
Étienne Yelle, Gestionnaire de la santé et sécurité – Construction, Gestion
et développement des installations, Services universitaires, Université McGill
Aux yeux de la société, les universités doivent être des modèles de
développement durable, mais les limites budgétaires et l’augmentation des
coûts énergétiques ne facilitent pas l’atteinte de cet objectif et requièrent
d’urgence de modifier les politiques de gestion de l’énergie. Trois universités
canadiennes ont relevé le défi en se dotant d’un plan directeur en matière
d’énergie. Venez découvrir l’approche qu’elles ont adoptée, de même que leur
méthodologie, leurs objectifs et leurs résultats.
Les modifications apportées aux lois sur la santé et la sécurité au travail
donnent aux universités des responsabilités accrues et un rôle de supervision
plus grand envers les travailleurs contractuels. Cette séance sera l’occasion
d’explorer différents scénarios où des contractuels ont à côtoyer le personnel et
les étudiants ou à travailler avec des employés de l’université afin de cibler les
meilleures façons d’informer ces sous-traitants sur les procédures des campus
en matière de sécurité, d’évaluer la documentation à établir concernant les
exigences en matière de diligence raisonnable et de mesurer les effets des
nouvelles exigences sur les besoins en dotation.
66
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
Gestion des installations et ressources humaines : parlons
recrutement, fidélisation et retraite
Modifications proposées aux normes comptables pour les
organismes à but non lucratif
Richard Courtois, conseiller principal en ressources humaines, Bureau du
personnel de secteur, Services universitaires, Université McGill
Tony Maltais, directeur commercial – exploitation et entretien, Gestion des
installations, University of Alberta
Christine Matheson, directrice adjointe – administration, Gestion des
installations, Dalhousie University
Dan Swerhone, directeur, Exploitation et entretien des bâtiments, University
of Saskatchewan
Martin Coutts, vice-recteur adjoint, Services des finances et de la gestion de
l’approvisionnement, University of Alberta
Représentant de L’Institut Canadien des Comptables Agréés (ICCA)
à confirmer
Confrontés à une diminution des ressources, à la complexification des bâtiments
et des services et à une hausse du volume de travail, les équipes de gestion
des installations doivent recourir à leur expérience, expertise et leadership pour
accomplir leurs tâches. Dans le cadre de cette séance, les panélistes parleront
de la concurrence dans leur région en matière de recrutement de professionnels
et d’autres employés en gestion des installations ainsi que des perspectives
de perfectionnement et d’avancement dans le domaine. La retraite anticipée,
le remplacement de l’expertise, le développement de l’expérience, le transfert
du savoir organisationnel, la planification de la relève et les programmes
d’apprentissage sont autant d’aspects qui seront abordés.
SÉMINAIRE SUR LES FINANCES
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
Vulgariser les données et les processus financiers : ça marche!
Ray McNichol, directeur des services financiers, University of British
Columbia
Daniel Therrien, contrôleur de l’Université, Services financiers, Université
Concordia
Parfois, la communication et la collaboration peuvent être entravées par les
différences de compétences en lecture d’information financière. Aider les nonspécialistes à comprendre ces données peut contribuer à renforcer la confiance,
à atteindre des objectifs et à faire accepter plus facilement le changement.
L’Université Concordia et la University of British Columbia ont fait le choix de
vulgariser l’information financière présentée à leurs partenaires et leur discours
sur les processus, la responsabilisation et la gouvernance. Cette séance révélera
leurs motivations et les tactiques appliquées, les résultats positifs obtenus, de
même que des conseils concrets et d’autres idées à reprendre à votre compte.
Les indicateurs d’une bonne santé financière :
examen d’une initiative ontarienne
Denis Cossette, vice-recteur associé aux ressources financières, Université
d’Ottawa
Pierre Piché, directeur et contrôleur, Services financiers, University of
Toronto
Les exigences en matière de responsabilisation et de transparence continuent
de croître, si bien que des indicateurs concrets sont maintenant nécessaires pour
prendre le pouls de la santé financière globale du secteur. Le Council of Financial
Officers (COFO) a justement établi des indicateurs qui aideront les universités à
mettre sur pied des stratégies efficaces pour gérer les risques institutionnels ainsi
que des référents pour l’analyse institutionnelle sous forme de ratios par secteur.
Au cours de cette séance, les conférenciers présenteront des indicateurs utiles
pour évaluer la dette d’un établissement, sa capacité financière et d’emprunt et
ses forces sur le plan financier, puis examineront les forces et les faiblesses d’un
indice financier composé.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Le Conseil des normes comptables (CNC) et le Conseil sur la comptabilité pour
le secteur public (CCSP) proposent actuellement de réviser et d’améliorer les
normes de déclaration en vigueur concernant les organismes à but non lucratif;
ces révisions toucheront les universités qui s’appuient largement sur ces normes
dans leurs propres principes comptables. Un énoncé de principes, première étape
dans l’élaboration de nouvelles normes, a récemment été publié pour rétroaction.
Les commentaires reçus orienteront la suite de la révision et la rédaction d’un
exposé-sondage détaillé. Cette séance vous permettra de connaître les principes
avancés et leurs répercussions potentielles sur la comptabilité et l’information
financière des organismes à but non lucratif des secteurs publics et privés.
Le point sur le rapport IFUC
George Dew, analyste principal, ACPAU
Dépenses de faible valeur : comment contenir les coûts tout en
respectant les exigences des organismes subventionnaires
France Boucher, directrice adjointe, Recherche, fiducie et dotation,
Université d’Ottawa
Angela Cummings, agente principale – contrôle financier et politiques,
Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada
Robert Potvin, chef d’équipe par intérim, Division des finances et de
l’administration des octrois du CRSNG et du CRSH
Les dépenses de faible valeur sont parfois difficiles à suivre et à gérer, puisqu’elles
sont associées à un grand nombre de transactions et d’exigences de conformité.
Les établissements doivent faire en sorte que les coûts engendrés par le contrôle
de ces transactions respectent les exigences des organismes subventionnaires.
Trois intervenants, dont deux provenant d’organismes subventionnaires, vont
présenter différentes façons de gérer les dépenses de faible valeur tout en se
conformant aux exigences. Les participants seront aussi invités à partager les
solutions trouvées dans leur propre établissement à cet égard.
Table ronde dirigée
SÉMINAIRE SUR LES RESSOURCES HUMAINES
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
Penser comme un chef
Teal McAteer, professeure agrégée, Ressources humaines et gestion,
DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University
Cette séance hautement interactive vise à faire comprendre comment ce qui
se passe dans notre tête se reflète sur l’efficacité des comportements que
l’on adopte en tant que chef. Apprenez comment notre façon de penser et de
réfléchir peut avoir une grande influence sur notre capacité à établir et entretenir
des relations, à composer avec le stress et le temps, à gérer le changement, à
résoudre les conflits et à fonctionner dans différentes dynamiques de groupe. Les
participants auront l’occasion de cibler les points qu’ils doivent personnellement
améliorer et de trouver des mesures concrètes pour y arriver.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
67
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
Monter des programmes de planification de la relève et de
développement du leadership pour les directeurs administratifs
Rosie Parnass, directrice du Centre de développement organisationnel et
d’apprentissage et conseillère en conciliation travail-famille-loisirs, University
of Toronto
Les organisations aux pratiques exemplaires comprennent l’importance de
mettre en œuvre des programmes ciblés de développement du leadership pour
assurer une relève forte à cet égard. Explorez les idées qui ont été dégagées
à la University of Toronto au cours des quatre dernières années tandis qu’elle
travaillait à élaborer et à appliquer une approche pour embaucher des employés
au potentiel élevé et les préparer à occuper un jour des postes de gestion. En
plus de découvrir les nombreux résultats qui peuvent déjà être observés à cette
université, les participants seront invités à expliquer comment leur établissement
gère cette problématique dans l’optique de mettre leurs connaissances en
commun.
Implications de la Norme nationale du Canada sur la santé et la
sécurité psychologiques en milieu de travail
Mary Ann Baynton, directrice de la société Mary Ann Baynton & Associates
Consulting et directrice des programmes du Centre pour la santé mentale en
milieu de travail de la Great-West
La nouvelle Norme nationale sur la santé et la sécurité psychologiques en milieu
de travail définit un « milieu de travail psychologiquement sain et sécuritaire »
comme un cadre favorisant le mieux-être psychologique des travailleurs, axé
activement sur la prévention de toute atteinte à leur santé psychologique
de façon négligente et délibérée. Le Système de gestion de la santé et de la
sécurité psychologiques (SGSSP) est semblable aux autres systèmes de gestion
et peut être intégré aux politiques et processus existants. Il ne requiert pas
d’investissements financiers importants ni de transformations profondes des
processus, politiques ou procédures en place. Apprenez ce que la norme implique
et où vous pouvez trouver des ressources pour vous aider à évaluer et à protéger
la santé et la sécurité psychologiques dans votre établissement.
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Rapport sur le sondage sur la fraude de l’ACPAU
Comité des vérificateurs internes de l'ACPAU
Dévoilement des résultats du sondage sur la fraude.
Comment bonifier la vérification interne grâce à la planification du
risque
Nancy Chase, associée, Services-conseils, KPMG LLP
En prenant l’Université d’Ottawa en exemple, cette séance exposera une
approche pratique pour élaborer non seulement des plans de vérification axés
sur le risque qui correspondent aux objectifs organisationnels, mais aussi des
cadres de gestion du risque qui tiennent compte de l’appétit qu’entretiennent les
gestionnaires à l’égard du risque.
La vérification des projets touchant l’évolution des TI
Robert Cooper, chef de la gestion des risques, McMaster University
Raj Devadas, directeur principal, Services-conseils – Gestion des risques,
KPMG
Sandy A. McBride, associé, Services-conseils – Management, KPMG
Découvrez, en adoptant le point de vue de la vérification interne, les risques
liés aux projets en TI, ce que peut coûter un échec et les avantages de la
vérification à cet égard. Approfondissez vos connaissances sur la vérification
touchant la gestion de projet, le cycle de vie d’un projet, les cadres de vérification
s’appliquant aux projets en TI et l’important travail de refonte des processus
et contrôles administratifs. Examinez ensuite du point de vue de la gestion de
projet les difficultés qui peuvent se présenter, les indicateurs laissant croire qu’un
projet est risqué, les outils menant à la réussite, les critères d’évaluation ainsi que
l’importance de la transparence et de l’amélioration continue. Cette présentation
dévoilera des conseils pour rendre vos projets en TI plus efficaces, classer en
ordre de priorité les projets à soumettre à la vérification et déterminer si des
gains ont été réalisés.
Table ronde dirigée
Rapport sur le sondage-repère
Comité des ressources humaines de l'ACPAU
Dévoilement des résultats du sondage d'étalonnage sur les RH.
SÉMINAIRE SUR LA VÉRIFICATION INTERNE
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
La vérification de la culture organisationnelle dans les universités
Michael Ramsay, directeur principal et chef des services professionnels,
secteur du capital humain, pratique du sud-ouest de l’Ontario, Deloitte
Un éditorialiste du Globe and Mail a déjà dit que les établissements universitaires
étaient confrontés à la tâche complexe de devoir mêler affaires et enseignement,
ce qui les exposait aux « tricheries financières ». Deloitte a récemment mis
au point une méthode de vérification de la culture organisationnelle qui peut
servir à évaluer efficacement les normes, valeurs et croyances culturelles d’une
organisation. Les pratiques mises de l’avant au sommet de la hiérarchie de même
que l’efficacité du réseau de contrôles jouent un rôle essentiel dans la gestion
éclairée des risques au sein d’une organisation. La vérification de la culture
peut aider une direction à favoriser l’éthique parmi son personnel et à évaluer
l’efficacité des contrôles internes. Venez apprendre comment une vérification de
la culture peut aider votre établissement universitaire à se protéger de la fraude.
68
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
SÉMINAIRE SUR L’APPROVISIONNEMENT
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
L’aventure de l’approvisionnement durable : l’expérience de la
McMaster University
Austin Noronha, directeur de l’approvisionnement stratégique, McMaster
University
Kate Whalen, directrice principale, Bureau de la durabilité, McMaster
University
Le bureau de la durabilité de la McMaster University a pour mission d’instaurer
au sein de l’université une culture de développement durable orientée autour
de sept aspects clés : l’éducation, l’énergie, les espaces verts, la santé et le
mieux-être, les transports, les déchets et l’eau. Le service de l’approvisionnement
stratégique de McMaster a collaboré avec le bureau de la durabilité afin
d’élaborer une approche concertée pour s’assurer que les nouvelles soumissions
tiennent compte du développement durable sur le plan social, économique et
environnemental. Découvrez la recette de leur succès, qui comprend notamment
la création d’un guide sur l’approvisionnement durable et d’un nouveau modèle
pour les demandes de propositions et les demandes de prix, lequel invite les
répondants à s’engager à l’égard des aspects clés du développement durable.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Les appels d’offres négociables :
l’exemple de la University of Toronto
Eddy Jin, directeur, Services d’approvisionnement, University of Toronto
Diana Magnus, directrice associée, Services d’approvisionnement, University
of Toronto
La University of Toronto a mis en œuvre un programme d’appels d’offres
négociables (AON), un mécanisme d’approvisionnement qui lui a permis de se
démarquer dans le milieu universitaire et qui lui a valu en 2012 le premier prix
de la qualité et de la productivité de l’ACPAU au niveau national. Ce programme
a été une réussite, comme en font foi la conformité accrue aux politiques, la plus
grande adhésion à celles-ci, les économies réalisées et la meilleure efficacité
opérationnelle. Découvrez comment la University of Toronto a su innover, voyez
comment se déroule un AON étape par étape, et discutez des outils qui ont
permis la mise en œuvre réussie du programme. Cette séance interactive donnera
aux participants des pistes de réflexion qui les aideront à appliquer le modèle des
AON dans leur établissement.
Formation de première ligne pour gestionnaires de
l’approvisionnement : un survol
Maureen Sullivan, présidente, National Education Consulting Inc. (NECI)
L’un des défis les plus urgents pour le secteur de l’approvisionnement
universitaire concerne la situation des ressources humaines. Dans un contexte
où de nombreux gestionnaires chevronnés partent à la retraite et où de
nombreux jeunes cadres veulent gravir les échelons, comment peut-on maximiser
l’utilisation du budget limité qui est consacré à la formation? Découvrez les
grandes lignes d’une initiative récente menée par une société d’État visant
d’abord à évaluer l’écart des savoirs parmi le personnel responsable de
l’approvisionnement, puis à combler cet écart à l’aide d’un programme de
formation semi-personnalisé. Cette séance vous présentera aussi un aperçu du
programme offert par NECI sur l’approvisionnement dans le secteur public, de
même que d’autres possibilités de formation.
Table ronde dirigée
SÉMINAIRE SUR LA GESTION DES RISQUES
8 h 00 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner continental
Séminaire
Gestion du risque d’entreprise 101
Mark Aiello, vice-président, Marsh Risk Consulting
Beaucoup d’organisations éprouvent de la difficulté à établir un lien entre
l’objectif stratégique d’un plan traditionnel de gestion du risque d’entreprise
(auquel les hauts dirigeants apportent leur grain de sel) et les risques
opérationnels que doivent gérer les différents secteurs organisationnels. Bien
que la gestion du risque d’entreprise vise particulièrement les risques liés au plan
stratégique, la gestion des risques en général porte plutôt surtout sur les facteurs
opérationnels (les causes à l’origine des risques). Découvrez une approche
qui aidera les établissements d’enseignement à mieux associer les risques
stratégiques de haut niveau aux facteurs opérationnels pour accroître l’efficacité
du programme de gestion du risque d’entreprise. Explorez aussi des approches
typiques prises pour créer des cadres à cet égard et les erreurs courantes
commises lors de leur mise en œuvre.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
2013
La gestion des risques au Canada : état des lieux
Michael Histed, directeur, Bureau de la gestion du risque, Université
d’Ottawa
La gestion des risques est une tâche de plus en plus complexe : la compétition
est féroce entre les établissements nord-américains, qui désirent tous être les
meilleurs malgré une période marquée par des compressions budgétaires et le
manque de ressources. Des organisations comme Marsh Canada et le Conseil
consultatif en matière d’éducation ont préparé des rapports dressant l’état des
lieux en ce qui concerne la gestion des risques, les pratiques exemplaires et les
risques les plus courants au sein des universités. À partir de ces rapports, vous en
apprendrez davantage sur la gestion des risques au Canada et sur les ressources
à consulter pour en savoir plus. Cette séance mettra la table pour le reste du
séminaire, qui comprendra des présentations de Marsh Canada et de plusieurs
universités canadiennes, lesquelles exposeront leurs pratiques exemplaires.
Resserrer le lien entre la gestion du risque d’entreprise et la
planification stratégique
Philip Stack, vice-recteur adjoint, Services de gestion du risque, University
of Alberta
La gestion du risque d’entreprise a pour principal objectif de permettre à
une organisation d’atteindre ses objectifs stratégiques. Autrement dit, un
établissement sera plus susceptible d’atteindre ses objectifs stratégiques s’il est
en mesure d’assurer une gestion adéquate du risque. Apprenez les concepts
essentiels de la gestion du risque d’entreprise et les cadres pertinents, puis
découvrez comment lier ce travail avec votre plan stratégique et pourquoi il
est important de le faire. Le modèle de la University of Alberta sera donné en
exemple, y compris en ce qui a trait à la structure, aux processus et aux rapports.
Les risques institutionnels :
de nouvelles façons de les cibler et de les hiérarchiser
Mark Aiello, vice-président, Marsh Risk Consulting (animateur)
Danielle Barrette, directrice des services commerciaux et de la gestion des
risques, Université de Sherbrooke
John Lammey, directeur associé, risque et assurance, Bureau de la gestion
du risque, Université d’Ottawa
Debbie Sabatino, directrice principale, risque d’entreprise, McMaster
University
Pour certains, il peut sembler ardu de s’engager à l’égard de la gestion du
risque d’entreprise ainsi que de cibler et de hiérarchiser les risques. Il est donc
important que le processus de création d’un registre des risques, que ce soit pour
l’ensemble de l’établissement ou dans une faculté donnée, soit compréhensible
pour tous ceux qui seront appelés à y participer. Provenant de trois universités
différentes, les panélistes feront part de précieux conseils et expliqueront
comment leur établissement a réussi à créer et à maintenir un registre des
risques.
Table ronde dirigée
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
69
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
« SOIRÉE DE LA VEILLE » DE L’ACPAU
TOURNOI DE FLÉCHETTES ACPAU À LA MÉMOIRE DE
GARY BOURNE
18 h 30 – 22 h 30
Marketplace, Student Centre, McMaster University
50 $ par joueur/spectateur
SÉMINAIRE SUR LA TRÉSORERIE ET
LE PLACEMENT STU BUDDEN
7 h 30 – 8 h 30
8 h 30 – 16 h 30
Déjeuner (commence plus tôt que les autres séminaires)
Séminaire
Si vous voulez vous amuser samedi soir, c’est au tournoi de fléchettes annuel
de l’ACPAU qu’il faut aller! Ouverte aux joueurs de tous les niveaux, cette
compétition amicale est toujours gage de bons moments et de rires abondants.
Retrouvez de vieux amis ou rencontrez-en de nouveaux tout en vous régalant
avec de la bonne bouffe et des rafraîchissements.
Le tournoi est limité à 60 participants (30 équipes de deux), alors inscrivezvous sans tarder! Les inscriptions individuelles ou en équipe sont acceptées.
L’inscription comprend le transport, le repas, ainsi qu’une soirée à la fois
amusante et relaxante en compagnie d’amis et de collègues. On recommande
une tenue vestimentaire décontractée pour cette soirée.
DÉGUSTATION DE VINS
Perspectives économiques à court, moyen et long terme
Michael Strauss, stratège en chef des investissements et économiste en
chef, Commonfund
Cette séance explorera les perspectives économiques mondiales à court, moyen
et long terme.
L’investissement responsable : de la théorie à la pratique
Robert Inglis, contrôleur, Mount Allison University
Brian O’Neill, directeur intérimaire, services d’investissement, Queen’s
University
Betsy Springer, directrice, gestion des caisses de retraite, Carleton
University
La question de l’investissement responsable est redevenue d’actualité depuis que
la théorie du filtrage des actions indésirables a évolué pour inclure les facteurs
environnementaux, sociaux et liés à la gouvernance dans le processus décisionnel
d’investissement. Les promoteurs de régime songent de plus en plus à intégrer
le concept de l’investissement responsable dans leurs politiques et pratiques
de placement, mais se demandent si cette action pourrait entrer en conflit avec
l’obligation fiduciaire. Des représentants de trois universités discuteront des
différentes approches adoptées par leur établissement face à l’investissement
responsable ainsi que des problèmes éprouvés à l’étape de la mise en œuvre.
Sondage 2012 de l’ACPAU sur les placements
Susan Service, directrice, Placements et régimes de retraite, University of
Victoria
Dévoilement des résultats du sondage annuel de l’ACPAU sur les placements.
Comment évaluer un gestionnaire
Laurie Lawson, trésorière, Université York
John Limeburner, trésorier et directeur général, Placements, Université McGill
Voyez comment évaluer un gestionnaire une fois le processus de recherche et de
mise en poste terminé. Cette séance fait suite à celle de 2012 ayant porté sur les
différentes façons de chercher des gestionnaires.
Table ronde dirigée
(séance à huis clos – représentants des universités seulement)
70
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
18 h 30 – 22 h 00
The Great Hall, McMaster University Club
55 $ par personne
Venez goûter aux saveurs de la région du Niagara! Au cours de cette soirée
exceptionnelle, vous aurez l’occasion de déguster divers vins provenant de
plusieurs vignobles réputés de la région ainsi que de délicieux aliments locaux
sélectionnés avec soin pour les accompagner.
L’historique Great Hall est situé dans le University Club de McMaster. Vous
aurez une vue magnifique sur le campus et le pavillon Hollow tandis que vous
relaxerez et discuterez avec des collègues, un verre à la main.
Le nombre de places étant limité, nous vous encourageons à vous inscrire
tôt. L’inscription comprend le service de navette, les bouchées et le vin. On
recommande une tenue d’affaires décontractée pour cette soirée.
DIMANCHE 16 JUIN
TOURNOI DE GOLF DE L’ACPAU
6 h 00 – 15 h 30 (heures approximatives; tournoi avec heures de départ fixes)
Copetown Woods Golf Club, Copetown (Ontario)
135 $ par personne
Cette année, le tournoi de golf se déroulera au Copetown Woods Golf Club, l’un
des plus beaux parcours de championnat du sud-ouest de l’Ontario. Ce 18 trous
à normale 72, ouvert depuis 2003, propose des terrains vallonnés, des fosses de
sable naturelles et des paysages à couper le souffle. Comptant 6 965 verges, il
procurera assurément un bon défi à n’importe quel golfeur! Pour en savoir plus,
visitez le www.copetownwoods.com.
Le tournoi se déroulera dans une formule à départs fixes (chaque équipe
se verra attribuer une heure de départ). Les détails entourant le transport et
l’horaire du tournoi seront communiqués par courriel aux personnes inscrites
quelques semaines avant l’événement.
Les frais d’inscription comprennent le déjeuner, le dîner, le transport,
les droits de jeu, la voiturette, des prix pour les gagnants, ainsi qu’un petit
souvenir remis à tous les participants.
Pour louer des bâtons, communiquez avec l’équipe du Copetown Woods
Golf Club en composant le 905-627-GOLF (4653). N’oubliez pas de
mentionner que c’est pour le tournoi de golf de l’ACPAU.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
VISITE DE NIAGARA FALLS
8 h 30 – 15 h 45
95 $ par personne
Ne manquez pas la chance de découvrir ou redécouvrir Niagara Falls. Dans le
cadre de cette visite guidée d’une journée, vous aurez l’occasion de voir de
nombreuses attractions, y compris, bien sûr, les fameuses chutes.
8 h 30 – Départ en autocar du Sheraton Hamilton Hotel, direction Niagara
Falls (environ 1 h de route)
10 h 00 – Tout le monde à bord du Maid of the Mist pour aller admirer les
chutes (et se faire mouiller). Le bateau vous amènera au pied de ce
rugissant géant de 13 étages, vous garantissant un point de vue
extraordinaire et des moments mémorables. Imperméable-souvenir
inclus pour vous protéger de l’humidité et des éclaboussures.
11 h 00 à 13 h 00 – Période libre au Maid of the Mist Centre de Clifton
Hill. Profitez des attractions locales en cassant la croûte à l’un des
nombreux restaurants du coin.
13 h 00 à 13 h 30 – Trajet en autocar de Clifton Hill au Jackson-Triggs Winery.
13 h 30 à 14 h 30 – Visite du vignoble et dégustation de vins. Le JacksonTriggs, l’un des vignobles les plus spectaculaires du Canada sur le plan
architectural, vous invite à venir déguster des vins primés appariés à
la perfection avec du fromage et du chocolat. Possibilité d’acheter du
vin sur place.
14 h 30 à 15 h 45 – Retour en autocar au Sheraton Hamilton Hotel.
Le prix inclut le transport, le tour à bord du Maid of the Mist, la dégustation de
vins, les taxes et le service. Dîner aux frais des participants (au restaurant de leur
choix). Un minimum de 40 inscriptions sont nécessaires pour que l’activité ait
lieu.
CÉRÉMONIE D’OUVERTURE
Mot de bienvenue
16 h 30 – 16 h 45
Centre des congrès de Hamilton
CONFÉRENCE PRINCIPALE
Commanditée par Plastiq
16 h 45 – 17 h 45
Remarque : L’interprétation simultanée est offerte pour cette séance.
26e REMISE DES PRIX DE LA QUALITÉ ET DE LA
PRODUCTIVITÉ DE L’ACPAU
Commanditée par Budget Location de voitures, Macquarie Equipment
Finance Ltd. et la Financière Sun Life
17 h 45 – 18 h 15
La remise des prix de la qualité et de la productivité de l’ACPAU constitue chaque
année un des moments forts du congrès. Ces prix soulignent et récompensent
les meilleures solutions et initiatives innovantes auxquelles ont eu recours des
administrateurs universitaires pour répondre aux besoins de leur établissement
ou de la communauté universitaire. Des prix sont décernés aux trois meilleurs
projets nationaux et à un gagnant pour chacune des quatre régions de l’ACPAU :
l’Atlantique, le Québec, l’Ontario et l’Ouest canadien.
RÉCEPTION D’ACCUEIL
Commanditée par Chartwells Education Dining Services
18 h 30 – 20 h00
Liuna Station, Hamilton
Tout de suite après la conférence principale, nous vous invitons à vous joindre
à nous et à notre commanditaire, Chartwells Education Dining Services, à
l'occasion de la réception d’accueil, qui se déroulera à Liuna Station, un lieu
renommé à Hamilton.
Construite en 1931, cette gare historique a été la porte d’entrée au
Canada de milliers d’immigrants. Véritable joyau architectural, la gare est
entourée de jardins splendides et compte une impressionnante fontaine.
Lors de la réception d’accueil, les convives auront l’occasion de se plonger
au cœur des années 1930. Un groupe de jazz et des danseurs de swing
sauront mettre l’ambiance à la fête!
Un service de navette est prévu. On recommande une tenue d’affaires
décontractée pour cette soirée.
Après la réception, nous vous invitons à essayer l’un des restaurants de
Hamilton. Vous trouverez une liste de suggestions dans votre sac de congressiste.
LUNDI 17 JUIN
Sauf mention contraire, toutes les activités ont lieu au Centre des
congrès de Hamilton.
Séances offertes en anglais sauf mention contraire.
ZUMBA (DANSE AÉROBIQUE LATINE)
6 h 30 – 7 h 30
Prévoir l’avenir pour mieux s’y préparer
Sheldon Levy, recteur et vice-chancelier, Ryerson University
S’il est pratiquement impossible de prédire l’avenir avec justesse, on peut
examiner les tendances actuelles pour tenter de voir ce qui se profile à l’horizon.
Les changements dans les politiques gouvernementales, l’évolution des attentes
de la population étudiante et les innovations technologiques sont autant de
facteurs qui sont susceptibles de transformer le monde de l’enseignement
supérieur. Sheldon Levy présentera son point de vue éclairé et parfois visionnaire
sur l’influence que ces facteurs pourraient avoir dans les établissements
universitaires et exposera les retombées qu’il entrevoit à cet égard pour le
personnel administratif.
Commencez votre journée du bon pied en prenant part à une séance de danse
aérobique latine. Alliant rythmes latins et mouvements de salsa, de merengue, de
mambo et de samba (entre autres), cette séance saura vous réveiller le corps et
l’esprit dans une ambiance festive.
DÉJEUNER
Commandité par Baker & McKenzie LLP
7 h 00 – 8 h 00
ASSEMBLÉE GÉNÉRALE ANNUELLE DE L’ACPAU
8 h 00 – 8 h 45
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
71
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
PLÉNIÈRE
8 h 45 – 10 h 00
Remarque : L’interprétation simultanée est offerte pour cette séance.
Faire face au bombardement d’information à l’ère du numérique
Nick Bontis, professeur, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University
Le bombardement d’information représente la plus importance menace à
l’endroit de la productivité. Cela dit, il est tout à fait possible de transformer
cette menace en avantage concurrentiel durable pour votre établissement. Cette
séance dynamique et enrichissante vous montrera à :
• gérer le bombardement d’information;
• améliorer votre capacité à gérer le changement;
• accroître votre efficacité et votre productivité;
• favoriser l’innovation par la collaboration;
• réaliser des économies substantielles;
• déterminer les actions que vous pouvez entreprendre dès aujourd’hui.
PAUSE
Commanditée par Oracle Canada ULC
10 h 00 – 10 h 45
Salon des exposants ouvert
Présentation d'entreprise par Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
Sodexo et la DeGroote School of Business : un partenariat de services
intégrés sur le campus qui encourage l’engagement des étudiants
10 h 05 – 10 h 25
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
10 h 45 – 12 h 00
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la
taille des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire
d’inscription. Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
Les indicateurs d’une bonne santé financière :
examen d’une initiative ontarienne (en français)
Denis Cossette, vice-recteur associé aux ressources financières, Université
d’Ottawa
Pierre Piché, directeur et contrôleur, Services financiers, University of Toronto
Remarque : Cette séance est aussi offerte en anglais dans le cadre du séminaire
précongrès sur les finances.
Les exigences en matière de responsabilisation et de transparence continuent
de croître, si bien que des indicateurs concrets sont maintenant nécessaires pour
prendre le pouls de la santé financière globale du secteur. Le Council of Financial
Officers (COFO) a justement établi des indicateurs qui aideront les universités à
mettre sur pied des stratégies efficaces pour gérer les risques institutionnels ainsi
que des référents pour l’analyse institutionnelle sous forme de ratios par secteur.
Au cours de cette séance, les conférenciers présenteront des indicateurs utiles
pour évaluer la dette d’un établissement, sa capacité financière et d’emprunt et
ses forces sur le plan financier, puis examineront les forces et les faiblesses d’un
indice financier composé.
72
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Effectuer de la veille stratégique dans le domaine
de l’enseignement supérieur : concepts et enjeux
Dwight Fischer, vice-recteur adjoint et dirigeant principal de l’information,
Dalhousie University
Les renseignements sont des marchandises de valeur. Imaginez un établissement
où données et renseignements sont échangés librement, où les interfaces
sont intuitives, et où l’on forme le personnel à faire un usage judicieux de
l’information de manière à améliorer l’apprentissage, la recherche et les services.
C’est le concept de la veille stratégique mis au service de l’enseignement
supérieur! Les établissements qui savent faire bon usage des renseignements
gagnent un avantage stratégique sur les autres. Explorez les aspects et
les problématiques de la veille stratégique, y compris le rôle des normes
organisationnelles, la nécessité de repenser les processus existants en matière
de données et d’administration, et les interruptions potentielles des pratiques
actuelles qui pourraient être causées par l’application de la veille stratégique.
Pour illustrer leurs propos, les conférenciers s’appuieront sur un processus de
planification mené récemment à la Dalhousie University dans le but d’élaborer
une vision et des structures de gouvernance fondamentales pour la mise en
œuvre d’une initiative de veille stratégique.
Proposition de modèles de gestion de la facturation interne pour le
service de gestion des installations
Robert J. Carter, vice-recteur associé, Ressources matérielles, University of
Guelph
Janet Hanna, directrice adjointe, Services administratifs, Carleton University
Ron Proulx, directeur général, Gestion et développement des installations,
Services universitaires, Université McGill
La facturation interne est un mécanisme utilisé par des organisations dans le but
de recouvrer des coûts liés à la prestation d’un service par une unité à une autre.
Lorsque des universités facturent des frais à des unités d’enseignement et de
recherche ou à des unités administratives pour des services fournis par d’autres
unités, cette pratique se doit d’être ouverte et transparente. Des panélistes
provenant de deux universités où des systèmes de facturation interne ont été
mis en place discuteront de la philosophie derrière cette pratique, des modèles
d’allocation de ressources sous-tendant la nécessité de facturer des unités pour
les services rendus, des avantages et inconvénients propres aux divers modèles
de facturation interne, et des approches de gestion efficace des systèmes de
facturation interne.
Survivre dans la jungle de l’approvisionnement :
quelques stratégies pour atténuer les risques
Wray Hodgson, gestionnaire responsable de l’approvisionnement, George
Brown College
Maureen Sullivan, présidente, National Education Consulting Inc. (NECI)
Explorez les plus importants risques juridiques et opérationnels qui touchent les
organisations d’approvisionnement et découvrez des suggestions de stratégies
d’atténuation ainsi que les faits saillants de certaines décisions rendues
récemment par la Cour suprême du Canada. Discutez du rôle que doit jouer
l’équipe de direction et apprenez six conseils utiles pour assurer la réussite de
l’approvisionnement.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
La force d’une politique
Joshua Adams, directeur du bureau des politiques et des communications
de la DFA, Cornell University
Michele Gross, directrice du programme des politiques universitaires,
University of Minnesota
Il y a plus de vingt ans, la Cornell University et la University of Minnesota ont
adopté deux approches différentes pour établir des modèles visant l’élaboration,
la promotion, le maintien et la révision de politiques administratives. Ces deux
établissements possèdent aujourd’hui des programmes de politiques durables et
efficaces; le succès de ces programmes s’explique en grande partie par l’appui
de la haute direction et par l’utilisation d’outils communs (modèles, procédures
d’examen et d’approbation, mécanismes de rétroaction par l’utilisateur, cycles
d’examen réguliers, etc.). Découvrez comment ces deux universités traitent la
question des politiques et comment vous pouvez utiliser ces outils pour créer des
politiques administratives efficaces dans votre établissement.
La nouvelle approche des trois Conseils de recherche en matière de
surveillance financière
Robert Potvin, chef d’équipe par intérim, Division des finances et de
l’administration des octrois du CRSNG et du CRSH
Ian Raskin, superviseur, Administration des octrois et surveillance financière,
Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada
En 2013, les trois conseils subventionnaires mettront en œuvre un processus
d’examen de la surveillance financière modernisé, lequel aura pour but
non seulement de garantir une couverture adéquate des risques associés à
l’administration externe des fonds versés par le gouvernement fédéral sous
forme de subventions et de bourses, mais aussi de réduire les coûts, d’accroître
les économies et d’augmenter la valeur de la surveillance pour tous les
intervenants. La nouvelle approche fournira aux trois conseils une évaluation
consolidée et fondée sur les risques reliés au cadre de contrôle utilisé par
chaque établissement. Les établissements profiteront d’un processus d’examen
transparent présentant les résultats selon les critères de contrôle, ce qui leur
permettra de se concentrer sur les domaines de préoccupation à l’intérieur de
leur cadre de contrôle. Cette séance vous donnera un aperçu de la nouvelle
approche ainsi que des principes, des processus et des répercussions connexes
en ce qui a trait à l’administration des fonds découlant de subventions et de
bourses.
DÎNER / SALON DES EXPOSANTS OUVERT
12 h 00 – 13 h 30
Présentation d'entreprise par Tribal
12 h 10 – 12 h 30
Présentation d'entreprise par MNP
12 h 40 – 13 h 00
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
13 h 30 – 14 h 45
Vers un meilleur arrimage des stratégies de trésorerie à la mission, à
la vision et aux buts de l’établissement
Swavek A. Czapinski, trésorier adjoint, Service des finances – trésorerie,
Université York
Les services de trésorerie des établissements universitaires ont des responsabilités
aussi nombreuses que diverses, qu’il s’agisse de la gestion des relations
bancaires, du risque de crédit, de l’émission de titres de créance, du service de la
dette, de l’évaluation des projets d’immobilisations, de la prévision des besoins
en liquidités à court terme, ou de la gestion des placements à long terme,
tant dans les fonds de dotation que dans les caisses de retraite. Étant donné
l’importance capitale de ces responsabilités, les stratégies de trésorerie se doivent
d’évoluer sans cesse afin d’appuyer le mieux possible les objectifs principaux de
l’établissement. Cette séance présentera un survol des tendances récentes, des
pratiques exemplaires et des leçons qui ont été tirées dans le secteur privé et qui
peuvent être appliquées de manière à mieux harmoniser le travail d’un service
de trésorerie avec la mission, la vision et les buts de l’établissement universitaire
qu’il sert.
Dépenses de faible valeur : comment contenir les coûts tout en
respectant les exigences des organismes subventionnaires (en
français)
France Boucher, directrice adjointe, Recherche, fiducie et dotation,
Université d’Ottawa
Angela Cummings, agente principale – contrôle financier et politiques,
Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada
Robert Potvin, chef d’équipe par intérim, Division des finances et de
l’administration des octrois du CRSNG et du CRSH
Remarque : Cette séance est aussi offerte en anglais dans le cadre du séminaire
précongrès sur les finances.
Les dépenses de faible valeur sont parfois difficiles à suivre et à gérer, puisqu’elles
sont associées à un grand nombre de transactions et d’exigences de conformité.
Les établissements doivent faire en sorte que les coûts engendrés par le contrôle
de ces transactions respectent les exigences des organismes subventionnaires.
Trois intervenants, dont deux provenant d’organismes subventionnaires, vont
présenter différentes façons de gérer les dépenses de faible valeur tout en se
conformant aux exigences. Les participants seront aussi invités à partager les
solutions trouvées dans leur propre établissement à cet égard.
L’examen des processus : une façon de promouvoir l’amélioration
continue de la qualité
Lynn Power, directrice des ressources humaines, Dalhousie University
Anne Weeden, vice-doyenne à l’exploitation, Dalhousie University
Encourager l’amélioration continue de la qualité peut cultiver l’efficacité, le
rendement et la flexibilité au sein d’un établissement. Pour que ces qualités
se développent au niveau institutionnel, tous les membres de l’organisation
doivent participer à une auto-évaluation critique des méthodes de travail. Ainsi,
le personnel se sent investi et responsable, les méthodes deviennent plus fiables
et l’utilisation des ressources, plus transparente. Voyez comment susciter cette
participation et explorez les retombées possibles, comme la rationalisation et la
réduction des dépenses.
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la taille
des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire d’inscription.
Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
73
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
La gestion par centres de responsabilité : êtes-vous prêts?
Jim Butler, vice-recteur aux finances et à l’administration, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Larry Goldstein, président, Campus Strategies, LLC
De plus en plus répandue, la gestion par centres de responsabilité est un modèle
de gestion des ressources vers lequel un nombre croissant d’établissements se
tourne. Sans être une panacée, ce modèle promet beaucoup aux universités
qui sont disposées à céder une partie du contrôle financier à des unités
décentralisées, à condition d’effectuer un travail réfléchi aux étapes de
l’élaboration et de la mise en œuvre. Cette séance vous fera découvrir les bons
et les mauvais côtés de ce modèle, ses réussites et ses échecs, ainsi que des
stratégies pour l’appliquer avec succès dans votre établissement.
Mise en place d’une approche axée sur les risques pour
l’approvisionnement : une étude de cas
Ryan Christensen, gestionnaire de projet, Stuart Olsen Dominion
Construction Ltd.
Hugh Warren, directeur général, Exploitation et entretien des bâtiments,
University of Alberta
Pour construire un cyclotron entre octobre 2011 et décembre 2012 – un projet
de 30 millions de dollars –, la University of Alberta a eu recours à une approche
axée sur les risques. Le projet présentait de nombreux défis : nature technique
du projet, échéancier à respecter, budget limité et élaboration en collaboration
avec plusieurs partenaires. Découvrez comment ces obstacles ont été surmontés
au niveau de l’approvisionnement et de la réalisation par l’application du modèle
« Best Value » dans la conception-construction et la gestion de projet intégrée.
|
Hamilton, Ontario
PAUSE
14 h 45 – 15 h 15
Salon des exposants ouvert
Présentation d'entreprise par Siemens Canada Limitée, Division
Technologies du bâtiment
Optimiser le refroidisseur d'eau grâce à la technologie Demand Flow
de Siemens
14 h 50 – 15 h 10
Cette séance d’information vous apprendra comment Siemens Demand Flow,
un programme de réduction énergétique hors pair, optimise les systèmes de
refroidisseur d’eau de manière à réduire la consommation totale d’énergie d’une
installation de 20 % à 50 %.
Forum des vice-recteurs
14 h 45 – 17 h 15
Sur invitation seulement
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
15 h 15 – 16 h 30
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la taille
des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire d’inscription.
Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
L’évaluation du risque d’entreprise : pour des stratégies avisées
Debbie Sabatino, gestionnaire principale, risque d’entreprise, Gestion des
risques d’entreprise, McMaster University
Modification des lignes directrices de la FCI sur les contributions en
nature et de ses exigences en matière d’administration des fonds
La présence d’un cadre de gestion du risque d’entreprise éclaire et facilite la
prise de décision dans les établissements en donnant un moyen de prévoir les
risques, et plus le cadre sera englobant, plus les avantages seront marqués. Pour
contrer la complexité et l’aspect bureaucratique du cadre, il suffit de procéder
à un déploiement stratégique de celui-ci. Découvrez au cours de cette séance
comment améliorer les processus en place de manière à aider les établissements
à repérer les occasions et les difficultés dans la réalisation de leur plan et de
leurs objectifs stratégiques, comment reconnaître les risques au bon moment et
comment déployer le niveau optimal de ressources.
Christine Charbonneau, directrice, Finances, Fondation canadienne pour
l’innovation (FCI)
Depuis 2010 et avec l’aide du public, la FCI s’est demandé comment aborder
les contributions en nature et modifier ses lignes directrices en conséquence.
De plus, afin de réduire le fardeau administratif engendré par le financement, la
fondation a aussi revu ses exigences en matière d’administration des fonds. Cette
séance vous permettra de vous mettre à jour sur les modifications proposées et
les changements déjà apportés. Les participants seront amenés à examiner les
exigences internes de leur propre établissement et à identifier les changements
qui pourraient être apportés afin de réduire la charge de travail.
Appliquer les principes de la gestion allégée au monde de
l’enseignement supérieur
Michael Ewing, PDG, e-Zsigma (Canada) Inc.
Gwen Miller, analyste financière, Bureau du vice-recteur adjoint aux services
financiers, University of Saskatchewan
Cindy Taylor, directrice, Bureau des initiatives qualité, Carleton University
Nés dans le secteur manufacturier, les principes de gestion allégée se sont
étendus au secteur des services : fonction publique, hôpitaux et nombre
d’organismes à but non lucratif y ont maintenant recours pour optimiser leur
rendement opérationnel et le travail à valeur ajoutée. Voyez comment utiliser ces
principes dans le domaine de l’enseignement supérieur et ce que certains de vos
collègues ont déjà réalisé sur ce plan.
74
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
Encourager la recherche : un défi pour les établissements, un
impératif pour le pays
BANQUET ET SOIRÉE DANSANTE DU PRÉSIDENT
Jay Black, dirigeant principal de l’information (DPI), Simon Fraser University
Lori MacMullen, directrice générale, Conseil des dirigeants principaux de
l’information des universités canadiennes (CDPIUC-CUCCIO)
Commanditée par par Fisher Scientific
18 h 00 – minuit
Salles Chedoke A et B, Centre des congrès de Hamilton
La recherche et l’enseignement s’appuient de plus en plus sur les ressources
informatiques. Pour innover, diffuser leurs résultats et rester concurrentiels
à l’échelle internationale, les professionnels canadiens de la recherche et de
l’éducation ont besoin d’une infrastructure numérique à la fois complète,
intégrée et durable. En l’absence d’un plan cohérent à cet égard, le Canada
risque de perdre du terrain dans les domaines de la recherche, de l’éducation et
de l’innovation, et la solution ne tient pas à l’ampleur des investissements faits,
mais plutôt à l’application d’une vision cohérente, uniforme, universelle et viable
à long terme. Il nous faut donc établir des stratégies et des tactiques pour que
notre infrastructure puisse soutenir les études et la recherche à l’ère numérique,
favoriser la productivité et contribuer au bien-être économique et social de la
société. Cette présentation propose un bilan des défis actuels à ce sujet et un
survol des mesures à prendre afin de progresser.
L’ACPAU et le commanditaire de cette soirée chic, Fisher Scientific, vous invitent à
un savoureux banquet qui servira de cadre pour remercier le président sortant de
l’ACPAU, M. Matthew Nowakowski, et accueillir son successeur, M. Dave Button.
Après le repas, les huit musiciens de l’énergique groupe torontois Parkside
Drive vous feront taper du pied et danser avec leur vaste répertoire musical :
dance, jazz, funk, soul, rock et reggae s’enchaîneront pour votre plus grand
plaisir. Attention, la piste de danse risque de se remplir vite!
La tenue de soirée est de mise pour cette activité.
Les compétences fondamentales : un moyen de développer son
talent et d’exploiter pleinement son potentiel
Bill Isley, gestionnaire, Apprentissage organisationnel et efficacité, Services
des ressources humaines, University of Alberta
Cynthia Munro, spécialiste de la formation et du perfectionnement,
Apprentissage organisationnel et efficacité, Services des ressources humaines,
University of Alberta
La University of Alberta a lancé avec succès un nouveau programme
d’apprentissage axé sur les compétences fondamentales; celui-ci est aligné aux
besoins organisationnels et soutenu par un contenu souple accessible en ligne.
Les conférenciers vous partageront leur expérience dans la mise en œuvre de
solutions d’apprentissage en ligne, les sept compétences clés qui ont servi à créer
et modeler ces ressources, de même que les défis et promesses liés à l’ouverture
à tous du programme d’apprentissage.
Réunir la protection des droits, la gestion de la qualité en recherche
clinique et les services de vérification sous un même toit : une
expérience unique au Canada
Scott Jamieson, conseiller, Gestion de la qualité – recherche clinique,
University of Alberta
Wade King, conseiller, Bureau de la dénonciation sous protection et des
droits humains, University of Alberta
Mary Persson, vice-rectrice adjointe à la vérification et à l’analyse,
University of Alberta
L’idée d’avoir un organe indépendant chapeautant pour l’ensemble d’une
organisation les activités liées à la conformité, à l’éthique et à la vérification
est relativement nouvelle dans le secteur de l’enseignement supérieur. Comme
beaucoup d’universités, la University of Alberta souhaitait améliorer sa
conformité et ses capacités de vérification tout en limitant son engagement
sur le plan des ressources. Pour y arriver, elle a rassemblé au sein d’un même
portefeuille les services de dénonciation sous protection, de protection des droits
humains, de gestion de la qualité en recherche clinique et de vérification interne,
créant un bureau occupant une position privilégiée pour offrir une vision unique
et complète des risques organisationnels et des moyens de les contrôler, tout en
proposant un guichet à la fois sûr et efficace pour accueillir les commentaires
sur la recherche, les politiques, l’éthique, la discrimination et le harcèlement.
Cette séance présentera les avantages d’avoir adopté cette approche intégrée et
rentable.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MARDI 18 JUIN
Sauf mention contraire, toutes les activités ont lieu au
Centre des congrès de Hamilton.
ZUMBA (DANSE AÉROBIQUE LATINE)
6 h 30 – 7 h 30
Commencez votre journée du bon pied en prenant part à une séance de danse
aérobique latine. Alliant rythmes latins et mouvements de salsa, de merengue, de
mambo et de samba (entre autres), cette séance saura vous réveiller le corps et
l’esprit dans une ambiance festive.
DÉJEUNER
Commanditée par Starbucks Coffee Canada
7 h 00 – 8 h 00
PLÉNIÈRE
Commanditée par PwC
8 h 00 – 10 h 00
Remise des prix de reconnaissance de l’ACPAU
Dévoilement des lauréats 2013 des prix de reconnaissance de l’ACPAU, y
compris du prix Ken Clements pour administrateur exceptionnel, des prix pour
service exceptionnel, le prix de leadership en apprentissage et le prix de leader
émergent.
Faudrait-il revoir radicalement le modèle universitaire actuel?
James Bradshaw, journaliste spécialisé en éducation postsecondaire,
nouvelles nationales, The Globe and Mail (animateur)
Ian D. Clark, professeur, École de politique publique et de gouvernance,
University of Toronto
Patricia Hibbitts, vice-rectrice aux finances et à l’administration, Simon
Fraser University
Rylan Kinnon, directeur général, Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance
Assistez à un débat portant sur la pertinence et la vitalité du modèle universitaire
en place. Ce modèle est-il déficient? Les approches actuelles dans les domaines
de l’enseignement, de la recherche, la différentiation institutionnelle et les autres
grands enjeux fonctionnent-elles vraiment? Les panélistes souligneront les ratés
du système, évoqueront des solutions et chercheront d’identifier qui sont les
intervenants les mieux placés pour améliorer le modèle universitaire canadien.
Remarque : L’interprétation simultanée est offerte pour cette séance.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
75
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
PAUSE
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Arrimer le plan stratégique au budget :
l’expérience de l’Université Laurentienne
10 h 00 – 10 h 45
Salon des exposants ouvert
Anne-Marie Mawhiney, conseillère spéciale du recteur, Université
Laurentienne
Carol McAulay, vice-rectrice à l’administration, Université Laurentienne
Présentation d'entreprise par Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
Sodexo et la DeGroote School of Business : un partenariat de services
intégrés sur le campus qui encourage l’engagement des étudiants
Découvrez le processus et les gens qui ont mené à l’élaboration, à l’Université
Laurentienne, du Plan stratégique de 2012-2017, fruit de vastes consultations
proactives auprès de la population étudiante, du corps professoral, du personnel,
des anciens et de leaders communautaires. Ambitieux et audacieux, ce plan
oriente l’université vers les priorités qui émergeront au cours des années à venir et
trace la route à suivre pendant sa prochaine période de croissance transformatrice.
En arrimant ce plan stratégique à la planification financière sur cinq ans, la
Laurentienne a su exploiter ses ressources financières de manière à appuyer
les 40 résultats escomptés liés aux cinq grands volets du plan : participation et
satisfaction des étudiants, reconnaissance nationale, université de choix, liens avec
les collectivités, et excellence organisationnelle.
10 h 05 – 10 h 25
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
10 h 45 – 12 h 00
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la taille
des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire d’inscription.
Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
Le campus : à la fois bien précieux, responsabilité d’envergure et
monde de possibilités
Jack K. Colby, ancien président de l’APPA et vice-chancelier adjoint à la
gestion des installations, North Carolina State University
E. Lander Medlin, vice-présidente exécutive, APPA
Le campus est le plus grand actif du portefeuille d’un établissement, mais aussi
bien souvent la plus lourde responsabilité. Comment tirer profit des fabuleuses
possibilités que recèle cet actif? Découvrez dans cette séance les six grands
enjeux liés à la gestion de cet espace (parmi lesquels la culture) et les avantages
potentiels que peut retirer un établissement en améliorant cette gestion au
moyen d’un programme bien conçu. Des études de cas serviront à illustrer
quelques pratiques exemplaires, et les participants seront invités à contribuer à
la discussion. Contenu adapté d’une conférence de la série « Thought Leaders »
2012 de l’APPA.
Comment la Western University a établi une culture du leadership
dans son établissement
Andrew Fuller, directeur, Apprentissage et perfectionnement, Western
University
Gitta Kulczycki, vice-rectrice aux ressources et aux opérations, Western
University
Peggy Roffey, formatrice principale, Apprentissage et perfectionnement,
Western University
Il y a onze ans, la Western University a mis sur pied un « forum des leaders »
unique en son genre réunissant quelques fois par année plus de 200 des
administrateurs et des membres clés du corps enseignant pour discuter des
dossiers stratégiques et des pratiques exemplaires en matière de leadership.
Toujours aussi florissant, ce forum a aidé la Western University à établir une
solide culture du leadership, à augmenter la compréhension et les échanges
entre dirigeants sur les enjeux stratégiques et opérationnels, et à faire régner
le respect mutuel entre le corps enseignant et l’administration, chaque partie
devenant consciente de la manière dont l’autre contribue réellement au succès
de l’établissement. Voyez comment vous aussi pouvez mettre sur pied, préparer,
présenter et promouvoir un forum du genre dans votre université et constituer
un bassin de modérateurs en mesure de favoriser la mise en place d’un dialogue
efficace.
76
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
La santé mentale des étudiants : effets et interventions
Michael Histed, directeur, Bureau de la gestion des risques, Université
d’Ottawa
Robert Quigley, directeur médical, région des Amériques, International SOS
La santé mentale des étudiants constitue un risque émergent de plus en plus
présent et préoccupant – certains parlent même d’une épidémie – qui a des
répercussions sur le campus et dans les salles de classe, tant à l’échelle nationale
qu’internationale. Apprenez-en plus sur les manières de gérer ce risque, les
normes actuelles liées au devoir de diligence, les responsabilités légales en cas de
manquement ou d’erreur, les réactions typiques et celles à privilégier, et la capacité
du personnel et du corps enseignant à gérer des situations où un étudiant est
source de danger pour lui-même ou les autres.
Les 10 grands enjeux associés aux TI dans le domaine de
l’enseignement supérieur
Dwight Fischer, vice-recteur adjoint et dirigeant principal de l’information,
Dalhousie University (animateur)
Ben Kosic, associé, services-conseils, KPMG Canada
Susan Grajek, vice-présidente, Données, recherche et analyse, EDUCAUSE
Oliver Grüter-Andrew, dirigeant principal de l'information, The University of
British Columbia
Ce panel réunit des experts reconnus qui discuteront ensemble des 10 grands
enjeux associés aux TI énoncés par EDUCAUSE. Dépassant l’anecdotique, leurs
réflexions éclaireront de nouvelles perspectives et stratégies par l’analyse de
divers cas de figure et le choc des idées sur divers sujets tels l’informatique
en nuage, les services partagés, les réseaux, le coût des TI, l’investissement, la
dotation, etc. Les participants seront aussi invités à contribuer au débat.
DÎNER ET PRÉSENTATION DU CONGRÈS ACPAU 2014
par la University of Victoria
12 h 00 – 13 h 30
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
13 h 30 – 14 h 45
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la taille
des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire d’inscription.
Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
Amélioration des processus : une approche managériale axée sur
l’initiative des gestionnaires
Joanne Roch, vice-rectrice à l’administration, Université de Sherbrooke
Jules Chassé, vice-recteur adjoint, ressources informationnelles, Université
de Sherbrooke
Veuillez noter que les conférenciers donneront cette séance à distance, par
vidéoconférence, depuis l'Université de Sherbrooke.
Cette présentation effectuera un survol de la démarche utilisée par l’Université
de Sherbrooke afin de permettre à ses gestionnaires de réaliser plus facilement
des projets d’amélioration de processus. Le lien entre la démarche d’amélioration
des processus et les orientations du plan stratégique de l’Université « Réussir
2010-2015 » sera abordé, ainsi que les structures du cadre sur lequel une telle
démarche repose, soit la composition du comité de pilotage, les critères utilisés
pour la sélection des projets ainsi que les étapes de réalisation de ceux-ci suite à
leur acceptation. Des exemples de succès seront présentés, suivi par un échange
avec les participants.
Remarque : Cette séance est offerte en français seulement.
Une initiative avant-gardiste : la Simon Fraser University intègre le
leadership stratégique à la gestion de la sécurité et du risque
Patricia Hibbitts, vice-rectrice aux finances et à l’administration, Simon
Fraser University
Terry Waterhouse, chef de la sécurité, Services de la sécurité et des risques,
Simon Fraser University
La sécurité sur le campus, la gestion du risque et les mesures d’urgence créent
des défis administratifs de plus en plus complexes. En outre, les incidents violents
et la prépondérance que prennent les enjeux en matière de santé et de sécurité
révèlent la nécessité d’intervenir de manière globale et intégrée. Cependant,
les structures internes des universités peuvent créer une fragmentation dans la
prestation des services, dont la responsabilité est souvent divisée entre plusieurs
portefeuilles. Voyez comment la Simon Fraser University s’y est prise pour créer
en 2011 les Services de la sécurité et des risques afin d’offrir avec efficacité
ces services aussi essentiels qu’importants. Cette séance interactive sera aussi
l’occasion de présenter le modèle et les priorités stratégiques qui ont guidé ce
travail et de souligner les retombées obtenues et les difficultés rencontrées.
Augmenter la viabilité des régimes de retraite
Jim Butler, vice-recteur aux finances et à l’administration, Wilfrid Laurier
University
Allan Shapira, associé principal, services de retraite, Aon Hewitt
Les prestations de retraite sont un aspect important de la rémunération globale
dans les universités. Cependant, il est de plus en plus difficile d’offrir cet
avantage tout en assurant la viabilité des régimes. Au cours de cette séance,
les différents intervenants exposeront leur vision d’un régime de retraite viable
en présentant et évaluant en regard du concept de viabilité les approches qui
sont ou pourraient être appliquées dans le milieu universitaire. Les défis liés à la
transition vers des formules plus viables seront aussi abordés.
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
2013
Atteinte à la vie privée : comment tirer parti d’un incident
regrettable
Janice Johnson, gestionnaire, Vice-rectorat aux finances et à l’exploitation,
University of Victoria
Paul Stokes, dirigeant principal de l’information, University of Victoria
Le 7 janvier 2012, dix mille documents de paie ont été volés à la University
of Victoria. Qu’est-ce qui peut assurer une intervention immédiate réussie
dans ce genre de situation, et quel processus permet de passer efficacement
de l’intervention à l’examen de la situation, puis à la résolution finale? Les
panélistes exposeront les grandes lignes des stratégies d’intervention et des
politiques utiles, les distinctions à établir entre les données électroniques et
papier, les raisons pour lesquelles la gestion des archives est si importante,
les outils d’évaluation existants, et le rôle que les administrateurs devraient
jouer quand ce type de scénario se produit, en soulignant que le succès
de ces interventions repose sur les gens et la qualité des processus, de la
communication et de la collaboration, car lorsqu’un événement suscite des
émotions chez une diversité de groupes (comme le personnel, les entreprises et
les organisations externes), rien n’est tout à fait simple.
Les services administratifs partagés et autres occasions de
collaboration
Oliver Grüter-Andrew, dirigeant principal de l’information, University of
British Columbia
Andrew Medd, directeur principal, Deloitte
Le contexte fiscal actuel imposant l’austérité, le ministère de l’Éducation
supérieure, de l’Innovation et de la Technologie de la Colombie-Britannique a
exigé de tous les établissements postsecondaires de la province qu’ils effectuent
un examen et une évaluation de la prestation des services administratifs ne
relevant pas de l’enseignement ni de la recherche en vue d’optimiser les
ressources et d’atteindre les objectifs fiscaux prévus par la réduction des coûts,
l’amélioration de la qualité, la gestion efficace du risque et l’optimisation des
services. Confié à Deloitte, ce projet consiste à colliger les possibilités de partage
en matière d’approvisionnement et de services administratifs de soutien en
partant des pratiques et économies de coûts ayant déjà fait leurs preuves dans
certains établissements et dans des initiatives de collaboration déjà établies.
Cette séance fera un survol du projet et des concepts de services partagés relevés
en plus d’exposer les conclusions de la phase d’évaluation des possibilités.
Viabilité financière et négociation collective : portrait des universités
canadiennes
Sharon Cochran, directrice, Services d’appui à la négociation avec le corps
professoral (SANCP)
Alexander Darling, directeur de la recherche et agent régional, Services
d’appui à la négociation avec le corps professoral (SANCP)
Cette séance sera l’occasion de se pencher sur la relation qui existe entre la
négociation collective et l’atteinte de la viabilité financière dans les universités.
Les participants seront invités à donner leur avis et partager leur expérience à ce
sujet par l’exploration des menaces financières que les négociations collectives
peuvent soulever et des facteurs essentiels de succès à réunir dans l’adoption
d’une approche plus stratégique. Les données recueillies serviront à la rédaction
par les SANCP d’un document de travail sur le sujet.
PAUSE
14 h 45 – 15 h 15
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
77
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
SÉANCES PARALLÈLES
15 h 15 – 16 h 30
Nous prions tous les congressistes de présélectionner les séances parallèles
auxquelles ils comptent assister, car le nombre de places est limité par la
taille des salles. Veuillez inscrire votre choix de séances sur le formulaire
d’inscription. Choisir une séance parmi les suivantes :
Le rôle de l’agent de conformité dans l’administration des fonds
octroyés
Diane Johnston, directrice, Financement de la recherche, University of
Waterloo
Shane Royal, directeur, Gestion financière de la recherche, University of
Calgary
L’octroi aux universités de fonds pour la recherche s’accompagne maintenant
d’exigences réglementaires et de déclaration de plus en plus complexes. Afin
de répondre à ces exigences, bon nombre d’établissements ont créé un poste
d’agent de conformité ayant pour fonction de s’assurer que les politiques et
lignes directrices liées à l’octroi de fonds sont respectées et de veiller à ce que
les membres de la communauté universitaire comprennent les responsabilités
financières et administratives qu’ils doivent assumer. L’agent de conformité
doit donc cerner, surveiller et réduire les risques présents. Voyez comment deux
universités ont défini ce nouveau rôle d’agent de conformité et découvrez
comment établir vos besoins à cet égard, rassembler des ressources pour créer
un poste, intégrer adéquatement ce poste dans la hiérarchie, définir les tâches
et responsabilités liées, et évaluer les répercussions et l’efficacité du travail
accompli.
Monter des programmes de planification de la relève et de
développement du leadership pour les directeurs administratifs
Rosie Parnass, directrice du Centre de développement organisationnel et
d’apprentissage, Ressources humaines, University of Toronto
Découvrez les programmes de planification de la relève et de développement
du leadership de la University of Toronto : leur évolution jusqu’à leur
structure actuelle, les bénéfices obtenus, et la manière de les adapter à
votre établissement. Des personnes ayant suivi ou suivant actuellement ces
programmes témoigneront de leur expérience. (Remarque: cette séance est aussi
offerte dans le cadre du séminaire précongrès sur les ressources humaines.)
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Planifier la continuité des activités dans
un contexte d’enseignement postsecondaire
Karen Alexander, coordonnatrice à la gestion des urgences, Administration
et finances, Memorial University of Newfoundland
Adam Conway, gestionnaire, Bureau de la gestion des urgences, University
of Alberta
Cette séance sera l’occasion de dévoiler un nouveau cadre pour la continuité des
activités adapté à l’enseignement supérieur. Conçu par et pour les membres de
l’ACPAU, ce cadre pratique propose des outils pouvant servir à tous les échelons :
de l’unité à l’établissement dans son ensemble.
La refonte du système ERP par une équipe interfonctionnelle :
l’expérience de la University of Calgary
Allen Amyotte, directeur, Gestion du risque d’entreprise, University of Calgary
Bernie Semenjuk, partenaire adjoint, IBM Global Services
Compte tenu de la nature décentralisée et collégiale des prises de décisions et des
exigences à respecter pour répondre aux demandes des intervenants externes et
des vérificateurs, la constance de la gouvernance dans une université n’est pas
toujours facile à atteindre. Forte de ce constat, la University of Calgary a lancé
en 2011 le projet Innovative Support Services (iS2), qui prévoyait notamment
une mise à niveau et une refonte du système ERP de PeopleSoft. Découvrez dans
cette séance comment une équipe interfonctionnelle s’y est prise pour réviser les
processus, les structures hiérarchiques et l’attribution des pouvoirs décisionnels,
pourquoi la délégation de pouvoirs et l’attribution des signataires autorisés
constituent des étapes clés dans la restructuration d’un système, et comment ces
éléments peuvent contribuer à renforcer la responsabilisation.
Les risques associés aux étudiants voyageurs
Anne Baxter, directrice des services de la sécurité et du risque, University of
Lethbridge
Alex Elson, président, International SOS
Robert Quigley, directeur médical, région des Amériques, International SOS
Un diplôme ne s’obtient plus forcément en suivant exclusivement des cours en
classe. En effet, les étudiants canadiens et étrangers ont maintenant accès à un
monde de possibilités alléchantes pour apprendre autrement : travaux pratiques
sur le terrain, programmes de stage ou d’échange, études libres et autoapprentissage, études à l’étranger, etc. Par conséquent, le nombre d’étudiants
se trouvant hors campus dans le cadre de leur cursus a explosé en dix ans.
Or, cette plus grande mobilité étudiante est aussi synonyme de risques plus
grands. Apprenez comment les universités gèrent ce risque et quelles sont leurs
responsabilités à l’égard des étudiants qui poursuivent leurs études à l’extérieur.
SOIRÉE D’ADIEU
18 h 30 – 21 h 30
Centre d’athlétisme David Braley, McMaster University
La McMaster University vous invite à son tout nouveau centre d’athlétisme pour
une soirée inoubliable. Si la réception d’accueil vous avait transporté dans un
décor de gare, la soirée d’adieu soulignera les « beautés liquides » de la ville,
qu’il s’agisse de sa centaine de chutes et cascades ou encore des eaux profondes
du port situé sur la rive sud du lac Ontario. Des spécialités locales vous seront
servies, et des étoiles montantes de la musique animeront la soirée. Ne manquez
pas cette dernière occasion de festoyer à Hamilton en compagnie de vos amis et
collègues!
Un service de navette est prévu. On recommande une tenue d’affaires
décontractée pour cette soirée.
78
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
PROGRAMME DES ACCOMPAGNATEURS
Ce programme comprend les déjeuners du lundi et du mardi ainsi que des billets
et le transport pour les trois activités sociales du congrès (réception d’accueil,
banquet et soirée dansante du président, soirée d’adieu). Profitez-en pour inviter
quelqu’un à Hamilton.
Dimanche 16 juin
16 h 30 – 17 h 30
Cérémonie d’ouverture – Centre des congrès de Hamilton
18 h 00 – 20 h 00
Réception d’accueil – Liuna Station
Mardi 18 juin
7 h 00 – 8 h 00
Déjeuner – Centre des congrès de Hamilton
18 h 30 – 21 h 30
Soirée d’adieu – McMaster University
250 $
250 $
250 $
250 $
250 $
300 $
Les frais d’inscription comprennent :
• La participation à la conférence d’ouverture du dimanche après-midi
ainsi qu’à toutes les séances plénières et parallèles du lundi et du mardi
• L’accès au Live Learning Centre (LLC) de l’ACPAU – Après le congrès,
toutes les séances enregistrées seront versées sur le LLC
• Le déjeuner, le dîner et les deux pauses-café du lundi et du mardi
• L’accès à toutes les activités sociales :
o Réception d’accueil – Dimanche soir*
o Banquet et soirée dansante du président – Lundi soir*
o Soirée d’adieu – Mardi soir*
*Il est possible d’acheter des billets supplémentaires pour ces activités
Membre
Non-membre
INFORMATION TOURISTIQUE
À propos de Hamilton
Riche en histoire et en culture, et entourée d’une nature spectaculaire, Hamilton
est une ville unique en son genre. Mariant avec brio une vie urbaine trépidante et
un dynamisme artistique et culturel sans pareil, Hamilton peut aussi se prévaloir
d’un passé historique captivant. Bien nichée entre le lac Ontario et l’escarpement
du Niagara, Hamilton conjugue la beauté de ses rives à l’exotisme de ses sentiers
en nature pour offrir des parcs, des chutes d’eau et des lieux de loisirs aussi
jolis et agréables les uns que les autres. Cyclistes, randonneurs, navigateurs de
plaisance et autres adeptes de plein air s’y retrouvent tout naturellement pour
prendre du bon temps. La ville s’est construite autour de la pointe ouest du lac
Ontario, en plein cœur de la région touristique la plus populaire au pays : le sud
de l’Ontario. À mi-chemin entre Toronto et Niagara Falls, Hamilton vaut sans
contredit le détour, que ce soit le temps d’une pause ou d’un long séjour.
INSCRIPTION
FRAIS D’INSCRIPTION AU CONGRÈS
Séminaires précongrès (samedi 15 juin 2013)
Les frais d’inscription comprennent :
• La participation à l’un des huit séminaires précongrès du samedi 15 juin
2013
• L’accès au Live Learning Centre de l’ACPAU, où il sera possible après le
congrès de visionner les sept autres séminaires précongrès
• Le déjeuner, le dîner et les deux pauses-café
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Séminaire sur les finances
Séminaire sur les ressources humaines
Séminaire sur la vérification interne
Séminaire sur l’approvisionnement
Séminaire sur la gestion des risques
Séminaire sur la trésorerie et le placement Stu Budden
Congrès (du dimanche 16 juin au mardi 18 juin 2013)
Lundi 17 juin
7 h 00 – 8 h 00
Déjeuner – Centre des congrès de Hamilton
18 h 00 – minuit
Banquet et soirée dansante du président – Centre des congrès de Hamilton
Séminaire à l’intention des gestionnaires académiques
Séminaire sur la gestion des installations
2013
Frais d’inscription
250 $
250 $
Jusqu'au À partir du
1er mai
2 mai
710 $
835 $
945 $
1 055 $
Activités facultatives
Tournoi de fléchettes
Dégustation de vins
Tournoi de golf
Visite guidée de Niagara Falls
50 $
55 $
135 $
95 $
Programme des accompagnateurs
325 $
Vous pouvez vous inscrire dès maintenant sur
notre site Web (www.acpau.ca) : à partir de la page
d’accueil, cliquez sur le lien situé sous le logo du
congrès et suivez les instructions données pour vous
inscrire et procéder au paiement.
Live Learning Centre
Encore une fois cette année, l’ACPAU permettra aux congressistes d’accéder
à toutes les présentations enregistrées dans le cadre du congrès. Les séances
seront enregistrées en format audio numérique de haute qualité et synchronisées
avec les présentations PowerPoint avant d’être mises en ligne sur le Live Learning
Centre, accessible directement à partir du site Web de l’ACPAU. Il sera possible
d’effectuer des recherches dans le contenu et, le cas échéant, de consulter
la biographie des conférenciers, les objectifs d’apprentissage, les notes des
conférenciers, la documentation distribuée, les liens Internet connexes, etc.
Lancée en 2011, l’initiative du Live Learning Centre répond à l’objectif
stratégique numéro un de l’ACPAU consistant à élargir l’offre de
perfectionnement professionnel proposée aux membres.
Les séances enregistrées lors des congrès 2011 et 2012 sont toujours en
ligne. Visitez le www.acpau.ca.
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
79
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
2013
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
Hamilton, Ontario
Taxi
Plusieurs services de taxi sont offerts à Hamilton :
INSCRIPTION SUR PLACE
Vendredi 14 juin
Hall du Sheraton Hamilton Hotel
16 h 30 – 20 h 00
Blue Line Taxi
Hamilton Cab
Samedi 15 juin
3e étage du Centre des congrès de Hamilton
7 h 15 – 18 h 00
Train
Si vous planifiez voyager par train, VIA Rail dessert plus de 450 villes
canadiennes. La gare GO Transit Aldershot se trouve à Burlington, tout près de
Hamilton. http://www.viarail.ca/fr
Dimanche 16 juin
3e étage du Centre des congrès de Hamilton
10 h 00 – 17 h 00
Automobile
De nombreuses autoroutes passent par Hamilton, notamment la Queen Elizabeth
Way (QEW), de même que les autoroutes 403, 407, 5, 6, 8 et 20.
Lundi 17 juin
3e étage du Centre des congrès de Hamilton
7 h 00 – 17 h 00
De Toronto :
Prendre la QEW en direction de Hamilton/Niagara
Prendre l’autoroute 403 Ouest vers Hamilton/Brantford
Mardi 18 juin
3e étage du Centre des congrès de Hamilton
7 h 00 – 17 h 00
Autocar et autobus
Des autocars de Greyhound Canada et Coach Canada se rendent à Hamilton et
en partent. GO Transit propose aussi des itinéraires en autobus et en train dans la
région du Grand Toronto.
www.greyhound.ca
www.coachcanada.com
www.gotransit.com
Pour obtenir plus de renseignements concernant l’inscription au congrès, veuillez
communiquer avec Unconventional Planning en téléphonant au 1-888-625-8455
(Amérique du Nord seulement) ou en écrivant à
[email protected]
CODE VESTIMENTAIRE
Tenue d’affaires décontractée pour toutes les activités du congrès, à l’exception
du banquet du président, où la tenue de soirée est de rigueur.
TRANSPORT
Avion
L’Aéroport International Toronto Pearson (www.torontopearson.com) se trouve
à 45 minutes de Hamilton via l’autoroute 403 et accueille les vols d’Air Canada
ainsi que ceux de nombreux autres transporteurs aériens de partout dans le
monde. Des bureaux d’information se trouvent dans chaque aérogare : vous y
trouverez les renseignements voulus pour la location de voitures, les services de
taxi, et les autres moyens de transport pour vous rendre à Hamilton.
Airways Transit Service Limited
Hamilton Limousine
Air Canada
WestJet
905-689-4460
905-529-5466
1-888-247-2262
1-888-937-8538
www.airwaystransit.com
www.hamiltonlimo.com
www.aircanada.ca
www.westjet.com
905-525-BLUE
905-777-7777
www.525blue.com
www.hamiltoncab.com
Location de voitures
L’ACPAU a un contrat national avec Budget Location de voitures. En vertu du
contrat de l’ACPAU, Budget offre aux « universitaires membres » le « meilleur
tarif possible » sur indication du numéro de réservation fourni ci-dessous.
Cela signifie que vous pourrez bénéficier de tout tarif inférieur aux tarifs
« universitaires » indiqués sur le site Web de l’ACPAU. Vous pourriez ainsi
économiser jusqu’à 10 $ par jour!
Pour en savoir plus, allez sur www.caubo.ca/supplier_contracts/car_rentals/
car_rental_rates ou téléphonez au 1-800-268-8900. Pour obtenir le tarif
« universitaire », utilisez le code de réservation A136100.
HÉBERGEMENT
Les séminaires précongrès et le congrès ACPAU 2013 auront lieu au Centre des
congrès de Hamilton. L’hôtel officiel du congrès est le Sheraton Hamilton Hotel;
des blocs de chambres supplémentaires ont aussi été réservés au Crowne Plaza
Hamilton et au Staybridge Suites Hamilton-Downtown. Nous vous invitons à
aller sur le site Web du congrès ACPAU 2013 pour obtenir de l’information à jour
concernant l’hébergement.
L’Aéroport international John C. Munro de Hamilton (www.flyhi.ca) accueille
quant à lui des vols WestJet à destination et en provenance de plus de 30 villes
du Canada, des États-Unis et des Caraïbes.
Covoiturage :
Un groupe a été créé dans la CyberCommunauté pour les personnes
désireuses de faire le trajet Toronto-Hamilton en covoiturage à l'occasion
du congrès ACPAU 2013. Si cette possibilité vous intéresse, connectezvous sur www.acpau.ca, entrez dans la CyberCommunauté, puis trouvez
le groupe en question dans le répertoire et demandez à vous y joindre.
80
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
MAÎTRISEZ VOTRE ÉCHIQUIER
70 e CONGRÈS ANNUEL DE L'ACPAU
|
2013
Hamilton, Ontario
NOS COMMANDITAIRES
Merci à tous nos commanditaires!
Un événement d’envergure comme le congrès annuel de l’ACPAU ne serait pas possible sans l’extraordinaire soutien
de nos commanditaires. Le temps qu’ils nous consacrent de même que leurs contributions en argent, en produits ou
en services permettent de rehausser la valeur de notre congrès et d’en faire un événement exceptionnel!
PARTENAIRES PRINCIPAUX
EXPOSANTS
Chartwells Education Dining Services
Fisher Scientific
Plastiq
Alertus Technologies
AMJ Campbell Van Lines
ARAMARK Higher Education
Banque Scotia
Blackboard Inc.
BMO Groupe financier
Campus Living Centres
Canadian Campus Communities
Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP
CEDARLANE
Commissionnaires
CRi Inc.
CURIE
Ellucian
Follett of Canada Inc.
Foyston, Gordon & Payne Inc.
Higher One
Honeywell
IBM Canada
KnowledgeOne
Les Suites d'Ottawa
L’Institut Canadien des Comptables Agréés
Macquarie Equipment Finance
Marsh Canada Limitée
MHPM maîtres de projets
peerTransfer
Precise ParkLink Inc.
Salto Systems Inc.
The Scion Group
Sharp’s audiovisuel
Siemens Canada limitée,
Division Technologies du bâtiment
Staples Avantage
Telecom Computer
TGT Solutions Inc.
United Van Lines – Armstrong
VWR International
PARTENAIRE DE PRESTIGE
PwC
PARTENAIRES MAJEURS
Baker & McKenzie LLP
Oracle Canada ULC
Starbucks Coffee Canada
COMMANDITAIRE OFFICIEL APPUYANT
LE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE
ARAMARK Higher Education
COMMANDITAIRE DES SACS DES
CONGRESSISTES
VWR International
COMMANDITAIRE OFFICIEL DE
L'ACCÈS INTERNET SANS FIL
OfficeMax Grand & Toy
PARTENAIRES ASSOCIÉS
Avis & Budget Location de voitures
CHERD (Centre for Higher Education
Research and Development)
Financière Sun Life
Knightsbridge talents stratégiques
Mercer
Millennium
MNP
Premiere Van Lines
RBC Banque Royale
Ricoh Canada
Sodexo Canada, Ltd.
Spring Global Mail
Towers Watson
Tribal
UNIGLOBE Beacon Travel
Western Union Solutions d’affaires
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
TOURNOI DE FLÉCHETTES À LA
MÉMOIRE DE GARY BOURNE
Greystone Managed Investments Inc.
DÉGUSTATION DE VINS
Legg Mason Global Asset Management
TOURNOI DE GOLF
KPMG s.r.l.
COMMANDITAIRES SUPPLÉMENTAIRES
LIÉS AU TOURNOI DE GOLF
Le plus près de la coupe – hommes : Commissionnaires
Le plus près de la coupe – femmes : Commissionnaires
Le plus long coup de départ – hommes : Plastiq
Concours de coups roulés : MNP
Le plus près de la corde : Commissionnaires
SÉMINAIRES PRÉCONGRÈS
Aberdeen Asset Management
Aon Hewitt
BDO Canada LLP
Bee-Clean services d’entretien
BNP Paribas Investment Partners Canada Ltd.
Deloitte
Ernst & Young LLP
Fiera Capital
Financière Sun Life
Greystone Managed Investments Inc.
Hicks Morley LLP
KPMG
MHPM maîtres de projets
RPR Environmental
Xerox Canada Ltd
Remarque : Liste à jour au moment de l’impression
du présent numéro de Gestion universitaire. D’autres
commanditaires pourraient confirmer leur participation
d’ici la tenue du congrès.
AUTRE CONTRIBUTEUR
First Student Canada
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
81
Doing business with our ADVERTISERS
Company
Website/Email
Phone
AMJ Campbell
www.amjcampbell.com
905-795-3638
Page
40
ARAMARK Canada
www.aramark.ca
416-255-1331
61
Armstrong Moving
www.armmove.com
888-670-4400
51
BNP Paribas Investment Partners
www.bnpparibas-ip.com
647-826-4400
3
Campus Living Centres
www.campuslivingcentres.com
647-7284684
83
Campus Retail Canada
www.campusretail.com
905-892-7582
16
Commissionaires
www.commissionaires.ca
888-688-0715
47
CURIE
www.curie.org
905-336-3366
25
D.L.G.L. Ltd
www.dlgl.com
450-979-4646
6
Eckler Ltd.
www.eckler.ca/vision
416-696-3000
21
Follett of Canada
www.follettofcanada.ca
800-323-4506, ext. 7029
2
Franklin Templeton Institutional
www.ftinstitutional.ca
416-957-6165 (Duane Green)
11
Invesco Trimark Ltd.
www.institutional.invesco.ca
416-324-7448
12
KPMG
www.kpmg.ca/education
613-212-2877
23
Mercer
www.mercer.ca
416-868-2000
59
mhpm
www.mhpm.com
MNP LLP
www.mnp.ca
403-537-7624 (Maggie Kiel)
84
Phillips, Hager & North
Investment Management Ltd.
www.phn.com
800-661-6141
10
Russell Investments
www.russell.com
416-640-6202
36
Scotiabank
www.scotiabank.com
416-775-0864
43
Siemens
www.siemens.ca/energyservices
Standard Life Investments
www.standardlifeinvestments.ca
403-531-1104
Sun Life Financial
www.sunlife.ca
877-266-3563 ext. 4766 (Randy Colwell)
Teknion
www.teknion.com
418-839-0646
7
T.E. Wealth
www.tewealth.com/employers
888-505-8608
9
20
26
4
55
Call for Articles
As a valued reader of University Manager, we
invite you to participate in its content by sharing
your ideas and experiences.
Article ideas can be submitted
to Alison Larabie Chase at
[email protected]
Demande d’articles
En votre qualité de lecteur de la revue Gestion universitaire, vous êtes invité á contribuer á son contenu
en partageant idés et vos expériences.
Les sujets des articles peuvent être transmis à Alison Larabie Chase, [email protected]
82
UNIVERSITY MANAGER • Spring 2013
Click HERE to return to TABLE OF CONTENTS
Enterprise Risk Management
Technology Risk Solutions
Corporate Governance
Risk-based Internal Audit Services
Internal Control Assessments
Fraud Prevention & Investigations
Business Resilience
Business Process Re-Engineering
Post Secondary Education Services
E=MNP2
The right formula for
educational excellence
Finding the right combination of expertise, people
and processes to sustain the service delivery of
your educational institution can be challenging.
Drawing on our extensive experience serving postsecondary organizations, MNP delivers a formula
of risk-based services to ensure you protect your
resources and your reputation.
Margriet Kiel , Leader of MNP’s
Post Secondary Centre of Excellence
[email protected] or 1.877.500.0792