Alick Tipoti - Ken Thaiday Snr. Brian Robinson

Commentaires

Transcription

Alick Tipoti - Ken Thaiday Snr. Brian Robinson
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
155
Alick Tipoti - Ken Thaiday Snr.
Brian Robinson
Torres Strait Islands / Îles du détroit de Torres (Queensland, Australia / Australie)
Éditions Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris
Alick Tipoti
Ken Thaiday Snr.
Brian Robinson
Torres Strait Islands (Queensland, Australia)
Îles du détroit de Torres (Queensland, Australie)
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
2
préface
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco
S.A.S. le Prince Albert II de Monaco
During my travels I have discovered Aboriginal and Oceanic art; genuine
sacred pathways through myths and dreams and the harsh reality of humanity’s
tenuous link with nature.
The Oceanographic Museum wanted to celebrate this imaginative and
colourful art with an exhibition entitled ‘Taba
Naba’, the title of a traditional Torres Strait Islander
children’s song recounting the relationship
between a child and the sea.
The Museum is thus inviting us on a voyage of
discovery. I am pleased to be able to lend several
works from my private collection to highlight my
admiration for these artists who have been able
to express, in such a unique way, the urgent need
to protect the environment and the oceans. The
Oceanographic Museum was created by my greatgrandfather, Prince Albert I, as a temple dedicated
to the sea and a meeting point for Science
and Art, the ‘two driving forces of civilisation’.
Contemporary art is a great vehicle for drawing
attention to the dangers that threaten us. The
artworks are true advocates for the preservation
of marine ecosystems and are particularly powerful
when viewed in the rooms of the Oceanographic
Museum; creating a living dialogue across our
collections. Using a wide variety of media (painting,
sculpture, photography, video, masks, headdresses,
etc.) and materials (wood, metal, plastic, fishing nets,
etc.), these works alert us to the importance of nature; the risks of climate change
and the devastation we inflict on our environment through overfishing, pollution and
plastic waste. They are an invitation to change our habits.
This exhibition has created real momentum with important support from
the Australian Government and the Queensland Government, major Australian
galleries and major museums such as the Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht and the
Musée des Confluences in Lyon. I hope that this event is welcomed with great
enthusiasm by the public, both in its encounter with the artworks as well as with the
many related events and workshops the Oceanographic Museum will be running.
It is by preserving endangered oceans that we will be able to usher in a new era of
sustainable development, shared by all peoples. I want to offer my sincere thanks to
the organisers for having devised and produced this unique and majestic exhibition
that demonstrates a world in balance that we aIl wish for.
Lors de mes voyages, j’ai pu découvrir l’art aborigène et océanien, véritables
itinéraires sacrés entre mythes, rêves et la dure réalité des liens distendus entre l’homme
et la nature.
Le Musée océanographique a souhaité célébrer cet art si imaginatif et
coloré avec une exposition dont le titre Taba Naba évoque une chanson enfantine
traditionnelle des peuples du détroit de Torres racontant la relation entre un enfant
et la mer. Le musée nous adresse une véritable invitation au voyage. Je suis heureux
de prêter plusieurs œuvres de ma collection privée pour souligner mon admiration
pour ces artistes qui ont su exprimer, de manière si singulière, l’impérieuse nécessité de
protéger l’environnement et les océans.
Le Musée océanographique a été créé par mon trisaïeul, le Prince Albert Ier,
comme un temple dédié à la mer et un carrefour des intelligences et des sensibilités
autour des « deux forces directrices de la civilisation », la Science et l’Art. L’art
contemporain est un formidable vecteur de sensibilisation sur les périls qui nous
3
menacent et un plaidoyer pour préserver les écosystèmes marins.
Les œuvres d’art prennent toute leur place sur le parvis et au sein des salles et
des collections du Musée océanographique, créant ainsi un dialogue plus vivant.
Ces œuvres, utilisant tous les supports (peintures, sculptures, photographies, vidéos,
masques, coiffes…) et de nombreux matériaux (bois, métal, plastiques, filets de pêche…), nous
alertent sur les risques et les vulnérabilités liés à l’impact du changement climatique et sur
les ravages que nous infligeons à notre environnement avec la surpêche, la pollution par les
déchets plastiques… et nous invitent à changer nos habitudes.
Cette exposition a su créer une véritable dynamique avec les soutiens
importants apportés par le gouvernement fédéral d’Australie et de l’État du Queensland,
par de grandes galeries australiennes ainsi que de grands musées tels que le Musée d’art
aborigène contemporain d’Utrecht ou le musée des Confluences de Lyon.
Je souhaite que cet événement soit accueilli avec un grand enthousiasme de la part du
public car au-delà de la rencontre avec cet art, le Musée océanographique proposera de
nombreuses animations et ateliers.
C’est en préservant les océans menacés que nous pourrons inaugurer une
nouvelle ère, celle du développement durable et partagé, pour tous les peuples. Je tiens
sincèrement à remercier tous les organisateurs pour avoir imaginé et réussi à mettre en
place cette exposition unique et majestueuse qui dessine un monde d’équilibre que nous
appelons de nos vœux.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
preface
avant-propos
His Excellency Mr Stephen Brady AO CVO,
Australian Ambassador to France and to the Principality of Monaco
Son Excellence Monsieur Stephen Brady,
Ambassadeur d’Australie en France et à Monaco
The Government of Australia is proud to support ‘Taba
Naba’ at the Oceanographic Institute in Monaco, a series of three
major exhibitions which explore the unique relationship between
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia, and
their country.
The cornerstone of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
beliefs is their interconnectedness to country – the natural
environment that nurtures them, and must in turn be nurtured
by them. This connection, seen by many Indigenous Australians
as central to their identity, spirituality and cultural well-being, has
influenced millennia of unique cultural practices and produced a
tradition of sustainable land and water management. It is therefore
entirely appropriate that these exhibitions take place at the
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, whose mission, as stated by its
founder H.S.H. Prince Albert I, is ‘knowing, loving and protecting the
oceans’.
The exhibition ‘Australia : Defending the Oceans at
the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands Art’ presents six
monumental installations by contemporary artists from the coastal
regions of northern Australia. Commissioned by curators
Stéphane Jacob and Suzanne O’Connell, over fifty artists including
Ken Thaiday Snr., Alick Tipoti and Brian Robinson and art centres
including Girringun Aboriginal Art Centre whose Bagu sculptures
will welcome visitors to the forecourt of the museum. Erub Arts,
Pormpuraaw Art and Culture Centre and Tjutjuna Art and Culture
Centre have all worked on the dramatic installations of giant sea
creatures featured in the hall of honour of the museum. These
works are a vibrant illustration of living Indigenous culture and the
unique relationship Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
have with the ocean environment.
For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the
process of artistic creation is intrinsic to the practice of their cultural
heritage and the transmission of knowledge from generation to
generation.
‘Oceania islanders: past masters in navigation and artistic
expression’ curated by Didier Zanette brings together objects and
artefacts from the Pacific Islands to demonstrate the similarities
between the different cultural traditions, with a focus on the sea and
its navigation. This exhibition echoes the collections assembled by
Prince Albert I during his scientific expeditions which are at the core
of the collection of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.
The exhibition ‘Living Waters’ explores how these
traditions influence the traditional and contemporary art of
Australia’s first peoples. The exhibition celebrates the world’s oldest
continuing living culture and demonstrates the extraordinary
capacity of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists
to adapt and engage with other cultures, across different media.
Mr Marc Sordello and Mr Francis Missana, whose major collection
lies at the heart of ‘Living Waters’, are to be commended for their
important contribution. So too their curatorial team, led by
Dr Erica Izett for bringing together contemporary Indigenous
artists as diverse as Emily Kngwarreye and Christian Thompson and
investigating the transcultural space through works by Ruark Lewis
and Imants Tillers, alongside those of the Yolngu from
eastern Arnhem Land.
Like the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, the
Australian Government shares a commitment to the sustainable
management and effective protection of the world’s oceans.
The government is also committed to promoting international
recognition and understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander cultures. I express my sincere thanks to H.S.H. Prince
Albert II of Monaco, the Oceanographic Museum, the artists and
curators for this extraordinary opportunity they have created
to show Australia in Monaco, and I commend all those who have
contributed to the fulfilment of this ambitious project.
Le gouvernement australien a l’honneur de soutenir le
Pour ces peuples, le processus de création artistique
projet Taba Naba, organisé au sein de l’Institut océanographique de
est indissociable de la pratique de leur héritage culturel et de la
Monaco. Cette série de trois expositions majeures explore la relation
transmission des savoirs de génération en génération.
unique liant les peuples australiens aborigènes et insulaires du
détroit de Torres à leur environnement.
l’expression artistique », conçue par Didier Zanette, rassemble des
objets et artefacts issus des îles du Pacifique, pour mettre en lumière
L’interdépendance des hommes et de leur environnement
« Océanie : des îliens passés maîtres dans la navigation et
est en effet au cœur des croyances des peuples aborigènes et des
les similarités entre différentes traditions culturelles, autour du
îles du détroit de Torres : la nature qui les entoure subvient à leurs
thème de la mer et de la navigation. Cette exposition fait écho aux
besoins, et ils s’efforcent de l’entretenir en retour. Cette relation
collections constituées par le prince Albert Ier lors de ses expéditions
constitue pour de nombreux peuples autochtones d’Australie
scientifiques, véritables poutres maîtresses du fonds du Musée
un aspect essentiel de leur identité, de leur spiritualité et de leur
océanographique de Monaco.
bien-être culturel. Elle a influencé des millénaires de pratiques
culturelles uniques et le développement d’une tradition de gestion
les arts premiers et contemporains des peuples autochtones
durable des sols et des ressources en eau. Dès lors, le choix du
d’Australie. L’exposition rend hommage à la plus ancienne culture
Musée océanographique de Monaco, dont la mission énoncée par
du monde encore en activité et démontre l’extraordinaire capacité
son fondateur le prince Albert Ier vise à faire « connaître, aimer et
d’adaptation des artistes australiens aborigènes et des îles du détroit
protéger » les océans, prend tout son sens.
de Torres, qui ont su engager le dialogue avec d’autres cultures, à
travers différents supports. Il convient de saluer la contribution
« Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des
« Eaux vivantes » explore l’influence de ces traditions sur
Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres » regroupe six
essentielle de M. Marc Sordello et de M. Francis Missana, dont
installations monumentales réalisées par des artistes contemporains
l’importante collection est au centre de l’exposition. Il faut également
originaires des régions côtières du Nord de l’Australie. Réunis par les
remercier leur équipe de commissaires d’exposition qui a su
commissaires d’exposition Stéphane Jacob et Suzanne O’Connell, plus
rassembler, sous la direction d’Erica Izett, des artistes contemporains
de cinquante artistes ont travaillé, dont Ken Thaiday Snr., Alick Tipoti
d’horizons variés tels qu’Emily Kngwarreye et Christian Thompson,
et Brian Robinson, ainsi que des centres d’arts tels que le Girringun
tout en proposant une approche interculturelle confrontant les
Aboriginal Art Centre, dont les sculptures Bagu accueillent les
œuvres de Ruark Lewis et d’Imants Tillers à celles d’artistes du peuple
visiteurs sur le parvis du musée, Erub Arts, le Pormpuraaw Art and
Yolngu, originaire de l’Est de la terre d’Arnhem.
Culture Centre et le Tjutjuna Arts and Cultural Centre, qui ont créé
les installations spectaculaires exposées dans les salles, prenant la
un même engagement en faveur d’une gestion durable et d’une
forme de gigantesques créatures marines. Ces œuvres offrent une
protection efficace des océans. L’Australie a également à cœur
brillante illustration des traditions culturelles actuelles et de la
de promouvoir, à l’échelle internationale, la reconnaissance et la
relation unique qui unit les Aborigènes et les Insulaires du détroit de
compréhension des cultures aborigènes et des îles du détroit de
Torres à leur environnement marin.
Torres. Je tiens à remercier chaleureusement S.A.S. le prince Albert II,
Le musée et le gouvernement australien partagent
le Musée océanographique de Monaco, les artistes et les commissaires
d’exposition qui sont à l’origine de cette aventure extraordinaire
mettant à l’honneur l’Australie au cœur de Monaco, et je salue toutes
les personnes qui ont contribué à la réalisation de cet ambitieux projet.
5
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
4
foreword
Senator The Honourable Mitch Fifield, Australian Government Minister for the Arts
Monsieur le sénateur Mitch Fifield, ministre australien des Arts
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
6
The Australian Government is proud to support Taba Naba, Australia,
Oceania, Arts of the Sea People at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.
Comprising works by well-known and emerging Australian Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander artists as well as works from the Pacific Islands, the exhibition conveys
a profound message about the responsibility we all have as custodians of our
environment, culture and heritage. It also celebrates the great richness and diversity
of the art of Australia and the Pacific region.
The exhibition at the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco offers an
opportunity for international audiences to experience the new works created for this
exhibition. I extend my congratulations to the artists and curators involved in this
extraordinary project and commend the vision of His Serene Highness Prince Albert II
of Monaco and the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco. Australia is proud to be
collaborating with Monaco on this important exhibition.
Le gouvernement australien est fier de soutenir Taba Naba, Australie, Océanie,
Arts des peuples de la mer au Musée océanographique de Monaco. Cette exposition,
qui présente des œuvres d’artistes aborigènes et du détroit de Torres connus et moins
foreword
avant-propos
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, Premier of Queensland and Minister for the Arts
Madame Annastacia Palaszczuk, Premier ministre et ministre des Arts du Queensland
It is my great pleasure to share the extraordinary work of Queensland’s Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander artists featured in 'Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Island Art' as part of the Taba Naba, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People.
I invite visitors to experience the unique art from Queensland and to embrace the
landscape, country and people of the world’s oldest living culture. Our Queensland artists, many
of whom live in remote communities, produce works that attract collectors and lovers of art
nationally and internationally.
My Government has provided financial support for this prestigious exhibition to ensure
Queensland artists can take their art to a global audience. This investment is part of Backing
Indigenous Arts, a landmark Queensland Government initiative that has been creating sustainable
economic opportunities and ethical pathways for Queensland’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
artists since 2007 and continues to nurture the next generation of artists.
It is my hope that this exhibition will encourage visitors to come to Queensland and see
for themselves the natural and unique beauty of the Great Barrier Reef and the lands that inspire
our artists. I congratulate the artists and Indigenous Art Centres presented here and trust that
works from Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island artists will continue to make their way
into international collections.
connus, est porteuse d’un message puissant : la protection de notre environnement,
de notre culture et de notre patrimoine nous incombe à tous. L’exposition rend aussi
hommage à la grande richesse et à la diversité de l’art australien et du Pacifique.
Queensland et du détroit de Torres présentées dans l’exposition « Australie : la défense des océans au cœur
de l'art des Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres », dans le cadre du projet Taba Naba, Australie,
Le Musée océanographique de Monaco propose à un public international
C’est avec un immense plaisir que nous partageons les œuvres des artistes insulaires du
des œuvres créées spécifiquement pour cette exposition. Je veux féliciter les artistes et
Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer.
les conservateurs impliqués dans cet incroyable projet, ainsi que Son Altesse Sérénissime
le Prince Albert II de Monaco et le Musée océanographique de Monaco d’avoir voulu
ancienne culture vivante du monde à travers le paysage, la géographie et les peuples qui la constituent.
et permis cette exposition. L’Australie est fière de collaborer avec Monaco pour cette
Nos artistes du Queensland, pour la plupart issus de territoires communautaires reculés, réalisent des
extraordinaire exposition.
œuvres qui attirent les collectionneurs et les amateurs d’art aussi bien en Australie que dans le monde
J’invite les visiteurs à découvrir la scène artistique unique du Queensland et à explorer la plus
entier. Mon gouvernement a fourni un soutien financier à cette prestigieuse exposition pour permettre
aux artistes du Queensland de toucher un public international.
Cet investissement s’inscrit dans l’initiative de soutien aux arts aborigènes mise en œuvre par
le gouvernement du Queensland sous le nom de « Backing Indigenous Arts ». Depuis 2007, cette initiative
contribue à créer une économie durable fondée sur des valeurs éthiques pour les artistes insulaires du
Queensland et du détroit de Torres, tout en offrant un tremplin à la prochaine génération d’artistes.
J’espère que cette exposition encouragera les visiteurs à séjourner dans le Queensland pour
découvrir par eux-mêmes la beauté naturelle et unique de la Grande Barrière de corail et des paysages qui
inspirent nos artistes. Je félicite les artistes et les centres d’art prenant part à cet événement en espérant
que les artistes du Queensland et du détroit de Torres rencontreront au cours des prochaines années
le succès qu’ils méritent au sein des collections internationales.
7
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
foreword
avant-propos
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
8
introduction
Conceptual seascapes
from the Torres
Strait Islands
Horizons marins
des îles du détroit
de Torres
In the Eastern Torres Strait Islands’ language of Meriam Mir there is a term, maiso
mir, that means ‘the murmur of the Great Barrier Reef heard from the island of Mer’. The
Reef, one of the seven natural wonders of the world, begins in waters northeast of Mer
(Murray Island) and is nurtured by the pristine ocean environment and abundant marine life
of the Torres Strait. With over 274 small islands spread across 48,000 square kilometers,
life in the Torres Strait depends on co-existing with the elements of the ocean, the weather,
and the seasons. The poetry of these natural surroundings has always inspired its Indigenous
population and it continues to motivate their artists today. Artists from the region produce
exceptionally innovative conceptual seascapes that capture far more than a visual record
of the marine location. The art derives from understanding nature’s rhythms, cycles, and
character. Torres Strait Islands (TSI) artists have a unique expertise in characterizing their
natural environment as part of their spirituality, and their own being. They express how people
of the Torres Strait do not try to conquer Nature but instead understand themselves as part of
its beauty.
A delicate balance between population and natural resources evolved in the Torres
Strait over 3,000 years of human habitation. Islands across the region are geo-physically
diverse, ranging from fertile hilly volcanic terrain to low-lying sandy islands, or mangrove
forests growing in saline coastal conditions. Diverse island ecosystems led to equally diverse
subsistence lifestyles, and cultural and linguistic distinctions between the Eastern and Western
regions - and differing dialects within these language groups. Language is always important to
cultural identity because it is a vehicle for people who identify as a community to share their
unique vision of the world. As the German philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein said, “The limits
of my language mean the limits of my world”. This is particularly significant for oral cultures
such as Aboriginal Australians and Torres Strait Islanders. Identities, laws, and moral codes, are
encoded in their unique languages – there are no written texts to consult and instead inherited
wisdom is encoded in their language, their storytelling, dance, song, and visual arts.
Stunning masks made using pearl and seashells, turtle shell, and exotic feathers
sometimes sourced from Papua New Guinea, demonstrate the holistic approach to art and
life in the Torres Strait. The purpose of their dramatic characterization supports ceremonial
performance of dance, song and storytelling. All artforms work together to create a memory
bank of knowledge that is vital to the sustainability of the community. These masks have such a
powerful essence of meaningfulness that early European modernists such as Pablo Picasso and
Paul Klée held examples in their private collections. Dance headdress, pearl and shell jewelry,
tattooing, and an outstanding carving tradition in wood, coral and turtle shell, signify the rich
artistic traditions of Torres Strait Islands cultures prior to European contact. [continue p. 12]
Par Sally Butler
En Meriam Mir, langue vernaculaire des îles de l’est du détroit de Torres, le terme
maiso mir signifie « le murmure de la Grande Barrière de corail entendu depuis l’île de Mer ».
L’immense récif corallien, figurant parmi les sept merveilles du monde, prend sa source au
nord-est de l’île de Mer (Murray Island) et s’épanouit dans les eaux cristallines et luxuriantes
du détroit de Torres. Dans cette zone où l’on recense plus de deux cent soixante-quatorze
petites îles disséminées sur quelque quarante-huit mille kilomètres, la vie est avant tout
conditionnée par l’océan, le climat et les saisons. La poésie de ce décor naturel a toujours
inspiré les populations indigènes et influence le regard des artistes contemporains des îles
9
du détroit de Torres. Leurs œuvres exceptionnellement novatrices, plus que jamais tournées
vers la mer, dépassent la simple représentation visuelle de l’environnement océanique. Elles
témoignent d’une compréhension intime des rythmes naturels, des cycles saisonniers et
des caractéristiques locales. Les artistes des îles du détroit de Torres s’illustrent par leur
expertise de l’environnement naturel, indissociable de leur spiritualité et de leur propre
existence. Leur art traduit l’état d’esprit des insulaires locaux qui, plutôt que de chercher à
conquérir la nature, se considèrent comme des prolongements de sa beauté.
Un équilibre fragile entre activités humaines et ressources naturelles s’est
peu à peu installé sur les îles du détroit de Torres, occupées par les indigènes pendant
trois mille ans. Les îles de la région présentent des caractéristiques géophysiques
variées : certaines offrent un terrain volcanique vallonné et fertile, tandis que d’autres
sont constituées de bancs de sable plats, ou de forêts de mangrove qui s’épanouissent
dans l’environnement salin de la côte. Les écosystèmes insulaires, très diversifiés, ont
engendré des modes de subsistance également diversifiés ainsi que des distinctions
culturelles et linguistiques entre les régions est et ouest (avec plusieurs dialectes
au sein de chaque groupe de locuteurs). La langue est toujours une composante
importante de l’identité culturelle, car elle véhicule une vision du monde propre à
chaque communauté. Comme le disait le philosophe allemand Ludwig Wittgenstein :
« Les limites de mon langage sont les limites de mon monde. » Cette composante est
particulièrement importante au sein des cultures indigènes d’Australie et du détroit
de Torres, fondées sur la tradition orale. Chaque dialecte véhicule une identité, un
ensemble de lois et de codes moraux. En l’absence de textes écrits à consulter, la
transmission du patrimoine culturel et des savoirs se fait à travers la tradition orale, la
danse, le chant et les arts visuels.
Les superbes masques fabriqués dans les îles du détroit de Torres à partir de perles,
de coquillages, de carapaces de tortue et de certaines plumes exotiques provenant parfois
de Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée, illustrent cette approche holistique de l’art et de la vie.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
By Sally Butler
introduction
PAPUA
NEW GUINEA
GULF OF PAPUA
Saibai
Turnagain
TORRES STRAIT
ISLANDS
Ugar
ARAFURA SEA
Erub (Darnley Island)
Masig
Poruma
Mabuiag
Moa
Badu (Mulgrave Island)
Long
Mer (Murray Island)
Warraber
Nagir
Kiriri
Goode
Friday
Waiben (Thursday Island)
Ngurapai
Muralug
Little Adolphus
Mount Adolphus
PAPUA
NEW-GUINEA
S0LOMON
ISLAND
Possession
Turtle Head
GULF OF
CARPENTARIA
CORAL SEA
Crab
Torres
Strait
INDIAN
OCEAN
Honiara
Port Moresby
Darwin
Cairns
PACIFIC
OCEAN
NORTHERN
TERRITORY
AUSTRALIA
WESTERN
AUSTRALIA
NEW-CALEDONIA
QUEENSLAND
Alice Springs
Brisbane
SOUTH
AUSTRALIA
NEW
SOUTH
WALES
Adelaide
Sydney
Canberra
VICTORIA
Melbourne
TASMANIA
VANUATU
TASMAN
SEA
Hobart
TORRES STRAIT ISLANDS BASIC FACTS
La personnification théâtrale de ces masques sublime la performance cérémonielle
Les Insulaires font partie des principales
modernes européens, notamment Pablo Picasso et Paul Klee, en possédaient quelques
populations autochtones d’Australie.
exemplaires dans leurs collections privées. Les coiffes cérémonielles, les bijoux en perles
Ils se différencient des Aborigènes,
et coquillages, l’art du tatouage et de la sculpture sur bois, coraux et carapace de tortue,
notamment par leurs liens ethniques
témoignent de la richesse des cultures traditionnelles des îles du détroit de Torres, avant
et culturels forts avec les peuples de
les premiers contacts avec les Européens.
Mélanésie, de Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée
et des îles de l’ouest du Pacifique. Les
de vivre isolés sur leurs îles d’origine, les Insulaires construisaient traditionnellement
îles du détroit de Torres sont aujourd’hui
des pirogues à balancier pour entreprendre de longues traversées vers la Papouasie-
partiellement administrées par la Torres
Nouvelle-Guinée, le continent australien et d’autres régions de Mélanésie. Les mutations
Strait Regional Authority (TSRA) et
culturelles se sont intensifiées avec l’arrivée des Européens. Luís Vaz de Torres fut le
possèdent un drapeau commun, dont
premier à naviguer dans le détroit, en 1606. Au cours du xixe siècle, les explorations se
l’emblème est la coiffe (dari) représentée
firent de plus en plus nombreuses. D’inoubliables images illustrant la vie insulaire allaient
dans l’œuvre de Ken Thaiday Snr.
bientôt peupler l’imaginaire culturel des Européens à travers l’œuvre des artistes ayant
Deux langues vernaculaires principales
visité la région entre 1842 et 1846 (Harden Melville, à bord du Fly et du Bramble avec le
qui mêle danse, chant et oralité. Toutes les formes d’art s’articulent pour constituer
une banque de savoirs, essentielle à la pérennisation de la mémoire collective et de
la communauté. La charge spirituelle de ces masques est telle que certains artistes
Le détroit de Torres est un carrefour géographique et culturel. Plutôt que
coexistent – le Kala Lagaw Ya des îles de
capitaine Francis Price Blackwood) ; et en 1848 (Oswald Brierly, à bord du Rattlesnake
l’Ouest et le Meriam Mir des îles de l’Est –
avec le capitaine Owen Stanley). Dans les années 1860, le développement des activités de
et donnent plusieurs dialectes distinctifs.
pêche à la perle et aux holothuries (concombres de mer) attire de nombreux plongeurs
Aujourd’hui, de nombreux insulaires parlent
et travailleurs japonais, philippins et malais dans la région. L’arrivée de la Société
un créole (ou pidgin) local, dérivé de la
missionnaire de Londres, en 1871, encourage également l’intégration de prêtres polynésiens
langue anglaise.
et mélanésiens au sein des communautés du détroit de Torres.
Les îles du détroit de Torres sont situées à
la jonction de la mer de Corail et de la mer
Torres acquièrent une notoriété sans précédent avec la publication des rapports
d’Arafura. Il y a 12 000 ans, juste après
du professeur Alfred Cort Haddon (Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological
la dernière période glacière, le détroit de
Expedition to Torres Strait). Publiés en six volumes, de 1901 à 1935, ces rapports
Torres était encore un bras de terre reliant
regroupent un remarquable corpus de croquis détaillés, de photographies,
l’Australie et la Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée.
d’enregistrements sonores et d’artefacts du détroit de Torres. Les artistes
Avec l’élévation du niveau de la mer, l’océan
contemporains utilisent fréquemment cette ressource pour compléter leur
a peu à peu submergé cette bande de terre,
compréhension des traditions insulaires (regroupées sous le nom Ailan Kastom) n’épargnant que les sommets qui ont formé
et enrichir leur pratique. Les images et informations relatives à la coiffe et au
les îles que l’on connaît aujourd’hui.
costume cérémoniels donnent lieu à de nouvelles formes de sculptures marines,
La population, estimée à sept mille
fabriquées à des fins artistiques plutôt que cérémonielles. Un nouveau mouvement
habitants, se concentre sur seulement
de linogravure voit le jour et reprend les motifs sophistiqués de la gravure sur
Au siècle suivant, l’art de vivre et la culture des îles du détroit de
Torres Strait Islanders are one
They also have two traditional
Strait was a land bridge between
quatorze des îles. Les Insulaires sont au
carapace de tortue ou sur bois. Si le linoléum n’est évidemment pas un support
of Australia’s main Indigenous
languages with various dialects that
Australia and Papua New Guinea.
moins six fois plus nombreux à vivre sur le
traditionnel pour les artistes du détroit de Torres, l’introduction de cette technique
populations. They do not identify as
are distinct to the Torres Strait – Kala
Rising sea levels gradually submerged all
continent australien, qui offre un plus large
d’impression dans les années 1990 a toutefois engendré l’une des formes esthétiques
Aboriginal Australians, and have strong
Lagaw Ya of the Western Islands and
but the peaks of this land, which formed
éventail de possibilités professionnelles et
les plus caractéristiques de l’art contemporain australien. La linogravure a permis de
ethnic and cultural links to Melanesian
Meriam Mir of the Eastern Islands.
the islands of today.
de formations.
réinventer les techniques traditionnelles de gravure sur bois et carapace de tortue,
people of Papua New Guinea and the
Today, many people also speak Torres
An estimated 7,000 people living in
tout en offrant aux artistes du détroit de Torres un moyen d’expression économique
western Pacific. Today the Torres Strait
Strait Kriol that has evolved from the
Torres Strait Islands inhabit only fourteen
synonyme de visibilité pour leur patrimoine culturel unique. Cette visibilité est
Islands are administered partially
English language.
of these islands. At least six times this
aujourd’hui totale, comme en témoigne l’installation pour toit-terrasse d’Alick Tipoti,
through the Torres Strait Regional
The Torres Strait Islands are located
many Torres Strait Islands people live on
réalisée pour le Musée océanographique de Monaco à partir d’une linogravure.
Authority (TSRA) and have their own flag
at the junction between the Coral and
the Australian mainland where there are
En dépit des multiples influences de l’histoire, les Insulaires ont su perpétuer un
(featuring the dari headdress represented
Arafura Seas. Until 12, 000 years ago,
more diverse employment and education
héritage culturel unique qui a engendré, dans les années 1990, un mouvement
in Ken Thaiday Snr.’s art).
just after the last ice age, the Torres
opportunities.
artistique détonnant dans le paysage contemporain. [suite p. 15]
11
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Boigu
INFORMATIONS CLÉS
SUR LE DÉTROIT
DE TORRES
Badu / Mulgrave Island
Mer / Murray Island
The Torres Strait is a geographic and cultural crossroads. Rather than being isolated
on their island homes, Torres Strait Islanders of the past built large outrigger canoes for long sea
voyages to Papua New Guinea, the Australian mainland, and other areas of Melanesia.
Cultural change escalated with the arrival of Europeans. Luís Vaz de Torres was the first in 1606,
but a European influx grew dramatically throughout the nineteenth century. Visual images of
Torres Strait Islands life in turn entered the European cultural imagination when artists visited the
area on board voyages in 1842-1846 (Harden Melville on Captain Blackwood’s Fly and Bramble
voyages); and 1848 (Oswald Brierly on Captain Owen Stanley’s Rattlesnake voyage).
A thriving marine industry in pearling and bêche-de-mer began in the 1860s, bringing Japanese,
Filipino, and Malay divers and workers to the region. Arrival of the London Missionary Society
in 1871 also encouraged integration of Polynesian and Melanesian pastors into Torres Strait
Islands’ society.
Torres Strait Islands life and culture gained prominent European exposure with
publication of Alfred C. Haddon’s Reports of the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to Torres
Strait. Published in six volumes over 34 years (1901-1935) the Report included a remarkable
archive of detailed drawings, photographs, sound recordings, and artefacts of Torres Strait Islands
cultures. Today’s artists frequently use this resource to supplement what they know and practice
of Island customs (known as Ailan Kastom). Images and information about headdress and dance
apparatus translated into new forms of sculpted seascapes made for artistic rather than ceremonial
purposes. Details of intricately carved designs in turtle shell and wooden craft provided the basis
for a new linocut print movement. Linocut is obviously not a traditional medium for Torres Strait
Islands artists but introduction of the printmaking technique in the 1990s resulted in one of
the most identifiable aesthetics in contemporary Australian art. It offered a useful method for
translating inherited skills in wood and turtle shell carving, and also provided economical methods
for Torres Strait Islands artists to gain maximum exposure for their unique cultural expression.
This exposure is now immense, with Alick Tipoti’s rooftop installation at the Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco that is based on a linocut design.
Torres Strait Islanders maintained their distinct cultural practices and expression despite
this cross-cultural history, and a dynamic contemporary art movement deepened the distinction
when it emerged in the 1990s. The political climate of the time sought improved measures of
self-determination for the region, and art supported this impetus in providing a visual method
of consolidating an autonomous Torres Strait Islands identity. A ground-breaking land rights
case (called ‘native title’ in Australia) in 1992, initiated and led by Mer Island’s Eddie Koiki Mabo
(1936-92), galvanized national attention to the continuous and fundamental connections between
Torres Strait Islanders and their homelands. Their contemporary art, and their complex seascapes,
continue with this message.
À l’époque où le droit à l’autodétermination occupait la scène politique, l’art a largement
contribué, à travers l’expression visuelle, à la construction d’une identité autonome pour
les Insulaires. En 1992, Eddie Koiki Mabo (1936-1992), originaire de Murray Island, milite
pour faire reconnaître les droits de son peuple sur leurs terres et entame une procédure
judiciaire sans précédent. L’événement va peu à peu éveiller les consciences et attirer
l’attention des Australiens sur les liens continus et fondamentaux qui unissent les
Insulaires à leurs îles. Ce message se perpétue aujourd’hui à travers l’œuvre des artistes
indigènes et leur rapport sophistiqué à l’environnement marin.
Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des Aborigènes
et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres
L’exposition intitulée « Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des Aborigènes
et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres » met en scène quelques-unes des plus grandes
œuvres d’Alick Tipoti, de Brian Robinson, et du duo collaboratif de Ken Thaiday Snr. et
Burrar / Bet Islet
At the back / au fond : Warraber / Sue Island
Jason Christopher. Ces installations de grande envergure sont nées de collaborations
complexes avec des artistes et artisans non indigènes. Elles illustrent l’entrée des arts
du détroit de Torres dans le domaine du spectacle public, à travers un nouveau champ
d’expression. Les valeurs et connaissances traditionnelles du détroit de Torres, dont la
portée est aujourd’hui mondiale, sont fortement liées aux enjeux écologiques actuels
et futurs.
Les arts ont toujours joué un rôle essentiel au sein des cultures orales du
15
un important vecteur de mémoire collective et permettaient la diffusion et la
transmission de savoirs fondamentaux au sein des communautés. La recherche de
points d’eau, l’identification de zones et de périodes propices à la chasse d’espèces
locales ou migratrices et la navigation sur les mers du détroit sont autant de
compétences essentielles à la vie. Bien qu’elle ne soit pas consignée par écrit, cette
expertise traditionnelle de l’environnement marin constitue une forme de science
océanographique à part entière, héritière de plusieurs siècles, voire de plusieurs
Maino, Crocodile dance mask,
Torres Strait Islands, wood, turtleshell, pandanus fibre, nut, iron,
hibiscus fibre, feathers, coconut
palm (wood and fibre), shells,
19th C., 66 x 22 x 27 cm,
British Museum, London /
Maino, Masque de danse
crocodile, îles du détroit de
Torres, bois, carapace de tortue,
fibre de pandanus, noix, fer,
fibre d'hibiscus, plumes, bois
et fibre de cocotier, coquillages,
66 x 22 x 27 cm, xixe siècle,
British Museum, Londres
Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islands Art
The exhibition “Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands
Art” includes some of the largest artworks ever created by Alick Tipoti, Brian Robinson, and the
collaboration between Ken Thaiday Snr. and Jason Christopher. These large-scale installation
pieces involve sophisticated collaborations with non-Indigenous artists and artisans and address a
new era in Torres Strait Islands art’s role as public spectacle. The cultural statement is now global
in scale and links Torres Strait Islands traditional values and knowledge with what impacts on our
world today, and in the future.
Art of the past played a vital role in Torres Strait Islands oral cultures. The patterns, designs
and imagery were an important memory device for disseminating and passing on inherited wisdom
that sustained a lifestyle dependent on knowing where to find fresh water, where and when to hunt
local and migratory fauna, and how to navigate the surrounding seas. Although this inherited wisdom
about the marine environment was not written down in words, it constitutes a significant mode of
marine science developed over hundreds, if not of thousands, of years. Knowledge about seasonal
habits of the wind, ocean and stars, and lifecycles of local fish, birds, and animals, are understood as
elements of their spiritual and cultural beliefs, and are remembered as stories about how the world
was created, and what forces continue to determine the nature of human existence. The visual story
of art helped to focus these stories around key events and characters.
millénaires d’expérience de terrain. La dynamique saisonnière des vents, des courants
océaniques et des étoiles, ainsi que le cycle de vie des poissons, oiseaux et mammifères
locaux, sont les éléments constitutifs des croyances spirituelles et culturelles des
indigènes. La tradition orale perpétue cet héritage à travers les récits créationnistes
et la compréhension de l’existence humaine dans son rapport étroit aux forces
originelles. L’histoire visuelle des arts a permis d’articuler ces histoires vieilles comme
le monde autour d’événements et de personnages clés.
“Torres Strait Islanders are one of Australia’s main
Indigenous populations. They do not identify as Aboriginal
Australians, and have strong ethnic and cultural links
to Melanesian people of Papua New Guinea and the western Pacific.”
« Les Insulaires du détroit de Torres font partie des principales populations autochtones d’Australie.
Ils se différencient des Aborigènes, notamment par leurs liens ethniques et culturels forts avec les peuples de Mélanésie,
de Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée et des îles de l’ouest du Pacifique. »
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
détroit de Torres. Les motifs, les formes et les images constituaient traditionnellement
WARU - SEA TURTLE
dugong. Gapu can also attach themselves to the
The two main species of sea turtles in the Torres
bottom of ships, sometimes hindering them.
Strait are the Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) and
Mark Antony reputedly lost the battle of Actium
the Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata).
(31BC) when his vessel became immobile because
Turtle meat and eggs are an important source of
of these fish!
protein in Torres Strait Islands life, and hunting
practices are carefully monitored to maintain the
GHITALAY - MUD CRAB
species. Community-based Turtle (and Dugong)
The mud or mangrove crab (Scylla serrata) is a
Management Plans are implemented throughout
deep green or brown mottled coloured crab that
the Torres Strait under the guidance of the Torres
is a delicious and nutritious food for the Torres
Strait Regional Authority. A Land and Sea Ranger
Strait Islands population. Ghitalay live in muddy
Program provides a team of Indigenous Rangers from
mangroves or shallow waters during low tide and
14 communities who work with Traditional Owners
feed at high tide. Their sweet meat is a very popular
in protecting and recording culturally significant places
Australian food today so female crabs are now
and features of the marine and terrestrial environment.
protected throughout Queensland and prohibited
from being in anyone’s possession without a permit.
DHANGAL - DUGONG
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
16
Dugong (order of Sirenia), also known as a sea-cow
WOMERR - FRIGATE BIRD
in some parts of the world, are the planet’s only
The frigate bird (Fregata species) is a sea bird found
strictly herbivorous marine mammal and graze
across all tropical and sub-tropical oceans. They are
mainly on seagrass. Their coastal habitats range
predominantly black in colour with forked tails and
across the Indo-West Pacific where they prefer
long hooked bills. They hunt mainly fish and squid
sheltered shallow waters. The meat and oil of
and Torres Strait Islanders use them as markers
dugong traditionally provided Torres Strait Islanders
for hunting and sea navigation. Fossils of species
with seasonal sources of protein, and today a large
related to today’s frigate bird date back to 50 million
area of western Torres Strait is a designated dugong
years ago.
sanctuary to protect the viability of the species in
modern times.
WARU - LA TORTUE MARINE
Les deux principales espèces de
tortue marine présentes dans le
détroit de Torres sont la tortue
verte (Chelonia mydas) et la tortue
imbriquée (Eretmochelys imbricata).
La chair et les œufs de tortue
constituent une source importante
de protéines pour les communautés
du détroit de Torres et les stratégies
de chasse sont minutieusement
contrôlées afin de préserver chaque
espèce. Des plans de gestion
communautaire protégeant la tortue
(et le dugong) sont mis en œuvre
sur l’ensemble des îles du détroit,
sous la supervision de la Torres Strait
Regional Authority.
Un programme de surveillance
terrestre et maritime mobilise des
gardes (chasse et pêche) indigènes
issus de quatorze communautés
différentes qui assurent, en
collaboration avec les représentants
communautaires, la protection des
zones et écosystèmes maritimes et
terrestres constitutifs du patrimoine.
TUP - SARDINES OR PILCHARD
Tup (pronounced ‘toop’) (family of Clupeidae) appear
GAPU - SUCKERFISH
in great shoals in the seas of the Eastern Torres
Suckerfish or Remora (Echeneis species) belong to
Strait at certain times of the year, particularly in the
the perch family of fish. They feature an adhesive
vicinity of Mer (Murray) and Erub (Darnley) Islands.
fin instead of an anterior dorsal fin and attach
They look like masses of black floating seaweed and
themselves to larger fish such as sharks, tuna and
are caught mainly by using funnel-shaped baskets
swordfish, as a method of transportation. Torres
made of split bamboo. Tup are roasted over coals
Strait Islanders use them to assist in hunting
or boiled.
“The patterns, designs and imagery were an important memory
device for disseminating and passing on inherited wisdom.”
« Les motifs, les formes et les images constituaient traditionnellement un important vecteur de mémoire collective
ESPÈCES MARINES DU DÉTROIT DE TORRES
FIGURANT DANS L’EXPOSITION
et permettaient la diffusion et la transmission de savoirs fondamentaux au sein des communautés. »
DHANGAL - LE DUGONG
Le dugong (ordre des siréniens),
également connu sous le nom de
« vache marine » dans certaines
régions du monde, est l’unique
espèce de mammifère marin
exclusivement herbivore et se
nourrit principalement dans les
herbiers marins. Les dugongs se
répartissent sur l’ensemble des
côtes du bassin Indo-Pacifique
où ils privilégient les eaux peu
profondes et abritées. La viande et
l’huile (graisse fondue) de dugong
constituaient traditionnellement des
sources saisonnières de protéines
pour les communautés insulaires.
Une vaste zone située à l’ouest du
détroit de Torres est aujourd’hui une
réserve protégée dédiée à l’espèce
afin d’assurer sa viabilité.
GAPU - LE POISSON-PILOTE
Ce poisson-pilote de type rémora
(Echeneis) appartient à la famille
des Echeneidae. En guise de
nageoire dorsale antérieure, ce
poisson possède une ventouse
lui permettant de se fixer sur des
espèces plus grandes telles que
le requin, le thon et l’espadon,
avec lesquelles il se déplace. Les
Insulaires l’utilisent stratégiquement
pour la pêche au dugong. Les gapu
peuvent également se fixer sur la
coque des bateaux et entravent
parfois la navigation. On raconte que
ces poissons auraient immobilisé
le navire du général romain Marc
Antoine (en 31 av. J.-C.), lui faisant
ainsi perdre la bataille d’Actium !
GHITALAY - LE CRABE
DES PALÉTUVIERS
Le crabe des palétuviers (Scylla
serrata), reconnaissable à sa couleur
vert foncé ou brun tacheté, constitue
un mets délicieux et nourrissant
traditionnellement consommé par
la population des îles du détroit de
Torres. Le ghitalay vit dans la vase
des mangroves ou dans les eaux
peu profondes à marée basse
et se nourrit à marée haute.
Sa chair délicieuse est aujourd’hui
très appréciée en Australie, c’est
pourquoi les femelles sont protégées
dans le Queensland et leur détention
est interdite en l’absence du permis
adéquat.
WOMEER - LA FRÉGATE
La frégate est un oiseau de
mer présent sur l’ensemble des
océans tropicaux et subtropicaux.
Reconnaissable à sa teinte
majoritairement noire, à sa queue
fourchue et à son long bec crochu,
cet oiseau se nourrit principalement
de poissons et de calamars.
Il sert d’indicateur aux indigènes
du détroit de Torres pour la pêche
et la navigation. Certains fossiles
d’espèces proches de la frégate
actuelle ont été datés à cinquante
millions d’années.
TUP - LA SARDINE
Les tup (prononcer « toup »),
poissons de la famille des
Clupeidae, forment des bancs
impressionnants à certaines
périodes de l’année, et se
concentrent à l’est du détroit de
Torres, en particulier au large
des îles de Mer (Murray Island)
et d’Erub (Darnley Island). Ces
sardines locales forment des
masses noires semblables à des
amas d’algues flottant à la surface
de l’océan, et sont principalement
pêchées à l’aide de casiers en
forme d’entonnoir, fabriqués à partir
de fibre de bambou. Les tup sont
grillées sur des braises ou bouillies.
17
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
TORRES STRAIT MARINE SPECIES FEATURED
IN THE EXHIBITION
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
18
19
Alick Tipoti
Marine science in a visual culture
Océanographie et culture visuelle
Marine science
in a visual culture
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
20
Previous pages /
Pages précédentes
Alick Tipoti, Sowlal
(close-up / détail),
Linocut created for
the vinyl reproduction for
thenorth-east rooftop of the
Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco, 170 x 93.5 cm /
linogravure créée pour la
reproduction sur la terrasse
nord-est du Musée
océanographique de Monaco,
170 x 93,5 cm, 2016
Left / à gauche
Alick Tipoti
About the artist
Alick Tipoti (b.1975) is one of the Torres Strait Islands’ most well known artists and a highly
respected leader in regenerating cultural knowledge, practices, and language. His art interprets
traditional cosmology and how local customs of chant, music, song, dance, storytelling, and visual
art encode important survival knowledge about the marine environment. Art historically played
a vital role in oral cultures of the region where collective memory relied on cultural rather that
written forms. All of the artforms work together in Zenadh Kes cultures. They consolidate sensory
knowledge about island life into a resource for the sustainable wellbeing of the community and
the environment. Tipoti’s art regenerates this sensory knowledge, and creates awareness that it
involves a useful form of marine science.
Tipoti was born on Wayben (Waiben, Thursday Island). His parents came from Baadhu
(Badu, Mulgrave Island) in Maluyligal (Western Torres Strait) where the artist spent his childhood.
Talented craftsmen and artists were common in Tipoti’s family, and he learned artistic skills from
his father and grandfather. Formal art training followed at Wayben, and then the Tropical North
Queensland Institute of Technical and Further Education in Cairns where he learnt from the
gifted teacher, Anna Eglitis. Tipoti then completed a Bachelor of Visual Art [Printmaking] at the
Australian National University in Canberra. At the latter institution Tipoti acquired skills from two
of Australia’s leading Master Printmakers, Basil Hall and Theo Tremblay. During his studies Tipoti
also commenced academic research into cultural heritage archives held in Cambridge University’s
Haddon Collection (mentioned in the Introduction).
Few Australian artists cover the artistic scope of Tipoti’s practice. He creates chants,
music, and choreography, and performs in his own dance troupe called Zugubal Traditional Torres
Strait Islands Dance Group. The Group performed in London in 2015 in conjunction with the
British Museum’s exhibition Indigenous Australia: enduring civilization [23 April - 2 August 2015].
He is one of Australia’s leading printmakers and also creates sculptures, ceremonial masks and
instruments, assemblage pieces, and public artworks.
Tipoti understands his traditional culture as a sophisticated body of knowledge that is
simultaneously a worldview, a science, and a system of spiritual belief. When we enter the visual
cosmos of Tipoti’s art, we begin to understand the Maluyligal perspective of how all dimensions of
human experience are implicated in one another.
Cosmology and marine science
The Oceanographic Museum of Monaco's mission statement of ‘knowing, loving and protecting
the ocean’ is in tune with the ethos of Maluyligal traditional cultures, but the latter goes further
than this. Maluyligal people believe that this duty of care is also reciprocated – that the marine
environment in turn knows, loves, and protects those who belong there. The total environment –
water, islands, flora, fauna, skies, and all of nature’s elements – are part of a shared spirituality, or
cosmology. Similarly to ancient Greek mythology, Maluyligal ancestral spirits, known as Zugubal,
take on a variety of human and natural forms, particularly the elements of earth, wind, fire, and
water. [continue p. 24]
21
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
By Sally Butler
océanographie
et culture visuelle
Alick Tipoti, "Kisay Dhangal"
180 x 60 x 200 cm, bronze &
pearlshell, 2015 / bronze avec
incrustation de nacre, 2015
Par Sally Butler
À propos de l'artiste
Alick Tipoti (né en 1975) est l'un des plus célèbres artistes des îles du détroit de
Torres, largement reconnu pour sa contribution à la promotion et au renouveau
du patrimoine culturel, des traditions et de la langue de ces îles. À travers son art, il
Alick Tipoti, Brian Robinson
Ken Thaiday & Jason Christopher
22
explore la cosmologie traditionnelle et raconte comment culture orale, musique, danse
et arts visuels s'interpénètrent pour nous livrer des connaissances fondamentales
sur l'environnement marin, essentielles à la survie des peuples. Depuis toujours, l'art
joue un rôle crucial au sein des cultures orales de la région, où la mémoire collective
repose traditionnellement sur des formes d'expression culturelles plutôt que sur
l'écriture. Dans les cultures des îles Zenadh Kes (nom vernaculaire des îles du détroit
de Torres), toutes les formes artistiques s'articulent et contribuent à consolider, à
travers de multiples expériences sensorielles, un savoir précieux sur l'art de vivre des
îles, ressource essentielle au bien-être et à la pérennisation de la communauté et de
vue dagnino recadrée
moins mosaïque
Below / Ci-dessous
Alick Tipoti, Adhaz
Parw Ngoedhe Buk,
Bronze, 173 x 79 x 59 cm, 2008,
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
23
l'environnement. L'art d'Alick Tipoti régénère ce savoir multidimensionnel et nous
révèle la part tangible de connaissances océanographiques qu'il recèle.
L'artiste est né sur l'île Thursday (Waiben). Il a grandi sur l'île de Badu, dans la
région du Maluyligal (ouest du détroit de Torres), dont ses parents sont originaires. La famille
Tipoti compte de nombreux artisans et artistes talentueux et c'est auprès de son père et
de son grand-père qu'Alick découvre la création artistique. Il entame ensuite un cursus de
formation officiel sur l'île Thursday, puis au sein du Tropical North Queensland Institute
of TAFE, à Cairns, où il enrichit sa pratique auprès de la talentueuse artiste Anna Eglitis.
Plus tard, il obtient un diplôme universitaire en Arts visuels (gravure) à l'Australian National
University de Canberra. Au sein de cette institution, il acquiert de l'expérience auprès de deux
graveurs d'art parmi les plus renommés d'Australie : Basil Hall et Theo Tremblay. Durant ses
études, l'artiste se lance également dans la recherche universitaire et explore les archives
d'Alfred Cort Haddon, qui regorgent d'informations sur le patrimoine culturel et sont
conservées par l'Université de Cambridge au sein de la Haddon Collection (voir page 25).
Peu d'artistes australiens couvrent un champ d'expression artistique aussi
vaste que celui d'Alick Tipoti. Il crée des chants, de la musique et des chorégraphies et se
produit au sein de sa propre troupe de danse traditionnelle, le Zugubal Traditional Torres
Strait Islands Dance Group. Le groupe de danseurs a donné un spectacle à Londres, en
2015, dans le cadre de l'exposition Indigenous Australia: enduring civilization, organisée
par le British Museum (du 23 avril au 2 août 2015). Figurant parmi les plus grands graveurs
d'art australiens, Alick Tipoti crée également des sculptures, des masques de cérémonie,
des instruments, des œuvres d'assemblage et d'art public.
Il interprète sa culture traditionnelle comme un creuset de connaissances
sophistiqué englobant à la fois une vision du monde, une science et un système
de croyances spirituelles. Entrer dans le cosmos visuel de Tipoti, c'est commencer
à comprendre la perspective Maluyligal selon laquelle toutes les dimensions de
l'expérience humaine s'interpénètrent.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Left / À gauche
Alick Tipoti, Gubau
Aimai Mabaigal
(close-up / détail)
Linocut / linogravure,
101 x 321 cm, 2006,
musée des Confluences,
Lyon (France)
Cosmologie et océanographie
Alick Tipoti,
Gubau Aimai Mabaigal
Linocut / linogravure,
101 x 321 cm, 2006,
Inv. 2009.32.2, musée
des Confluences, Lyon (France)
–
Alick Tipoti, Kisay Dhangal
Preparatory drawing /
dessin préparatoire, 2015
Ces histoires fournissent à la fois un guide de survie, un point de vue philosophique
et une forme de science, constituant ainsi un véritable système de connaissances. Ce
concept de système de connaissances revêt une importance particulière, car il forme la
base du sens esthétique des îles Zenadh Kes. Les arts visuels et arts du spectacle sont
des modes de conservation et de diffusion de ces connaissances. L'art fait ainsi vivre la
mémoire collective et réinvente son rapport à chaque génération à travers l'innovation
« Faire connaître, aimer et protéger les océans » : la mission du Musée
et la créativité. La pratique artistique d'Alick Tipoti est une manifestation magistrale
océanographique de Monaco fait écho à la philosophie des cultures traditionnelles
de cet acte de mémoire créative.
du Maluyligal. Cependant, cette philosophie va plus loin encore. Pour les peuples du
Maluyligal, le devoir est réciproque : l'environnement marin, en retour, connaît, aime
longuement plongé dans les archives d'Alfred Cort Haddon (voir page 23), consignant
et protège également les habitants locaux. Toutes les facettes de l'environnement
méticuleusement les formes d'art visuel, les motifs et les symboles qui s'y trouvent.
– eau, îles, flore, faune, ciel et éléments naturels – partagent une même spiritualité,
Il s'est penché sur les informations ethnographiques et scientifiques compilées dans
ou une même cosmologie. À l'instar des figures de la mythologie grecque, les esprits
ces documents, tout en adoptant une perspective plus holistique que celle de Haddon.
ancestraux du Maluyligal, les Zugubal, prennent différentes formes humaines et
Bien qu'Alfred Cort Haddon ait souhaité adopter une approche plutôt globale dans le
naturelles, incarnant plus particulièrement les éléments terre, vent, feu et eau.
traitement des informations concernant les îles du détroit de Torres, les disciplines
Les histoires traditionnelles illustrant les habitudes, les tempéraments et la nature
universitaires de son époque imposaient de les classer selon des catégories distinctes.
essentielle des Zugubal, constituent les supports narratifs de la mémoire et livrent
Chez les peuples des Zenadh Kes, les distinctions entre « culture » et « science »
des connaissances importantes sur l'environnement et la condition humaine.
n'existent pas. Tous les aspects de la vie, du temps et de l'espace s'articulent dans le
Au cours de ses études à l'Australian National University, l'artiste s'est
cycle continu et perpétuellement renouvelé de la vie. Le renouvellement perpétuel
n'est pas un concept nouveau au sein des cultures du détroit de Torres. Il s'agit de
“Similarly to ancient Greek mythology, Maluyligal
ancestral spirits, known as Zugubal, take on a variety
of human and natural forms, particularly the elements
of earth, wind, fire, and water.”
« À l'instar des figures de la mythologie grecque, les esprits ancestraux du Maluyligal, les Zugubal, prennent
différentes formes humaines et naturelles, incarnant plus particulièrement les éléments terre, vent, feu et eau. »
25
l'essence même de l'existence spirituelle et physique.
Les motifs complexes et imbriqués que l'on retrouve dans les linogravures
de Tipoti illustrent cette perspective globale définissant la vie comme un flux continu.
La composition est orchestrée par des éléments interconnectés qui semblent flotter
dans un champ magnétique de force vitale. Ce concept de force vitale permet
également de mieux appréhender les œuvres sculpturales de Tipoti. Les objets
s'inscrivent dans un champ de forces invisibles pétri d'histoires, de croyances et de
connaissances. Ce contexte s'exprime et se reflète à travers les surfaces ornées de
motifs.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
24
Traditional stories about the habits, temperaments, and essential nature of the Zugubal,
are narrative frameworks for remembering important knowledge about the environment and
the human condition. These stories are at once survival knowledge, philosophical outlook, and a
form of science – a system of knowledge. The concept of a system of knowledge is particularly
important, as it provides the basis of a Zenadh Kes aesthetic. Visual and performance art are
modes of preserving and disseminating this knowledge. Art supports collective memory and
interprets its relevance for each generation through innovation and creativity. Tipoti’s art is a
masterful exponent of this act of creative memory.
During his study at the Australian National University Tipoti delved deeply into the
Haddon archive (discussed in the Introduction), closely recording visual designs, patterns, motifs
and symbolism. He studied both its ethnographic and scientific information, but adopted a more
holistic perspective than Haddon. Haddon did aim for a somewhat all-inclusive approach to
information about the region, but requirements of academic disciplines still required information to
be separated into discrete categories. Distinctions between ‘culture’ and ‘science’ do not exist in a
Zenadh Kes worldview, as all aspects of life, time, and space, are integrated into a continuous cycle,
or re-cycle of life. Recycling is not a new concept for Torres Strait cultures – it is the essence of
spiritual and physical existence.
Intricate and cohesive patterns in Tipoti’s linocut prints convey the all-encompassing
scale and flux of this worldview. Composition is orchestrated by interconnected elements that
seem to float in an energized field of life force. This mindset of a life force is also useful in
approaching Tipoti’s sculptural pieces; the objects are surrounded by an invisible force-field of
stories, beliefs, and knowledge. Their patterned surfaces reflect and exude this context.
Tipoti’s colossal bronze and pearl shell sculpture titled Kisay Dhangal represents a dugong swimming
in the moonlight. It is captured in the position known in Kala Lagaw Ya language as San Tidayk. This
position marks the moment when the mammal flips its tail to dive down and graze on sea grass beds.
Kisay Dhangal characterizes the dynamic power and agility that make dugong one of the most beautiful
of the world’s endangered marine species. To this end the incised patterning on Kisay Dhangal relates
to destruction of sea grass beds caused mainly by large vessels that force dugong and other marine
creatures from their feeding ground. This ecological message is interwoven and encoded into traditional
patterns recording inherited cultural knowledge about dugong and their habitat.
A (marine) dust trail runs between the dugong tail and figure of the moon in Kisay Dhangal,
emphasizing how lunar cycles determine dugong feeding and mating habits. Kisay (the moon) is one
of the most poetic and fundamental forces in Zenadh Kes cosmology. Tipoti describes how a hunting
charm in the shape of a dugong symbolizes its relationship to the moon and guidance for hunting:
“The hunter would carve the back of a wooden dugong charm hollow as if it was a canoe. He
would then place some ancestral bones and sea grass obtained from the mouth of a previously
killed dugong. When the light of the moon shines on the charm, the hunter waiting with his wap
(harpoon) whispers a sacred chant that lead dugong to the nath (hunter’s platform). When there
is no moon, a different chant acknowledges the phosphorescence created by the dugong when
exhaling underwater. This phosphorescence enables hunters to pinpoint the exact position on the
dugong where the wap must enter the mammal.”
Alick Tipoti, Brian Robinson
Ken Thaiday & Jason Christopher
26
Kisay Dhangal
Kisay Dhangal
Cette colossale sculpture en bronze et nacre, intitulée Kisay
Dhangal, représente un dugong nageant au clair de lune. L'animal
adopte la position de san tidayk, telle qu'on la désigne en langue
Kala Lagaw Ya. Cette position marque l'instant où le mammifère
recourbe la queue pour plonger et rejoindre les herbiers marins,
son garde-manger. Kisay Dhangal incarne la puissance dynamique
et l'agilité qui font du dugong l'une des plus belles espèces
marines menacées au monde. En ce sens, les motifs gravés sur le
corps du dugong évoquent la destruction des herbiers marins,
principalement causée par les grands navires qui chassent
ce mammifère, ainsi que d'autres espèces, des prairies sousmarines essentielles à leur survie. Ce message écologique se mêle
intimement aux entrelacs des motifs traditionnels, dépositaires de
tout un héritage culturel et de précieuses connaissances relatives
aux dugongs et à leur habitat naturel.
Kisay Dhangal met en scène une traînée de poussière
(marine) reliant la queue du dugong à la lune. Elle symbolise
l'influence déterminante des cycles lunaires sur les habitudes
Alick Tipoti incising the mould of Kisay Dhangal /
Alick Tipoti en train d’inciser le modèle
préparatoire de Kisay Dhangal
alimentaires et la reproduction des dugongs. Dans la cosmologie
des îles du détroit de Torres, kisay (la lune) est l'une des forces les
plus fondamentales et chargées de force poétique. Tipoti décrit ainsi
comment une amulette de chasse en forme de dugong symbolise la
relation du mammifère à la lune, tout en orientant la stratégie de
chasse : « Les chasseurs avaient pour habitude d'évider le dos d'une
27
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Alick Tipoti,
Kisay Dhangal
Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco, 2016 /
Musée océanographique
de Monaco, 2016
Alick Tipoti,
Kisay Dhangal
Bronze and pearlshell /
bronze avec inscrustations
de nacre, 180 x 60 x 200 cm,
2015
The Gapu (suckerfish or remora) that is attached to the dugong in
the sculpture represents how marine ecology is preserved in traditional stories
and arts. Gapu played an important role in Maluyligal traditional hunting of
Dhangal (dugong) and Waru (turtle). The tail of Gapu was tied with rope made
from coconut fibres and when released the fish would swim to where dugong
were feeding. Gapu attaches itself to dugong, and the rope then tows hunters in
canoes. When the rope weakens hunters know to throw their harpoons. Dugong
are sacred to Tipoti’s people and several clans identify with this totem. Dugong oil
is used as a traditional medicine, and the meat is an important source of protein.
Tipoti collaborated with the Brisbane-based Urban Art Projects company
to produce the sculpture. Their team of artisans worked side by side with Tipoti in
shaping the form of the artwork, and casting incised designs into the bronze surface.
UAP also assisted Tipoti in producing the 2008 sculpture Adhaz Parw Ngoedhe Buk
that is now part of the National Gallery of Australia Collection.
Sowlal (Turtle Mating and Nesting Season)
Right / À droite
Inking Girelal lino block exhibited
in the 18th Sydney Biennale /
Encrage de Girelal exposé à
la 18e Biennale de Sydney (2012), 2011
In 2016 the main theme of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco is the
preservation of sea turtles, and Tipoti’s immense rooftop installation pays
homage to this theme. The lifecycle of turtles – their courtship, mating and
nesting – feature in Tipoti’s art from the onset, and are significant visual elements
of his complex linocut compositions, and his understanding of traditional
cosmological rhythms.
A monumental turtle dominates the largest linocut reproduction ever
produced. Tipoti has produced large-scale linocut prints in the past up to 8.25
meters long, but this rooftop installation allows audiences to literally walk through
Tipoti’s world and almost become part of its pattern of life. Interconnecting forms
and optical illusion are a significant aspect of Tipoti’s artistic strategy. Audiences
gazing at his artworks experience how decorative patterns emerge into forms of
marine creatures such as fish, stingrays, squid, crabs, sharks, and dugong.
29
Alick Tipoti and the Zugubal Dancers /
Alick Tipoti et les Zugubal Dancers
amulette de bois en forme de dugong, à la manière d'un petit canoë. Ils y plaçaient
ensuite des ossements ancestraux et des échantillons d'herbiers marins récupérés
dans la gueule d'un dugong précédemment tué. Lorsque la lumière de la lune éclaire
l'amulette, le chasseur armé de son harpon (wap) entonne une prière sacrée qui attire
le dugong vers la plate-forme de chasse (nath). Lorsque la lune est absente, le chasseur
utilise un chant différent invoquant la phosphorescence qui émane du dugong
lorsqu'il expire sous l'eau. Cette phosphorescence permet aux chasseurs d'identifier
sur le corps du mammifère l'emplacement exact où le harpon doit être planté. »
Le gapu (poisson-pilote de type rémora) que l'on retrouve collé sur le
dugong de la sculpture représente la préservation de l'écologie marine à travers
les histoires traditionnelles et les arts. Le gapu jouait un rôle important dans les
techniques de pêche au dugong (dhangal) ou à la tortue (waru) de la région du
Maluyligal. La queue du gapu était attachée au bout d'une cordelette constituée
de fibres de noix de coco. Une fois le poisson relâché, celui-ci rejoignait les zones
où les dugongs se nourrissaient. Le gapu se fixait sur le dugong, et les chasseurs
installés dans les canoës n'avaient plus qu'à se laisser tracter. Lorsque la cordelette
s'effilochait, les chasseurs savaient qu'il était temps de lancer leurs harpons. Au sein de
la communauté d'Alick Tipoti, les dugongs sont sacrés et plusieurs clans s'identifient
à ce totem. L'huile de dugong (la graisse fondue) est utilisée dans la médecine
traditionnelle et la viande constitue une source importante de protéines.
Tipoti a réalisé cette sculpture en collaboration avec la société Urban Art
Projects (UAP), basée à Brisbane. Une équipe d'artisans de l'UAP a travaillé aux côtés
de l'artiste pour façonner l'œuvre d'art et orner sa surface de bronze de motifs gravés.
L'UAP a également assisté Tipoti dans la réalisation de sa sculpture de 2008 intitulée
Adhaz Parw Ngoedhe Buk, qui fait maintenant partie de la collection de la National
Gallery of Australia.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
28
Sowlal (Saison des amours des tortues)
En 2016, la protection des tortues marines est le thème principal proposé par le Musée océanographique
de Monaco. L'installation monumentale couvrant le toit-terrasse du musée rend hommage à cette
mission. Le cycle de vie des tortues – parade nuptiale, accouplement et ponte – figure depuis toujours
dans les œuvres de Tipoti. L'artiste y puise les éléments visuels caractéristiques de ses linogravures
complexes, illustrant son interprétation des rythmes cosmologiques traditionnels.
Cette œuvre mettant en scène une immense tortue est aussi la plus grande reproduction
en linogravure jamais réalisée. Tipoti est l'auteur d'autres linogravures à grande échelle, dont la
plus imposante mesure 8,25 mètres de long. Cependant, cette installation inédite pour toit-terrasse
permet littéralement aux visiteurs de sillonner l'univers de l'artiste pour s'inscrire à leur tour dans
les méandres de son cadre de vie. L'interpénétration des formes et l'illusion d'optique constituent un
aspect essentiel de la stratégie artistique d'Alick Tipoti. Les visiteurs contemplant son œuvre assistent
à la métamorphose des motifs décoratifs qui s'articulent sous leurs yeux pour former les contours
de créatures marines telles que poissons, raies, calmars, crabes, requins et dugongs. Cette imagerie à
la frontière du visible et de l'invisible encourage une perspective participative où les cycles de la vie
semblent littéralement évoluer sous les yeux de l'observateur.
Tipoti grave les motifs de ses linogravures sans croquis préalable. L'histoire est déjà présente
dans son esprit, mais l'imagerie en elle-même évolue naturellement au cours du travail de gravure.
Alick Tipoti revisite les formes, symboles et motifs hérités de son enfance et puisés dans les archives
de Haddon, pour en donner une interprétation ancrée dans la spiritualité Maluyligal, entre tradition
30
et renouveau, où se joue le dialogue avec chaque génération. Toute la magie de cette passerelle entre
31
raconte l'aventure d'une nuit : « Lorsque je grave des motifs traditionnels et que mon travail se prolonge
tard dans la nuit, je ressens la présence de ces esprits. Je leur rends hommage verbalement et, dans
ma langue, je les remercie de m'avoir guidé et permis de visualiser les mots qu'ils m'ont donnés. Je
garde le souvenir précis d'une soirée inhabituelle où ces esprits m'indiquèrent de repenser l'ébauche
d'un bloc que j'allais commencer à graver, et d'en modifier l'interprétation. Ce soir-là, je suis entré en
communication avec les Zugubal qui se sont manifestés, comme tant d'autres fois, pour m'indiquer
comment mieux servir nos traditions culturelles. » (Australian Art Print Network, 2004)
Alick Tipoti,
Sowlal Project,
Based on the linocut
Sowlal, Oceanographic
Museum of Monaco /
Projet Sowlal, réalisé à
partir de la linogravure Sowlal,
Musée océanographique
de Monaco, 663 m2 (18.1 x
36.6 cm / 18,1 x 36,6 m), 2016
This semi-hidden imagery encourages a participatory kind of viewing where
cycles of life seem to literally evolve before one’s eyes.
Tipoti carves designs for linocuts without any prior drawings. The
story is in place in his mind, but the actual imagery evolves organically as he
carves. Inherited designs, motifs and patterns that Tipoti learnt about during his
childhood, and from the Haddon archive, are interpreted and translated into a
Maluyligal ethos that evolves to maintain relevance to each generation. The magic
of Tipoti’s translation of cultural knowledge into contemporary printmaking is
described in Tipoti’s frequently quoted experience of working one night: “When
I work late at night carving traditional designs, I can sense the presence of these
spirits who I verbally acknowledge and thank in language for their guidance
and help in visualizing the words they have given me. I vividly remember an
unusual event late one evening when I was guided to re-sketch and change the
interpretation of a block I was about to carve. This was just one of the many
occasions when I have connected with the Zugubal who have instructed me on
the proper ways of our cultural traditions”. [Australian Art Print Network, 2004]
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Alick Tipoti, Brian Robinson
Ken Thaiday & Jason Christopher
héritage culturel et linogravure contemporaine se reflète dans un témoignage saisissant où l'artiste
Biography /
biographie
EDUCATION AND SELECTED AWARDS /
FORMATION ET RÉCOMPENSES (SÉLECTION)
2008 P
eople’s Choice Award, Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum
and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (MAGNT), Darwin, Australia
2003 T
elstra Work on Paper Award, 20e édition du Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Art Award, MAGNT, Darwin, Australia
1998 Bachelor of Visual Arts [gravure], Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
1995 A
dvanced Diploma (Arts), Tropical North Queensland Institute of Technical and Further
Education, Cairns, Australia
1993 Associate Diploma (Arts), Thursday Island TAFE, Torres Strait Islands
EXHIBITIONS (SOLO) / EXPOSITIONS SOLO (SÉLECTION)
33
2015 Alick Tipoti – Zugubal: Ancestral Spirits, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
2012 n Badhulayg – Person of Badu, works by Alick Tipoti, Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne, Australia
2011 n Mawa Adhaz Parul – Sorcerer Masks, Australian Art Network Galleries at Canopy Artspace,
Cairns, Australia
2009 n GAIGAI IKA WOEYBADH YATHAREWMKA Legends through patterns from the past
(Alick Tipoti & Denis Nona), Robert Steele Gallery, New York, USA
2008 n Caston Gallery à Melbourne, et Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London, United Kingdom
2007 n Malangu – From the Sea, Andrew Baker Art Dealer, Brisbane, Australia
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
n
EXHIBITIONS (GROUP) / EXPOSITIONS DE GROUPE (SÉLECTION)
2015
n The British Museum Exhibition. Indigenous Australia enduring civilisation, British Museum, London
n Saltwater Country, AAMU Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands
n Lignes de vie. Art contemporain des Autochtones d’Australie, Musée de la civilisation, Quebec, Canada
n Parcours des Mondes, Arts d’Australie – Stéphane Jacob, Paris, France
2014
n Lag Meta Aus Home in the Torres Strait, National Museum of Australia, Canberra, Australia
2013 n My Country, I Still Call Australia Home. Contemporary Art from Black Australia, Queensland Art
Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
2012
n Malu Minar, Te Manawa Art Gallery, New Zealand
n Biennale of Sydney, All our Relations, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia
2011
n Land, Sea and Sky: Contemporary Art of the Torres Strait Islands, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery
of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
Alick Tipoti, Sowlal,
Linocut created for the vinyl
reproduction for the
north-east rooftop of the
Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco, 170 x 93.5 cm /
linogravure créée pour la
reproduction de la terrasse
nord-est du Musée
océanographique de Monaco,
170 x 93,5 cm, 2016
2004 9e édition du Pacific Arts Festival, Belau National Museum, Republic of Palau, Australia
n Australia Embassy, Washington, USA
n Out of country, Kluge Ruhe Aboriginal Art Museum, Charlottesville, Virginie, USA
n
COLLECTIONS / COLLECTIONS (SÉLECTION)
Musée des Confluences, Lyon, France
British Museum, London, United Kingdom
n Kluge Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA
n Centre culturel de Tjibaou, Noumea, New Caledonia
n Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia
n Cambridge University Museum, Cambridge, United Kingdom
n National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia
n National Museum of Australia, Canberra, Australia
n Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth
n Queensland Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
n Collection du Parlement, Wellington, New Zealand
n Ambassade d'Australie, Lisbon, Portugal
n Belau National Museum, Koror, Republic of Palau
n Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns, Australia
n Parliament House Collection, Canberra, Australia
n Torres Strait Regional Authority, Thursday Island, Australia
n Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
n University of Queensland Art Museum, Brisbane, Australia
n
n
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
32
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
34
35
Ken Thaiday Snr. &
Jason Christopher
Sculptural seascapes for the 21st century / Sculptures marines pour le xxie siècle
Sculptural
seascapes for
the 21st century
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
36
Previous pages /
Pages précédentes
Ken Thaiday Snr.
in collaboration with
Jason Christopher,
Torres Strait and Erub
Eastern Island Dari
Headdresses,
Aluminium, flat bar, aluminium
tube, stainless steel, perspex,
21.45 x 6.6 x 1.6 m approx., 2016
Ken Thaiday Snr.
en collaboration avec
Jason Christopher, Coiffes
Dari du détroit de Torres
et de l'île d'Erub,
Barre plate et tube en aluminium,
acier inoxydable, perspex,
21,45 x 6,6 x 1,6 m approx., 2016
Left / À gauche
Ken Thaiday Snr.
About the artists
Being a leader means embracing change and taking risks. Ken Thaiday Snr. (b. 1950) is a leader of the
Torres Strait Islands’ cultural community in every sense, and continues to break new ground in how
Erub (Darnley) Island traditions and customs are interpreted in the contemporary era. Erub Eastern
Island Dari Headdress, commissioned for the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco exhibition, is the
largest Dari headdress sculpture ever produced, and also the most technically advanced. It derives from
Thaiday’s ongoing artistic collaborations with Sydney-based artist, Jason Christopher.
Thaiday is an innovator, but the basis of his art is deeply rooted in a cultural heritage and
way of life that celebrates the sea. His early childhood living on Erub Island in the Eastern Torres Strait
Islands involved learning from elders to fish, dance, and navigate the oceans by taking heed of the
stars, wind, and ocean currents. Sea creatures are key symbols in his art because they are spiritual
totems that help people identify with their environment, and are also a vital food source for the small
island populations. Seasonal habits of marine life and birds are particularly important markers for
understanding fluctuating ocean currents and wind patterns. When he was fifteen Thaiday sought
employment in Cairns, on the Australian mainland, and this physical distance only strengthened
emotional ties with his homeland, if that was possible. His art is not simply an act of remembering the
islands and oceans of his birth, so much as a method for psychologically transporting him back there.
He is spiritually at home when creating his art.
Few people in Australia were aware of the Torres Strait Islands when Thaiday first exhibited his
art in 1991. Although the Torres Strait Islands are among Australia’s most dynamic cultures, the region
remained under the radar of mainland attention because of a relatively small population and remote
location. Thaiday led an art movement through the 1990s that helped capture the attention of Australians,
and the world, about political momentum to assert the autonomous identity of the Torres Strait Islands.
A new regional authority and a new flag stemmed from this momentum, along with a range of initiatives
in cultural and environmental sustainability. The Torres Strait Islands made its individual mark on the world
at this time, and Thaiday helped in consolidating visual and cultural symbols of this modern identity.
Ken Thaiday Snr. and Jason Christopher began artistic collaborations when the Cairns
Regional Gallery commissioned Clam Shell with Hammerhead Shark in 2013. Manufactured in
aluminium with mechanical gearing, this groundbreaking sculpture represents a giant clamshell that
opens to reveal a hammerhead shark (Thaiday’s key totem) inside. The head of the shark moves along
rails, bringing a golden disc radiating rays of light into view. This represents the sun rising over Erub, and
is a perfect example of how Thaiday understands his sculptures as seascapes for the 21st century. The
image of the rising sun also signifies his deep Christian belief. Introduction of Christianity to the Torres
Strait Islands occurred first on Erub in 1871 with the arrival of the London Missionary Society. The
event is locally known as ‘the Coming of the Light’. Thaiday’s artworks are a perfect example of the
innovative nature of Torres Strait Islands cultural traditions, in that he melds customary practices and
beliefs with the symbolism and ideals of the introduced Christian faith.
37
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
By Sally Butler
Sculptures marines
pour le XXIe siècle
Par Sally Butler
À propos des artistes
Être avant-gardiste, c'est savoir accueillir le changement et prendre des risques.
Ken Thaiday Snr. (né en 1950), véritable précurseur au sein de la communauté
culturelle des îles du détroit de Torres, propose une interprétation inédite des
traditions et coutumes de l'île Darnley (Erub) dans le paysage contemporain.
L'œuvre intitulée Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdress (Coiffe Dari de l'île d'Erub),
réalisée pour l'exposition du Musée océanographique de Monaco, est la plus grande
sculpture représentant une coiffe traditionnelle (ou dari) jamais réalisée, et la plus
sophistiquée d'un point de vue technique. Cette œuvre est le fruit des nombreuses
collaborations artistiques de Ken Thaiday Snr. et Jason Christopher, artiste installé à Sydney.
Résolument avant-gardiste, l'art de Thaiday n'en est pas moins profondément ancré
dans un héritage culturel et dans un mode de vie célébrant la mer. Durant son
Left / À gauche
Hanging of Erub Eastern Island Dari
Headdress, Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco / Montage de Coiffe Dari
de l'île d'Erub, Musée océanographique
de Monaco, 2016
enfance sur l'île d'Erub (nom vernaculaire), située à l'est du détroit de Torres, l'artiste
apprend de ses aînés l'art de la pêche, de la danse et de la navigation guidée par les
étoiles, le vent et les courants océaniques. Les créatures marines, symboles essentiels
de son art, sont des totems spirituels permettant aux indigènes de s'identifier à leur
environnement. Elles constituent également une ressource alimentaire vitale pour les
petites populations insulaires. Les rythmes saisonniers des espèces aquatiques et des
oiseaux de mer sont des repères essentiels permettant de comprendre la fluctuation
Below / Ci-dessous
Jason Christopher
39
des courants marins et la dynamique des vents. Lorsque Ken Thaiday Snr., âgé de
quinze ans, rejoint Cairns pour chercher un emploi sur le continent australien, la
distance physique qui le sépare de son île ne fait que renforcer encore davantage ses
liens avec sa terre natale. Son art, au-delà d'un acte de mémoire reliant l'artiste aux îles
et océans de son enfance, constitue un véritable véhicule spirituel lui permettant de
revenir, inlassablement, aux paysages des origines. À travers sa pratique artistique, il
réintègre son foyer spirituel.
Lors de sa première exposition, en 1991, peu d'Australiens connaissaient les îles
du détroit de Torres. Bien que les traditions culturelles de ces îles figurent parmi les plus
dynamiques du paysage australien, les habitants du continent ne s'intéressèrent à cette région
que tardivement en raison de sa population relativement restreinte et de son isolement
géographique. Dans les années 1990, Thaiday prend la tête d'un mouvement artistique qui
contribuera à attirer l'attention, en Australie comme dans le monde, sur l'impulsion politique
visant à affirmer l'identité autonome des îles du détroit de Torres. De cette impulsion
naîtront une nouvelle autorité régionale et un nouveau drapeau, ainsi que différentes
initiatives en faveur de la préservation culturelle et environnementale. Durant cette période,
les îles du détroit de Torres émergent enfin sur la scène internationale, et Ken Thaiday Snr.
contribue à consolider les symboles visuels et culturels de cette identité moderne.
C'est en 2013 que débutent les collaborations artistiques de Ken Thaiday Snr.
et Jason Christopher, avec la réalisation de l'œuvre intitulée Clam Shell with Hammerhead
Shark (Coquille de bénitier et requin-marteau) pour la Cairns Regional Gallery.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
38
« La connaissance de la mer et sa célébration, omniprésentes
dans les arts du détroit de Torres, constituent un héritage précieux pour
le monde qu'il faut s'efforcer de préserver. »
“The knowledge and celebration of the sea invested in Torres Strait Islands art cannot be lost to the world.”
Cette sculpture d'aluminium équipée d'engrenages mécaniques représente une
coquille de bénitier qui s'ouvre pour révéler un requin-marteau (principal totem de
Thaiday). La tête du requin se déplace sur des rails pour accompagner l'apparition
d'un disque doré qui projette des rayons lumineux. Cette structure mettant en scène
le lever du soleil sur l'île d'Erub est un parfait exemple de l'interprétation des œuvres
de Thaiday en tant que « sculptures marines pour le xxie siècle ». L'image du soleil
levant témoigne également de la profonde foi chrétienne de l'artiste. L'introduction
du christianisme dans les îles du détroit de Torres débuta sur l'île d'Erub en 1871, avec
l'arrivée de la Société missionnaire de Londres. Dans la région, l'événement prend
le nom de « Venue de la Lumière ». Les œuvres de Thaiday illustrent parfaitement la
nature novatrice des traditions culturelles de ces îles, à travers la fusion des pratiques
et croyances traditionnelles avec des symboles et idéaux issus de la foi chrétienne.
41
des pratiques traditionnelles à travers le prisme de l'automatisation. Les deux
artistes partagent un intérêt commun pour la réinvention des idées et coutumes
traditionnelles à travers des techniques d'assemblage novatrices. L'amour de la mer
est un autre dénominateur commun de leur approche artistique. Jason Christopher
Ken Thaiday Snr. in
collaboration with Jason
Christopher, Clam Shell
with Hammerhead Shark,
Automated kinetic sculpture:
acrylic, cast aluminium, stainless
steel, electronic components
Ken Thaiday Snr. en
collaboration avec Jason
Christopher, Coquille de
bénitier et requin-marteau,
Sculpture cinétique :
peinture acrylique, moule
aluminium, acier inoxydable,
composants électroniques,
80 x 120 x 120 cm approx., 2013,
Cairns Regional Gallery
Christopher is a sculptor whose work reflects on the displacement of traditional practices
as a consequence of automation. Both artists share interests in renegotiating traditional ideas and
customs through innovative assemblage techniques. Their joint love of the sea also unites their
artistic vision. Christopher draws on experience working with the film, design and art industries, along
with extensive world travel into wilderness areas. His Junk Metal figurative works of the late 1980s
are based on assembling the artifacts of modern life into vehicles of expression about the past and its
impact on the future. This is precisely what drives Thaiday in his own sculptural practice.
When the artists commenced collaboration, they chose artworks that were most
compatible with automation. For Clam Shell with Hammerhead Shark (2013) Christopher used the
CAD program to orchestrate discrete movements of the shell and shark into the automation cycle
of the work. Components are powered by small electric engines called actuators that remain visible
in the artwork to accentuate the interface of cultural traditions with contemporary technology.
Dari – To dance, sing, and be at one with the sea
The spectacular wall sculpture that adorns the red walls of the first floor landing of the Oceanographic
Museum of Monaco, titled Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdress, is based on the headdress worn by
male Torres Strait Islands dancers. It is an important symbol for Thaiday in his art because the artist was
among the first of his people to introduce a regular Torres Strait Islander dance troupe to the Australian
mainland (The Darnley Island Dance Troupe). The Dari is also the principal motif in the Torres Strait
Islands flag.
Ken Thaiday Snr., Hammerhead Shark
Headdress / Coiffe requin-marteau,
Plywood, feathers, acrylic paint,
mixed technic / bois contreplaqué, plumes,
acrylique, technique mixte, 80 x 60 x 75 cm, 2004,
Inv.2005.6.3, musée des Confluences, Lyon (France)
s'appuie sur diverses expériences dans les secteurs du cinéma, du design et de l'art,
ainsi que sur ses nombreux voyages dans différentes régions du monde, en particulier
dans les zones de nature vierge. Ses œuvres figuratives en métal recyclé, réalisées dans
les années 1980, transforment les objets de la vie moderne en supports d'expression
donnant à réfléchir sur le passé et ses répercussions futures. La pratique sculpturale
de Ken Thaiday Snr. s'appuie également sur ce mode d'expression.
Au début de leur collaboration, les artistes ont sélectionné les projets les plus
compatibles avec l'automatisation. Pour Clam Shell with Hammerhead Shark (2013), Jason
Christopher a utilisé la conception assistée par ordinateur (CAO) pour orchestrer les
mouvements distincts du coquillage et du requin composant cette sculpture-automate.
Les éléments sont actionnés par de petits vérins électriques (actionneurs) qui restent
Next pages / Pages suivantes
Ken Thaiday Snr. in collaboration
with Jason Christopher, Torres Strait
and Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdresses,
Rendering of the installation,
21.45 x 6.6 x 1.6 m approx., 2016
Ken Thaiday Snr. en collaboration
avec Jason Christopher, Coiffes Dari
du détroit de Torres et de l'île d'Erub,
Simulation de l'installation,
21,45 x 6,6 x 1,6 m approx., 2016
visibles pour accentuer le parallélisme entre traditions culturelles et technologie moderne.
Dari : danser, chanter, et communier avec l'océan
Intitulée Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdress (Coiffe Dari de l'île d'Erub), l'immense
sculpture murale qui orne le mur rouge du palier, au premier étage du Musée
océanographique de Monaco, est une reproduction de la coiffe portée par les danseurs
des îles du détroit de Torres. Cette coiffe est un symbole important dans l'œuvre de
Thaiday. En effet, l'artiste figure parmi les premiers Insulaires à avoir introduit sur
le continent australien une authentique troupe de danseurs du détroit de Torres (la
Darnley Island Dance Troupe). Le dari (nom vernaculaire de la coiffe) est également le
motif central du drapeau des îles du détroit de Torres.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Jason Christopher, quant à lui, est un sculpteur dont l'œuvre explore la mutation
42
43
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Dari occur across the Torres Strait Islands but those from Erub are traditionally made from
cane and white feathers that are trimmed in the shape of the bones of local tup (sardines). String and
pulleys activate components of the headdress to enhance characterization during dance. Thaiday creates
the Dari today as artworks rather than functional dance apparatus, but they maintain their message of
the spectacle of a seafaring life in the Torres Strait Islands. The wall sculpture features the sapoka, or
falling stars, often seen in the evening whilst sitting on the beach on Erub. Thaiday recalls that his father
explained to him that sapoka are spirits, flying away from their graves. “On seeing such a star, you should
return to your house. Nothing is going to happen to you, but it’s scary: a ghost, a devil walking”.
Having audiences understand the symbolism of the Dari is very important to Thaiday
because he regards his innovative interpretations of traditional culture as a gift to the world from
his people. He says: “This Dari represents Eastern Islands – it represents me, a Darnley boy. The
blue and green are the oceans and trees of our islands, and are the colours of our flag. This is very
special to me. This is my design that I give to you – you don’t see that anywhere in Australia. It is
automated so that if you push the frigate bird the feathers move back.”
The frigate bird featured in the sculpture is an iconic seasonal marker about the weather
in the Torres Strait Islands. Thaiday says that he was taught to pay attention to the arrival of the
frigate bird because it signals rough weather on the way – approaching winds of 40 to 50 knots.
This is not the time for fishing. The Dari design also represents fish traps used on Erub, that make it
easier to spear fish such as trevally and swordfish that swim through channels near the islands.
Cet objet est présent sur toutes les îles du détroit de Torres. Cependant,
les coiffes de l'île d'Erub sont traditionnellement confectionnées à partir de tiges
de canne à sucre et de plumes blanches taillées en forme d'arêtes de sardines, un
poisson emblématique de la pêche locale. Un système de ficelles et de poulies actionne
les composants de la coiffe qui s'anime durant la danse. Cet élément du costume
traditionnel, devenu œuvre d'art sous l'égide de Thaiday, perpétue aujourd'hui
l'héritage maritime des îles du détroit de Torres. La sculpture murale met en scène
les étoiles filantes (ou sapoka), qui illuminent souvent les soirées sur les plages
d'Erub. Thaiday se souvient du récit de son père décrivant les sapoka, esprits volants
échappés de leurs tombeaux : « Si tu vois une de ces étoiles, tu dois rentrer chez toi.
Tu ne risques rien, mais c'est un spectacle effrayant : un fantôme, un démon errant. »
Pour l'artiste, ses interprétations revisitées de la culture traditionnelle
permettent de révéler au monde l'héritage de son peuple. Il est donc essentiel de permettre
au public de comprendre la symbolique du dari. Ken Thaiday Snr. en parle ainsi :
« Cette coiffe Dari représente les îles de l'Est ; elle me représente, moi, l'enfant de Darnley.
Le bleu et le vert sont les océans et les arbres de nos îles, ainsi que les couleurs de notre
drapeau. Cette coiffe est irremplaçable pour moi. À travers elle, je vous livre ma conception
personnelle. C'est une pièce unique que vous ne retrouverez nulle part en Australie.
Elle est automatisée. Il suffit de pousser l'oiseau pour que les plumes se replient. »
Left / À gauche
Ken Thaiday Snr. in front of
his work at the Oceanographic
Museum of Monaco / Ken Thaiday
Snr. devant son œuvre au Musée
océanographique de Monaco
L'oiseau de mer (une frégate) mis en scène dans la sculpture est un
indicateur saisonnier emblématique des îles du détroit de Torres. Thaiday raconte
que ses aînés lui apprirent à guetter l'arrivée des frégates signalant l'approche des
intempéries, avec des vents de quarante à cinquante nœuds. Par gros temps, la pêche
est remise à plus tard. La structure de Dari met également en scène les pièges à
poissons utilisés sur l'île Darnley, qui permettent de harponner plus facilement les
poissons traversant le détroit, tels que les carangues et les espadons.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
45
Alick Tipoti, Brian Robinson
Ken Thaiday & Jason Christopher
44
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
46
Purple Spider Dance Group,
performing on Erub /
performance à Erub
Right, below /
À droite, en bas
Ken Thaiday Snr. in
collaboration with Jason
Christopher, Erub Eastern
Island Dari Headdress,
Rendering of the installation
Ken Thaiday Snr. en
collaboration avec Jason
Christopher, Coiffe
Dari de l'île d'Erub,
Simulation de l’installation,
665 x 780 x 150 cm, 2016
Erub / Darnley Island
Collaborating for a sustainable future
Main dans la main pour un avenir durable
Thaiday’s collaboration with Jason Christopher represents the spirit of engagement with modern
technology that will help to sustain the culture and environment of the Torres Strait Islands. The
Torres Strait Islands are physically close to the sea - most of the landmass has an altitude of no more
than 50 metres. A number of the islands are already suffering the impact of rising sea levels. Torres
Strait Islanders understand better than most what is at stake with climate change, and are activists in
advancing the sustainability of marine environments.
Christopher introduced new technologies, materials, and automation to Thaiday’s
contemporary seascape sculpture. The use of CAD, 3D printing and CNC machining (precision
engineered metal componentry) propelled the sculptures into the digital sphere. In Erub
Eastern Island Dari Headdress Christopher reimagined Thaiday’s Dari design by adopting a
new technological aesthetic derived from the use of computerized systems. Working in close
consultation with Thaiday, Christopher designed individual components in a CAD program and
assembled them into the final design. Christopher regards this collaboration as an important
development for race relations in Australia. He says: “The works produced serve to promote and
preserve Torres Strait Islander culture as well as breaking down barriers between Indigenous –
non Indigenous cultures.”
La collaboration de Ken Thaiday Snr. et Jason Christopher témoigne d'un élan vers
la technologie moderne qui permettra, à terme, de mieux préserver la culture et
l'environnement des îles du détroit de Torres. Sur la plupart d'entre elles, l'altitude ne
dépasse pas cinquante mètres. Un certain nombre d'îles subissent d'ores et déjà les
répercussions de l'élévation du niveau de la mer. Les Insulaires, aux premières loges du
réchauffement climatique, ont pris toute la mesure de cette menace planétaire et luttent
activement pour préserver durablement le milieu marin.
Les nouvelles technologies, les matériaux innovants et l'automatisation marquent la
contribution de Jason Christopher dans la sculpture marine de Thaiday. L'utilisation de la
conception assistée par ordinateur (CAO), de l'impression 3D et de la commande numérique
(CN), propulse les sculptures dans la sphère numérique. Pour la sculpture intitulée Erub
Eastern Island Dari Headdress (Coiffe Dari de l'île d'Erub), Jason Christopher a revisité
la structure de la coiffe traditionnelle réalisée par Thaiday en adoptant une esthétique
technologique à travers l'utilisation de systèmes informatisés. En collaboration étroite
avec le sculpteur, Jason Christopher a conçu des composants individuels par le biais d'un
programme de CAO avant de les assembler pour former la structure finale.
The knowledge and celebration of the sea invested in Torres Strait Islands art cannot be lost
to the world. It teaches us to take notice of less obvious changes in nature and understand its cycles and
seasons as a status report of our environment – when it is in and out of balance. Tangible cultural heritage
– tangible art objects and materials – are vital in transmitting this scientific and sensory knowledge but
so too is intangible cultural heritage such as customs of storytelling, dance, and song. These performative
vessels of how we see the world can slip away from us in the duration of one generation.
This is why Thaiday and Christopher developed a work for the 2016 Sydney Biennale that
enables Thaiday to reengage with his dance prowess in new and inventive ways. The work breaks new
ground in cross-cultural collaborative projects, using technological innovations to bring the visual and
performing arts into closer synergy, as they are in Indigenous traditions. Christopher’s technological
assemblage piece is choreographed to move in sequence with the rhythmic motion of Thaiday’s Beizam
dance. It is electronically synchronized to a recording of Thaiday’s performance, and simulates elements
of the elegant power of Torres Strait Islands dance.
One day in the near future the dominating spectacle of Dari wall sculptures will literally
envelope audiences in virtual performance of dances that find their rhythm in the 21st century
seascapes of the Torres Strait Islands.
Pour Jason, cette collaboration représente un pas important dans l'évolution des
relations interethniques en Australie. Il témoigne : « Les œuvres réalisées permettent
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
48
de promouvoir et de préserver la culture des îles du détroit de Torres, tout en faisant
tomber les barrières entre les cultures indigènes et non indigènes. »
La connaissance de la mer et sa célébration, omniprésentes dans les arts du
détroit de Torres, constituent un héritage précieux pour le monde qu'il faut s'efforcer
de préserver. Cet héritage nous incite à prendre conscience des changements subtils
de la nature et à interpréter ses cycles et ses saisons comme autant d'indicateurs qui
nous informent sur l'état de l'environnement : son équilibre et ses perturbations. Les
éléments tangibles de l'héritage culturel – objets d'art et matériaux – jouent un rôle
crucial dans la transmission des savoirs scientifiques et du rapport à l'environnement.
Il en va de même pour l'héritage immatériel qui mêle tradition orale, danse et chant.
Ces formes de transmission vivante véhiculant toute une vision du monde peuvent
nous échapper à jamais en l'espace d'une génération.
Conscients de cette précarité, Ken Thaiday Snr. et Jason Christopher ont
réalisé, pour l'édition 2016 de la Biennale de Sydney, une œuvre permettant à Thaiday
de renouer avec ses talents de danseur de façon inédite et inventive. Cette œuvre donne
un nouveau souffle aux projets collaboratifs interculturels, en utilisant des innovations
technologiques pour concrétiser la synergie entre arts visuels et arts du spectacle,
telle qu'elle existe dans les traditions indigènes. L'assemblage technologique réalisé
par Jason Christopher est chorégraphié pour s'animer au rythme de la danse de Ken
Thaiday Snr., qui porte le nom de Beizam. Grâce à un système électronique, la structure
est synchronisée sur un enregistrement de la performance du danseur et simule
différents éléments chorégraphiques pour reproduire la force élégante de la danse des
îles du détroit de Torres.
Dans un futur proche, le spectacle monumental de ces coiffes murales
enveloppera littéralement le public dans un tourbillon de danses virtuelles, à l'unisson
des paysages marins du xxie siècle, au large des îles du détroit de Torres.
Biography / biographie
KEN THAIDAY SNR. & JASON CHRISTOPHER
COLLABORATIVE WORKS / COLLABORATIONS
2016 Beizam Triple Hammerhead Shark, 20th Biennale of Sydney,
Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney, Australia
2016 Torres Strait and Erub Eastern Islands Headdress,
TABA NABA, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People,
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, France
2013 Clamshell with Hammerhead Shark, Ken Thaiday Senior:
Erub Kebe Le, A Survey Exhibition from 1990 to the
Present, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
KEN THAIDAY SNR. EXHIBITIONS (SOLO) /
EXPOSITIONS (SOLO)
2014 n Ken Thaiday, Carriage Works & Performance Space, Sydney,
Australia
2013 n Ken Thaiday Senior: Erub Kebe Le, A Survey Exhibition from
1990 to the Present, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
KEN THAIDAY SNR. SELECTED EXHIBITIONS
(GROUP) / EXPOSITIONS (GROUPE)
2015 n The British Museum Exhibition. Indigenous Australia enduring
civilization, The British Museum, London, United Kingdom
2015 n Parcours des Mondes, Arts d’Australie – Stéphane Jacob,
Paris, France
2015 n Country & Western landscape re-imaged, Perc Tucker
Regional Gallery, Townsville, Australia
2015 n Utrecht, The Netherlands; Australian Embassy, Washington
DC, USA; The Arts Centre Gold Coast, Surfers Paradise,
Australia
2014 n Saltwater Country, AAMU Museum of Contemporary
Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands
2014 n Lag Meta Aus Home in the Torres Strait, National Museum
of Australia, Canberra, Australia
2011 n Land, Sea and Sky: Contemporary Art of the Torres Strait
Islands, Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art,
Brisbane, Australia
2010 n Malu Minar (Sea Pattern) Art of the Torres Strait, Te
Manawa Art Gallery, 2012 national tour of New Zealand;
Cairns Indigenous Art Fair, Australia; Tjibaou Cultural
Centre, New Caledonia
2010 n Parcours Nomad’s en Australie, Arts d’Australie, Stéphane
Jacob, Paris, France
2010 n Menagerie, Australian tour to Melbourne, Launceston,
Adelaide & Perth, Australia
2009 n Dreamtime – Temps du Rêve, Musée d’Art Contemporain
Les Abattoirs, Toulouse, France
2008 n Parcours des Mondes, Arts d’Australie – Stéphane Jacob,
Paris, France
2006-2007 n Gifted: Contemporary Aboriginal Art: The Mollie
Gowing Acquisition Fund, Art Gallery of New South Wales,
Sydney, Australia
2005 n St-art – European Art Fair, Arts d’Australie, Stéphane
Jacob, Strasbourg, France
2004 n Paradise now? Contemporary art from the Pacific, Asia
Society Museum, New York, USA
2003 n 20th Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of Northern Territory,
Darwin, Australia
2003 n Tactility: two centuries of Indigenous objects, textiles and
fibre, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia
1995 n The 12th National Aboriginal Art Award, Museum and Art
Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, Australia
1994 n Urban Focus, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra,
Australia
1993 n Aratjara, Art of the First Australians, Touring to Dusseldorf,
London, and Humlebaek, Denmark
1991 n Flash Pictures, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra,
Australia
KEN THAIDAY SNR. SELECTED COLLECTIONS /
COLLECTIONS
Musée des Confluences, Lyon, France
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
n Cultural Centre of Tjibaou, Noumea, New Caledonia
n Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia
n Cambridge University Museum of Anthropology, United Kingdom
n National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia
n National Museum of Australia, Canberra, Australia
n Otago Museum, Dunedin, New Zealand
n Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, Australia
n Queensland Museum, Brisbane, Australia
n Australian Embassy, Washington DC, USA
n Museum Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
n Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns, Australia
n Parliament House Collection, Canberra, Australia
n Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, Australia
n Queensland University of Technology Art Museum, Brisbane,
Australia
n Australian Museum, Sydney, Australia
n Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney, Australia
n Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia
n Campbelltown City Bicentennial Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia
n
n
49
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Ken Thaiday Snr.,
Fish Trap and Sea
Dari Headdress –
Barramundi / Coiffe
Dari piège à poisson
et mer-Barramundi,
Plywood, bamboo, feathers,
beads, cane, pvc, nylon
line, acrylic paint / bois
contreplaqué, bambou,
plumes, perles, jonc,
pvc, fil de nylon,
peinture acrylique,
60 x 51 x 91 cm, 2011
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
50
51
Brian Robinson
Navigating a woven waterworld
L’appel des méandres sous-marins
Navigating
a woven
waterworld
About the artist
Art is always filtered through the personality of the artist, but this is particularly the case with the work
of Brian Robinson. His jovial personality, sense of humor, and deep love of the tropical environment that
he calls home, are the building blocks of an art practice that is changing how we understand Indigenous
cultures of Australia’s north. His art interprets a new era of inherited traditional knowledge about
sustainable relationships between people and their marine environment.
Robinson was born in 1973 and raised on Waiben (also known as Thursday Island) in the
Torres Strait Islands. He belongs to the Kala Lagaw Ya language group of the Torres Strait and Wuthathi
language group of the Shelburne Bay area of Cape York Peninsula and is now based in the Australian
mainland city of Cairns, which is the closest metropolitan city to the Torres Strait. Robinson grew
up within a rich mix of cultural influences, experiencing Zenadh Kes Indigenous traditions along with
learning the Catholic religion, and having some understanding of the Islamic faith of his maternal greatgrandfather who came from the state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo in Malaysia. These complex
cultural references weave throughout his art practice.
The artist also has an eclectic background working in the arts industry. He studied Visual
Arts at the Tropical North Queensland Institute of Technical and Further Education before becoming
a curatorial intern at the Cairns Regional Gallery in 1997. A pioneering career as one of Australia’s
earliest Indigenous curators ensued, involving positions as Senior Curator and Deputy Director of the
Cairns Regional Gallery over a period of 15 years. Along the way Robinson also completed internships
at the National Museum of Australia, the National Gallery of Australia and the Gab Titui Cultural Centre
on his home island of Waiben. In 2010 he turned to full time art practice and now works extensively on
public art projects, private and public art commissions, as well as developing his practice as a printmaker,
sculptor, painter, and installation artist. When we look at Robinson’s art we are looking through the
wealth and diversity of this background, and engage with an artist who understands the cosmopolitan
and contemporary nature of cultural life in the Torres Strait Islands.
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
52
Previous pages /
Pages précédentes
Brian Robinson,
Malu Githalayl,
Aluminium honeycomb
composite panel / panneau
en aluminium alvéolaire,
2016
Left / À gauche
Brian Robinson
Githalay
Githalay means mud crab in Robinson’s Kala Lagaw Ya language. Mud crabs are a food source for the
Torres Strait Islands community, and a deep respect for the sustainability of the species is encoded
into traditional totems and customs and their ancestral mythology. Robinson’s large sculptural artwork
scales up the patternation and form of these crabs. It is an expression of how an intimate knowledge
of the habits and character of local flora and fauna provide a sense of belonging and psychological
connection to the physical environment.
Robinson says that within his community “there remains a strong belief in the land and ocean
as sentient, or that ancestral spirits imbue the environment, creating a situation in which spiritual and
physical aspects cannot be altogether separated”.
53
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
By Sally Butler
l’appel des
méandres
sous-marins
Par Sally Butler
À propos de l’artiste
Si toute forme d’art s’exprime à travers le prisme de la personnalité de l’artiste,
cette empreinte est particulièrement visible dans l’œuvre de Brian Robinson. Son
attitude joviale, son sens de l’humour et son amour profond de l’environnement
tropical, dont il est originaire, sont les ingrédients essentiels d’une pratique
artistique qui transforme notre approche des cultures indigènes du Nord de
l’Australie. Son art dévoile une nouvelle interprétation de l’héritage traditionnel,
fondé sur des rapports durables entre les populations et leur environnement marin.
Brian Robinson est né en 1973, sur l’île Thursday (Waiben), dans le détroit
55
de Torres, où il a passé son enfance. Il fait partie des locuteurs du Kala Lagaw Ya et
du Wuthathi, des langues parlées respectivement dans le détroit de Torres et dans la
région de Shelburne Bay (péninsule du cap York). Il réside aujourd’hui sur le continent,
Left / À gauche
Hanging of Malu Githalayl,
Oceanographic Museum
of Monaco / Montage de
Malu Githalayl, Musée
océanographique de Monaco,
2016
à Cairns, dans la ville métropolitaine la plus proche des îles du détroit de Torres
(Zenadh Kes). Son enfance est marquée par un riche éventail d’influences culturelles :
il fait l’expérience des traditions indigènes des îles Zenadh Kes, reçoit parallèlement
une éducation catholique et hérite de son arrière-grand-père maternel, originaire
de l’état de Sarawak sur l’île de Bornéo (Malaisie), une certaine compréhension de
la foi musulmane. Ces références culturelles complexes constituent la trame de sa
pratique artistique.
Brian Robinson, Githalay I,
Rendering / simulation,
2016, éd. 1/3
Son parcours est également éclectique grâce à ses nombreuses
expériences dans l’industrie de l’art. Brian Robinson a étudié les arts visuels au
sein du Tropical North Queensland Institute of TAFE, avant d’intégrer la Cairns
Regional Gallery en tant que conservateur stagiaire, en 1997. Véritable pionnier sur
le marché de l’art australien, il fait partie des premiers conservateurs de musée
indigènes. Il a notamment occupé pendant quinze ans les postes de conservateur
principal et de directeur adjoint au sein de la Cairns Regional Gallery. Au cours de
sa carrière, il a également effectué plusieurs stages auprès du National Museum
of Australia, de la National Gallery of Australia et du Gab Titui Cultural Centre,
ce dernier étant situé sur son île natale de Waiben. Depuis 2010, il se consacre
entièrement à la pratique artistique et travaille aujourd’hui essentiellement sur
des projets d’art public, sur des commandes privées et publiques, ainsi que sur
le perfectionnement de sa pratique intégrant linogravure, sculpture, peinture et
installations.
L’œuvre de Brian Robinson reflète la richesse et la diversité de son
parcours et embrasse la nature cosmopolite et contemporaine de la vie culturelle
des îles du détroit de Torres.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
54
« Les terres et les océans sont encore largement considérés comme
des entités douées de conscience, avec des esprits ancestraux omniprésents dans l’environnement, ce qui crée un mode de pensée dans lequel les aspects spirituels et physiques ne peuvent être dissociés. »
“There remains a strong belief in the land and ocean as sentient, or that ancestral spirits imbue the environment,
creating a situation in which spiritual and physical aspects cannot be altogether separated.”
Githalay
Le terme githalay signifie « crabe des palétuviers » en langue Kala Lagaw Ya. Ce
crabe constitue une source de nourriture pour les indigènes de détroit de Torres
qui témoignent d’un profond respect envers cette espèce à travers leurs totems
traditionnels, leurs coutumes et leur mythologie ancestrale. La sculpture de Brian
Robinson reproduit à l’échelle les motifs et la forme de ce crabe. Elle montre comment
la connaissance intime des habitudes et des caractéristiques de la flore et de la faune
locales permet d'entretenir un sentiment d’appartenance et un lien spirituel avec
57
l’environnement physique.
Waiben / Thursday Island
This relationship between people and the natural environment is a long-standing Indigenous tradition,
but it is also in tune with the aims of environmental sustainability initiatives around the world today. Art
offers a way of making tangible connections between human, environmental and spiritual forces, or at
least it provides psychological triggers that remind us to think closely about what is around us and why
it matters.
Direct observation of nature occurred early for Robinson, and was part of his childhood
development. His recollections about ‘crabbing day’ offer insight into how knowledge about nature’s
habits and character is integral to learning how to collect and hunt for food. He recalls that,
“Usually the crabs, dark grey in color, would scatter across the surface of the submerged
mudflats upon your arrival and it would be your job to scoop them up quickly. But occasionally they
would retaliate and come charging back, claws at the ready. This is when you hoped for a close by boat
for a quick get-away. After several hours when enough Githalayl were caught, we would then return
home, tying up the front claws of each crab with sturdy twine … one, to limit their escape and two, to
avoid injury to our body from their small but powerful vice grips”.
The adjustable arms, legs and claws of the crabs in Robinson’s artwork can be manipulated
upon installation to reflect this ‘scatter or attack’ personality of the mud crab, and to make it appear as
though crabs are scattering across the façade of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco.
Interpreting the marine environment
Many of Robinson’s public artworks have a playful appearance that belies their thought-provoking
purpose. His often quite vibrant palette has a sense of fun but it also reflects vivid colors of the
sea, and the surreal appearance of submarine life. Tropical fish and coral have an almost fluorescent
hue that is conditioned by light refracted through water and waves. Flora and fauna in the tropical
landscape are also lush and intensely colored, featuring vibrant green foliage and birdlife colors
across the spectrum of a rainbow. Robinson’s palette aims to tap into this life-affirming chromatic
energy.
L’artiste raconte qu’au sein de sa communauté « les terres et les océans
sont encore largement considérés comme des entités douées de conscience, avec
des esprits ancestraux omniprésents dans l’environnement, ce qui crée un mode de
pensée dans lequel les aspects spirituels et physiques ne peuvent être dissociés. »
Ce lien entre les populations et leur environnement naturel s’inscrit dans une
tradition indigène de longue date. Cependant, il fait également écho aux enjeux de
durabilité environnementale si présents sur la scène internationale actuelle. L’art
permet de concrétiser les liens d’interdépendance entre différentes forces humaines,
environnementales et spirituelles, ou offre pour le moins quelques amorces de
réflexion sur l’environnement dans lequel nous évoluons et les enjeux qui y sont liés.
L’observation directe de la nature constitue, depuis l’enfance, un ingrédient essentiel
du parcours de Brian Robinson. Ses souvenirs de pêche au crabe démontrent que
l’observation des comportements naturels joue un rôle essentiel dans la recherche et
la capture des crustacés. Il raconte : « En général, les crabes gris foncé se dispersaient
à la surface des bancs de vase immergés à l’arrivée des pêcheurs, et il ne nous restait
qu’à les ramasser rapidement. Mais il arrivait qu’ils se rebellent et reviennent pour
nous charger, toutes pinces dehors. Alors il fallait rejoindre en vitesse l’embarcation
la plus proche pour éviter l’attaque. Au bout de quelques heures quand nous avions
récolté assez de githalayl, nous rentrions chez nous, sans oublier d’attacher les pinces
de chaque crabe avec de la ficelle solide... d’abord pour les empêcher de s’échapper,
mais aussi pour éviter les blessures causées par l’étau de leurs pinces, petites mais
puissantes. »
Les pattes et les pinces réglables des crabes de Brian Robinson peuvent
être ajustées lors de l’installation pour refléter la personnalité du crabe des palétuviers,
en position de dispersion ou d’attaque, et permettent de donner l’illusion que les
crustacés se dispersent sur la façade du Musée océanographique de Monaco.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
56
Brian Robinson, Woven Fish,
Stainless steel, internal tubular
piping for water feature /
acier inoxydable, tube
d'alimentation d'eau,
800 x 1 400 x 400 cm, 2003,
Cairns Esplanade Lagoon
Robinson’s approach to his artwork is not simply a matter of mimicking nature, or of applying
inherited traditional designs. He does both of these things, but within the framework of his own individual
personality. His jovial nature and sense of fun thread a joie de vivre through the art that is engaging
and uplifting. Robinson says that he expresses these upbeat emotions because this is how the natural
environment impacts on him. Vibrant color, organic forms, and fluid interconnecting patterns combine to
create the impression of the pulse of life - a rhythm that carries with it a deep sense of wellbeing.
Patternation in Robinson’s artwork is also a method of engaging audiences. It pertains to
Robinson’s love of playing games and relates to recurring references in his art to chess and Rubik Cubes.
He says that “patterns in my art are more strategic rather than decorative. They play a conceptual role in
engaging audiences with what is going on inside the artwork. I think about how the viewer will navigate
their way through the artwork. I think about how I would do this from that third person perspective.”
Patterns are thus like a kind of puzzle that makes viewers curious and engaged in the process
of composition. Inspiration for patterns that adorn the mud crabs in Malu Githalayl derives from several
sources. They relate to the mark-making underpinning Robinson’s lino-cut artwork, recalling traditional
motifs and designs used in turtle-shell carving, tattooing and the adornment of canoes and ceremonial
objects. The patterns also reference floral lace in homage to the feminine dimension of life, and
a fundamental symbolism of Mother Nature. Dresses worn by Torres Strait Islands women today
featuring hibiscus and frangipani flower designs also contribute to this feminine aesthetic.
Interpréter l’environnement marin
Les œuvres d’art public de Brian Robinson dégagent souvent une légèreté apparente
qui dissimule leur fonction première : une invitation à la réflexion. La palette de
l'artiste, souvent assez vive, apporte une touche de gaieté à ses œuvres. Cependant,
elle reflète également les couleurs saisissantes des fonds marins et l’apparence
surréaliste de la flore et de la faune sous-marines. Les poissons et coraux tropicaux
arborent des teintes presque fluorescentes conditionnées par la réfraction de la
lumière dans l’eau et dans les vagues. La flore et la faune caractéristiques du paysage
tropical sont également luxuriantes et hautes en couleurs, avec des feuillages d’un
vert éclatant et des oiseaux arborant toutes les couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel. La palette de
Brian Robinson puise allègrement dans cette énergie chromatique célébrant la vie
sous toutes ses formes.
La pratique de cet artiste ne se résume pas à imiter la nature ou à appliquer
les motifs traditionnels hérités de sa culture. Ces deux approches sont présentes dans
son œuvre, mais on y retrouve toujours l’empreinte de sa personnalité unique. Son
tempérament jovial et son regard ludique confèrent à ses créations une joie de vivre
qui éveille la curiosité et exalte les sens. L’artiste confie que les émotions positives qu’il
exprime traduisent l’influence de l’environnement naturel sur son humeur.
Left / À gauche
Brian Robinson, Navigating
narrative - Nemo's encounter
in the Torres Strait
Linocut printed in black ink from
one block / linogravure imprimée
à l'encre noire en un seul bloc,
56 x 109 cm, 2012
Les couleurs vives, les formes organiques et les motifs fluides s’articulent
pour créer une pulsation de vie presque palpable, un rythme diffusant une profonde
sensation de bien-être.
L’utilisation de motifs distinctifs permet à Brian Robinson de capter
l’attention de son public. Ils traduisent la passion de l’artiste pour les jeux de réflexion,
notamment pour les échecs et le Rubik’s Cube, dont on retrouve l’empreinte récurrente
dans son travail. Brian Robinson témoigne : « Les motifs utilisés dans mes œuvres
relèvent d’une approche plus stratégique que décorative. Ils jouent un rôle conceptuel
en incitant le public à se demander ce qui se joue dans chaque œuvre. Je réfléchis au
chemin d’interprétation que l’observateur va emprunter. J’adopte un regard extérieur
pour mieux imaginer les possibilités d’interprétation. »
Ces motifs constituent donc une sorte de jeu de piste énigmatique qui
éveille notre curiosité et nous incite à interroger le processus de composition.
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
60
Brian Robinson,
Three Fishermen
and a Lamborghini,
Linocut printed in black ink
from one block / linogravure
imprimée à l'encre noire en un
seul bloc, 40 x 85,5 cm, 2012
Why public art?
Public art commissions, such as Malu Githalayl produced for the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco
exhibition, form a major part of Robinson’s art practice. He has been producing public art commissions
since 1998 and now has pieces permanently installed in public sites across Australia. Robinson enjoys
the collaborative requirements of public art, and particularly working with creative professionals
involved in built environment design. He says, “I have become familiar with the language of site-plans
and building plans, and understand the engineering and construction requirements of public art. This is
challenging and it inspires me to work with tight conceptual themes that are developed collaboratively,
and through discussion”.
Les motifs qui ornent les crabes des palétuviers, ou Malu Githalayl, puisent dans
différentes sources d’inspiration. Ils s’apparentent au même procédé de marquage
utilisé par l’artiste dans ses linogravures, rappelant les motifs des gravures sur
carapace de tortue, que l’on retrouve également dans les tatouages traditionnels et la
décoration des canoës et des objets cérémoniels. Les motifs incorporent des éléments
floraux en hommage à la dimension féminine de la vie, ainsi que différents symboles
célébrant la nature dans toute sa diversité. Les robes que portent aujourd’hui les
femmes des îles du détroit de Torres, ornées de fleurs d’hibiscus et de frangipanier,
61
contribuent également à cette esthétique féminine.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Brian Robinson, August 23 1898 - Today I
collected with much zeal, through the barter
and exchange of gifts, ancient artefacts
belonging to a race of Indigenous Australian's
known as Torres Strait Islanders. Wooden
masks, pearlshell pendants, smoking pipes,
dance objects, and a strange device called
a USB flash drive were among the items
obtained. A.C. Haddon,
Etching printed in multiple colours from one plate,
49.5 x 98 cm / gravure imprimée en couleur
d'après une seule plaque, 49,5 x 98 cm, 2012
Brian Robinson, Githalay II
Rendering / simulation,
2016, éd. 1/3
Pourquoi l’art public ?
La plupart des œuvres de Brian Robinson sont réalisées dans le cadre de commandes
d’art public, comme par exemple Malu Githalayl, destinés au Musée océanographique
63
aujourd’hui installées de façon permanente sur différents sites à travers l’Australie.
Brian Robinson apprécie les exigences collaboratives inhérentes à l’art public, en
particulier le travail auprès de créateurs professionnels qui exercent dans le domaine
du design urbain. Il raconte ainsi son expérience : « Je me suis familiarisé avec le
jargon des urbanistes et des architectes. Je comprends les exigences de l’art public en
termes d’ingénierie et de construction. C’est un univers plein de défis qui me motive
à travailler sur des thèmes conceptuels exigeants, élaborés collectivement, à force de
dialogue et de compromis. »
Le projet Malu Githalayl a été supervisé par CREATIVEMOVE, l’agence
d’art public de Brian Robinson, basée à Brisbane. C’est en collaboration étroite avec
CREATIVEMOVE que l’artiste conçoit et élabore ses œuvres d’art public. Ce projet
Brian Robinson,
Githalay I et II,
Aluminium honeycomb
composite panel / panneau
en aluminium alvéolaire,
260 x 400 x 100 cm
(each/chacun), 2016
The Malu Githalayl project was project managed by Robinson’s Brisbane-based public
art agent, CREATIVEMOVE. Robinson works closely with CREATIVEMOVE on the research and
development of his public art works. This innovative project also required collaboration with Sydneybased TILT Industrial Design who provided design detailing and the fabrication of the works in
aluminium honeycomb composite panel. Whilst the overall form of Malu Githalayl is not as complex as
some of Robinson’s other public art practice, environmental factors required particular consideration.
This took account of the very strong wind loading of the Monaco site, and the installation requirements
of protecting a significant heritage building. In this sense, the art not only refers to the environment
conceptually, but also pays heed to it physically.
Robinson enjoys making public art because it offers opportunities to create art that is seen
beyond the white-walled cube of art gallery spaces, and opens itself to public opinion – ‘good, bad,
and ugly’! The theme of marine conservation is perfectly suited to his own personal beliefs, and his art
practice, and he embraces the occasion to show international audiences how Torres Strait Islanders
interpret their ancient traditions of ecologically grounded beliefs about the sea and how it sustains a
cycle of life.
novateur a également motivé une collaboration avec TILT Industrial Design (Sydney)
qui a pris en charge la simulation et la fabrication des œuvres en panneau aluminium
alvéolaire. Si la structure générale du Malu Githalayl n’est pas aussi complexe que celle
d’autres œuvres d’art public du même auteur, c’est pour mieux répondre aux facteurs
environnementaux. En effet, la structure tient compte de la situation du site de
Monaco, battu par les vents, et des exigences liées à la protection du musée, précieux
bâtiment historique. En ce sens, au-delà de son rôle conceptuel, l’art s’inscrit de façon
concrète dans son environnement.
Brian Robinson apprécie l’art public, car il offre la possibilité de créer des
œuvres qui seront vues en dehors des quatre murs blancs d’une galerie aseptisée, pour
se confronter à l’opinion publique dans toute sa diversité. Il s’empare du thème de
la protection des océans, en accord parfait avec ses idéaux personnels et sa pratique
artistique, pour montrer aux visiteurs du monde entier comment les Insulaires
interprètent leurs traditions et croyances ancestrales, empreintes d’écologie et
profondément ancrées dans la mer.
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
de Monaco. L’artiste travaille ainsi depuis 1998 et certaines de ses créations sont
BIOGRAPHY & SELECTED EXHIBITION HISTORY /
BIOGRAPHIE
EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT & AWARDS /
FORMATION ET RÉCOMPENSES (SÉLECTION)
A l i c k T i p o t i - K e n T h a i d a y S n r.
Brian Robinson
64
2013 O
verall Winner and People’s Choice Award Winner, Western Australian Indigenous Art Award,
Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, Australia
2010-2011 Artist in Residence, Djumbunji Press Kick Arts Fine Art Printmaking, Cairns, Australia
2006-2010 Exhibitions Manager/Deputy Director, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
2004 Internship, National Museum of Australia; Gab Tatui Cultural Centre, Waiben Island; National
Gallery of Australia, Australia
2001-2006 Curator, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
2001 Winner, Arts and Culture Recognition Award, Cairns Corroboree, Australia
1999-2001 Exhibitions Officer/Technician, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
1999 Winner, Ten Queensland, Young Achiever of the Year for Regional Queensland 2000, Australia
1999 Finalist, Golden Circle Arts Award, Young Australian of the Year 2000, Australia
1997 Internship: Trainee Curator, Arts Administration, Technician, Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
1995 Advanced Certificate in Visual Arts (ATSI) Tropical North Queensland Institute of TAFE, Cairns, Australia
1994 S
urvival Skills for Visual Artists Certificate, Tropical North Queensland Institute of Tertiary
and Further Education, Cairns, Australia
1992 Associate Diploma in Visual Arts (ATSI) Tropical North Queensland Institute of TAFE, Cairns, Australia
SELECTED COLLECTIONS / COLLECTIONS
Australian Museum, Sydney, Australia
Australian War Museum Canberra, Australia
n Queensland University of Technology Art Museum Collection, Brisbane, Australia
n Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney, Australia
n Cairns Regional Gallery, Australia
n Environmental Protection Agency, Cairns, Australia
n Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Noumea, New Caledonia
n KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns, Australia
n Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, Australia
n AAMU, Museum of Contemporary Aboriginal Art, Utrecht, Netherlands
n National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Australia
n National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia
n OTC Collection, Australia
n Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
n Queensland Museum, Brisbane, Australia
n The Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, Virginia, USA
n
n
SELECTED EXHIBITIONS (SOLO) / EXPOSITIONS (SOLO)
2015 n Spirit Realm: The Art of Brian Robinson, Michael Reid Galleries, Sydney, Australia
2015 n Strait Protean, The art of Brian Robinson, Flinders University Gallery, Adelaide, Australia
2014 n Zenadh Kes: Art is Life, Shalini Ganandra Fine Art, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2014 n Brian Robinson, Artstage Singapore
2012 n men + GODS, KickArts Contemporary Arts, Cairns, Australia
2012 n Intertwining Mythology, Mossenson Gallery, Melbourne, Australia
2008 n Northern Mythology: The Art of Brian Robinson, Banggu Minjaany Gallery, Cairns, Australia
2003 n Oceanic Navigator Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns, Australia
2000 n Malu Girel, Cairns Regional Gallery, Cairns, Australia
Associate Professor Sally Butler lectures in art history at the University of Queensland in
Brisbane, Australia, and is also a freelance curator and arts writer. Relevant publications and
exhibitions in the fields of Indigenous art and culture and visual politics include: Our Way,
Contemporary Aboriginal Art from Lockhart River (UQP 2007) and Before Time Today,
Reinventing Tradition in Aurukun Aboriginal Art (UQP 2010). Our Way is also the title of
an exhibition curated by Butler that toured to Asia and the USA. Before Time Today was an
exhibition that featured as a cameo display in Hans Belting’s Global Contemporary exhibition
in Berlin in 2011.
SELECTED EXHIBITIONS (GROUP) / EXPOSITIONS (GROUPE)
Le professeur Sally Butler est maître de conférences en histoire de l'art à l'Université du Queensland
2015 n Encounters: Revealing Stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Objects from the British
Museum, National Museum of Australia, Canberra, Australia
2015 n Here Right Now: A Powerful Regional Voice in our Democracy, Regional Arts Australia,
Old Parliament House, Canberra, Australia
2015 n GOMA-Q: Contemporary Queensland Art, Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
2014 n Saltwater Country, Gold Coast Art Gallery (national & international present tour)
2013 n Everywhere at all times: Bringing the archive into the Contemporary, Michael Reid Galleries,
Berlin, Germany
à Brisbane, en Australie, et également conservatrice et auteur dans le domaine de l'art.
Ses publications et expositions les plus notables dans les domaines de l’art aborigène et de la culture
des politiques visuelles comprennent entre autres : Our Way, Contemporary Aboriginal Art from
Lockhart River (UQP 2007) et Before Time Today, Reinventing Tradition in Aurukun Aboriginal Art
(UQP 2010). Our Way est aussi le titre d’une exposition itinérante en Asie et aux État-Unis montée
par Sally Butler. Before Time Today était une exposition créée dans le cadre de la grande exposition
de Hans Belting Global Contemporary à Berlin en 2011.
65
Australia: D efending the O ceans
Australie : la défense des océans
Biography /
biographie
2013 n Art Berlin, Michael Reid Galleries Berlin, Germany
2012 n Malu Minar: Art of the Torres Strait, Cairns Regional Gallery, touring New Zealand
2011 n Land/Sea/Sky: Contemporary Art of the Torres Strait Islands, Queensland Art Gallery/
Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia
2004 n Out of Country, Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Centre, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA /
Australian Embassy Art Gallery, Washington DC, USA.
1998-2001 n Ilan Pasin: Torres Strait Art, Cairns Regional Gallery, national tour, Australia
1998-2000 n Raiki Wara (Long Cloth), National Gallery of Australia, national tour, Australia
1996-98n Ancient Land, Modern Art, Queensland Art Gallery national tour, Australia
Remerciements / Acknowledgements :
Catalogue published for the exhibition TABA NABA, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People in collaboration
with Australian Art Network and CREATIVEMOVE
Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, March 24 - September 30, 2016
Catalogue réalisé à l’occasion de l’exposition TABA NABA, Australie, Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer en collaboration
avec Australian Art Network et CREATIVEMOVE
Musée océanographique de Monaco, du 24 mars au 30 septembre 2016
“Australia: Defending the Oceans at the Heart of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islands Art”
Project Manager, Coordinator & Senior Curator: Stéphane Jacob, Director Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob (Paris)
Associate Curator: Suzanne O’Connell, Director Suzanne O’Connell Gallery (Brisbane)
« Australie : la défense des océans au cœur de l’art des Aborigènes et des Insulaires du détroit de Torres »
Commissaire scientifique et chef de projet : Stéphane Jacob, directeur de la galerie Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob (Paris)
Commissaire associée : Suzanne O’Connell, directrice de la galerie Suzanne O’Connell (Brisbane)
“Torres Strait and Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdresses”, "Sowlal", "Malu Githalayl" and "Kisay Dhangal" installations as well as the Zugubal Dancers have
been assisted by the Australian Government through the Ministry for the Arts’ 'Catalyst Australian Arts and Culture Fund'.
The exhibition has also received significant support from the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland.
"Kisay Dhangal" by Alick Tipoti : Main sponsor Urban Art Projects (Brisbane)
“Torres Strait and Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdresses” : Special thanks for his dedication to Jason Christopher (Sydney)
Special thanks to the Zugubal Dancers: Alick Tipoti, Joey Laifoo, Naselie Tamwoy, Patock Tamwoy and Tommy Tamwoy
Denis Jacob, Caroline & Georges Jollès, David Jones, Markus Keller et les équipes d'AccorHotels, Michael & Di Kershaw, Julia King, Gilles Laffay,
Anne Langerôme, Eric Langevin, Valérie Langevin, Sarah Lanzi, Jérémy Larini, Sylvie Laurent, Anne Parsons & Roger Le Mesurier, Sébastien Leduc et
les équipes de l’imprimerie Iro (La Rochelle), Marie-Antoinette Lemoine, Claire Leny, Jonathan Levine, Isabel Levy, Helen & Bori Liberman,
Louise Litchfield, José Littardi et les équipes du restaurant La Terrasse, Laëtitia Loas-Orsel, Noelle Loison, Isabelle Lombardo, Judith Lovell,
Cherisse Lyons, Olivier Maguet, Jean-Claude Mangion, Louise Martin-Chew, Céline Mathieux, Elsa Milanesio, Arielle Barabino & Richard Milanesio,
Lydia Miller, Gilles Millet, George Mina, Damien Montat, Magali Moret, Eva Muller, Eve-Anna Musso, Rupert Myer, Debra Nicholson, Agnès Niel, Béatrice Novaretti,
Harriet O'Malley, Frédéric Pacorel, Romain Parlier, Catherine Pascaud, Joël Passeron, Alessandra Penayo, Véronique Pernin, Marie Perrier, Nathalie
Perrin et les équipes de Co-Influence, Auriane Pertuisot, Maria Petturiti, Tim Phillips and staff of TILT Industrial-Design, Laetitia Pierrat, Patrick Piguet,
Jorge Pinto et les équipes de Multiplast, Isabel Pires, Valérie Pisani, Didier Poteau, Sandra Puch, Frédéric Ramin, Guillaume Rapin et les équipes
du Novotel Monte-Carlo, Maïté René-Watts, Marc Rigazzi, Nathalie Ritz, Tanya Robinson, Neelame Roustarealy, Isabel Rubio, Sue Ryan, Sémir Saidi,
Isabelle Sanfilippo, Béatrice Schawann, Rachel See, Penelope Stockdale, Mary Stuart, Valérie Suda, Bernard Tabary & les membres d’ABIE,
Tinee Tang, Emilie Tarditi, François Tetienne, Didier Théron et ses équipes, Thierry Thévenin, Daniel & Matthew Tobin and staff from UAP,
Jacques Tomasini, Ingrid Trawinski, Alexandre Trueba et les équipes de WES, Brian Tucker, Alexia Tye, Olivier Valero, Anne Vissio, Julien Vivaudo,
Karl Wildman, Andrew Willis, Gabrielle Wilson, Kim Wirth, François-Marie Wojcik, Mark Young, Marie-Pascale Zugaj Benteo et les animateurs
et animatrices vacataires du Musée océanographique et les animatrices et animateurs stagiaires du Pavillon Bosio de Monaco,
l'École de la Condamine de Monaco : les enfants de la classe de CPM à horaires aménagés option musique et leurs parents, Mme Pascale Bellingeri,
directrice, M. Alain Serra, enseignant, l’Académie de musique Rainier III de Monaco : M. Christian Tourniaire, directeur, Mme Bernadette Hudelot,
assistante direction, Mme Brigitte Clarys, professeur de musique de la classe, M. Damien Gastaud, professeur de musique,
Mairie de Monaco : Mme Karyn Ardisson-Salopeck, élue chargée de l'école de musique.
Les installations suivantes : « Torres Strait and Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdresses », « Sowlal », « Malu Githalayl » et « Kisay Dhangal »,
ainsi que les Zugubal Dancers ont bénéficié du soutien du gouvernement australien par l’intermédiaire du fonds Catalyst pour les arts et la culture
d’Australie du Ministère fédéral des Arts. L'exposition a également reçu le soutien du gouvernement du Queensland (département des Arts du Queensland).
« Kisay Dhangal » d'Alick Tipoti : Urban Art Projects (Brisbane), mécène principal
« Torres Strait and Erub Eastern Island Dari Headdresses » : remerciements particuliers à Jason Christopher (Sydney)
Remerciements particuliers aux Zugubal Dancers : Alick Tipoti, Joey Laifoo, Naselie Tamwoy, Patock Tamwoy et Tommy Tamwoy
H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco / S.A.S. le Prince Albert II de Monaco
His Excellency Mr Stephen Brady AO CVO, Australian Ambassador to France and to the Principality of Monaco and his team /
Son Excellence Monsieur Stephen Brady, Ambassadeur d’Australie en France et à Monaco et ses équipes
Senator the Honourable Mitch Fifield, Australian Government Minister for the Arts, and his team /
Monsieur le Sénateur Mitch Fifield, ministre australien des Arts et ses équipes
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk MP, Premier of Queensland and Minister for the Arts, and her team /
Madame Annastacia Palaszczuk, Premier ministre et ministre des Arts du Queensland et ses équipes
Robert Calcagno, CEO of the Oceanographic Institute and his team / Robert Calcagno, directeur de l’Institut océanographique et ses équipes
Hélène Lafont-Couturier, Director of the musée des Confluences (Lyon) and her team /
Hélène Lafont-Couturier, directrice du musée des Confluences (Lyon) et ses équipes
Josh Abel (The Artificial), Lisa Airasca, Paolo Alvarez, Eleonora Alzetta, Jean-Christophe Arnoux, Jérôme Arnoux, Julie Arnoux, Olivier de Baecque,
Anne-Gaële Duriez de Baecque, Harriet Baillie, Elisabeth Baltzinger, Patrick Bani, Gaël Baslé, Marie-Claude Beaud, Emmanuel Behrendt, Natacha Bernet,
Pamela Bigelow, Anna Bijelic, Bruce Blundell, Natalie Bochenski, Catherine Bodet, Anne-Marie Boisbouvier, Myriam Boisbouvier-Wylie & John Wylie,
Eric et Isabelle Bonnal, Laurence Bonnefond, Sylvie Boucherat, Muriel Bubbio, Lee-Ann Buckskin, Sally Butler, Béatrice Calcagno, Anne Candy, Tiziana Caporale,
Daniel Caravano, Michael Carr, Sébastien Carré, Raffaele Carrozza, Anne-Marie Cattelain, Gaëlle Charbonnel, Jaeme Christopher, Falila Coiba,
David Comte, Veronica Comyn, Miriam Cosic, Georges Cotton, Benjamin Curtet, Michel Dagnino, Anne-Marie Damiano, Romuald de Lencquesaing,
José-Luis de Mendiguren, Fiammetta de'Santis, Marc & Nelly Debailleul, Véronique Delandemare, Laurent Delannet, Laurent Delval, Jane Dermer,
Jérémy Devos, Pierine di Giacomo, Tea Dietterich, Helen Donald, Régis Dorey, Solenne Ducos-Lamotte, Bruno Dufosse, Olivier Dufourneaud,
Nicolas Dupont, les équipes de cascadeurs d'EMTA, Tony Ellwood, Mickael Fabre, Gilles Fage, Daphné Ferrié, Florence Forzy, Philippe Foutrel, William Foye,
Blaise Franco, Julien Frappa, Evie Franzidis, Emmanuelle Gaillard, David Galloway-Penney, Marine Gaudin, Carole Ge, Marylin Georgeff, Laurent Giauffret,
Bruce, Judith & Genevieve Gordon, Renai Grace, Michel Guillemot, Philippe Haddad, Joël & Martha Hakim, Claire Harquet, Mélanie Harquet, Robert Heathcote,
Béatrice Hedde, Kirsten Herring, Sarah Heymann, Geoff Hirn, Monika Horvath, Peter & Andrea Hylands, Erica Izett, Philippe & Liliane Jacob,
LES LANGUES AUTOCHTONES D’AUSTRALIE
Les Aborigènes et les Insulaires du détroit de Torres représentent dans leur
ensemble la culture autochtone d’Australie. Leurs cultures et leurs langues
sont distinctes, ils ont d’ailleurs chacun leur drapeau. Avant la colonisation,
il y avait deux cent cinquante groupes linguistiques aborigènes – ou
« nations » – et près de six cents dialectes. On estime aujourd’hui
que soixante langues sont encore parlées en Australie.
Dans le détroit de Torres, deux langues sont actuellement parlées assez
largement sur les différentes îles : le Kala Lagaw Ya dans les îles occidentales,
et le Meriam Mir dans les îles orientales. Des dialectes de ces langues sont
parlés dans les îles du Centre-Ouest, du Nord-Ouest, les îles centrales
et les îles orientales.
Même au sein de ces groupes linguistiques, les Aborigènes et les Insulaires
du détroit de Torres voient leur identité culturelle comme étant unique et
différente de celle de leurs voisins.
Selon l’artiste Alick Tipoti : « La langue est l’ingrédient essentiel qui connecte
toutes les cultures du monde actuel. Tout ce que l’on fait, traditionnellement
ou culturellement, évolue à partir d’une langue. Connaître la langue, c’est
connaître la culture ».
AUSTRALIAN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES
Australia’s Indigenous people are divided into Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander groups as each is culturally distinct, with its own flag that proclaims
their separate identities.
Prior to white settlement there were more than two hundred and fifty
Aboriginal language groups or nations with around six hundred dialects spoken
across the continent. An estimated sixty languages are still spoken today.
In the Torres Strait there are two languages which are spoken fairly widely
throughout the islands today. Kala Lagaw Ya is spoken in the Western islands
and Meriam Mir in the Eastern islands. Dialects of these are spoken in the
Mid Western, Top Western, Central and Eastern islands.
Even within these language groups or nations, Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islanders see their cultural identity as unique and different from their
neighbours. Alick Tipoti believes that ‘ language is the vital ingredient that
binds all cultures in the world today. Everything you do, traditionally or
culturally, evolves from a language. When you know the language, you know
your culture.’
Crédits photo / Photographic credits
Couverture / front cover : Burrar Islet and reef © Kim Wirth
4e de couverture de gauche à droite / back cover : Alick Tipoti © Michel Dagnino /
Musée océanographique de Monaco ; Ken Thaiday © Michael Marzik ; Brian Robinson © Michael Marzik
Ambassade d'Australie en France : 4 ; Australian Art Network : 22, 23, 25 h/top, 48 ; Jason Christopher : 40, 42, 43, 47 ;
Creative cowboy films : 46 ; CREATIVEMOVE : 50, 51, 62 ; Michel Dagnino / Musée océanographique de Monaco : 20, 26, 29 h/top, 30, 38, 54 ;
Roger D’Souza Photography : 28 ; Stéphane Jacob : 44 ; Laetitia Loas-Orsel : 10 ; Michael Marzik : 29 b/bottom, 36, 52, 58, 59 ;
Multiplast : 19, 20, 33 ; musée des Confluences : 41 ; Nicholas A Nicholls SC : 39 ; Palais princier, Monaco : 2 ; Queensland Government : 7 ;
Brian Robinson : 60, 61 ; The Trustees of the British Museum : 14 ; TILT Industrial Design and The Artificial : 55, 63 ; Jacques Tomasini : 34, 35 ;
Alick Tipoti : 25 b/bottom ; UAP : 27 ; Kim Wirth : 12, 13, 15, 56
Éditeur / Publisher France : éditions Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob, Paris.
Conception / Editor : Stéphane Jacob, Emmanuelle Gaillard (Le Faune éditeur), Benjamin Curtet
Design graphique / Graphic Designer : Laëtitia Loas-Orsel
Impression / Printing : IRO Imprimeur - La Rochelle, France
Mai 2016 / May 2016
Traduction / Translation : 2M Language Services
Coordination France : Stéphane Jacob, Emmanuelle Gaillard (Le Faune éditeur), Benjamin Curtet
Coordination Australie : Suzanne O’Connell
Textes / Texts : « Conceptual seascapes from the Torres Strait Islands », « Alick Tipoti, Marine science in a visual culture »,
« Ken Thaiday Snr. and Jason Christopher, Sculptural seascapes for the 21st century », « Brian Robinson, Navigating a woven waterworld »,
© Sally Butler
ISBN : 979-10-95931-01-0
© Tous droits réservés : les artistes, l’auteur, Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob et Suzanne O’Connell Gallery
© The artists, authors, Suzanne O’Connell Gallery and Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob. This work is copyright.
Toute reproduction de cet ouvrage, même partielle, est interdite sans l’autorisation préalable de l’éditeur.
Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968 (Australian Government),
no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission of the copyright holders and publisher.
Catalogue imprimé avec des encres végétales sur du papier PEFC issu de forêts gérées durablement.
Catalogue printed using vegetable-based inks on PEFC – certified paper sourced from sustainably-managed forests.
Impression
05 46 30 29 29 -
PEFC/10-31-1371
Catalogue réalisé à l’occasion de l’exposition TABA NABA, Australie, Océanie, Arts des peuples de la mer
en collaboration avec Australian Art Network et CREATIVEMOVE Musée océanographique de Monaco, du 24 mars au 30 septembre 2016
Catalogue published for the exhibition TABA NABA, Australia, Oceania, Arts of the Sea People
in collaboration with Australian Art Network and CREATIVEMOVE Oceanographic Museum of Monaco, March 24 - September 30, 2016
www.artsdaustralie.com/monaco-alick-tipoti
www.artsdaustralie.com/monaco-ken-thaiday
www.artsdaustralie.com/monaco-brian-robinson
Arts d’Australie • Stéphane Jacob
179, Boulevard Pereire, 75017 Paris. France
Tel : + 33 (0)1 46 22 23 20 - Fax : + 33 (0)9 55 72 05 90
E-mail : [email protected]
Sur rendez-vous / By appointment only
Expert en art aborigène
Membre de la Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en Objets d’Art et de Collection (C.N.E.S.)
Membre du Comité Professionnel des Galeries d’Art
Signataire de la Charte d’éthique australienne “Indigenous Art Code”
www.ar tsdaustralie.com

Documents pareils