In This Issue

Commentaires

Transcription

In This Issue
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
In This Issue:
Nurse case management to improve risk reduction outcomes in a stroke prevention clinic ...............................7
Examining the relationship between patient-centred care and outcomes ..............................................................14
Analyse du rôle de l’infirmière dans le suivi des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires ..............22
Call for abstracts: CANN Scientific Sessions, June 14–17, 2011........................................................................30
Demande de résumés : Sessions scientifiques de l’ACIISN : 14–27 juin, 2011 ..............................................33
Board of directors, committee chairpersons and associated
organization representatives — Conseil d’administration, responsables
des comités et représentants des groupes associés 2010
Executive
Portfolios
President/Présidente: Sandra Bérubé
Vice-President and Secretary/
Vice-président et secretaire:
Deb Holtom
Past-President/Présidente sortante:
Karen Waterhouse
Treasurer/Trésorière: Mark Bonin
Legislation and Bylaws/Conseillère
des politiques: Karen Waterhouse
Archivist: Geraldine Fitzgerald
Membership/Abonnement:
Aline Mayer
Professional Practice/Practique
professionnelle: Melodie Mortenson
Research/Recherche: Patti Gallagher
Translation/Traduction:
Rolande D’Amour
Program Liaison/Programme:
Jodi Dusik-Sharpe
Scientific Liaison/Scientifique:
Janice Nesbitt
Councillors
British Columbia: Brenda Macleod
Alberta South: Janet Warner
Alberta North: Janet Chaney
Saskatchewan: Doris Newmeyer
Manitoba: Tara Bergner
Ontario West: Mary Ann Regan
Ontario Central: Linda Smith
Ontario East: Paula Poupore
Québec: Martha A. Stewart
New Brunswick/PEI: Rose Butler
Nova Scotia: Janet White
Newfoundland and Labrador:
Viola Finn
2
Committees
Program Chair—Vancouver 2011:
Cindy Hartley
Scientific Chair—Vancouver 2011:
Sue Kadyschuk
Communications and
Marketing (Web): Sharron Runions
Communications and Marketing
(Subscriptions): Wendy MacGregor
Editor—Canadian Journal
of Neuroscience Nursing/
Rédactrice en chef—Le Journal
canadien des infirmières et infirmiers
en sciences neurologiques:
Theresa Green
Representatives
WFNN Representative:
Deb Holtom
ink First: Sheryl Finnigan
Canadian Association of Brain Tumour
Coalition (CABTO): Janice Nesbitt
National Stroke Council
Representative: Patti Gallagher
Canadian Brain and Nerve
Health Coalition (CBANHC):
Darlene Schindel
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Le Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
Editor/Rédactrice en chef
Theresa Green, 1468 Northmount Dr. N.W.
Calgary, AB T2L 0G6; [email protected]
For subscriptions, contact/Pour inscriptions :
Lynn Pratt, 6357 Lumberman Way, Ottawa, ON K1C 1V6;
[email protected]
Peer Reviewers/Réviseures
Sharon Bishop, Regina, SK
Jennifer Boyd, Toronto, ON
Andrea Fisher, Ottawa, ON
Debbie Holtom, Gananoque, ON
Sandra Ireland, Hamilton, ON
Lynn Joseph, Nepean, ON
Wilma Koopman, London, ON
Joanna Pierazzo, Ancaster, ON
Mina D. Singh, Toronto, ON
Nancy Thornton, Calgary, AB
•
•
•
•
Make cheques payable to: Canadian Association of Neuroscience
Nurses/Les chèques doivent être émis à : L’Association canadienne des
infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN) : c/o
Lynn Pratt, 6357 Lumberman Way, Ottawa, ON K1C 1V6.
Yearly subscriptions are included with a membership in
CANN/ACIISN ($75.00 Member, $65.00 Associate) or they may be
purchased separately. L’abonnement annuel à le Journal canadien des
infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques est inclus dans les
frais d’inscription à l’ACIISN (75,00 $ pour les membres actifs et
65,00 $ pour les membres associés).
Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing
The Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing is the peerreviewed journal of the Canadian
Association of Neuroscience
Nurses
(CANN)/Association
canadienne des infirmières et
infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN). The journal
is published quarterly. We welcome the submission of original
manuscripts in the areas of practice, research, theory, education,
and policy, which are of interest to
the neuroscience nursing community. The views, statements,
and opinions expressed in the
articles, editorials, and advertisements are those of the authors or
advertisers. They do not necessarily represent the views and
policies of CANN/ACIISN and
Canada: $65.00 (CAN)
United States: $65.00 (US)
International: $70.00 (US)
Single Copy: $15.00 (CAN)
the editors and publishers disclaim any responsibility or
assumption of liability for these
materials. The Canadian Journal
of Neuroscience Nursing is
indexed in the Cumulative Index
to Nursing and Allied Health
Literature, International Nursing
Index (INI) and Nursing Citation
Index ISSN # 1913-7176.
Mission statement
The Canadian Association of
Neuroscience Nurses (CANN)
sets standards of practice and
promotes continuing professional education and research.
Members collaborate with individuals, families, interdisciplinary teams and communities to
prevent illness and to improve
health outcomes for people
with, or at risk for, neurological
disorders.
Copyright
No part of this publication can be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the
prior written consent of the publisher or a licence from the
Canadian Copyright Licensing Agency (Access Copyright). For an
Access Copyright licence, visit www.accesscopyright.ca or call
toll-free to 1-800-893-5777.
The Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses gratefully
acknowledges the funding provided to the Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing by the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council under the Aid to Transfer Journals program, to
support the operation and expansion of the journal.
Le Journal canadien
des infirmières et
infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques
Le Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques est le journal de
L’Association canadienne des
infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN).
Cette publication est revisée par
ses propres membres. Le journal
est publié quatre fois par année.
Nous acceptons les manuscrits
originaux se rapportant à la pratique du nursing, de la recherche,
de la théorie, de l’éducation, et de
l’éthique professionnelle, tous
des sujets qui suscitent l’intérêt
de l’ensemble du personnel en
neurosciences.
Les opinions, les points de vue, et
les énoncés exprimés dans les articles, éditoriaux et affiches publicitaires sont ceux des auteurs et
commerçants. Ils ne reflètent pas
nécessairement les idées et les
politiques de l’ACIISN. L’éditeur
et la maison d’édition n’acceptent
aucune responsabilité reliée au
contenu du matériel publié dans
le journal. Le Journal canadien
des infirmières et infirmiers en
sciences neurologiques est rattachée au Cumulative Index to
Nursing and Allied Health
Literature, International Nursing
Index (INI) and Nursing Citation
Index ISSN # 1913-7176.
Énoncé de mission
L’Association canadienne des
infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN)
établit les standards de pratique
de la profession et fait la promotion de l’éducation permanente
et de la recherche. Les membres
collaborent avec les individus, les
familles, les équipes multidisciplinaires et la communauté en
général dans le but de prévenir
les maladies neurologiques et
d’améliorer la santé des gens qui
en sont atteints ou qui sont à
risque d’en souffrir.
Editorial
Research reporting: Clarity and accuracy improve quality
Research publication is one of the final steps in the research
process, which begins with development of a research idea.
Moving through the process of bringing together
collaborators, design of the study protocol, securing of grant
or study funding, and obtaining ethic(s) approval to conduct
the research, and implementation of the research, analysis
and drawing of conclusions based on the data leads to
publication of the study results. Although a final step in the
research process entails dissemination of the results, many
studies go unreported or are improperly reported. Indeed,
reviewers have suggested that many randomized controlled
trials, observational studies, and qualitative studies lack
crucial methodological features or details that lend credibility
to study results (Simera et al., 2010).
Attending to these features is the responsibility of the
author(s) of the manuscript. However, in many instances,
finished manuscripts remain unclear and lack details that
would allow readers to judge the usefulness of the research
(Moher, Simera, Schulz, Hoey, & Altman, 2008). For example,
the manuscript may contain confusingly large tables, an
overuse of acronyms, or other style challenges (Morris, 2008).
If authors do not provide “complete, clear and transparent
reports”, readers cannot judge the “reliability and usefulness of
health research” (Altman & Simera, 2009). It is the role of
editors and peer reviewers to ensure the manuscripts
submitted for publication in a journal meet these basic
criteria.
Journal editors have worked to improve the quality of
research reporting through instructions to authors, peer
review, and the editorial process. In 1979, the International
Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) published
reporting guides for authors, initially limited to formatting
issues in research reports (Moher, 2009). This initiative was
followed by the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts
Submitted to Biomedical Journals (International Committee
of Medical Journal Editors, 2008) and in the mid-1990s by the
Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT)
Statement (Hopewell, Clarke, Moher et al., 2008). The
CONSORT Statement is a 22-item checklist and flow diagram
focused on systematically guiding researchers through the
writing of scientific reports of RCTs. Other internationally
endorsed guidelines for reporting research include STARD
for diagnostic accuracy research and STROBE for
epidemiological observational studies.
An international initiative to improve the reliability and value
of medical research literature was launched in June 2008,
called Enhancing the Quality and Transparency of Health
Research (EQUATOR; http://equator-network.org). The
EQUATOR Network promotes transparent and accurate
reporting of research studies through efforts to:
• raise awareness of the importance of good reporting;
providing resources, education and training related to
health research reporting
4
• assist in the development, dissemination and implementation of reporting guidelines
• monitor the status of the quality of health research
reporting and
• conduct research related to the quality of reporting.
The seven major goals of the EQUATOR Network include:
1. Development and maintenance of a comprehensive
internet-based resource centre providing up-to-date
information, tools and other materials related to health
research reporting.
2. Assisting in the development, dissemination and
implementation of robust reporting guidelines.
3. Actively promoting the use of reporting guidelines and
good research reporting through an education and training
program.
4. Conducting regular assessments of how journals
implement and use reporting guidelines.
5. Conduct regular audits of how journals implement and use
reporting guidelines.
6. Setting up a global network of local EQUATOR ‘offices’ to
facilitate the improvement of health research reporting on
a worldwide scale.
7. Development of a general strategy for translating
principles of responsible research reporting into practice.
The EQUATOR website provides many useful links and
resources for authors, editors and peer reviewers. I
encourage you to take a look. In the next edition of the
CJNN, I will continue this editorial theme with comments
on the conduct and reporting of survey research. It is my
hope that providing some background and context around
manuscript requirements and peer review might help
alleviate some of the stress inherent in the writing process of
potential authors. Although these editorials will focus on
research reports, the elements of clarity, completeness and
transparency apply to clinical practice and experiential
manuscripts as well.
Useful links
The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors:
Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts:
http://www.icmje.org/urm_main.html
Reporting Guidelines: http://www.equator-network.org/
resource-centre/library-of-health-research-reporting/
UK National Health System Research Flowchart:
http://www.rdinfo.org.uk/flowchart/Flowchart.html
Strobe: http://www.strobe-statement.org
’Til next time,
Theresa Green, RN, PhD
Editor, CJNN
References
Altman, D., & Simera, I. (2009). Responsible reporting of
health research studies: Transparent, complete, accurate and timely.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 65, 1–3.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Hopewell, S., Clarke, M., Moher, D., et al. (2008). CONSORT
for reporting randomized controlled trials in journal and conference
abstracts: Explanation and elaboration. PLoS Med, 5, e20.
International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. (2008).
Uniform requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical
journals: Writing and editing for biomedical publication. Retrieved
from http://www.icmje.org/
Moher, D. (2009). Guidelines for reporting health care
research: Advancing the clarity and transparency of scientific
reporting. Canadian Journal Anesthesia, 56, 96–101.
Moher, D., Simera, I., Schulz, K., Hoey, J., & Altman, D. (2008).
Helping editors, peer reviewers and authors improve the clarity,
completeness and transparency of reporting health research. BMC
Medicine, 6(13), 1741–43.
Morris, C. (2008). The EQUATOR Network: Promoting the
transparent and accurate reporting of research. Developmental
Medicine & Child Neurology, 50, 723.
Simera, I., Moher, D., Hirst, A., Hoey, J., Schulz, K. & Altman,
D. (2010). Transparent and accurate reporting increases reliability,
utility, and impact of your research: reporting guidelines and the
EQUATOR Network. BMC Medicine 8(24).
We want your
Neuroscience Nursing News!
Please send your stories, clinical ethical issues,
or other information for CJNN content to
Theresa Green, Editor, at [email protected]
Websites of interest
Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses and
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing website: www.cann.ca
Check this site often for updates on information.
Reports will be on the website.
Canadian Nurses Association: www.cna-nurses.com
Canadian Congress of Neurological Society: www.ccns.org
Please check out the web page to learn more about the society to which we belong.
CANN is an affiliate of this society.
Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences: www.CJNS.org
World Federation of Neuroscience Nurses: www.WFNN.org
All CANN members are automatically members of WFNN.
The Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing is published by Pappin Communications /
La Journal canadienne des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques est publié par Pappin Communications
The Victoria Centre, 84 Isabella Street, Pembroke, Ontario K8A 5S5, email: [email protected]
Managing Editor: Bruce Pappin; Layout and Design: Sherri Keller
Advertising space is available/Disponibilité d’espaces pour messages publicitaires
For information, contact Heather Coughlin, Advertising Manager, Pappin Communications,
The Victoria Centre, 84 Isabella Street, Pembroke, Ontario, K8A 5S5; telephone: 613-735-0952; fax: 613-735-7983
email: [email protected] or visit our website at www.pappin.com
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
5
Éditorial
Rapport de recherche : la clarté et l’exactitude pour améliorer la qualité
La publication d’une recherche est l’une des étapes finales d’un
processus de recherche débutant par le développement d’une
idée. Au fur et à mesure que le projet évolue grâce au
rassemblement de collaborateurs, au plan du protocole, à
l’obtention d’une subvention ou d’un fonds de recherche et à
l’approbation d’effectuer la recherche. Par la suite, la mise en
œuvre, l’analyse et la conclusion tirée des données mènent à la
publication des résultats de l’étude. Bien que l’étape finale d’un
processus de recherche nécessite la diffusion des résultats,
plusieurs études sont rapportées incorrectement ou ne le sont
pas du tout. En réalité, des évaluateurs on affirmé que plusieurs
essais cliniques comparatifs, études par observations, et études
qualitatives manquent de méthodologie ou ne sont pas
suffisamment détaillées, ce qui donne peu de crédibilité aux
résultats (Simera, Moher, Hirst, Hoey, Schulz, & Altman, 2010).
Respecter la méthodologie est la responsabilité de l’auteur d’un
manuscrit. Cependant, dans plusieurs cas, plusieurs manuscrits
manquent de clarté et de détails qui permettraient aux lecteurs
de juger de l’utilité de la recherche (Moher, Simera, Schulz,
Hoey, & Altman, 2008). Par exemple, le manuscrit peut
contenir une table des matières trop importantes pouvant créer
de la confusion, une utilisation trop abondante d’acronymes, ou
d’autres problèmes de style (Morris, 2008). Si les auteurs ne
présentent pas des « rapports complets, clairs et transparents »,
les lecteurs ne peuvent juger de « la fiabilité et de l’utilité de la
recherche » (Altman, & Simera, 2009). C’est le rôle du rédacteur
en chef et des réviseurs de s’assurer que les manuscrits à publier
dans le journal répondent aux critères de base.
Les rédacteurs en chef du journal ont travaillé à améliorer la
qualité des rapports de recherche et du processus éditorial en
donnant des instructions aux auteurs et aux réviseurs. En 1979,
l’International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) a
publié un guide de présentation des rapports pour les auteurs,
au départ seulement pour les questions de mise en page (Moher,
2009). Par la suite, il y a eu les exigences uniformes pour les
manuscrits présentés aux revues biomédicales (Uniform
Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical
Journals) (International Committee of Medical Journal Editors,
2008) et, au milieu des années 1990, le développement du
CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials)
(Hopewell, Clarke, Moher et al., 2008). Le CONSORT
comprend une liste de 22 éléments à vérifier et un schéma
fonctionnel que les auteurs peuvent utiliser pour écrire des
rapports scientifiques pour des essais cliniques. Il existe d’autres
recommandations pour les rapports de recherche à l’échelle
internationale dont STARD pour les études de diagnostique et
STROBE pour les études d’observation en épidémiologie.
Une initiative internationale pour améliorer la fiabilité et la
valeur des écrits de recherches médicales a été lancée en juin
2008, Enhancing the Quality and Transaparency of Health
Research
(EQUATOR;
http://equator-network.org).
EQUATOR fait la promotion de la transparence et de
l’exactitude des études de recherche en :
• sensibilisant à l’importance de bien rapporter les données;
indiquer les sources, éduquer et former relativement à la
recherche;
6
• aidant au développement, à la diffusion et à l’intégration des
recommandations pour la rédaction de rapports;
• surveillant la qualité des rapports de recherche; et
• effectuant des recherche relativement à la qualité des
rapports.
Les sept objectifs les plus importants de EQUATOR sont :
1. développer et tenir à jour un centre de ressources sur
Internet fournissant des informations, des outils, et
d’autres matériels à jour relativement aux rapports de
recherche en santé.
2. aider au développement, à la diffusion et à l’intégration de
recommandations importantes.
3. promouvoir activement l’utilisation des recommandations
et l’importance de faire de bons rapports de recherche
grâce à un programme d’éducation et de formation.
4. effectuer des évaluations régulières sur la façon d’intégrer
et d’utiliser les recommandations.
5. effectuer des vérifications régulières sur la façon d’intégrer
et d’utiliser les recommandations.
6. mettre sur pied un réseau des « bureaux » locaux de
EQUATOR afin d’aider à l’amélioration des rapports de
recherche à l’échelle mondiale.
7. développer une stratégie générale permettant d’amener les
principes importants des rapports de recherche au niveau
pratique.
Le site Web EQUATOR affiche plusieurs liens utiles et fournit
des ressources pour les auteurs, les rédacteurs en chef et les
réviseurs; je vous encourage à aller y jeter un coup d’œil. Dans
le prochain numéro du JCIISN, je continuerai à parler du même
thème dans mon éditorial en ajoutant des commentaires sur
comment effectuer et rapporter les résultats d’une recherche
par sondage. J’espère qu’en donnant des informations de base et
divers éléments entourant les recommandations par rapport
aux manuscrits et à l’évaluation par les réviseurs diminuer la
tension que peuvent ressentir des auteurs potentiels. Bien que
ces éditoriaux mettront l’accent sur les rapports de recherche,
la clarté, exhaustivité et la transparence s’appliquent également
aux pratiques cliniques et aux manuscrits.
Liens utiles
The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors:
Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts:
http://www.icmje.org/urm_main.html
Reporting Guidelines: http://www.equator-network.org/
resource-centre/library-of-health-research-reporting/
U.K. National Health System Research Flowchart:
http://www.rdinfo.org.uk/flowchart/Flowchart.html
Strobe: http://www.strobe-statement.org
À la prochaine,
Theresa Green, inf., Ph.D.
Rédactrice en chef, JCIISN
Références
Les références se trouvent à la page 4.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Nurse case management to improve risk
reduction outcomes in a stroke prevention clinic
By Sandra Ireland, RN, PhD, Gail MacKenzie, RN, MScN, Linda Gould, RPN,
Diane Dassinger, RN, Alicja Koper, RN, and Kathryn LeBlanc, BSc, MSc
Abstract
Stroke prevention clinic health care professionals are mandated
to provide early access to neurological consultation and treatment, diagnostic testing, and behavioural risk factor management for clients with transient ischemic attack or mild
non-disabling stroke. Clinic nurses collaborate with clients and
interprofessional teams to support risk factor reduction to prevent recurrent stroke events. Although hypertension is the most
Gestion de cas par le personnel
infirmier dans le but d’améliorer
la diminution des cas dans une
clinique de prévention des
accidents cérébro-vasculaires
Résumé
Les professionnels de la santé d’une clinique de prévention des
accidents cérébro-vasculaires (ACV) ont pour mandat de
faciliter l’accès aux consultations en neurologie, aux traitements, aux tests diagnostiques et à la gestion des facteurs
comportementaux de risque pour les clients présentant des
ischémies transitoires ou un ACV léger et non incapacitant.
Les infirmières de la clinique collaborent avec les clients et les
équipes multidisciplinaires afin de contribuer à la diminution des facteurs de risque dans le cadre de la prévention
d’ACV récurrents. Quoique l’hypertension soit le facteur modifiable le plus important, une recherche plus poussée montre
que le respect de la prescription de médicaments par ces
patients serait de moins de 50 %. Une clinique mentionne la
nécessité d’améliorer les résultats par l’identification des
clients présentant une hypertension non contrôlée ainsi que
des caractéristiques de non adhésion secondaire à des problèmes cognitifs et/ou d’efficacité personnelle, permettant de
prédire que le niveau de pression sanguine désiré ne sera pas
atteint. Afin de répondre à ce besoin, la faisabilité d’un modèle élargi de plan de soins a été testée auprès d’un échantillon
de 20 clients. Des entrevues de motivation et des approches
d’autogestion ont été combinées à des interventions destinées
à améliorer le respect des prescriptions de médicaments : simplification des routines de prises de médicaments, fourniture
de moyens mnémotechniques et d’auto-monitorage à domicile, ainsi que des conseils et un suivi infirmier pendant six
mois. Les résultats ont prouvé que l’utilisation d’un modèle
élargi de plan de soins était faisable avec un impact seulement modéré sur les ressources cliniques. Au bout de six mois,
on a pu constater une diminution de la pression et une augmentation du respect de la médication chez certains patients
sélectionnés comme présentant un grand risque d’ACV et une
incapacité à atteindre les résultats désirés du traitement.
important modifiable risk factor for stroke, broader evidence
indicates that adherence to prescribed medications may be less
than 50%. One clinic identified a need to improve risk factor outcomes through identifying clients with uncontrolled hypertension, cognitive, self-efficacy and/or adherence characteristics
predictive of non-achievement of blood pressure targets. To
address this need, an expanded nurse case management care
delivery model was pilot tested for feasibility in a participant
sample of 20 clients. Motivational interviewing and self-management approaches were combined with interventions designed
to improve adherence: facilitation of the simplification of medication routines, providing memory cues and home self-monitoring equipment, counselling, and six-month nursing follow-up.
Results demonstrated that an expanded nurse case management model of care delivery is feasible with only a modest
impact on clinic resources. At six months, there were significant
reductions in blood pressure and increases in medication selfefficacy and adherence for selected clients identified with high
risk for stroke and non-achievement of treatment outcomes.
Key words: stroke, transient ischemic attack, prevention,
hypertension, nurse case management, self-efficacy, adherence
Introduction
The mandate of health care providers in secondary stroke prevention clinics (SPC) in Ontario is to provide early access to
neurological consultation and treatment, diagnostic testing, and
behavioural risk factor management for clients with transient
ischemic attack (TIA) or mild non-disabling stroke (Ministry of
Health and Long-Term Care of Ontario, 2001). The SPC in the
study site described here provides services to a client population ranging from middle to older age adults (M = 67.5 years).
Clients present with multiple and complex co-morbidities:
hypertension, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, hyperlipidemia,
mild dementia and/or depression, and a variety of psychosocial health care issues (Hamilton Health Sciences, 2009). On
admission to the SPC clinic, clients referred from emergency
department, family and other physicians receive comprehensive neurological assessment and diagnosis, determination of
disease etiology, evidence-based treatment, and support in selfmanagement of behavioural risk factors. Effective management
of risk factors is essential for clients following TIA or minor
stroke whose 30-day risk for stroke is 5% to 12% without timely treatment and reduction of modifiable risk factors
(Gladstone, Kapral, Fang, Laupacis, & Tu, 2004). These include
hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity,
excess alcohol consumption, and sedentary lifestyle.
Hypertension is prevalent in SPC client populations and is one of
the most important modifiable risk factors for stroke (O’Donnell
et al., 2010). Even modest reductions in blood pressure have been
reported to offer significant risk reduction in recurrent stroke
(Faxon et al., 2004; Pickering et al., 2005). Although adherence
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
7
to blood pressure medications and other treatments has been
reported to be less than 50% in stroke and other populations
(Haynes et al., 2005), often the first response is to intensify
medical therapy without considering potential client adherence issues. Adherence issues may include client lack of understanding of how medications work and possible side effects, as
well as personal beliefs about the efficacy of medications.
At the study site SPC, newly referred clients routinely are limited
to two to three visits with a neurologist and clinical nurse specialist (CNS) extending over approximately one to two months.
Within this limited timeframe, the expectations of the CNS
nurse case manager (NCM) role are to 1) develop rapport with
clients, 2) facilitate behavioural change using motivational interviewing techniques (Rollnick & Miller, 1995), 3) implement selfmanaged care strategies (McGowan, 2005), and 4) evaluate the
outcomes of these changes. Meeting these expectations within
tight timelines and relatively static resources in an environment
of rapidly increasing clinic volumes, reflective of the growing
burden of chronic illness in our aging population, has resulted in
a need to test alternative care delivery approaches. Based on the
findings of a recently completed research study conducted at the
study site (Ireland, Arthur, Gunn, & Oczkowski, 2010), a process
was developed to determine those clients whose level of risk and
adherence to treatment characteristics would most benefit from
expanded NCM interventions. Based on the results of a literature
review, interventions were identified and a pilot study designed
to test the feasibility of an expanded NCM care delivery model.
Literature review
A systematic review of the literature conducted by Haynes et al.
(2005) recommended a combination of interventions to improve
client adherence to medications. These included simplifying dosing regimens, adherence counselling, providing memory cues,
home self-monitoring, and nurse-led supportive follow-up care.
In a recent study, Ireland et al. (2010) found that deficits in cognition and self-reported medication self-efficacy and adherence
independently predicted six-month non-achievement of blood
pressure targets in 93 participants attending a SPC. Specifically,
participants’ scores of 1) < 26 on the Mini Mental Status
Examination (MMSE) (OR, 1.277; CI, 1.062–1.53; p = 0.033)
(Folstein et al., 1975); 2) < 100% on a question to determine selfefficacy that the prescribed medication(s) would improve their
health (OR, 1.613; CI, 1.025–1.253; p = 0.039); and 3) < 100% on
a question to determine adherence to medications in an average week (OR, 1.14; CI, 1.011–1.291; p = 0.033) were predictive
of non-achievement of national stroke blood pressure recommended targets (Lindsay et. al., 2008). In addition, this study
and others reviewed concluded the need for improvement in
risk factor management for high risk for stroke clients attending SPCs (Joseph, Babikian, Allen, & Winter, 1999; Mouradian,
Majumdar, Senthilselvan, Khan, & Shuaib, 2002).
Theoretical perspectives
Concepts identified from Self-Efficacy and Self-Managed Care
theories provided the framework for this nursing research
(Bandura, 1998; McGowan, 2005). Self-efficacy, a major concept
in Social Cognitive eory, is described as the confidence that a
person has in their ability to change their behaviour and achieve
8
goals. Individual self-efficacy in any specific behaviour may be
increased through provision of 1) exposure to mastery experiences (successful experiences in the behaviour of interest), 2)
vicarious learning (modelling or observing others performing
similar tasks), 3) receiving physiological feedback following
achievement of the behaviour of interest (physiological signs),
and 4) verbal persuasion (receiving positive feedback) (Bandura,
1998). From this theoretical perspective, what people believe
and feel affects how they act. For example, positive physiological
feedback received by clients from blood pressure self-monitoring may result in feelings of self-efficacy in taking antihypertensive medications and result in continued adherence.
Approaches to behaviour change informed by Self-Managed
Care help people to develop self-esteem regarding their abilities
in the behaviours of interest, gain insight into their own behavioural triggers, and develop the knowledge and confidence to
make healthy choices (McGowan, 2005). Motivational
Interviewing is an approach that facilitates self-management
by assisting the person to identify discrepancies between
beliefs and actions, and participate in the development of care
goals (Rollnick & Miller, 1995).
In summary, two theoretical approaches and the evidence
reviewed informed the development of the expanded NCM
interventions included in this study. The purpose of the interventions was to improve client medication self-efficacy and
adherence, reduce blood pressure and achieve long-term stroke
risk reduction for a specific subset of high risk for stroke SPC
clients. Interventions included 1) facilitating medical management, 2) provision of home self-monitoring devices, 3) supportive lifestyle and adherence counselling, and 4) adherence
monitoring. Adherence monitoring was performed in collaboration with community providers (pharmacists, family practitioners and family caregivers).
Primary research questions
1. Is an expanded NCM model of care delivery feasible in an
SPC from a resource utilization perspective; that is, is there
adequate staff and time and nursing resources to perform the
work effectively?
2. Do NCM strategies (facilitating the simplification of medication regimens and home self-monitoring, providing adherence counselling and memory cues) and six-month follow-up
of clients with probable TIA or confirmed stroke and deficits
in cognition, self-efficacy and/or self-reported adherence
result in reductions in blood pressure and improved medication self-efficacy and/or self-reported adherence?
Methods
Design
The pilot study employed a mixed methods design. A prospective cohort design was utilized to obtain a convenience sample of
20 consenting adult participants attending an SPC with hypertension and confirmed minor stroke or probable transient ischemic
attack and deficits in any or all of cognition, medication self-efficacy and self-reported medication adherence. Additionally, a
qualitative analysis of NCM visit notes, client responses to openended questions and other communications was conducted to
identify recurrent themes or concepts of the NCM experience
from the nurse and client perspectives (Straus & Corbin, 1990).
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Study setting
The study was conducted in an outpatient SPC located in an
urban, university-affiliated regional stroke centre hospital. Each
designated Ontario Stroke Centre must meet identified best
practice requirements. They are responsible for organizing the
human and medical resources required to provide continuum
of care stroke services across their respective regions (Ontario
Stroke System, 2008). The study site SPC manages approximately 1,000 client referrals annually (HHS, 2009). Five neurologists,
one CNS, one part-time nurse clinician, and one administrative
support person routinely staff the SPC. A specialist in internal
medicine with an interest in stroke is available for consultation.
Additionally, a dietetic assistant contributes to monthly client
educational sessions, as one component of usual care.
ry of quit patterns, depression and history of previous TIA or
stroke were also collected (Table 1). These data provided the
NCM with necessary information within which to frame adherence and other risk factor counselling.
Recruitment and sampling procedures
The sample size for this pilot study was determined based on a
historical review of SPC data to determine the expected number
of clients attending the SPC with the specific characteristics of
interest over a six-month period (HHS, 2009). Participants were
initially eligible for recruitment if they were 18 years of age or
older, English speaking and able to provide admitting information. Participants were recruited after diagnostic test results and
neurologist examinations indicated a diagnosis of probable TIA
or confirmed stroke. Clinic nurses approached eligible clients to
explain the study and identify interest in participation. Informed
consent was obtained by a nurse not involved in study.
Screening measures
Blood pressure was measured utilizing a single manual sphygmomanometer with the client at rest and in a seated position.
The measure recorded was the mean of readings of pressures
taken from both arms. Hypertension was defined as exceeding
national stroke recommendations (≥ 140/90 mmHg or
≥ 130/80 mmHg for those clients with diabetes or chronic renal
impairment) (Lindsay et al., 2008).
Participant demographic data regarding age, educational level
and living status were collected. Additionally, risk factor data
regarding hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, smoking and histoTable 1. Study participant characteristics
Characteristic
#
%
Age > 65 years
9
45
Probable TIA or confirmed stroke
20 100
Blood pressure exceeding
national recommendations
20 100
Medication self-efficacy rating <100%
19 95
Self-reported adherence to medication <100%
5
25
Mini-Mental State Examination <26
2
10
Education level < 9 years
3
15
Lives alone
6
30
Hyperlipidemia (documented)
13 65
Diabetes (documented)
10 50
BMI >30
9
45
Current smoker (within last 6 months)
2
5
Former smoker (quit > 6 months ago)
9
45
Never smoked
9
45
Depression (treated)
3
15
Past HX of TIA or stroke
4
20
Participants were recruited over a seven-month period.
Eligibility requirements included 1) a diagnosis of probable TIA
or confirmed stroke; 2) hypertension (defined as clinic blood
pressure readings greater than national stroke recommendations recorded at both admission [SPC visit one] and recruitment visit [SPC visit two or three] [Lindsay et al., 2008]); and 3)
deficits in one or all of cognition (MMSE score < 26) (Folstein
et al., 1975), medication self-efficacy (score < 100%) and/or
medication non-adherence (self-report of any missed medications in an average week) (Ireland et al., 2010).
Cognition was screened by the recruiting nurse using the
MMSE. A score of < 26 of a possible 30 indicated some degree
of cognitive deficit (Folstein et al., 1975; Molloy, 1999). The
MMSE was designed to identify dementia, delirium and cognitive changes over time. Test-retest reliability has been reported
to vary from 0.82 to 0.98; a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of
82% have been reported (Cockrell & Folstein, 1988).
Medication self-efficacy expectation was determined by asking
the client to rate his or her level of confidence that taking the
prescribed stroke risk reduction medication(s) would reduce
the risk for another TIA or stroke on a Likert-type 7-point rating scale with 1 being no confidence and 7 being high confidence (Ireland et al., 2010). The validity and reliability of this
measure have not been established.
Medication adherence. Three measures of adherence were
included. Deficits in any or all of these measures resulted in a
rating of non-adherence.
Self-reported adherence to medication was measured by the
number of pills clients self-reported as missed in an average
week (Craig, 1985). Participants were asked to respond to the
question “Remembering to take medications is difficult. In an
average week, how many pills have you missed taking?” Using
this measure, Ireland et al. (2010) found that any report of
missed medication taking was an independent predictor of SPC
clients’ non-achievement of national guideline blood pressure
targets (Lindsay et al., 2008).
Participants were requested to bring all medications to their
clinic visits in the original containers. Pill counts of up to three
antihypertensive or other medications specific to stroke risk
reduction were conducted by the study nurse using the following formula: number of pills taken since prescription refill date
divided by number of pills the client was prescribed to take
multiplied by 100 equaled pill count adherence percentage.
Additionally, with the written consent of the participants, community pharmacists were contacted by fax to confirm whether
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
9
the client had been adherent (≥ 80%) according to prescription
renewals patterns for these medications. An allowance of 20%
was provided to allow for individual variability in prescription
renewal patterns.
Outcome measures
Primary outcome measure: The feasibility of the expanded
NCM care delivery model was determined based on the number
of NCM hours spent in counselling and telephone consultation
over six months, and a qualitative analysis of narrative visit
notes. Hours were compared to usual care CNS SPC hours.
Secondary outcome measures: Blood pressure readings were
recorded at study admission and at six-month follow-up.
Medication self-efficacy scores were measured on study admission and at six-month follow-up. Medication adherence to three
medications prescribed to reduce stroke risk was originally
based on study admission and six-month follow-up ratings of 1)
self-report, 2) pill counts, and 3) community pharmacist assessment of participant adherence based on renewal patterns.
Analysis: Study data were analyzed using a commercially available statistics package, SPSS Version 12 (2005). Statistical procedures conducted in the analysis included descriptive procedures,
Student’s t-test, chi-square and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests.
Interventions
Each participant had a minimum of one physician assessment
and six consultations with the NCM in addition to their routine
SPC visits over the six-month study period. At the first study
visit, a specialist in internal medicine with an interest in hypertension management and stroke counselled participants on the
need for medication adherence. Included was an assessment of
the need for 1) adjustments to current blood pressure medications (altering dosages or simplification of dosing schedules), 2)
additional medications, and 3) utilization of combination therapy (for example, a vasodilator medication combined in the
same pill as a diuretic). At this visit, the NCM reviewed with
participants the purpose of their medications and discussed
individual lifestyle changes to assist in blood pressure reduction. Lifestyle changes discussed included reduction in dietary
salt, increased activity, weight loss, smoking cessation, reduced
alcohol consumption, and improved adherence to medications.
Motivational interviewing techniques and a self-managed care
approach were integrated into all discussions with participants
to support behaviour change. Group training in motivational
interviewing and self-managed care had been previously provided by the regional stroke program. At their first study visit
with the NCM, participants were provided with a memory cue
in the form of a weekly medication dosette if they were not previously using one. Additional individualized memory cues were
collaboratively identified by the NCM, participants and family
members/supportive others that would assist in taking medications at the prescribed times, for example, at meal times or at
time of brushing teeth in the morning. Participants were also
instructed in how to self-monitor blood pressure using either
personal machines or equipment available at their local pharmacy. Where other resources were not available, automatic
blood pressure machines were loaned to participants for the
duration of the study.
10
Nurse case management follow-up over an approximate sixmonth study period included, at a minimum, a monthly telephone call to the participants that provided counselling and
ongoing support for risk factor management including adherence. Based on these discussions and participant requests,
additional clinic visits with the NCM and the physician were
provided, as needed, for the management of hypertension
issues. Attendance at a two-hour stroke prevention class led
by the NCM and a dietetic assistant, as part of usual care, was
also offered to both participants and family members.
Approval for the study was obtained from the joint Hamilton
Health Sciences and McMaster University Research Ethics
Board (March 10, 2008). The authors of this publication have
no declared conflicts of interest.
Results
Participants
An additional month of recruitment was required to ensure an
adequate number of participants. At the end of seven months,
a total of 20 participants with probable TIA or confirmed
stroke, hypertension, and one or all of the following had been
recruited: cognitive deficit (MMSE < 26), reduced level of selfefficacy (score < 7), and/or any self- or pharmacist-reported nonadherence to specific medications. Early in the study process,
pill counts were found by the research team to be an unreliable
measure of adherence. Based on these concerns, a calculation of
improvement in pill count at six-months from baseline was not
conducted or included in these results. The wide range of adherence calculated from pill count data confirms the difficulty with
this measure (range 50% to 116%) in this participant group.
Most characteristics of study participants were similar to the historical profile of SPC clients at the study site (Hamilton Health
Sciences, 2009). Participants ranged in age from 32 to 87 years
(M = 67.5 years; SD = 16.077). The majority of participants were
male (60%). Fifty per cent of participants were diabetic; 60% had
three or more risk factors. MMSE scores at baseline ranged
from 22 to 30 with only two of the 20 participants scoring < 26
(Folstein et al. 1975). Differences in the characteristics of the
participant group when compared to historical SPC client data
included a higher incidence of hypertension (100% versus 71.8%),
diabetes (50% versus 21%) and hyperlipidemia (65% versus
58.1%). Table 1 provides the characteristics of study participants.
All participants (n = 20) self-monitored blood pressure during
the study. Fifty per cent of participants owned blood pressure
monitoring machines at recruitment or were able to attend a
local pharmacy weekly for blood pressure checks. Others
were provided with machines (50%). Thirty per cent were in
the habit of using medication dosettes on recruitment. Only
one participant did not have a family physician (5%).
Primary outcomes
The average amount of NCM contact and therapeutic intervention time for each participant over the six-month follow-up
period was 4.8 hours. This translated into approximately four
hours per week in calls and visits. The qualitative analysis of
NCM case notes and client responses to open-ended questions
revealed the following themes and concepts and the NCM
interventions that followed.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
a) Medication knowledge gaps created anxiety for participants
and their caregivers requiring ongoing NCM support and education. Knowledge needs included education regarding the purpose and possible side effects of medications. In some cases, this
required the NCM to negotiate changes in dosing regimens with
prescribing physicians. For example, spacing the administration
times of antihypertensive agents reduced unpleasant side effects
for some participants and resulted in controlled blood pressure measures in the morning and evening. When mild cognitive loss was thought to impact on participants’ adherence,
blister packs were requested from community pharmacists.
b) Gaps in transition of care communication required the
NCM to act as a link with family physicians, supportive others
and community providers. Examples included locating a family physician for a participant, making referrals for community
homecare follow-up for falls prevention and medication monitoring, alerting pharmacists when a participant was receiving
incompatible medications from more than one pharmacy, and
providing assistance in completing applications for funding.
c) Some healthy lifestyle changes were reported to the NCM by
each participant. For example, participants reported now reading labels to identify salt and fat content of the food, or adding
a formal exercise component, or losing weight. Two participants who had been counselled in smoking cessation by the
NCM reported quitting smoking.
Secondary outcomes
Improved hypertension management: Thirty per cent (n = 6) of
the 20 participants at the six-month follow-up visit had achieved
nationally recommended blood pressure targets of < 140/90
mmHg or < 130/80 mmHg for those with diabetes or chronic
renal impairment (Lindsay et al., 2008). Importantly, the majority experienced significant reductions in blood pressure from
the time of recruitment when compared to the study follow-up
at six months (see Table 2). Analysis using Student t-tests
demonstrated a mean reduction in systolic blood pressure from
baseline of 16.75 mmHg (p = 0.000), and a mean reduction in
diastolic blood pressure of 5.025 mmHg (p = 0.004).
Table 2. Comparison of participant blood pressure
measurements at baseline and six-month follow-up visits
Visit
BP in mmHg
SD
Mean SBP
at screening
150.80
8.920
Mean SBP
at follow-up
134.05
7.870
Mean DBP
at screening
81.72
11.971
Mean DBP
at follow-up
76.70
10.569
Significance
p = 0.000
p = 0.004
Improvement in medication self-efficacy: In addition to the
presence of probable TIA or confirmed stroke and hypertension, the most frequent inclusion criteria met by 95% of participants was decreased medication self-efficacy expectations, i.e.,
any degree of belief that taking medications as directed would
not prevent a future stroke (M = 4.63; SD = 1.29). At six-month
follow-up, participants reported significantly increased levels
of medication self-efficacy (M = 5.88; SD = 1.050; p = 0.04).
Adherence to medication: At study enrolment, 20% of participants (n = 5) reported missing one or more medications in an
average week. At six-month follow-up, there was a significant
improvement in self-reported medication adherence with only
three participants (15%) reporting having missed taking one or
more pills in an average week (p = 0.003).
The majority of participants were reported by their community pharmacists as having been ≥ 80% adherent with medications based on prescription renewal patterns at both study
baseline and at six-month follow-up. However, pharmacist
adherence ratings reflecting renewal of only statin and antihypertensive agents demonstrated a mean adherence increase of
14.6% at six-month follow-up when compared to baseline.
This trend did not demonstrate statistical significance.
Discussion
In this study, a combination of medical and NCM interventions
significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure at six
months in a high-risk group of 20 SPC participants diagnosed
with probable TIA or confirmed stroke and increased risk of
non-adherence. Additionally, participant medication self-efficacy and self-reported adherence to medication scores
improved significantly from baseline.
The wide range of scores and the difficulty in collecting meaningful data regarding participant adherence from pill counts was
an important finding in terms of future study of SPC client populations. In spite of instructions and reminders, study nurses
noted that participants frequently brought the original pill containers, but neglected to bring the filled dosettes from home.
Others ordered medication early from their pharmacy, before
they had run out. Some others placed re-fill medication in old
containers so that dates of re-fill were inaccurate. In addition,
study nurses reported feeling uncomfortable counting pills in
front of participants, feeling that this action conveyed a lack of
trust that was detrimental to the nurse-client relationship.
The results of this study suggest that pharmacists were responsive and amenable to participating in a review of adherence for
their clients. All returned comment sheets by fax indicating
each participant’s level of adherence based on renewal patterns.
Based on this finding and the potential lack of reliability of pill
count data described, pharmacists may be an underutilized
partner in client follow-up, discussion of medication adherence
issues and research. Pharmacist feedback may provide clinicians and researchers with reliable data to determine correlation with client self-report of adherence.
The medical management of hypertension of two participants
varied from NCM recommendations and may have impacted
on overall blood pressure outcomes in this small study sample. For one participant, their physician made the decision not
to increase the dosage of antihypertensive medication to
avoid lowering diastolic blood pressure and to increase the
pulse pressure range. This was done to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure 70 mmHg or greater in order to provide
adequate coronary artery perfusion. For the second participant, a family physician discontinued his antihypertensive
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
11
therapy just prior to the six-month follow-up visit because of
the participant’s reports of falling.
During the development of the study protocol, it was anticipated that combination therapy (e.g., vessel dilator medication
plus a diuretic medication in one pill) would be helpful in promoting adherence to medication taking, as it would reduce the
number of medications the client would need to take. However,
only one participant was prescribed a combination medication.
For certain study participants for whom stabilization of blood
pressure was difficult, it was important to have the capacity to collaborate with a physician to titrate doses of diuretic and to alter
times of medication administration. One participant required
changes to the timing of medications including taking his ACE
inhibitor and a diuretic in the morning, a calcium channel
blocker at noon, and a second dose of the ACE inhibitor in the
evening. By combining different antihypertensive medications
at different times of the day, blood pressure was lowered without the participant experiencing precipitous drops in pressure
experienced when all medications were taken at the same time.
Consistent with evidence that supports interventions to
improve self-efficacy, the qualitative data from NCM field notes
and interview responses, as well as the increased self-efficacy
scores of participants at six months, supports the expanded
NCM approach taken. The inclusion of verbal persuasion using
motivational interviewing to assist participants and their caregivers in coming to an understanding of medication regimens
and the need for adherence appears to have been effective.
Memory cues provided participants with mastery experiences
in medication taking. Group classes provided opportunities for
participants and their caregivers to identify with others who,
like themselves, had experienced a stroke event and were recovering successfully (Bandura, 1998; McGowan, 2005).
Home self-monitoring of blood pressure provided participants with physiological feedback that medication and
lifestyle changes were associated with measurable improvements in their health (Bandura, 1998). Consistent with other
evidence, home blood pressure readings also provided objective data upon which medical and NCM decisions could be
made to tailor treatment to meet individual client needs
(Brook, 2000; Nordmann, Frach, Walker, Martina, & Bettegay,
1999; Yarows, Julius & Pickering, 2000).
The extension of NCM counselling and intervention over the
six-month period described here reflect an approach that
encourages self-management and a collaborative model of care
planning. This approach recognized clients as partners in care
and encouraged ongoing communication with their health
care providers. Telephone contact was an effective method of
providing support. However, during the course of the study,
extra physician visits were facilitated by the NCM for a few
participants to monitor response to treatment and make
changes to medications. Alternatively, some participants preferred to communicate with the NCM by email or fax, as they
could send blood pressure reports rather than call. This
approach was less disturbing for those who worked shifts and
slept in the daytime or were at work. One participant with mild
aphasia found it easier to communicate in person or by email.
Motivational interviewing was integrated into the counselling
approach so that clients were major participants in determin12
ing personal goals and identifying strategies for lifestyle
change. Some of the participants made dramatic changes in
levels of activity (e.g., recreational dancing, sports), weight loss
(bariatric clinic programs), and smoking cessation. Most counselling occurred by means of telephone conversations and
required only positive reinforcement of the health benefits of
the changes that were reflected in improved blood pressures.
Important to the feasibility of an expanded NCM approach
within limited resources, the additional time required to telephone, counsel or participate in extra visits with the limited
number of participants identified by the study screening criteria
was not excessive. However, if a case management model of follow-up is adopted, in order to sustain the quality of this intervention and demonstrate the value attached to the work and
the potential for improved client outcomes, additional NCM
contact hours will need to be built into clinic staffing plans.
Implications for research and practice
Additional study is required to evaluate the broader economic
impact on health service utilization of an NCM approach to
stroke prevention in high risk for stroke and non-adherence sub
groups of SPC client populations. Further research may determine the economic impact of facilitating a smooth transition
from intensive clinic specialty care to home, increasing collaboration with family practitioners and closing gaps and addressing
discrepancies between the plan of care and its implementation
by clients and supportive others. The value of meeting other
SPC client needs for concrete assistance, for example, locating a
family physician or completing required financial assistance
forms, may also need evaluation. Additionally, further study is
needed to determine how longer term NCM through the continuum impacts on the perceptions of care and quality of life of
clients at risk for stroke and their supportive others.
The screening processes implemented in this study captured an
important subgroup of SPC clients with complex health care
management needs meriting a practice enhancement. Clinic
practice at the study site now incorporates self-efficacy and adherence screening questions into assessment. Cognitive assessment
testing occurs if the nurse or neurologist assesses client problems
in providing a history, uncertainty about medications taken,
and/or if clients or family members identify memory deficits and
confusion. With client permission, if medication adherence is
uncertain or if they are unable to provide a list of their medications, their community pharmacist is consulted to verify medications and renewal patterns. Home self-monitoring equipment is
available on loan. Clients with blood pressures above national
stroke recommended levels are requested to monitor and record
their blood pressure on a weekly basis and bring their records to
their SPC visits. Alternatively, clients are now invited to email or
fax records to the clinic nurse between appointments.
Limitations
The results of this pilot feasibility study are limited in their
generalizability by the small participant sample size, lack of a
control group reflecting routine care and recruitment at a single site. A randomized controlled trial with an adequately
powered sample size is currently being conducted at multiple
sites to determine the efficacy of the expanded NCM model of
care delivery in improving client hypertension management.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
The trial is utilizing the Montreal Cognitive Assessment
(MoCA) Scale to screen for cognition based on a sub study
comparison of the MoCA and the MMSE conducted in parallel to the study reported here. The MoCa has demonstrated
higher sensitivity in detecting mild cognitive impairment
(90%) when compared to the MMSE (90%) in other older
client populations (Nasreddine et al., 2005).
Conclusions
An expanded NCM care delivery model that included an
extended follow-up for those SPC clients with probable TIA
or confirmed stroke, uncontrolled hypertension and additional risk associated with deficits in cognition and medication
self-efficacy and adherence was feasible within current clinical operations with only a modest impact on nursing
resources. In addition, the results suggested that a cluster of
nurse-led case management follow-up interventions tailored
to support self-management has potential to improve riskfactor management and medication self-efficacy and adherence outcomes in order to reduce risk for stroke.
Acknowledgements
is research was funded by a grant from the Ontario Stroke
System (2008–2009). In addition, the Hamilton Health
Sciences David Braley Research Institute provided support for
the development of this research study.
About the authors
Sandra Ireland, RN, PhD, Assistant Clinical Professor,
McMaster University, Chief of Nursing Practice, Hamilton
General Site, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON.
Email: [email protected]
Gail MacKenzie, RN, MScN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Stroke
Prevention Clinic, Hamilton Health Sciences—General Site,
Hamilton, ON.
Linda Gould, RPN, Central South Regional Data Specialist,
Hamilton Health Sciences—General Site, Hamilton, ON
Diane Dassinger, RN, Stroke Prevention Clinic, Hamilton
Health Sciences—General Site, Hamilton, ON.
Alicja Koper, RN, Stroke Prevention Clinic, Hamilton Health
Sciences—General Site, Hamilton, ON.
Kathryn LeBlanc, BSc, MSc, Clinical Manager Neuroscience
Ambulatory Centre, Regional Stroke Program Director,
Central South Ontario, Hamilton Health Sciences—General
Site, Hamilton, ON.
References
Bandura, A. (1998). Health promotion from the perspective of
social cognitive theory. Psychology and Health, 13, 623–649.
Brook, R.D. (2000). Home blood pressure: Accuracy is
independent of monitoring schedules. American Journal of
Hypertension, 13, 625–631. doi: S0895-7061(99)00273-3
Cockrell, J.R., & Folstein, M.F. (1988). Mini-mental state
examination (MMSE). Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 24(4), 689–690.
Craig, H.M. (1985). Accuracy of indirect measures of medication
compliance in hypertension. Research in Nursing and Health, 8, 61–66.
Faxon, D., Fuster, B., Libby, P., Beckman, J., Hiatt, W.,
Thompson, R., et al. (2004). Atherosclerotic vascular disease
conference: Writing group III: Pathophysiology. Circulation, 109(21),
1617–1625.
Folstein, M., Folstein, S.E., & McHugh, P.R. (1975). MiniMental State: A practical method for grading the cognitive state of
patients. Journal of Psychiatry, 12, 189–198.
Gladstone, D., Kapral, M.K., Fang, J., Laupacis, A., & Tu, J.
(2004). Management and outcomes of transient ischemic attacks in
Ontario. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 170(7), 1099–1104.
Hamilton Health Sciences. (2009). Central south stroke
network SPC half-year performance report. L. Gould, Hamilton
Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON.
Haynes, R.B., Yao, X., Degani, A., Kriplani, S., Garg, A., &
McDonald, H.P. (2005). Interventions to enhance medication
adherence. Cochrane database Systematic Review 4. Chicester, JK:
John Wiley & Sons Limited.
Ireland, S.E, Arthur, H.M., Gunn, E.A., & Oczkowski, W.
(2010). Stroke prevention care delivery: Predictors of risk
management outcomes. International Journal of Nursing Studies.
doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2010.07.003
Joseph, L.N., Babikian, V.L., Allen, N.C., & Winter, M.R. (1999).
Risk factor modification in stroke prevention. Stroke, 30, 16–20.
Lindsay, P., Bayley, M., Helling, C., Hill, M., Woodbury, E.,
Phillips, S., et al. (2008). Canadian best practice recommendations for
stroke care (updated 2008). Canadian Medical Association Journal,
179(12). Retrieved from http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/179/12/S1
McGowan, P. (2005). Self-management: A background paper
(225). New perspectives: International conference on patient selfmanagement (p. 1–10). Retrieved from http://www.coag.uvic.ca/
cdsmp/documents/What_is_Self-Management.pdf
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care of Ontario. (2001).
Towards an integrated stroke strategy for Ontario. Toronto, ON:
Queen’s Printer.
Molloy, W. (1999). Standardized Mini Mental State
Examination. Newgrange Press: Troy, NY.
Mouradian, M.S., Majumdar, S.R., Senthilselvan, A., Khan, K.,
& Shuaib, A. (2002). How well are hypertension, hyperlipidemia,
diabetes, and smoking managed after a stroke or transient ischemic
attack? Stroke, 33, 1656–1659.
Nasreddine, Z.S., Phillips, N.A., Bediriam, V., Charbonneau,
S., Whitehead, V., Collin, I., et al. (2005). The Montreal Cognitive
Assessment MoCA: A brief screening tool for mild cognitive
impairment. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 53(4), 695–699.
Nordmann, A., Frach, B., Walker, T., Martina, B., & Bettegay,
E. (1999). Reliability of patients measuring blood pressure at home;
prospective observational study. British Medical Journal, 319, 1172.
O’Donnell, M.J., Xavier, D., Lui, L., Zhang, H., Chin, S.L., RaoMelacini, P., et al. (2010). Risk factors for ischaemic and intracerebral
haemorrhagic stroke in 22 countries (the INTERSTROKE study): A
case-control study. e Lancet, 376, 112–122.
Ontario Stroke System. (2008). Prevent Stroke. Retrieved from
www.preventstroke.ca
Pickering, T., Hall, J., Appel, L., Falkener, B., Graves, J., Hill,
M., … Roccella, E.J. (2005). Recommendations for blood pressure
measurement in humans and experimental animals part 1: Blood
pressure measurement in humans (AHA Scientific Statement).
Hypertension, 45(1), 142–161.
Rollnick, S., & Miller, W.R. (1995). What is motivational
interviewing? Behavioural and Cognitive Psychiatry, 23, 325–334.
Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1990). Basics of qualitative research:
Grounded theory procedures and techniques. London: Sage Publications.
Yarows, S., Julius, S., & Pickering, T. (2000). Home blood
pressure monitoring. Archives of Internal Medicine, 160, 1251–1257.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
13
Examining the relationship
between patient-centred
care and outcomes
By Sonia Poochikian-Sarkissian, RN, ACNP, PhD, CNN(C), Souraya Sidani, RN, PhD,
Mary Ferguson-Pare, RN, PhD, and Diane Doran, RN, PhD
Abstract
Purpose: to examine the extent to which staff nurses provided
patient-centred care (PCC), as perceived by staff nurses and
patients, and to explore the relationships between implementation of PCC and patient outcomes.
Liens entre les soins
centrés sur le patient et
l’évolution des patients
Methods: Data were collected from 63 nurses and 44 patients
admitted to cardiology, neurology/neurosurgery and orthopedic units. Nurses’ and patients’ perception of implementation
of dimensions of PCC, and patient outcomes were measured
with validated instruments.
Findings: Overall, nurses and patients reported implementation of PCC to a moderate extent. Provision of different aspects
of PCC was associated with high levels of patient self-care.
Résumé
But : Examiner dans quelle mesure les soins donnés sont
centrés sur le patient (SCP) selon la perception du
personnel infirmier et des patients, ainsi que les liens entre
l’implantation des SCP et l’évolution des patients.
Structure : Les chercheurs ont utilisé une structure de
corrélations descriptives avec des évaluations quantifiées
répétées. Ils ont procédé à des statistiques descriptives et
calculé les corrélations et t-tests.
Méthodologie : Les informations ont été obtenues auprès de
63 infirmières et 33 patients admis en cardiologie,
neurologie/neurochirurgie et orthopédie. Les perceptions du
personnel soignant et des patients quant à l’implantation de
certains aspects des SCP, ainsi que l’évolution des patients
ont été mesurées au moyen d’instruments préalablement
validés.
Résultats : En général, le personnel soignant et les patients
n’ont mentionné l’implantation des SCP que de façon
modérée. Les réserves au sujet de différents aspects des SCP
étaient associées à un haut niveau d’auto-soins.
Conclusions : L’implantation des SCP devrait améliorer
l’évolution des patients en augmentant leurs capacités
d’auto-soins et leur satisfaction à l’égard des soins et de leur
qualité de vie.
Utilité clinique : Les résultats de cette recherche
orienteront les améliorations à apporter à l’implantation
des SCP afin d’augmenter continuellement la qualité des
soins infirmiers, ainsi que d’améliorer la perception des
patients face à leur séjour hospitalier et à leur disponibilité
à quitter.
14
Design: A descriptive correlational design with repeated
measures was used. Descriptive statistics, correlations and
t-tests were calculated.
Conclusions: Implementation of PCC is expected to improve
patient outcome by increasing patient self-care ability and
improving satisfaction with care and quality of life.
Clinical relevance: e findings will guide further improvement in the implementation of PCC to continuously enhance
quality of nursing care, the patients’ hospital experience and
readiness for discharge.
The quest for continuously improving the quality of health
care for patients admitted to acute care settings led to a shift
in the philosophy and model underlying care delivery
(McLaughlin & Kaluzny, 2000). The shift was from a standardized, one-size-fits-all model, where the same approach to
care is provided to all patients, toward a patient-centred care
(PCC) model, where the approach to care is personalized to
meet the patients’ needs, values, and preferences (Radwin,
2003). Despite the congruence of PCC with the holistic perspective underlying nursing care and the contribution of PCC
to outcomes for patients and nurses, there is limited research
on the extent to which PCC is actually implemented in acute
care settings by staff nurses, and its impact on patient outcomes. This study explored the implementation of PCC in
inpatient specialized care units, following staff training in the
dimensions of PCC.
The main dimensions of PCC are to recognize each patient as
a unique person, to respect the patient’s values and beliefs,
and to respond to the patient’s individual needs and preferences (Lauver et al., 2002; Radwin, 2003; McCormack, 2003;
Suhonen, Valimaki, & Leino-Kilpi, 2005; Bernsten, 2006;
McCance, Slater, & McCormack, 2009). Application of PCC
implies that nurses will assess the individual patient’s needs
and preferences, encourage their participation in care, and
select interventions that are consistent with and responsive to
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
the patient’s needs (Stewart et al., 2000; Lauver et al., 2002;
Schoot et al., 2005). The delivery of PCC is hypothesized to
yield positive outcomes for patients and nurses. The positive
outcomes that patients may experience include increased
understanding of their condition and treatment, increased
ability to manage care at home after discharge from hospital,
increased sense of personal control, and increased satisfaction
with care (Larrabee & Bolden, 2001; Attree, 2001; Wolf et al.,
2008a; Sidani, 2008; Hibbard, Greene, & Tusler, 2009;
Kowinsky, Greenhouse, Zombek, Rader, & Reidy, 2009). The
positive outcomes for nurses who provide PCC, may include
increased satisfaction with their job, and feeling empowered
to plan and conduct their work according to the patients’ best
interests (Chaaya et al., 2003; Johnson, 2005; Brown,
McWilliam, & Griffin, 2006; McCance et al., 2009).
sions were: 1) respect for patients’ values, preferences, and
expressed needs, 2) coordination of care services, 3) adequacy and relevance of educational information about the
patient’s condition and care, 4) enhancement of physical comfort, 5) provision of emotional support, 6) involvement of
patient’s family and friends in patient care, as appropriate, 7)
maintaining continuity of care across health care settings, and
8) improved access to care.
The specific objectives of this study were: 1) to examine the
extent to which staff nurses on cardiology, neuroscience and
orthopedic units, where nurses are trained to implement
PCC, engage in PCC as perceived by nurses and patients, 2) to
examine the similarities and differences in nurses’ and
patients’ perceptions of dimensions of PCC, and 3) to explore
the relationships between dimensions of PCC and improvement in patient outcomes.
Patient-centred care
and patient outcomes
Review of literature
The literature review focused on dimensions of PCC that
could be implemented by nurses and evaluated by patients,
and on examining the relationships between dimensions of
PCC and patient outcomes. The literature search was done in
CINAHL and MEDLINE, using the key words: “patient-centred care”, “individualized care”, “patient outcomes”, combined
with nursing/nurse.
Dimensions of patient-centred care
Patient-centred care (PCC) is generally defined as the extent
to which nurses select and deliver interventions that are
respectful of and responsive to the needs and values of individual patients (Lauver et al., 2002; McLaughlin & Kaluzny,
2000), thereby increasing the likelihood of producing desired
health outcomes (Naylor, 2003).
Results of four qualitative studies described patients’ perspective of what constituted patient-centred care. The findings
were consistent in identifying the following as essential
dimensions of PCC: individualization of care that is knowing
about patient progress and being responsive to their needs;
patient participation in planning care; provision of information on condition and treatment; and treating the patient with
respect (Larrabee & Bolden, 2001; Lee et al., 1999; Oermann,
1999; Staniszewka & Ahmed, 1999).
Patient-centred nursing care has been found in qualitative
studies to be related to trust in nurses, a sense of well-being,
optimism, and fortitude (Radwin, Cabral, & Wilkes, 2009).
McCance et al. (2009) reported that nurses need to be aware
of patients’ perceptions of caring, and use this to influence
changes in practice, where the main focus was to promote
PCC. Gerteis, Edgman-Levitan, Daley, & Delbanco (1993)
identified eight dimensions that reflected PCC. These dimen-
The results of the above-mentioned studies were consistent in
identifying aspects of nursing care that were considered
essential for providing PCC. The specific dimensions of PCC
that were addressed in this current study were: provision of
individualized care by attending to patients’ needs and
encouraging patient participation in care.
Implementation of PCC is expected to improve patient outcome by increasing self-care ability, increasing satisfaction
with care (Cahill, 1996; Dana & Wambach, 2003; Kowinsky et
al., 2009), and improving quality of life (Stewart et al., 2000;
Reid Ponte et al., 2003). A few studies examined the relationships between selected dimension of PCC and patient outcomes in different settings. In primary care settings, the
results of three studies supported a positive relationship
between delivery of PCC dimensions and patient outcomes
including improvement in diabetic patients’ blood sugar levels and functional status (Kaplan et al., 1989), improved compliance with medical advice and health outcomes (Safran et
al., 1998), and need for fewer diagnostic tests and referrals to
specialized services (Stewart et al., 2000). In acute care settings, patients’ involvement in care-related decision-making
and providing individualized patient care contributed to
increased self-care ability and satisfaction with care (Sidani,
2008; Hibbard et al., 2009). A positive association between
PCC and satisfaction with care was consistently in outpatient
medical and psychiatric services (Wensing & Grol, 2000;
Dana & Wambach, 2003; Ruggeri et al., 2003; Wolf et al.,
2008a). Radwin et al. (2009) investigated the relationship
between PCC for 173 hospitalized hematology-oncology
patients and health outcomes. Individualization of care was
positively related to authentic self-representation, optimism
and sense of well-being. Responsiveness and proficiency
were positively related to patients’ trust in nurses. A clinical
randomized study (post test design) was also conducted
(Wolf et al., 2008a) to examine whether PCC delivered by
trained nurses, as compared to usual care, impacts patient
satisfaction, perception of nursing care, and quality of care. A
total of 116 patients were randomized into an intervention
(PCC) or control group. The PCC group rated satisfaction
(p = .04) and quality of services (p = .03) higher than the control group.
Despite differences in patient populations, research methods,
and how PCC was operationalized, these findings provided
evidence supporting the benefits of PCC and its impact on
patients’ perception of the level of satisfaction and quality of
care received. Patients who received PCC showed improve-
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
15
ment in outcomes. Scholars have also suggested that PCC
provided effective team performance and increased patient
satisfaction with care. The extent to which staff nurses who
were trained to practise PCC in specific acute care settings,
i.e., cardiology, neurology/neurosurgery and orthopedic
units, engage in PCC, and the effect on patient outcomes are
not known. These were investigated in this study, and guided
by the conceptual framework described next.
Functional status referred to patients’ physical, psychological,
and social functioning. Physical functioning involved patients’
ability to do usual physical activities, such as dressing self.
Psychological functioning involved the patients’ emotional
state, that is, level of anxiety or depression. Social functioning
involved patients’ involvement in activities such as community functions or visiting friends (Ware, Snow, Kosinski, &
Gandek, 1993).
Conceptual framework
Self-care referred to patients’ perceived ability to manage
their condition after discharge home. It encompassed the ability to manage symptoms, take medications as prescribed, and
perform regular activities (Sidani, 2003).
The conceptual framework was developed based on the literature review conducted for the study.
The conceptualization of PCC adopted for this study represented a synthesis of the dimensions of PCC identified by
Gerteis and colleagues (1993), Radwin (2003) and Sidani
(2008). PCC refers to the provision of care that is consistent
with the patients’ individual needs and responsive to their
preferences. Nurses contribute to every dimension of PCC by
enhancing the personal aspects of caring or serving as the link
between patients/families and other health care providers.
An important dimension of quality is what patients want from
health care, which is the enhancement of their sense of wellbeing and relief from their suffering (Gerteis et al., 1993).
Patient-centred care provides a common ground for patients,
nurses and other health care providers. Therefore, it is important for all health care providers to incorporate the patient’s
perspective while providing care in order to improve health
care quality and increase satisfaction.
The implementation of PCC involved individualization of
patient care by attending to their needs and attempting to
resolve their health-related problems; participation of
patients in their care and care-related decision; and coordination of patient care.
This study explored the relationships between two dimensions of PCC and patient outcomes. The PCC dimensions
were patient participation in care and individualization of
care. Patient outcomes were selected based on other studies
that revealed these outcomes being sensitive to nursing care
(Sidani & Irvine, 1999; Brooten et al., 2002), and to PCC
(Wensing & Grol, 2000; Sidani, 2008; Wolf, Lehman, Quinlin,
Zullo, & Hoffman, 2008b).
Patient participation in care was defined as the extent to
which nurses involved the patients in the planning of their
care and engaging them in care-related activities. It is the
process in which patients are involved in performing activities
related to the management of their condition and in decisionmaking related to their care (Cahill, 1996).
Individualization of care was defined as the extent to which
nurses attended to patients’ needs and preferences; attempted
to resolve the patients’ problems while in hospital, and
arranged for special services that they needed after discharge
home (Radwin, 2003).
Patient outcomes included those found to be associated with
PCC: functional status, self-care, and patient satisfaction.
16
Satisfaction with care referred to the patients’ rating of quality of care received in hospital (Rubin, Ware, Nelson, &
Meterko, 1991).
Methods
Design
A descriptive correlational design with repeated measures
was used in this study to examine patients’ perception of the
extent to which the dimensions of PCC were provided by
nurses, and the relationships of these dimensions to patient
outcomes. Patients were asked to respond to questionnaires at
two points in time: within 48 hours of their admission to the
unit (time 1), and within one week following discharge from
hospital (time 2). These timeframes are adequate for the outcomes to be achieved and facilitate the investigation of change
in outcomes. Furthermore, patients tend to be critical of the
care received while responding to the questionnaire at home
rather than in the hospital environment (Hiidenhovi,
Laippala, & Nojonen, 2001). It also enhances the accuracy of
the patients’ assessment of their own self-care ability after discharge home.
At time 1, patients were asked to complete instruments measuring patient outcomes (functional status, self-care), and
socio-demographic status. At time 2, patients were asked to
complete questionnaires measuring the same outcomes,
dimensions of PCC (individualization of care and patient participation in care), and satisfaction with care. To examine the
nurses’ perception of the extent to which PCC was implemented, nurses were requested to indicate the degree to
which they provided PCC to patients assigned to their care by
completing questionnaires measuring the same dimensions of
PCC mentioned above.
Setting and Sample
The study was conducted at a university-affiliated hospital.
The following three units were included in the study: a cardiology unit, a neurology/neurosurgery unit, and an orthopedic unit. These units were selected because the majority
(83/95 = 87.4%) of the nurses had participated in a staff
training health care organizational initiative instructing
nurses in the elements of and strategies for delivering PCC
and the relationship of PCC to patient satisfaction, health
care quality and patient outcomes, as described by Gerteis,
Edgman-Levitan, Daley, and Delbanco (1993) in the
Picker/Commonwealth Study.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
The target populations were staff nurses and patients on the
same units. Nurses were selected if they met the following
inclusion criteria: were registered nurses (RNs) or registered
practical nurses (RPNs). Patients were eligible if they met the
following inclusion criteria: a) were 18 years of age or older, b)
able to read and understand English, and c) cognitively intact,
as ascertained by nursing staff. Of the 72 patients providing
consent and data at time 1 (i.e., within 24 to 48 hours of
admission), 44 completed the questionnaire at time 2 (i.e.,
within one week after discharge), while 28 withdrew from the
study, leading to a 39% attrition rate.
The convenience sample consisted of 63 nurses (response
rate = 63/83 = 75%) and 44 patients (response rate = 61%). The
patient sample size was adequate to detect a medium to large
difference (Cohen, 1992) in the perception of PCC between
nurses and patients (objective two) and to explore the bivariate
relationships between each PCC dimension and patient outcome (objective three). To minimize the potential for Type 1
error with testing, the p-level was lowered to < .035.
Procedures
The study protocol was approved by the institution’s research
ethics board (REB). The researchers introduced the study to
nurses, and the recruitment of nurses and patients began at
the same time over a six-month period in 2007–2008.
Participating nurses were not aware of which patients on their
unit enrolled in the study. The research assistant (RA) followed-up with the nurses to provide detailed information
about the study, obtained their written consent, and provided
a copy of the questionnaires to complete at their convenience.
Within a week, the RA contacted the nurses to remind them
to return the completed questionnaire, in a sealed envelope, in
a box located on their units.
The RA informed the unit nursing staff of patient eligibility
criteria and requested their assistance in identifying patients
who met the study criteria, as required by the REB. The RA
approached eligible patients who expressed interest in the
study, described the study to them, obtained their written
consent and administered the questionnaire within 48 hours
of admission. Following the completion of the questionnaire,
the RA provided to patients a copy of the questionnaire, with
a return stamped envelope, to be completed at Time 2, and
within one week of discharge. A few days after discharge, the
RA called to remind patients to complete and return the questionnaires in a pre-stamped envelope by mail.
Variables/measures
Nurses: Nurses were requested to complete a questionnaire
inquiring about demographic and professional characteristics
(i.e., age, gender, education, employment status and position,
work schedule and length of employment in nursing). Their
perception of individualization of care and patient participation in care were measured with validated instruments. All
measures have been used in previous studies with nurse practitioners and patients on general surgical and medical units,
and demonstrated good psychometric properties.
Individualization of care: was measured with relevant items
adapted from the Patient-Centred Comprehensive Care sub-
scale of the Individualized Care Index developed by van
Servellen (1988). Four items measure attendance to patients’
needs; three items reflect resolution of patients’ health-related problems; and five items assess provision of care according
to patients’ preferences. A six-point numeric scale is used for
all items, anchored with ‘not at all’ and ‘very much so’. Higher
scores indicated higher levels of individualization of patient
care. This scale demonstrated acceptable reliability (alpha:
.80; Sidani et al., 2000). Individualization of care items loaded
on their respective factors, which were associated with
patients’ self-care ability, performance of regular activities,
and satisfaction with care (Sidani, 2008).
Patient participation in care: was measured with five items
developed by Sidani et al. (2000). A six-point numeric rating
scale is used to indicate the extent to which nurses encourage
patients’ participation in care, with the anchors ‘not at all’ and
‘very much so’. Higher scores indicate higher levels of patient
involvement in care and care-related decisions. The items
were internally consistent and alpha coefficient was .88
(Sidani et al., 2000). The items loaded on one factor, which
correlated with self-care ability (Sidani, 2008).
Patients: Patients were requested to respond to items related
to their demographic characteristics (i.e., age, gender, education, marital status and employment). Information on their
medical diagnosis and type of surgery was extracted from
patients’ medical records. The same measures, described
above, were used to assess the patients’ perception of individualization of care and participation in care. In addition,
patients completed questionnaires addressing the following
outcomes:
Functional status: was measured with relevant subscales of
the Medical Outcome Study-Short Form 36 (SF-36) (Ware et
al., 1993). The following subscales were used in this study:
physical function (α > .90), social function (α > .75), and psychological function (α > .70). It is a well-established measure
with acceptable psychometric properties demonstrated in different patient populations (Ware et al., 1993).
Self-care: was measured with the Therapeutic Self-Care
(TSC) scale (Sidani, 2003). It consists of 13 items assessing the
patients’ ability to take medications as prescribed, recognize
and manage symptoms, perform and adjust regular activities,
and manage changes in condition. A six-point numeric rating
scale was used. High subscale scores indicated high levels of
self-care ability. The TSC demonstrated reliability and validity (Irvine Doran, Sidani, Keatings, & Doidge, 2002).
Satisfaction with care: was measured with the Satisfaction
with Hospital subscale of the Patient Judgment of Hospital
Quality Questionnaire (Rubin et al., 1991), which has acceptable psychometric properties (Hays, Nelson, Rubin, Ware, &
Meterko, 1991; Irvine Doran et al., 2002). High scores indicated high levels of patient satisfaction with care.
Results
Reliability of measures
Nurses: The self-report instruments used to measure nurses’
perception of the extent to which they engaged in the different
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
17
aspects of PCC, demonstrated acceptable internal consistency
reliability. The Cronbach’s alpha coefficients are presented in
Table 1.
Table 1. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients for all
measures administered to nurses and patients
Instruments
Nurses Patients
Individualization of care:
Attendance to patients’ needs
.88
.81
Resolution of patients’ health problems .66
.69
Provision of care according
to patients’ preferences
.88
.82
Patient participation in care
.84
.91
Functional status:
Patients’ age ranged between 20 and 90 years, with a mean of
59 (± 18). Slightly more women (57%) than men (43%) took
part in the study. Patients’ level of education varied: 33%
reported having undergraduate or graduate university degree;
29% were high school graduates; 21% had some college; 12%
had attended high school; and 5% received technical training.
About two-thirds (64%) of patients were married, while the
rest were single (21%), divorced (9%), or widowed (5%). Most
patients reported being retired (48%), working on a full-time
basis (26%), or not employed (19%). Patients were admitted to
three types of units: neurosciences (n = 14, 33%), orthopedics
(n = 14, 33%), and cardiology (n = 14, 33%). The primary diagnosis, as documented in the patient’s chart, included: stroke,
brain tumour, aneurysm, blocked shunt (neurology/neurosurgery); congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation
(cardiology); and bone fracture and osteoarthritis (orthopedics). About 56% of patients had undergone surgery, while
44% were receiving medical treatment for their illness.
Physical function
.94
Role limitations due to
physical health
.96
Vitality
.86
Psychological distress
.83
Table 2. Mean (SD) Scores on PCC Variables
for Nurses (n = 63) and Patients (n = 44)
Self-care
.87
Dimensions of PCC
Satisfaction with care
.85
Individualization of Care
Provision of PCC
The mean scores on the variable reflecting aspects of PCC, for
the samples of nurses and patients, are presented in Table 2.
Patients: Patients completed self-report instruments measuring their perception of the extent to which nurses provided
PCC, as well as health-related outcomes. All measured
showed acceptable internal consistency reliability, as indicated by the values of Cronbach’s alpha coefficients reported in
Table 1. The low value of the Cronbach’s alpha coefficients,
observed for the subscale measuring resolution of patients’
health problems in the samples of nurses and patients, is
explained by the small number of items (n = 3) comprising
this subscale.
Nurses
Patients
Attendance to patients’ needs
3.4 (0.9)
3.5 (1.2)
Resolution of patients’
health problems
3.2 (0.9)
3.2 (1.4)
Provision of care according
to patients’ preferences *
4.5 (0.5)
3.3 (1.2)
Patient participation in care *
4.4 (0.5)
3.0 (1.4)
* p ≤ .05
Characteristics of participants
Nurses: The mean age of the 63 participating nurses was 37
(± 11.5, range: 23–67). The majority were women (81%),
reporting the highest degree obtained as college diploma
(44%) or university degree (46%). They described their position as registered nurse (94%) or educator (6%). Most worked
on a full-time basis (78%), and mixed (day, evening, night)
schedule (79%). The length of experience in nursing varied
from one month to 37 years, with a mean of 10 (± 11). The
participating nurses were assigned to three types of units:
neurosciences (n = 21, 33.3%), orthopedics (n = 21, 33.3%),
and cardiology (n = 21, 33.3%). The length of experience on
their respective units ranged between two weeks and 22 years,
with a mean of 6 (± 6). The nurses reported taking care of five
patients (range = 0 to 7, SD = 0.9) on average, during a shift.
On average, nurses reported that they attended to patients’
needs, resolved health problems, provided care according
to patients’ preferences, and encouraged patient participation in care to a moderate to high extent. The extent to
which they resolved patients’ health problems was low to
moderate. Patients indicated that nurses 1) attended to
their needs, resolved their health problems, and provided
care according to their preferences to a moderate extent,
and 2) encouraged their participation in care to a limited
extent. There were statistically significant (p ≤ .05) differences between the nurses’ and the patients’ groups on the
following PCC variables: provision of care according to
patients’ preferences [t (105) = 6.66], and patient participation in care [t (105) = 16.06]. In all comparisons, the mean
scores for patients were consistently lower than the mean
scores for nurses.
Patients: The sociodemographic and health/illness-related
characteristics of the 44 patients who provided data on the
two occasions of measurement (i.e., time 1, upon admission
and time 2, within one week after discharge) are described.
Patient outcomes
Table 3 summarizes the mean scores on the patient outcome
subscales measuring functional status, self-care ability, and
satisfaction with care at time 1 and time 2. On average,
18
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
patients showed improvement in their level of physical, psychological, and social functioning over time. Patients reported high levels of perceived functional status, and self-care
ability in performing regular activities. The results of paired
t-tests revealed no statistically significant changes in these
outcomes between time 1 and time 2. Patients reported that
they were somewhat satisfied with the care they received during hospitalization.
Table 3. Mean (SD) Scores on Patient (n = 44)
Outcomes Measured at Time 1 and Time 2
Patient outcome
Time 1
Time 2
Physical function
1.7 (0.6)
1.7 (0.6)
Social function
3.9 (1.1)
4.1 (1.2)
Psychological function
4.3 (1.1)
4.6 (1.0)
4.1 (0.7)
4.1 (0.7)
Functional status:
Self-care
Satisfaction with care
1.8 (0.7)
Relationship between dimensions
of PCC and patient outcomes
The relationship between dimensions of PCC and patient outcomes following discharge from hospital (Time 2) was examined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Attendance to
patients’ needs was correlated with self-care (r = .36, p = .001),
and satisfaction with care (r = -.38, p = .013). Resolution of
patients’ health problems was associated with self-care
(r = .32, p = .034), and satisfaction with care (r = .33, p = .032).
Provision of care according to patients’ needs correlated with
satisfaction with care (r = .33, p = .032), and encouraging
patient participation in care was also correlated with satisfaction with care (r = .39, p = .011). All correlations were of a
moderate magnitude, and imply that provision of different
dimensions of PCC is associated with high levels of self-care
and satisfaction with care.
Discussion
This study examined the extent to which staff nurses engage
in PCC, as perceived by nurses and patients, and the relationship between dimensions of PCC and patient outcomes.
Results indicated that, overall, nurses provide PCC to a moderate extent as perceived by nurses and patients assigned to
their care. They also indicated that provision of different
dimensions of PCC are moderately associated with patient
outcomes (i.e., self-care and satisfaction with care).
Individualization of care is an important attribute of quality
care provided and dimension of PCC, as perceived by
patients (Attree, 2001; Larrabee & Bolden, 2001; Mead &
Bower, 2000; Radwin, 2003). In this study, patients indicated
that nurses provided individualized care to a moderate
extent. This finding was anticipated based on relevant literature (Sidani, 2008). However, it was inconsistent with that
reported by Radwin (2003), who mentioned that cancer
patients perceived that the nurses personalized care accord-
ing to their needs. Differences in research design, patient
populations, and operationalization of PCC may be considered as possible explanations for the inconsistent results. For
example, in previous research studies, patients responded to
the PCC questionnaire during their interaction with the
nurses, whereas in this study, they did so within one week
after discharge from hospital.
In this study, patients perceived that nurses encouraged them
to participate in their care or care-related decisions to a limited extent. Previous studies indicated that patients usually prefer to be involved in their care-related decision-making
process, which is considered an important dimension of PCC
(Schoot et al., 2005; Suhonen et al., 2005). However, the extent
to which nurses encourage patient participation in care may
not meet patients’ expectations at all times. Stewart, Albey,
Shnek, Irvine, and Grace (2004) indicated that 63% of patients
admitted to coronary care units preferred to have active
involvement in decision-making, and that 85% of these
patients reported that their health care professionals did not
consider patients’ opinion during the decision-making
process related to their treatment. Thus, the difference
between patients’ expectations and the extent of their involvement in care may account for the patients’ perception in this
study that nurses encourage the patients to participate in their
care to a limited extent.
The relationships between PCC and patient outcomes indicated that provision of different dimensions of PCC was
associated with high levels of self-care. This finding is similar to previous findings, which indicated that patients’
involvement in decision-making, and self-care were positively associated with improved functional status (Kaplan et
al., 1989) and health outcomes (Safran et al., 1998). However,
other studies indicated that outpatient interactions with
health care professionals did not affect patients’ self-care
and functional outcomes (Stewart et al., 2000; Mark, Byers,
& Myers, 2001). It is important to note that differences in
patient populations or other factors, such as, length of stay,
severity of condition, operationalization of PCC and functional outcomes, may account for the variability in the
results. The results of this study also indicated that attendance to patients’ needs, resolution of patients’ health problems, provision of care according to patient preferences, and
encouraging patient participation in care in acute care settings of neuroscience, cardiology and orthopedic patients
were significantly correlated with satisfaction with care provided. Similar findings pertaining to patients admitted to the
neuroscience clinical program were reported (SarkissianPoochikian et al., 2008).
Implications for
practice and limitations
In this study the investigators found that nurses in acute care
settings provide PCC to patients to a moderate extent.
Patient-centred care, operationalized as providing individualized patient care and involving patients in care-related decision-making, contributed to increased self-care ability and
satisfaction with care. Specifically, attendance to patients’
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
19
needs, resolution of patient’s health problems, provision of
care according to patient preferences, and encouraging
patient participation in care were significantly correlated with
satisfaction with care. However, patients perceived that nurses encouraged patients to participate in their care to a limited
extent. Therefore, there is a need to consider discussions with
nurses regarding the development and evaluation of strategies
to improve patients’ perception of their participation in the
care received.
Due to the comparatively small sample of nurses and
patients in the three units, the results could not be compared between nurses and different groups of patient populations, and the present findings must be interpreted with
caution. It is notable that all of the instruments employed
boast strong psychometric properties and have been used in
previous research studies. Despite its limitation, this study
identified the dimensions of PCC that are related to
improved patient outcomes or satisfaction with care. This
knowledge may provide further information to aid in the
application of the PCC initiative at various organizations.
However it is important to consider that good functional
outcomes after discharge from hospital may also lead the
patient to reflect that the patient-centred care received must
have been satisfactory. There is the need for further study on
the dimensions of PCC using a larger sample, comparing
outcomes of different units and patient populations, and
including various clinical areas in an acute care setting in
order to increase the generalizability of the findings. The
results obtained will inform us as to which dimension of
PCC requires modification or improvement to enhance the
quality of care provided, and improve patients’ hospital
experience and readiness for discharge.
Acknowledgement
is research was supported by the Canadian Nurses’
Foundation and the University Health Network.
We would like to thank all nurses and patients who
participated in this research project.
About the authors
Sonia Poochikian-Sarkissian, RN, ACNP, PhD, CNN(C), is a
Clinician Scientist, Nursing, University Health Network,
Krembil Neuroscience Program, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Souraya Sidani, RN, PhD, is a Professor and Canada
Research Chair, Health Interventions, School of Nursing,
Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Mary Ferguson-Pare, RN, PhD, is Chief Nurse Executive,
University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Diane Doran, RN, PhD, is a Professor, Scientific Director,
Nursing Health Services Research Unit (Toronto site), Ontario
Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Nurse Senior
Researcher, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Correspondence regarding this article should be addressed
to Dr. Sonia Poochikian-Sarkissian, email:
[email protected]
References
Attree, M. (2001). Patients’ and relatives’ experiences and
perspectives of “good” and “not so good” quality care. Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 33(4), 456–66.
Bernsten, K.J. (2006). Implementation of patient centeredness
to enhance patient safety. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 21(1),
15–19.
Brooten, D., Naylor, M.D., York, R., Brown, L.P., Munro, B.H.,
Hollingsworth, A.O., … Youngblut, J.M. (2002). Lessons learned from
testing the quality cost model of advanced practice nursing (APN)
transitional care. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 34(4), 369–75.
Brown, D., McWilliam, C., & Ward-Griffin, C. (2006). Clientcentered empowering partnering in nursing. Journal of Advanced
Nursing, 53(2), 160–68.
Cahill, J. (1996). Patient participation: A concept analysis.
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 24, 561–71.
Chaaya, M., Rahal, B., Morou, G., & Kaiss, N. (2003).
Implementing patient-centered care in Lebanon. Journal of Nursing
Administration, 33(9), 437–40.
Cohen, J. (1992). A power primer. Psychological Bulletin,
112(1), 155–59.
Dana, N., Wambach, K.A. (2003) Patient satisfaction with an
early discharge home visit program. Journal of Obstetrics and
Gynecology & Neonatal Nursing, 32(2), 190–98.
Gerteis, M., Edgman-Levitan, S., Daley, J., Delbanco, T.L.
(Eds.) (1993). rough the patients’ eyes: Understanding and
promoting patient-centered care. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Hays, R.D., Nelson, E.C., Rubin, H.R., Ware, J.E., & Meterko,
M. (1991). Further evaluations of the PJHQ scales. Medical Care,
28(9, Suppl.), S29–39.
20
Hibbard, J.H., Greene, J., Tusler, M. (2009). Improving the
outcomes of disease management by tailoring care to the patient’s
level of activation. American Journal of Managed Care, 15(6),
353–60.
Hiidenhovi, H., Laippala, P., & Nojonen, K. (2001).
Development of a patient-oriented instrument to measure services
quality in outpatient departments. Journal of Advanced Nursing,
34(5), 696–705.
Irvine Doran, D., Sidani, S., Keatings, M., & Doidge, D. (2002).
An empirical test of the Nursing Role Effectiveness Model. Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 38(1), 29–39.
Johnson, R. (2005). Shifting patterns of practice: Nurse
practitioners in a managed care environment. Research and eory
for Nursing Practice, 19(4), 323–40.
Kaplan. S.H., Greenfield, S., & Ware, J.E. (1989). Assessing the
effects of physician-patient interactions on the outcomes of chronic
disease. Medical Care, 27, S110–S127.
Kowinsky, A, Greenhouse, P.K., Zombek, V.L., Rader, S.L.,
Reidy, M.E. (2009). Care management redesign: Increasing care
manager time with patients and providers while improving metrics.
Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(9), 388–92.
Larrabee, J.H., & Bolden, L.V. (2001). Defining patientperceived quality of nursing care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality,
16(1), 34–60.
Lauver, D.R., Ward, S.E., Heidrich, S.M., Keller, M.L.,
Bowers, B.J., Brennan, P.F., … Wells, T.J. (2002). Patient-centered
interventions. Research in Nursing & Health, 25, 246–55.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Lee, J.L., Chang, B.L., Pearson, M.L., Kahn, K.L., &
Rubenstein, L.V. (1999). Does what nurses do affect clinical outcomes
for hospitalized patients? A review of the literature. Health Services
Research, 34(5), 1011–1032.
Mark, D.D., Byers, V.L., Myers, M.Z. (2001). Primary care
outcomes and provider practice style. Military Medicine, 166,
875–80.
McCance, T., Slater, P., McCormack, B. (2009). Using the
caring dimensions inventory as an indicator or person-centered
nursing. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18(3), 409–17.
McCormack, B. (2003). Researching nursing practice: Does
person-centeredness matter? Nursing Philosophy, 4, 179–88.
McLaughlin, C.P., & Kaluzny, A.D. (2000). Building client
centered systems of care: Choosing a process direction for the next
century. Health Care Management Review, 25(1), 73–82.
Mead, N., & Bower, P. (2000). Patient-centeredness: A
conceptual framework and review of the empirical literature. Social
Science & Medicine, 51, 1087–1110.
Naylor, M.D. (2003). Nursing intervention research and
quality of care: Influencing the future of healthcare. Nursing
Research, 52(6), 380–85.
Oermann, M.H. (1999). Consumers’ descriptions of quality
health care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 14(1), 47–55.
Radwin, L.E. (2003). Cancer patients’ demographic
characteristics and ratings of patient-centered nursing care. Journal
of Nursing Scholarship, 35(4), 365–370.
Radwin, L.E., Cabral, H.J., & Wilkes, G. (2009). Relationships
between patient-centered cancer nursing interventions and desired
health outcomes in the context of the health care system. Research in
Nursing & Health, 32(1), 4–17.
Reid Ponte, P.R., Conlin, G., Conway, J.B., Grant, S., Medeiros,
C., Nies, J., Shulman, L., Branowicki, P., & Conley, K. (2003). Making
patient-centered care come alive. Journal of Nursing Administration,
33(2), 82–90.
Rubin, H.R., Ware, J.E., Nelson, E.C. & Meterko, M. (1991).
The Patient Judgments of Hospital Quality (PJHQ) Questionnaire.
Medical Care, 28(9, Suppl.), S17–18.
Ruggeri, M., Lasalvia, A., Bisoffi, G., Thornicroft, G., VazquesBarquero, J.L., Becker, T., Knapp, M., Knudsen, H.C., Schenem, A.,
Tansella, M., EPSILON Study Group (2003). Satisfaction with mental
health services among people with schizophrenia in five European
sites: Results from the EPSILON Study. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 29(2),
229–45.
Safran, D.G., Kosinski, M., Tarlov, A.R., Rogers, W.H., Taira,
D.A., Lieberman, N., et al. (1998). The primary care assessment
survey: Tests of data quality and measurement performance. Medical
Care, 36, 728–39.
Sarkissian-Poochikian, S., Wennberg, R., & Sidani, S. (2008).
Examining the relationship between patient-centred care and
outcomes on a neuroscience unit: A pilot project. Canadian Journal
of Neuroscience Nursing, 30(2), 14–19.
Schoot, T., Proot, I., Meulen, R.T., & DeWitte, L. (2005).
Actual interaction and client centeredness in home care. Clinical
Nursing Research, 14(4), 370–93.
Sidani, S. (2003). Self-care. In, D.M. Doran (Ed.), Nursingsensitive outcomes. State of the Science (pp. 65–114). Sudbury, MA:
Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
Sidani, S. (2008). Effects of patient-centered care on patient
outcomes: An evaluation. Research and eory for Nursing Practice,
22(1), 24–37.
Sidani, S., & Braden, C.J. (1998). Evaluating nursing
interventions. A theory-driven approach. Thousand Oaks: Sage.
Sidani, S., & Irvine, D. (1999). A conceptual framework for
evaluating the nurse practitioner role in acute care settings. Journal
of Advanced Nursing, 30(1), 58–66.
Sidani, S., Irvine, D., Porter, H., O’Brien-Pallas, L., Simpson,
B., McGillis Hall, L., … Redelmeier, D. (2000). Practice patterns of
acute care nurse practitioners. Canadian Journal of Nursing
Leadership, 13(3), 6–12.
Staniszewska, S., & Ahmed, L. (1999). The concepts of
expectation and satisfaction: Do they capture the way patients
evaluate their care? Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(2), 364–72.
Stewart, D.E., Albey, S.E., Shnek, Z.M., Irvine, J., & Grace, S.L.
(2004). Gender differences in health information needs and
decisional preferences in patients recovering from an acute ischemic
coronary event. Psychosomatic Medicine, 66, 42–48.
Stewart, M., Brown, J.B., Donner, A., McWhinney, I.R., Oates,
J., … Jordan, J. (2000). The impact of patient-centered care on
outcomes. Journal of Family Practice, 49(9), 796–804.
Suhonen, R., Valimaki, M., Leino-Kilpi, H., & Katajisto, J.
(2004). Testing the individualized care model. Scandinavian Journal
of Caring Sciences, 18(1), 27–36.
Suhonen, R., Valimaki, M., & Leino-Kilpi, H. (2005).
Individualized care, quality of life and satisfaction with nursing care.
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 50(3), 283–92.
van Servellen, G. (1988). The Individualized Care Index. In,
C.F. Waltz & O.L. Strickland (Eds.), Measurement of nursing
outcomes. Volume one: Measuring client outcomes (pp. 499–522).
New York: Springer.
Ware, J.E., Snow, K.K., Kosinski, M., & Gandek, B. (1993).
SF-36 health survey: Manual and interpretation guide. Boston, MA:
The Health Institute, New England Medical Center.
Wensing, M., & Grol, R. (2000). Patients’ views on health care.
A driving force for improvement in disease management. Disease
Management & Health Outcomes, 7(3), 117–25.
Wolf, D.M., Lehman, L., Quinlin, R., Rosenzweig, M., Friede,
S., Zullo, T., Hoffman, L. (2008a). Can nurses impact patient
outcomes using a patient-centered care model? Journal of Nursing
Administration, 38(12), 532–40.
Wolf, D.M., Lehman, L., Quinlin, R., Zullo, T., Hoffman, L.
(2008b). Effect of patient-centered care on patient satisfaction and
quality of care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 23(4), 316–21.
Publish your manuscript in the
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
We welcome the submission of original manuscripts in the areas of research, theory, practice, policy and education, which
are of interest to the neuroscience nursing community. Submit manuscripts to Theresa Green, Editor, at [email protected]
CJNN Author’s Award: Authors who have published in the CJNN will have the chance to win one of two prizes!
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
21
Analyse du rôle de l’infirmière dans le suivi des
personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires
Par Cynthia Gagnon, erg., PhD, Maud-Christine Chouinard, inf., PhD, Mélissa Lavoie, inf., MSc, et François Champagne, PhD
Résumé
Le modèle d’infirmière pivot en maladies neuromusculaires a
démontré des résultats prometteurs d’un point de vue clinique
auprès de ces clientèles. Afin de permettre une évaluation plus
formelle et d’étendre ce modèle à d’autres cliniques neuromusculaires, un portrait des pratiques des infirmières est nécessaire. Ce portrait des pratiques est d’autant plus nécessaire
considérant que ces pratiques infirmières ne sont pas formalisées tant au niveau de la formation des infirmières que dans la
littérature scientifique. De plus, un constat a été fait sur le sousdéveloppement du rôle d’infirmières spécialisées en maladies
neuromusculaires. La présente démarche évaluative a pour
objectifs d’identifier et d’expliciter le rôle de l’infirmière pivot au
sein d’une clinique neuromusculaire et de vérifier le fondement
théorique des interventions infirmières déployées dans ce rôle
en lien avec la poursuite des objectifs de réadaptation.
Mots-clés : maladies neuromusculaires, dystrophie
myotonique, infirmière-pivot, modèle logique, gestion de la
santé, réadaptation, services
Introduction
Les maladies neuromusculaires se composent d’un large éventail de maladies qui peuvent être d’origine héréditaires ou
non. Parmi celles héréditaires, se retrouvent entre autres, les
dystrophies musculaires, les atrophies spinales, les
myopathies métaboliques et les myotonies (Walton, Karpati,
& Hilton-Jones, 1994). Au niveau international, seulement
quelques articles et rapports scientifiques viennent documenter l’offre de services ou son organisation pour les maladies neuromusculaires héréditaires chez l’adulte (AFM, 2000;
Donze, Delattre, Viet, & Thevenon, 1999; Hanna, et al., 2007;
Hill & Phillips, 2006). Les services offerts aux personnes
atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires sont généralement
décrits comme étant déficients et inadéquats (Donze, et al.,
1999; Hanna, et al., 2007; Harper, 2004; Hill & Phillips, 2006).
Un rapport publié en 2007 en Angleterre rapporte que le taux
de survie pour ces patients est différent d’une région à l’autre,
que les services sont variables et vulnérables en raison de la
précarité des équipes et que les patients ne reçoivent souvent
pas les services multidisciplinaires requis par leur condition
(Hanna, et al., 2007). Au Canada, les services sont souvent
organisés autour de cliniques neuromusculaires surspécialisées, généralement multidisciplinaires, ayant des modes de
fonctionnement très variables. Plusieurs partenaires sont
aussi impliqués dans le suivi des clientèles incluant les
médecins de famille, les services communautaires locaux, les
centres de réadaptation en déficience physique et les sections
locales de l’organisme de soutien aux patients (Dystrophie
Musculaire Canada). À notre connaissance, aucun rapport ou
étude ne s’est intéressé à l’organisation des soins et des services pour ces clientèles au Canada.
22
La Clinique des maladies neuromusculaires du Centre de
santé et des services sociaux de Jonquière (CMNMJ), au
Québec (Canada) œuvre depuis plus de 25 ans auprès des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires et offre des
services à plus de 1500 patients (adultes et enfants). Elle est
considérée comme l’une des plus grosses cliniques au Canada.
Au fil des ans, la CMNMJ a développé un modèle
d’organisation des services centré autour d’infirmières spécialisées en maladies neuromusculaires dont le rôle s’inspire
de celui de l’infirmière pivot (IP-MNM) au sein d’une
approche de gestion de la santé. Ce modèle d’organisation des
services permet de faire le suivi auprès de plus de 900 clients
rencontrés annuellement au cours de cliniques ambulatoires,
de visites à domicile ou de relance téléphonique sous la
responsabilité de trois infirmières pivots. Le délai d’attente
avant une première visite est de moins d’un mois et le taux de
satisfaction est très élevé avec 96,7 % des personnes interrogées se disant très ou assez satisfaites des services.
Ce modèle d’organisation semble prometteur mais le renouvellement du personnel et le désir d’étendre ce modèle à
d’autres cliniques neuromusculaires ont amené l’équipe de
recherche et l’équipe clinique de la CMNMJ à voir la nécessité
de cristalliser les pratiques des IP-MNM de manière systématique. Ce portrait des pratiques est d’autant plus nécessaire
considérant que les pratiques infirmières auprès des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires ne sont pas formalisées tant au niveau de la formation des infirmières que
dans la littérature scientifique. De plus, un constat a été fait
sur le sous-développement du rôle d’infirmières spécialisées
dans le suivi des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires (Hill & Phillips, 2006). Ces mêmes auteurs ont
souligné l’apport potentiel des infirmières spécialisées dans la
coordination des services, la surveillance des complications et
le counselling (Hill & Phillips, 2006). La présente démarche
évaluative a pour objectifs, dans un premier temps,
d’identifier et d’expliciter le rôle de l’IP-MNM au sein de la
Nursing role in
neuromuscular disorders
Abstract
e nursing role in neuromuscular disorders has been
shown as a promising solution in service organization.
However, the role of neuromuscular nurses has scarcely
been addressed in the literature. e present evaluation
process was geared toward defining nursing role in relation
to systematic follow-up of neuromuscular disorders and to
assess its theoretical background.
Key words: neuromuscular disorders, myotonic
dystrophy, nursing role, logic model, health management,
rehabilitation, services
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
CMNMJ et, dans un deuxième temps, de vérifier le fondement théorique des interventions infirmières déployées dans
ce rôle en lien avec la poursuite des objectifs de la CMNMJ.
Méthodologie
L’élaboration d’un modèle logique a été sélectionnée comme
démarche évaluative. Cette démarche vise à définir l’ensemble
des postulats sur la manière dont un programme est relié aux
bénéfices qu’il est supposé produire, et les stratégies qu’il a
utilisées pour atteindre les objectifs visés (Rossi, Mark, &
Freeman, 2004). Il s’agit d’une étape préalable au questionnement évaluatif global (évaluation des effets, économique,
etc.) (Contandriopoulos, Champagne, Denis, & Avargues,
2000). La première étape consiste à déterminer le modèle
logique permettant de définir de manière systématique le rôle
de l’IP-MNM. La deuxième étape est l’analyse logique des
interventions de l’IP-MNM. Cette analyse permettra
d’explorer de façon théorique, à l’aide d’une recension des
écrits, comment les services et activités de l’IP-MNM contribuent à l’atteinte des objectifs de la CMNMJ.
2001). La prévalence de cette maladie varie de 2,1 à 14,3 cas
par 100 000 habitants dans le monde, mais atteint 189 cas par
100 000 habitants dans la région du Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean
(SLSJ) au Québec où la CMNMJ se situe (Emery, 1991; Mathieu,
De Braekeleer, & Prevost, 1990). La DM1 est une maladie autosomale dominante causée par une répétition instable des trinucléotides (CTG)n sur le chromosome 19q13.3 (Fu, et al., 1992).
La sévérité de la maladie est globalement corrélée avec le nombre de répétitions CTG sur ce gène et avec l’âge d’apparition des
symptômes (Harley et al., 1993). La DM1 est caractérisée par
des anomalies dans plusieurs systèmes incluant les systèmes
musculaire, respiratoire, cardiaque, endocrinien, oculaire et
nerveux central (Harper, 2001; Ranum & Day, 2004). La dystrophie comprend quatre phénotypes cliniques basés sur l’âge
d’apparition des symptômes (naissance au début de la quarantaine) et le nombre de répétition CTG. De façon classique, les
symptômes deviennent évidents au milieu de l’âge adulte, mais
les premiers signes peuvent être décelables dès la première
décade (Harper, 2001). La DM1 a un impact sur plusieurs
aspects de la vie des personnes qui en sont atteintes incluant : 1)
une espérance de vie réduite avec seulement 12 % des personnes qui dépassent l’âge de 65 ans (de Die-Smulders, et al., 1998;
Mathieu, Allard, Potvin, Prevost, & Begin, 1999); 2) une participation sociale compromise dans plusieurs sphères, car seulement
une faible proportion des personnes atteintes maintiennent une
vie sociale active et satisfaisante (Gagnon, Noreau, Moxley, et
al., 2007; Gagnon, Mathieu, & Noreau, 2007; Natterlund,
Gunnarsson, & Ahlstrom, 2000); et 3) un environnement caractérisé par la pauvreté, l’exclusion sociale et une politique de prise
en charge de la maladie sous-développée (Gagnon, Mathieu, &
Noreau; Gagnon, et al., 2007; Laberge, Veillette, Mathieu, Auclair,
& Perron; Perron, Veillette, & Mathieu, 1989; van Engelen,
Eymard, & Wilcox, 2004; Veillette, Perron, & Mathieu, 1989).
Le profil clinique très variable et le nombre élevé de comorbidités simultanées, caractérisant cette maladie, font de sa prise en
charge un défi continuel (Chouinard, et al., 2009; Gagnon,
Noreau, Moxley et al., 2007; Harper, van Engelen, Eymard, Rogers,
& Wilcox, 2002). Cette clientèle fait partie des populations
nécessitant une approche de réadaptation telle que définie par
Jester et al. (2007), avec une apparition et un déroulement progressif (Booth & Jester, 2007). De plus, cette clientèle répond aux
critères de référence des services spécialisés de réadaptation en
déficience physique car elle présente des incapacités persistantes
et significatives (Jester, 2007). La DM1 s’avère un bon exemple
qui regroupe la majorité des problématiques typiques présentes
au sein des clientèles atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires.
Méthode de collecte de données
Afin de construire le modèle logique et de procéder à l’analyse
logique, la méthode de Rossi (Rossi et al., 2004) a été utilisée.
Cette méthode comprend les étapes suivantes :
1. Analyse de documents non publiés. La programmation de la
CMNMJ ainsi que plusieurs documents administratifs ont été
analysés. Les informations concernant l’approche conceptuelle, les buts et les objectifs ont été extraites et analysées.
2. Recension des écrits scientifiques. Une recension des écrits
a été effectuée en lien avec les interventions infirmières
dans le suivi des maladies neuromusculaires, dans le suivi
des clientèles de réadaptation et comme intervenante pivot.
3. Entrevue avec les détenteurs d’enjeux. Des entrevues semidirigées avec les IP-MNM (actuelles et retraitées; n = 5), le
directeur médical et le gestionnaire de la CMNMJ ont été
réalisées. L’analyse de contenu a été effectuée à partir des
transcriptions des entrevues en comparant l’information
obtenue avec celles des documents non publiés et de la
recension des écrits. Les questions des entrevues visaient à
répondre à la question principale suivante : Quel est le rôle
de l’IP-MNM au sein de la CMNMJ?
4. Discussion de groupe et observation participante. Ces deux
étapes ont été réalisées simultanément. L’observation participante consiste à ce qu’un chercheur s’immerge dans la
réalité des participants et prenne part, dans la mesure du
possible, à leurs activités (Loiselle, Profetto-McGrath, Polit,
& Beck, 2007). Cette observation participante a eu lieu lors
des échanges dans le cadre des réunions de programmation
de la CMNMJ (n = 8) qui se sont déroulées avec les membres de l’équipe interdisciplinaire. Cette démarche a permis
de construire le modèle logique avec les intervenants et le
gestionnaire (chef de programme) de la CMNMJ et de
valider les questions reliées à l’analyse logique.
Afin de situer le modèle logique de l’intervention de l’IP-MNM,
une description des principaux enjeux reliés à la prestation de
services en maladies neuromusculaires sera présentée suivie de
l’approche conceptuelle globale appliquée à la CMNMJ. Par la
suite, le modèle logique de l’intervention de l’IP-MNM sera
présenté ainsi que l’analyse logique en découlant.
La dystrophie myotonique de type 1
comme population de démonstration
La présentation des résultats sera illustrée à l’aide de la dystrophie myotonique de type 1 (DM1), la maladie neuromusculaire
la plus fréquente au sein de la CMNMJ et la forme la plus
fréquente de dystrophie musculaire chez l’adulte (Harper,
1. Description des principaux enjeux reliés à la
prestation de services en maladies neuromusculaires
L’élaboration des objectifs de la CMNMJ est issue du constat
que les personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires, dont
la DM1, présentent généralement plusieurs incapacités, une
diminution de leur participation dans les activités courantes et
Résultats
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
23
les rôles sociaux et ainsi qu’une diminution de leur qualité de
vie. Cette situation découle en partie : 1) du processus pathophysiologique de la maladie; 2) d’une absence de prise en charge
systématique, globale et factuelle et; 3) de l’environnement
physique et social de la personne qui peut présenter des obstacles à la pleine réalisation de ses activités. Parmi ces trois causes, le rôle de l’IP-MNM sera abordé principalement dans son
potentiel d’améliorer la prise en charge systématique, globale et
factuelle. Dans la domaine des maladies neuromusculaires, la
prise en charge est à son tour influencée par le constat qu’il
existe : 1) une rareté d’écrits scientifiques ainsi que dans la littérature grise sur les modèles de prise en charge des soins et
services pour les maladies neuromusculaires; 2) une perspective de suivi axée généralement sur les aspects biomédicaux et;
3) une difficulté d’accès aux données probantes. Cette analyse
du problème a permis de définir les objectifs de la CMNMJ qui
seront présentés ci-après.
2. Approche conceptuelle de l’organisation
des services au sein de la CMNMJ
La CMNMJ utilise une approche conceptuelle pour aider à la
planification, l’organisation et la dispensation de l’ensemble des
soins et services pour les clientèles adultes atteintes d’une maladie neuromusculaire. Cette approche a été nommée Gestion
de la Santé et sera brièvement présentée (Figure 1). Elle comprend des services et activités déjà présents à la CMNMJ mais
aussi des éléments à développer. La gestion de la santé est une
intégration du modèle de gestion de la maladie (Disease
Management Association of America, 2005) (Chouinard, et al.,
2009) et de principes reconnus de promotion de la santé
(Nutbeam, 1986; Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, 1986).
Le modèle de gestion de la maladie comprend les composantes
suivantes et a déjà été décrite pour les maladies neuromusculaires par notre équipe (Chouinard, et al., 2009) : 1) Processus
d’identification de la clientèle; 2) Stratification des risques et
interventions adaptées aux besoins; 3) Guide de pratiques clinApproche de gestion de la santé
Principes de promotion de la santé
co A
mm cti
u n on
au
t ai
re
Gestion de la maladie
Autogestion
Pratique
collaborative
Communication/
rétroaction
s
nt
me t
e
n n
on rta
v ir p o
En su p
Guide
Identification
de pratique de la clientèle
Mesure des clinique
résultats et Technologie Stratification
des risques
processus
Po
Infirmière-pivot
en
l
de itiqu
ion
maladie neuromusculaire
tat ces
san es
n
ie r v i
té
r
o
Ré es se
Gestion de cas
d
• Accueil
• Orientation et navigation
• Évaluation et surveillance
• Dépistage des besoins
• Enseignement, autogestion
et counselling
• Soutien personne/famille
• Dépistage de la détresse
psychologique et techniques
Services
Équipe
d’intervention psychosociale de base interdisciplinaire
communautaires
• Recherche/Application
des connaissances
Personnes atteintes de DM1 avec un état de santé
et une participation sociale optimaux
Figure 1. Approche de gestion de la santé
24
iques; 4) Pratique collaborative; 5) Éducation des patients à
l’autogestion; 6) Mécanismes de communication/rétroaction;
7) Utilisation appropriée de la technologie; et 8) Mesure des
résultats et des processus (Disease Management Association of
America, 2005; Huber, 2005a). Les principes de promotion de
la santé retenus sont les suivants : 1) Établissement d’une politique publique saine; 2) Création de milieux favorables; 3)
Renforcement de l’action communautaire; 4) Développement
d’aptitudes personnelles (autogestion); et 5) Réorientation des
services de santé (Rootman, et al., 2001). L’établissement d’une
politique publique saine, le renforcement de l’action communautaire et la réorientation des services de santé ne seront pas
discutés dans le présent article car ils interpellent davantage le
rôle des gestionnaires, décideurs et politiciens.
3. Modèle logique de l’intervention infirmière
Le but à long-terme des services offerts à la CMNMJ est
d’optimiser l’état de santé et la participation sociale des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires. Le but du programme de la CMNMJ est d’offrir un suivi de santé
systématique et global suivant une pratique factuelle. Ce but est
réalisé avec la contribution de l’ensemble de l’équipe multidisciplinaire en lien avec ses partenaires mais seulement le rôle de
l’IP-MNM sera abordé dans la présentation des résultats. Afin
de rencontrer ce but, la démarche évaluative a permis de cerner trois grandes hypothèses reliées aux objectifs à court terme
qui orientent l’intervention de l’IP-MNM. Ces trois hypothèses
ont servi de base pour faire l’analyse logique du modèle à savoir
est-ce qu’il est plausible de penser qu’une IP-MNM qui offre
des services 1) selon un modèle d’infirmière-pivot utilisant un
processus de gestion de cas; 2) au sein d’une approche de gestion de la santé; 3) en appliquant des données probantes,
arrivera à offrir un suivi de santé systématique, global et factuel
aux personnes atteintes de DM1 et à leurs proches pour ultimement optimiser leur état de santé et leur participation sociale.
Le modèle logique final sera détaillé premièrement en fonction
des services/fonctions propres à l’IP-MNM qui sont ressortis
clairement lors des entrevues et ont été supportés par la recension des écrits. Deuxièmement, les activités reliées aux différents services de l’IP-MNM seront décrites au sein des
composantes de l’approche de la gestion de la santé. En terminant, les résultats de l’analyse logique seront présentés.
A. Modèle d’organisation des services pour l’IP-MNM
Le modèle d’organisation des services pour l’IP-MNM
s’apparente au concept de nurse-led clinic. Les nurse-led
clinics ont surtout été développées pour supporter les soins
intermédiaires suivant une phase aigue de maladie. Elles sont
souvent aussi le point d’entrée des soins de première et
deuxième lignes (Hatchett, 2005). Des exemples d’application
pour le suivi du diabète, de l’insuffisance rénale, des maladies
pulmonaires obstructives chroniques, des plaies et de
l’incontinence ont été décrits antérieurement (Wong &
Chung, 2006). Ces cliniques font surtout appel à une pratique
infirmière avancée mais l’utilisation du titre et leurs fonctions
sont variables d’une clinique à l’autre (Wong & Chung, 2006).
Les infirmières y travaillent majoritairement de façon
indépendante ou interdépendante (80 %). Suite à la recension
des écrits et au processus de construction du modèle logique,
une variante du nurse-led clinic, basée sur le suivi de l’IPMNM a été élaborée et est présentée ci-après.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
B. Infirmière pivot en maladies neuromusculaires (IP-NMN)
Le choix de l’infirmière comme intervenante pivot a été basé
sur la vision globale de la santé qui fait partie de la profession
d’infirmière détenant une formation universitaire (Comité des
spécialistes, 2000). Le rôle global de l’IP-MNM implique deux
dimensions interreliées soit les pratiques professionnelles et la
coordination des soins et services (Tremblay, 2007). La définition proposée des rôles de l’IP-MNM est en concordance avec
la définition développée par le Ministère de la Santé et des
Services Sociaux du Québec pour le rôle d’infirmière pivot en
oncologie (Tremblay, 2007) mais possède aussi d’autres fonctions particulières. Les services qui pourraient être offerts par
une infirmière dans le cadre des maladies neuromusculaires
ont été brièvement explorés dans quelques articles (Campbell,
et al., 2000; Hill & Phillips, 2006) mais sans l’utilisation d’un
cadre global d’analyse. Par contre, les fonctions définies par
Jester (2007) chez l’infirmière en réadaptation en déficience
physique ont permis d’orienter la discussion et de valider ces
fonctions dans le cadre de la pratique de l’IP-MNM. L’IPMNM offre huit grandes catégories de services au sein de la
CMNMJ de façon autonome ou en collaboration avec l’équipe
multidisciplinaire : 1) Accueil; 2) Évaluation et surveillance de
l’état de santé; gestion des symptômes et prévention des complications secondaires; 3) Dépistage des besoins et références
aux professionnels de la santé ainsi qu’aux services communautaires; 4) Orientation/navigation à l’intérieur du système
de santé et des services sociaux; 5) Enseignement sur la maladie, autogestion et counselling; 6) Soutien à la personne et à
la famille (Jester, 2007; Tremblay, 2007; Wong & Chung,
2006); 7) Dépistage de la détresse psychologique et techniques
d’intervention psychosociale de base (National Institute for
Clinical Excellence, 2004); 8) Recherche/Application des connaissances. Ces services sont offerts à l’intérieur d’un processus de gestion de cas qui est définie comme un processus
collaboratif à travers lequel l’infirmière évalue, planifie,
implante, coordonne et évalue les options et services pour
rencontrer les besoins de santé des personnes par des
échanges d’information et l’accès à des ressources en visant
l’atteinte des meilleurs résultats (Wilson, 2002). La gestion de
cas implique l’accompagnement de la personne par
l’infirmière pivot pour aller chercher les services dont la personne a besoin à l’intérieur d’un réseau de services.
L’infirmière agit comme gestionnaire de cas afin de réaliser les
objectifs établis conjointement par la personne et l’équipe
multidisciplinaire. Le processus de gestion de cas a été ciblé
comme central par les différents intervenants dans l’atteinte
des objectifs de la CMNMJ. Le neurologue, chef médical de la
CMNMJ a décrit le rôle de l’IP-MNM comme étant « le but de
l’intervention [de l’infirmière], c’est de s’occuper de tout. C’est
clair. C’est pas compliqué. Je veux dire faut pas qu’il y ait de
zone non évaluée. »
Une brève présentation de la structure de fonctionnement des
services offerts par l’IP-MNM est présentée ci-après pour
décrire le cadre à l’intérieur duquel s’effectue la prestation de
services à la CMNMJ. La clinique fait partie d’un établissement
spécialisé de réadaptation en déficience physique et possède
une mission de services surspécialisés pour cette clientèle. Suite
aux procédures diagnostiques et à l’évaluation initiale par le
neurologue, le client et sa famille se voient attitrés une IPMNM en fonction de leur territoire de résidence. L’ensemble
des références peut être fait par l’IP-MNM pour les ressources
multidisciplinaires de la CMNMJ. Elle peut ainsi procéder aux
références à l’ensemble des services paramédicaux
(ergothérapeute, physiothérapeute, travailleur social, etc.) et
aux services médicaux (médecin de famille, cardiologue, pneumologue, etc.). Trois IP-MNM offrent les services à la CMNMJ
pour une population totale de plus de 1500 patients. La formation de base nécessaire est un baccalauréat en sciences infirmières. Présentement, deux des IP-MNM de la CMNMJ
poursuivent des études graduées au niveau de la maîtrise en sciences infirmières. Les bureaux des IP-MNM sont au sein même
de la CMNMJ. Au niveau des services connexes, les IP-MNM
bénéficient d’un support clérical dans le cadre de leur pratique.
C. Approche de gestion de la santé et activités de l’IP-MNM
Chacun des éléments de la gestion de la santé sera brièvement
décrit avec une emphase sur les activités de l’IP-MNM au sein
de la CMNMJ pour notre population de démonstration, la
clientèle adulte atteinte de DM1. Ces activités sont incluses
dans les services offerts par l’IP-MNM décrits précédemment
mais pour une meilleure compréhension elles sont intégrées à
l’approche de gestion de la santé.
Processus d’identification de la clientèle : Le processus
d’identification est centralisé à la CMNMJ qui effectue la
majorité des démarches diagnostiques pour l’ensemble des
régions desservies. Les sources de références à la CMNMJ sont
multiples incluant les médecins de première et deuxième ligne
et les conseillères en génétique. Le processus d’identification est
effectué au sein du service accueil et d’orientation/navigation
qui est en partie sous la responsabilité de l’IP-MNM. Son rôle
est de recevoir les demandes de services et procéder à la validation de l’éligibilité, selon les critères établies, faire la gestion de
la liste d’attente et faire le 1er contact avec le patient et sa
famille. Par la suite, son rôle est de soutenir les services de conseil génétique (dispensés par des conseillères en génétique)
après le diagnostic initial. Les activités de l’IP-MNM incluent
de vérifier l’état des connaissances de la personne sur les
mécanismes de transmission du gène de la maladie et
d’informer la personne sur la nécessité d’agir à titre d’agent
d’information pour sa famille. Elle complète aussi le génogramme de la famille. Le rôle des infirmières dans la dispensation de services en génétique est largement discuté au sein de la
profession au Canada. Une large enquête chez les infirmières
canadiennes (n = 975) a démontré que les infirmières considèrent avoir un rôle important dans la dispensation des services
en génétique pour les maladies héréditaires chez l’adulte mais a
aussi indiqué un manque de formation et de confiance dans ce
domaine (Bottorff, et al., 2004). À la CMNMJ, une activité de
formation continue est offerte par les conseillères en génétique
sur une base annuelle pour le maintien des compétences des IPMNM pour les aspects génétiques.
Guide de pratiques cliniques : L’utilisation de guides de pratiques au sein de la CMNMJ est surtout présente dans les services d’évaluation et de surveillance de l’état de santé et de
références aux professionnels de la santé. Suite à l’établissement
du diagnostic, l’évaluation de l’état de santé de la personne par
l’IP-MNM porte sur la condition physique et mentale, le milieu
social, les croyances et les aspirations en regard de sa santé et
son bien-être (Booth & Jester, 2007). Par la suite, elle coordonne
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
25
et participe à l’élaboration d’un plan d’intervention multidisciplinaire. Lors de visites planifiées subséquentes à la CMNMJ ou
à domicile, elle est responsable du dépistage et des références
pour l’ensemble des besoins de la personne et procède à une
évaluation et à des interventions à l’intérieur de son champ de
pratique. Pour faciliter le suivi clinique, les guides de pratiques
cliniques infirmiers sont souvent intégrés dans un plan de soins
intégrés à la CMNMJ. Celui-ci établit la séquence optimale de
planification des interventions pour un problème de santé particulier et inclut des activités interorganisationnelles, des évaluations devant être réalisées et des algorithmes guidant les
décisions à partir des normes de pratique reconnues (Campbell,
Hotchkiss, Bradshaw, & Porteous, 1998; Van Herck, Vanhaecht,
& Sermeus, 2002). À la CMNMJ, l’IP-MNM utilise un guide de
pratique nommé Outil de Gestion Intégré de la Santé (OGIS)
pour la clientèle DM1. De plus, les activités de l’IP-MNM incluent la participation à l’élaboration des guides de pratiques, tel
que l’OGIS, en collaboration avec l’équipe de recherche.
Pratique collaborative. La pratique collaborative est instaurée à
la CMNMJ depuis plus de 25 ans. Elle est centrée sur le patient
et est conçue de manière à promouvoir la participation active
de plusieurs spécialistes médicaux et professionnels du
domaine de la santé. L’IP-MNM est responsable du processus
permettant d’arriver à une pratique collaborative à l’aide principalement de la gestion de cas. Les activités de l’IP-MNM
incluent aussi l’organisation et la participation aux réunions
interdisciplinaires suite à l’évaluation de la personne à la
CMNMJ, une harmonisation des relations interpersonnelles
au sein de l’équipe et la mobilisation des intervenants afin de
répondre aux besoins du patient. Au niveau communautaire et
des autres milieux de santé, l’IP-MNM à l’intérieur de sa fonction liée à l’application des connaissances, s’assure que les
milieux ont l’information nécessaire sur les différentes maladies neuromusculaires.
Éducation des patients à l’autogestion : Les activités reliées à
l’autogestion sont sous la responsabilité de l’IP-MNM.
L’autogestion couvre toutes les activités par lesquelles une personne cherche à améliorer son état de santé, à prévenir la maladie ou sa progression, à interpréter ses symptômes et à
retrouver un état de santé optimal (Dean, 1986) (Lorig &
Holman, 2003). L’autogestion peut notamment couvrir une
vaste gamme d’activités incluant la prise de médication, le sommeil, la gestion du poids, la pratique de l’activité physique,
l’arrêt tabagique, et la gestion du stress. Les activités de l’IPMNM visant à favoriser l’autogestion des patients incluent
l’évaluation des besoins en autogestion et l’éducation individuelle découlant de la situation de la personne. Chez les personnes démontrant des aptitudes ou capacités à un processus
d’autogestion plus complet, l’IP-MNM offre, et organise, et
anime des rencontres d’autogestion de groupe du programme
de Stanford adapté aux personnes atteintes de DM1 et leurs
proches aidants (Lorig & Holman, 2003) en collaboration avec
d’autres professionnels de la CMNMJ.
Mécanismes de communication/rétroaction : La communication est un des points forts qui est ressorti des entrevues qualitatives, où l’IP-MNM est définie comme l’agent de liaison
entre les différents professionnels au sein de la CMNMJ mais
aussi dans les autres milieux tel que les milieux scolaires, les
26
services communautaires et les autres établissements de santé.
Les mécanismes de communication/rétroaction font aussi
appel à la gestion de cas. Les activités de l’IP-MNM consistent
à développer une relation de confiance avec les autres milieux
et à devenir l’interlocuteur privilégié. Suite à la visite d’un
patient, elle s’assure que l’ensemble de l’information est transmis aux partenaires concernés. Elle effectue aux besoins des
relances téléphoniques pour s’assurer du cheminement des
demandes auprès des partenaires. De plus, dans le cas des maladies neuromusculaires qui sont des maladies peu fréquentes,
elle s’assure aussi que les partenaires ont un niveau de connaissance suffisant de la maladie pour bien traiter la demande. Par
la suite, elle effectue un suivi auprès du patient pour s’assurer
que les services ont répondu à son besoin.
Utilisation appropriée de la technologie : La CMNMJ dispose
d’un registre informatique de sa clientèle (Tableau 1). Ce registre permet plusieurs fonctions et est maintenu à jour après
chaque visite (soutien clérical). L’IP-MNN se sert du registre
pour réaliser plusieurs activités. Le registre permet une fonction d’alerte pour certains éléments qui nécessitent un suivi
annuel tel que la vaccination antigrippale ou l’électrocardiogramme. L’identification des membres d’une même
famille sera aussi possible grâce à l’informatisation des arbres
généalogiques en attribuant un numéro commun à l’ensemble
des membres d’une même famille. Il permet aussi de suivre
l’utilisation des services à la CMNMJ.
Tableau 1. Éléments présents
dans le registre de la CMNMJ
Facteurs
personnels
Environnement Services de
la clinique
utilisés
ADN
Année du diagnostic
Début des symptômes
Classe diagnostique
Vaccin
Electrocardiogramme
Bilan métabolique
Dynamométrie
Échelle MIRS
Arbre
généalogique
Services
communautaires
(CLSC)
Neurologie
Ophtalmologie
Médecine
familiale
Cardiologie
Pneumologie
Orthopédie
Physiothérapie
Ergothérapie
Neuropsychologie
Travail social
Nutrition
Mesure des résultats et des processus : Cette partie n’a pas fait
l’objet d’un processus systématique au niveau clinique jusqu’à
maintenant. Cependant, les notions de gouvernance clinique
et de gestion de la qualité ont souligné la nécessité d’instaurer
une telle pratique. Des démarches d’évaluation de différents
indicateurs de résultats potentiellement pertinents aux acteurs
cliniques sont actuellement en cours à la CMNMJ dans le
cadre de différents projets de recherche. Les résultats et
processus évalués peuvent être nombreux mais l’attention sera
portée sur ceux plus spécifiques de la fonction d’IP-MNM.
Jester (2007) propose l’évaluation des éléments suivant : 1)
Satisfaction de la clientèle; 2) Impacts sur la clientèle (Patients
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
outcomes) avec un emphase particulier sur la participation
sociale; 3) Analyse de la nature et du nombre de complications;
4) Impacts économiques du service; 5) Évaluation des temps
d’attente et des patients qui ne se présentent pas; 6)
Appréciation des autres membres de l’équipe interdisciplinaire
sur le service. Le sentiment de compétence des infirmières et
l’analyse des écarts par rapport aux guides de pratiques
cliniques sont aussi envisagés.
Environnement supportant : La prestation de soins et services se fait à l’intérieur d’environnements divers incluant
notamment la CMNMJ, le domicile, le milieu de travail et
l’école. Ces environnements peuvent être supportant ou non
dans l’atteinte d’une participation sociale optimale de la personne. Le rôle des intervenants de la CMNMJ est de rendre
ces environnements supportant pour la personne atteinte de
maladies neuromusculaires. Pour l’IP-MNM, cette composante se situe dans les services de soutien à la famille et aux
proches. Elle comprend la création de milieux qui favorisent
un niveau optimal de participation sociale et ce, dans chacune
des sphères de vie incluant la vie communautaire. La création
se fait aussi dans l’articulation du réseau : trouver les bons
interlocuteurs au sein des différents environnements (CLSC,
famille, etc), faire connaître les services de la CMNMJ et faire
en sorte que les services spécialisés soient moins cloisonnés
(AFM, 2000). Les activités de l’IP-MNM se situent au niveau
du dépistage des besoins reliés à l’environnement de la personne tel que le logement, le soutien social ou les aides techniques. De plus, l’IP-MNM assure une fonction de navigation
au sein du réseau de la santé ce qui implique qu’elle établisse
un lien entre la personne et les ressources. Elle assume aussi
le lien premier entre les acteurs liés au domaine de la santé et
communautaires qui font partie du réseau de la personne
atteinte et agit à titre de vecteur de transmission des connaissances. Elle offre aussi du soutien aux proches aidants. Les
activités reliées à la création d’environnement supportant se
fait dans le respect de la confidentialité du client et avec son
accord. De plus, dans son rôle lié à l’application des connaissances, elle collabore à la création de liens avec les milieux
d’enseignement infirmier et à la formation des différents
milieux de réadaptation.
4. Analyse logique de l’intervention de l’infirmière pivot
L’analyse logique a permis de regarder le lien entre le but de la
programmation de la CMNMJ et les objectifs de l’intervention
de l’IP-MNM. Le but de la CMNMJ est d’offrir un suivi de
santé systématique et global suivant une pratique factuelle et
l’IP-MNM y contribue de par la dispensation des services
précédemment décrits. Ce but est différent des buts recensés
dans les écrits qui soulignent que les nurse-led clinics ont été
introduites pour; 1) supporter les soins intermédiaires en
phase aigue d’une maladie; 2) contenir les coûts de santé; 3)
favoriser l’intégration supérieure du continuum de soins lors
de la phase de réadaptation dans le but de réduire les durées
de séjour (Wong & Chung, 2006). Par contre, il s’apparente à
ceux décrit en cardiologie (Hatchett, 2005) et dans la gestion
de cas pour une clientèle âgée dans la communauté (Sargent,
Pickard, Sheaff, & Boaden, 2007). De manière globale, la
majorité des activités et des services s’établissement sur des
compétences infirmières déjà présentes dans leur curriculum
incluant la promotion de la santé, l’évaluation de l’état de santé
global, l’éducation du client, la coordination des soins, le soutien psychosocial et l’approche familiale (Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers du Québec, 2009) (Association des
infirmières et infirmiers du Canada, 2005). Les entrevues ont
souligné à plusieurs reprises la capacité et la compétence des
infirmières à contribuer à l’atteinte des objectifs de la
CMNMJ. De plus, une analyse des tâches effectuées par les
infirmières dans leur horaire de travail au cours des trois
dernières années a permis d’observer une pratique se répartissant de la façon suivante : 1) Contacts avec les patients en personne ou par téléphone (47 % du temps total); 2) coordination
clinique (environ 12 %); 3) participation aux activités de
recherche (1.5 %); 4) élaboration de plan d’intervention et formation continue (3.3 %).
Analyse des hypothèses
La première hypothèse de l’intervention de l’IP-MNM s’énonce
comme suit : les activités et services basés sur l’approche de gestion de la santé permettront d’offrir un suivi de santé systématique et global suivant une pratique factuelle (but du
programme de la CMNMJ). L’intégration du modèle gestion de
la maladie avec les principes de promotion de la santé est nouvelle à notre connaissance et aucun écrit n’est disponible pour
soutenir cette hypothèse. Par contre, ces perspectives prises
séparément ont démontré des effets positifs (Huber, 2005b;
Stuifbergen, 2006). De plus, le choix du professionnel central
dans la gestion de cas est aussi un facteur contributif à l’atteinte
du but de la CMNMJ. Certains auteurs soulignent que lors de
l’évaluation des interventions de l’infirmière pivot par les
patients, l’approche holistique était un point central de
l’infirmière pivot (Arvidsson, et al., 2006).
La deuxième hypothèse de l’intervention de l’IP-MNM est que
le rôle de gestionnaire de cas assumé par l’IP-MNM permettra
un suivi systématique aux personnes atteintes. Cette
hypothèse est soutenue de plusieurs façons dans les écrits en
général mais aussi permis ceux portant sur les nurse-led clinics. La gestion de cas implique le développement d’une relation
stable avec les patients tout au long de leur suivi à la CMNMJ.
Cette notion est supportée par Arvidsson (2006) dans son
étude qualitative sur une nurse-led clinic en rhumatologie. Un
des concepts clés est nommé « Révision régulière » (Regular
review) et comprend la notion de percevoir une sécurité car on
connaît bien l’infirmière, une notion de régularité et
d’accessibilité (Arvidsson, et al., 2006). Cette notion de révision régulière est présente à la CMNMJ où le concept de visites planifiées est sous la responsabilité de l’IP-MNM. Les trois
IP-MNM répondent aux besoins de cette clientèle. De plus, tel
que souligné par Hatchett (2005), la présence de trois infirmières permet de stabiliser le fonctionnement de la clinique
lors des congés/vacances et autres absences temporaires, et
favorise le partage des expertises. Cette gestion de cas pourrait
aussi répondre aux besoins soulevés dans l’organisation des
services offerts dans les CMNM. Les deux études effectuées en
Angleterre (Hanna, et al., 2007; Hill & Phillips, 2006) soulignaient : 1) la composition variable des équipes interdisciplinaires rendant l’évaluation globale des besoins du patient
incomplète; 2) le manque d’information des intervenants sur
les services disponibles en dehors de ceux reliés à leur CMNM.
Ces auteurs soulignaient encore que les patients sont souvent
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
27
laissés à eux-mêmes pour coordonner leurs soins. À la
CMNMJ, la gestion de cas permet à l’IP-MNM de répondre en
grande partie à ces problématiques. De plus, les nurse-led clinics semblent répondre aux besoins des patients en temps
opportun car ceux qui fréquentent une telle clinique sont plus
satisfaits des services que ceux qui fréquentent une clinique
ambulatoire médicale traditionnelle (Moore, et al., 2002;
Sullivan, Burnett, & Juszczak, 2006). Une des explications possibles soulevée par ces auteurs est la possibilité que les patients
se sentent moins intimidés de contacter l’infirmière pivot que
le médecin entre les visites.
La troisième hypothèse d’intervention de l’IP-MNM est que
l’utilisation d’un plan de soins intégrés augmentera
l’utilisation des données probantes dans le suivi des personnes
atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires. Cette utilisation est
principalement soutenue par l’application de guides de pratiques cliniques dans le suivi des clientèles. Les guides de pratique clinique ont démontré des résultats au niveau de
l’intégration des données probantes au sein de la pratique
infirmière lors du suivi des clientèles (Campbell, et al., 2000;
Thomas, et al., 2000).
Dans un autre milieu en Écosse, un guide de pratique clinique
a déjà été développé pour la clientèle atteinte de DM1, mais ce
guide se limitait à la collecte de données médicales (Campbell,
et al., 2000). Des changements significatifs dans les pratiques
ont néanmoins été observés suite à son introduction incluant
la collecte des données musculaires, sur la myotonie et sur les
risques anesthésiques, ainsi que sur la réalisation de
l’électrocardiogramme. Les infirmières impliquées ont décrit
une augmentation de leur sentiment de compétence et aussi
que le guide de pratique leur donnait de l’assurance pour étendre leur rôle auprès des personnes atteintes.
Conclusion
Cette démarche évaluative a permis de définir les services
offerts par l’IP-MNM au sein de la CMNMJ et de faire une
exploration théorique du lien entre la dispensation de ses
services et l’atteinte de l’objectif de la CMNMJ. Cette première
étape est importante pour aider le développement du rôle des
infirmières au sein des CNMN. À travers une pratique clinique de plus de 25 ans, ces infirmières pivots jouent un rôle
significatif dans la vie des patients et de leur famille. La
prochaine étape est présentement en cours et vise à démontrer les effets des interventions de l’IP-MNM au sein de la
CMNMJ pour la clientèle atteinte de DM1.
Au sujet des auteures
Cynthia Gagnon, erg., PhD. Professeur adjoint à la Faculté de
Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé de l'Université de
Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada. Groupe de recherche
interdisciplinaire sur les maladies neuromusculaires
(GRIMN). Centre de santé et de services sociaux de Jonquière.
Cette recherche a été effectuée dans le cadre de mon stage
post-doctoral au GRIS de l'Université de Montréal avec
l'appui financier des IRSC. Courriel :
[email protected]
Maud-Christine Chouinard, inf., PhD, Groupe de recherche
interdisciplinaire sur les maladies neuromusculaires
(GRIMN), Clinique des maladies neuromusculaires, Centre
de réadaptation en déficience physique de Jonquière, Centre
de santé et de services sociaux de Jonquière, QC,
Département des sciences infirmières, Université du Québec
à Chicoutimi, QC.
Mélissa Lavoie, inf., MSc, Groupe de recherche
interdisciplinaire sur les maladies neuromusculaires
(GRIMN), Clinique des maladies neuromusculaires, Centre
de réadaptation en déficience physique de Jonquière, Centre
de santé et de services sociaux de Jonquière, QC. Candidate
au PhD. Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la santé de
l'Université de Sherbrooke.
François Champagne, PhD, Groupe de recherche
interdisciplinaire en santé, Université de Montréal, QC,
Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, QC.
Références
AFM. (2000). Le métier d’initiateur de Projet d’Insertion.
Arvidsson, S.B., Petersson, A., Nilsson, I., Andersson, B.,
Arvidsson, B.I., Petersson, I.F., et al. (2006). A nurse-led rheumatology
clinic’s impact on empowering patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A
qualitative study. Nurs Health Sci, 8(3), 133–139.
Association des infirmières et infirmiers du Canada. (2000).
Cadre national pour les programmes de maintien de la compétence
chez les infirmières autorisées. Ottawa: Association des infirmières et
infirmiers du Canada.
Booth, S., & Jester, R. (2007). The rehabilitation process. In R.
Jester (Ed.), Advancing practice in rehabilitation nursing (pp. 1–13).
Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.
Bottorff, J.L., McCullum, M., Balneaves, L.G., Esplen, M.J.,
Carroll, J., Kelly, M., et al. (2004). Nursing and genetics. Can Nurse,
100(8), 24–28.
Campbell, H., Bradshaw, N., Davidson, R., Dean, J., Goudie, D.,
Holloway, S., et al. (2000). Evidence based medicine in practice: Lessons
from a Scottish clinical genetics project. J Med Genet, 37(9), 684–691.
28
Campbell, H., Hotchkiss, R., Bradshaw, N., & Porteous, M.
(1998). Integrated care pathways. BMJ, 316(7125), 133–137.
Chouinard, M.C., Gagnon, C., Laberge, L., Tremblay, C., Côté,
C., Leclerc, N., et al. (2009). The potential of disease management for
neuromuscular hereditary disorders. Rehabil Nurs, 34(3), 122–130.
Comité des spécialistes. (2000). Projet de formation infirmière
intégrée. Québec: Comité directeur sur la formation infirmière intégrée.
Contandriopoulos, A.P., Champagne, F., Denis, J.L., &
Avargues, M.C. (2000). L’évaluation dans le domaine de la santé:
concepts et méthodes. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique, 48(6),
517–539.
de Die-Smulders, C.E., Howeler, C.J., Thijs, C., Mirandolle, J.F.,
Anten, H.B., Smeets, H.J., et al. (1998). Age and causes of death in
adult-onset myotonic dystrophy. Brain, 121(Pt. 8), 1557–1563.
Dean, K. (1986). Self-care behaviour: Implications for aging. In
K. Dean, T., Hickey, B.E., Holstein (Eds.), Self-care and health in old
age: Health behaviour implications for policy and Practice (pp.
58–93). London: Croom Helm.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Disease Management Association of America. (2004).
Disease management program evaluation guide. Washington, D.C.:
DMAA.
Donze, C., Delattre, S., Viet, G., & Thevenon, A. (1999).
Enquête auprès d’une population d’adultes atteints de pathologies
neuromusculaires dans le Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Rev Neurol (Paris),
155(12), 1063–1070.
Emery, A.E. (1991). Population frequencies of inherited
neuromuscular diseases: A world survey. Neuromuscul Disord, 1(1),
19–29.
Fu, Y.H., Pizzuti, A., Fenwick, R.G., Jr., King, J., Rajnarayan, S.,
Dunne, P.W., et al. (1992). An unstable triplet repeat in a gene
related to myotonic muscular dystrophy. Science, 255(5049),
1256–1258.
Gagnon, C., Mathieu, J., & Noreau, L. (2007). Life habits in
myotonic dystrophy type 1. J Rehabil Med, 39(7), 560–566.
Gagnon, C., Noreau, L., Moxley, R.T., Laberge, L., Jean, S.,
Richer, L., et al. (2007). Towards an integrative approach to the
management of myotonic dystrophy type 1. J Neurol Neurosurg
Psychiatry, 78(8), 800–806.
Hanna, M.G., Muntoni, F., Reilly, M., Bushby, K., Hilton-Jones,
D., Quinlivan, R., et al. (2007). Building on foundations: e need for
a specialist neuromuscular service across England. London, UK: All
party parliamentary group for muscular dystrophy.
Harley, H.G., Rundle, S.A., MacMillan, J.C., Myring, J., Brook,
J.D., Crow, S., et al. (1993). Size of the unstable CTG repeat sequence
in relation to phenotype and parental transmission in myotonic
dystrophy. Am J Hum Genet, 52(6), 1164–1174.
Harper, P. (2001). Myotonic dystrophy (3rd ed.). London: WB
Saunders.
Harper, P. (2004). Myotonic dystrophy: A multisystemic
disorder. In P. Harper, B. Van Engelen, B. Eymard & D. Wilcox (Eds.),
Myotonic Dystrophy: present management, future therapy (pp. 3–13).
Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Harper, P., van Engelen, B., Eymard, B., & Wilcox, D. (Eds.).
(2004). Myotonic Dystrophy: Present management, future therapy.
New York: Oxford University Press.
Hatchett, R. (2005). Key issues in setting up and running a
nurse-led cardiology clinic. Nurs Stand, 20(14–16), 49–53.
Hill, M.E., & Phillips, M.F. (2006). Service provision for adults
with long-term disability: A review of services for adults with chronic
neuromuscular conditions in the United Kingdom. Neuromuscul
Disord, 16(2), 107–112.
Huber, D. L. (2005). Disease management: A guide for case
managers. Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders.
Jester, R. (2007). The role of the specialist nurse within
rehabilitation. In R. Jester (Ed.), Advancing practice in rehabilitation
nursing (pp. 14–28). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.
Laberge, L., Veillette, S., Mathieu, J., Auclair, J., & Perron, M.
(2007). The correlation of CTG repeat length with material and social
deprivation in myotonic dystrophy. Clin Genet, 71(1), 59–66.
Leprohon, J., Lessard, L.M., & Lévesque-Barbès, H. (2009).
Mosaïque des compétences cliniques de l’infirmière : Compétences
initiales (2e ed.). Westmount, QC: Ordre des infirmières et infirmiers
du Québec.
Loiselle, C.G., Profetto-McGrath, J., Polit, D.F., & Beck, C.T.
(2007). Canadians essentials of nursing research (2nd ed.).
Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Lorig, K.R., & Holman, H. (2003). Self-management education:
History, definition, outcomes, and mechanisms. Ann Behav Med,
26(1), 1–7.
Mathieu, J., Allard, P., Potvin, L., Prévost, C., & Bégin, P.
(1999). A 10-year study of mortality in a cohort of patients with
myotonic dystrophy. Neurology, 52(8), 1658–1662.
Mathieu, J., De Braekeleer, M., & Prévost, C. (1990).
Genealogical reconstruction of myotonic dystrophy in the SaguenayLac-Saint-Jean area (Quebec, Canada). Neurology, 40(5), 839–842.
Moore, S., Corner, J., Haviland, J., Wells, M., Salmon, E.,
Normand, C., et al. (2002). Nurse led follow up and conventional
medical follow up in management of patients with lung cancer:
Randomised trial. BMJ, 325(7373), 1145.
National Institute for Clinical Excellence. (2004). Guidance on
cancer services: Improving supportive and palliative care for adults
with cancer. London: NICE.
Natterlund, B., Gunnarsson, L.-G., & Ahlstrom, G. (2000).
Disability, coping and quality of life in individuals with muscular
dystrophy: A prospective study over five years. Disabil Rehabil
22(17), 776–785.
Nutbeam, D. (1986). Health promotion glossary. Health
Promot, 1(1), 113–127.
Perron, M., Veillette, S., & Mathieu, J. (1989). La dystrophie
myotonique: I. Caractéristiques socio-économiques et résidentielles
des malades. Can J Neurol Sci, 16(1), 109–113.
Ranum, L.P., & Day, J.W. (2004). Myotonic dystrophy: RNA
pathogenesis comes into focus. Am J Hum Genet, 74(5), 793–804.
Rootman, I., Goodstadt, M., Hyndman, B., McQueen, D.V.,
Potvin, L., Jane, S., et al. (Eds.). (2001). Evaluation in health
promotion. Principles and perspectives (Vol. European Series, No.
92). Copenhagen: WHO Regional Publications.
Rossi, P.H., Mark, W.L., & Freeman, H.E. (2004). Expressing
and assessing program theory. In P. H. Rossi, W. L. Mark & H. E.
Freeman (Eds.), Evaluation: A systemic approach (7th ed., pp.
133–168). Thousand Oaks, Ca: SAGE Publications.
Sargent, P., Pickard, S., Sheaff, R., & Boaden, R. (2007). Patient
and carer perceptions of case management for long-term conditions.
Health Soc Care Community, 15(6), 511–519.
Stuifbergen, A.K. (2006). Building health promotion
interventions for persons with chronic disabling conditions. Fam
Community Health, 29(1 Suppl.), 28S–34S.
Sullivan, P.B., Burnett, C.A., & Juszczak, E. (2006). Parent
satisfaction in a nurse led clinic compared with a paediatric
gastroenterology clinic for the management of intractable, functional
constipation. Arch Dis Child, 91(6), 499–501.
Thomas, L.H., Cullum, N.A., McColl, E., Rousseau, N.,
Soutter, J., & Steen, N. (1999). Guidelines in professions allied to
medicine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev(1), CD000349.
Tremblay, D. (2007). La traduction d’une innovation
organisationnelle dans les pratiques professionnelles de réseau:
l’infirmière pivot en oncologie. Montréal: Université de Montréal.
van Engelen, B.G., Eymard, B., & Wilcox, D. (2005). 123rd
ENMC International Workshop: Management and therapy in
myotonic dystrophy, 6–8 February 2004, Naarden, The Netherlands.
Neuromuscul Disord, 15(5), 389–394.
Van Herck, P., Vanhaecht, K., & Sermeus, W. (2004). Effects of
clinical pathway: Do they work? Journal of Integrated Care Pathways,
8(3), 95–105.
Veillette, S., Perron, M., & Mathieu, J. (1989). La dystrophie
myotonique: II Nuptialité, fécondité et transmission. Can J Neurol
Sci, 16(1), 114–118.
Walton, J., Karpati, G., & Hilton-Jones, D. (1994). Disorders of
voluntary muscle. New York: Churchill Livingstone.
Wilson, I. (2002). Case management. In N. Harris (Ed.),
Psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Basingstoke:
Palgrave, Macmillian.
Wong, F.K., & Chung, L.C. (2006). Establishing a definition for
a nurse-led clinic: Structure, process, and outcome. J Adv Nurs, 53(3),
358–369.
World Health Organization. (1986). Ottawa Charter for
Health Promotion. Health Promotion, 1(4), iii–v.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
29
Call for abstracts: CANN Scientific Sessions, June 14–17, 2011
Please note extension of Call for Abstracts for
CANN Scientific Sessions in June 2011
Important new dates:
• January 15, 2011—All abstracts for oral (paper and workshop) presentations must be received.
If the Codman Award, Brain Tumour Foundation Award, or
Medtronic Award is being sought, this must be noted at the
time of abstract submission.
• February 1, 2011—All abstracts for poster presentations
must be received.
• February 15, 2011—All manuscripts/papers submitted
for the Codman Award, Brain Tumour Foundation Award,
or Medtronic Award must be received.
Please consider submitting an abstract for the 42nd
Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Canadian
Association of Neuroscience Nurses.
Call for Abstracts: CANN Scientific
Sessions, June 14-17, 2011
e British Columbia Chapter of CANN invites you to come
and experience the magnificent jewel that is Vancouver.
Situated alongside the majestic Coastal Mountains and the
sparkling Pacific Ocean, Vancouver is endowed with naturally
spectacular scenery. In addition to its scenic advantages,
Vancouver is also a modern metropolis, world renowned for its
diversity. Guests are invited to stay at the Coast Plaza Hotel &
Suites, ideally situated within a few blocks of both English Bay
and Stanley Park. ere are plentiful opportunities nearby for
sightseeing, entertainment, shopping and dining, all guaranteed to make your meeting a truly memorable experience!
We are excited and proud to be hosting the 2011 CANN
Scientific Sessions. We anticipate a challenging and educational scientific program with content for both novice and
expert practitioners, as well as networking opportunities for
neuroscience nurses and our colleagues. Please consider submission of an abstract! The abstract selection process is a
blind review process, reviewed by the scientific committee.
You may submit your abstract in English or French.
Submissions may be in the categories of neuro assessment,
pediatrics, epilepsy, spine, stroke, brain tumours, professional
development or other areas of interest to neuroscience nurses. We are open to the possibilities!
We encourage all presenters to complete written papers of their
presentations and submit them for publication in our peerreviewed, indexed journal. Please bear in mind that our neuroscience nursing journal, Canadian Journal of Neuroscience
Nursing (CJNN), is one of only two such journals in North
America.
The purpose of the scientific sessions is to provide an opportunity
for neuroscience nurses to enhance their knowledge and expertise. We invite nurses and other health care professionals from all
neuroscience areas to contribute to our scientific program.
The abstracts are used to assist:
a) The scientific committee in selecting those papers of the most
value and relevance to our membership and nursing specialty
b) The registrants of the conference in choosing the
papers/sessions they would like to attend.
Requirements for preparing abstracts
1. On a single page, the abstract must, in 200 words or fewer,
describe the central theme of the paper, workshop or poster.
2. Type your name and the title of your poster or presentation
or workshop on the top of the page. The first author should
be the person presenting the paper, workshop or poster.
Submit a second copy of the abstract with the title only. Do
not include any names on this second abstract. A blind
review process is used for abstract selection.
3. Indicate the following on the abstract page:
• Intended level of audience (basic, advanced, or all participants)
• Intended subspecialty (e.g., pediatrics, neurology, neurosurgery, neuro-critical care, etc.)
• Format of your session (plenary, concurrent, workshop or
poster)
4. Send the following via email only:
• Microsoft Word files:
I. One file of the completed abstract with title and author
II. One file of the completed abstract with title only
III.One file with curriculum vitae for each presenter
IV.One file with authors’ information and audiovisual
requirements
V. Your return email address
5. If you wish your abstract to be considered for one of the
awards available, please indicate this with your initial submission. Details of the awards available are at www.cann.ca,
or speak with your local chapter councillor.
Please forward the above to:
Sue Kadyschuk, email: [email protected]
Acknowledgement of receipt of any files or communication will
be sent via email soon after receipt. If you do not receive such
acknowledgement, or if you need to communicate with Sue,
please contact her at:
Scientific Chair—Vancouver 2011
Sue Kadyschuk
12122 220th Street, Maple Ridge, BC V2X 5R5
(H) 604-466-0677; (W) 604-777-8345
Home email: [email protected]
Work email: [email protected]
30
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Important new dates:
• January 15, 2011—All abstracts for oral (paper and workshop) presentations must be received.
If the Codman Award, Brain Tumour Foundation Award, or
Medtronic Award is being sought, this must be noted at the
time of abstract submission.
• February 1, 2011—All abstracts for poster presentations
must be received.
• February 15, 2011—All manuscripts/papers submitted
for the Codman Award, Brain Tumour Foundation Award,
or Medtronic Award must be received.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing has the first
right of refusal for the publication of the Mary Glover,
Codman Award, Brain Tumour Foundation, and Medtronic
Award papers presented at these scientific sessions.
All presenters must register for the conference at least for
the day of their presentation and pay the applicable registration fee.
Guidelines for Brain Tumour
Foundation Award
The Brain Tumour Foundation Award is in honour of Pamela
Del Maestro, RN, BSc, CANN member and a co-founder of
Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada. It will be presented to
the author or authors of a written paper that demonstrates the
achievement of excellence in neuroscience nursing related to
brain tumours. It is expected the money will be used for professional development.
Eligibility
1. At least one of the author(s) is a general/honorary member
of the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses
(CANN) and was a general/honorary member in the preceding year;
2. The author(s) stipulates in writing the intention to seek the
award by the call for abstracts deadline. The deadline is
January 15, 2011;
3. The author(s) is prepared to present the paper at the CANN
Annual Meeting in the year the award is being presented;
4. The paper contains original work by the author(s);
5. The paper may be an adaptation from a previous work by
author(s); this must be stated;
6. The award may not be presented to the same author(s) two
consecutive years;
7. The author(s) may not be the recipient of any other CANN
awards in the same given year;
8. The author(s) must indicate if they have received any
awards from CANN in the past two years. The type of
award and date it was received will be provided to the scientific committee.
Content
1. The paper is approached from a nursing perspective;
2. The paper is relevant to care of patients with brain tumours;
3. The author(s) presents a logical development of ideas based
on scientific evidence;
4. The author(s) demonstrates creativity and originality;
5. The paper has implications for neuroscience nursing practice, education, administration or research;
6. The paper is relevant to current trends in neuroscience
nursing with brain tumour patients;
7. Demonstrates comprehensive knowledge of the topic.
Style
1. The paper is written according to the manuscript guidelines
for publication as established by the Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing.
2. The paper shall not exceed 20 double-spaced typed pages.
Selection
1. The paper is selected by the Scientific Program Committee
through consultation with the editor of CJNN and the scientific liaison.
2. The Scientific Program Committee reserves the right to
withhold the award if no paper meets the specifications;
3. Papers for consideration must be received by the Scientific
Program Committee by February 15, 2011.
Presentation
1. The completed paper and disk must be brought to the June
meeting;
2. The paper will be published in the September 2011 issue of
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing.
Publication
1. The completed paper must be submitted to the editor of
CJNN, or designee (e.g., peer reviewer) at the annual meeting for publication;
2. The monetary portion of the award will be withheld until
publication in CJNN.
Guidelines for the Codman Award
The Codman Award will be presented to the author or authors
of a written paper that demonstrates the achievement of excellence in the area of neuroscience nursing research. It is expected the money will be used for professional development.
Eligibility
1. At least one of the author(s) is a general/honorary member of
the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses (CANN)
and was a general/honorary member in the preceding year;
2. The author(s) stipulates in writing the intention to seek the
award by the call for abstracts deadline. The deadline is
January 15, 2011;
3. The author(s) is prepared to present the paper at the CANN
Annual Meeting in the year the award is being presented;
4. The paper contains original work by the author(s);
5. The paper may be an adaptation from a previous work by
author(s); this must be stated;
6. The award may not be presented to the same author(s) two
consecutive years;
7. The author(s) may not be the recipient of any other CANN
awards in the same given year;
8. The author(s) must indicate if they have received any
awards from CANN in the past two years. The type of
award and date it was received will be provided to the scientific committee.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
31
Content
1. The paper is approached from a nursing perspective;
2. The paper is relevant to current neuroscience nursing;
3. The author(s) presents a logical development of ideas based
on scientific evidence and a comprehensive review of the
literature;
4. The author(s) demonstrates creativity and originality;
5. The paper has implications for neuroscience nursing
practice, education, administration, or research;
6. The paper reflects current trends in nursing;
7. Demonstrates comprehensive knowledge of the topic.
Style
The paper is written according to the manuscript guidelines
for publication as established by the Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing.
Selection
1. The paper is selected by the Scientific Program Committee
through consultation with the editor of CJNN and the
scientific liaison.
2. The Scientific Program Committee reserves the right to
withhold the award if no paper meets the specifications;
3. Papers for consideration must be received by the Scientific
Program Committee by February 15, 2011.
Presentation
1. The completed paper and disk must be brought to the June
meeting;
2. The award is presented to the authors by a representative of
the Codman company;
3. If the paper is co-authored by a non-member, sharing of the
award is left to the discretion of the author(s) who is (are)
members.
Publication
1. The completed paper must be submitted to the editor of
CJNN, or designee (e.g., peer reviewer) at the annual
meeting for publication;
2. The monetary portion of the award will be withheld until
publication in CJNN.
Guidelines for the Medtronic Award
The Medtronic Award will be presented to the author or
authors of a written paper that demonstrates the achievement
of excellence in the area of neuroscience nursing clinical
practice. It is expected that the money will be used for
professional development.
Eligibility
1. At least one of the author(s) is a general/honorary member
of the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses
(CANN) and was a general/honorary member in the
preceding year;
2. The author(s) stipulates in writing the intention to seek the
award by the call for abstracts deadline. The deadline is
January 15, 2011;
32
3. The author(s) is prepared to present the paper a the CANN
Annual Meeting in the year the award is being presented;
4. The paper contains original work by the author(s);
5. The paper may be an adaptation from a previous work by
author(s); this must be stated;
6. The award may not be presented to the same author(s) two
consecutive years;
7. The author(s) may not be the recipient of any other CANN
awards in the same given year;
8. The author(s) must indicate if they have received any
awards from CANN in the past two years. The type of
award and date it was received will be provided to the
scientific committee.
Content
1. The paper is approached from a nursing perspective;
2. The paper is relevant to current neuroscience nursing;
3. The author(s) presents a logical development of ideas based
on scientific evidence and a comprehensive review of the
literature;
4. The author(s) demonstrates creativity and originality;
5. The paper has implications for neuroscience nursing
practice, education, administration, or research;
6. The paper reflects current trends in nursing;
7. Demonstrates comprehensive knowledge of the topic.
Style
The paper is written according to the manuscript guidelines
for publication as established by the Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing.
Selection
1. The paper is selected by the Scientific Program Committee
through consultation with the editor of CJNN and the
scientific liaison.
2. The Scientific Program Committee reserves the right to
withhold the award if no paper meets the specifications;
3. Papers for consideration must be received by the Scientific
Program Committee by February 15, 2011.
Presentation
1. The completed paper and disk must be brought to the June
meeting;
2. The award is presented to the author(s) by a representative
of the Medtronic company;
3. If the paper is co-authored by a non-member, sharing of the
award is left to the discretion of the author(s) who is (are)
members.
Publication
1. The completed paper must be submitted to the editor of
CJNN, or designee (e.g., Peer reviewer) at the annual
meeting for publication;
2. The monetary portion of the award will be withheld until
publication in CJNN.
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
Demande de résumés : Sessions
scientifiques de l’ACIISN : 14–17 juin, 2011
Veuillez considérer soumettre un résumé pour la 42ème réunion annuelle et les sessions
scientifiques de l’Association canadienne des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques
Le Chapitre de l’ACIISN de la Colombie-Britannique vous invite à vivre une magnifique expérience à Vancouver. Située dans
les montagnes de l’ouest canadien et près de l’océan Pacifique,
Vancouver jouit de paysages naturels spectaculaires. En plus
d’avoir une vue magnifique, Vancouver est aussi une métropole
moderne, de renommée mondiale pour sa diversité. Les participants a la conférence sont invités à demeurer à l’hôtel Coast
Plaza Hotel & Suites, situé près des sites touristiques tels que le
Parc Stanley et English Bay. On y trouve une multitude d’attraits
touristiques, du magasinage, des restaurants, enfin, tout ce qu’il
faut pour faire de votre conférence une expérience mémorable.
Nous sommes fiers d’être les hôtes des sessions scientifiques
de 2011. Nous prévoyons un programme scientifique dynamique avec un contenu éducationnel en français et en anglais,
qui conviendra aux novices autant qu’aux experts. Nous espérons avoir l’occasion d’offrir des présentations en français.
Pour ce, nous avons besoin de vos résumés et présentations en
français pour nos membres qui les désirent. Le processus de
sélection des résumés se fait par le comité scientifique. Vous
pouvez soumettre votre résumé en français ou en anglais.
Vous pouvez choisir une des catégories suivantes : l’évaluation
neurologique, la pédiatrie, l’épilepsie, la colonne vertébrale,
l’accident vasculaire cérébral, les tumeurs cérébrales, le développement professionnel ou n’importe quel autre sujet qui se
rapportent aux sciences neurologiques. Nous sommes
ouverts à toutes les possibilités!
Nous vous encourageons à participer. Vous pouvez même
faire publier vos travaux dans notre revue : le Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques. Sachez que ce journal est l’une des deux seules
publications de ce genre en Amérique du nord.
La raison d’être des sessions scientifiques est de donner aux
infirmières l’occasion d’accroître leurs compétences pratiques
et de promouvoir le développement des soins infirmiers en
sciences neurologiques. Nous invitons les infirmières, ainsi
que les autres professionnels de la santé pratiquant cette spécialité, à contribuer à notre programme scientifique.
Les résumés aident :
a) le Comité scientifique à sélectionner des articles appropriés et pertinents pour nos membres tout en procurant
une variété de sujets intéressants;
b) les participants de la conférence à choisir les sessions auxquelles ils veulent participer.
Conditions pour la rédaction des résumés :
1. Le résumé doit être composé d’un maximum de 200 mots
afin de décrire le thème principal de l’article, de l’atelier ou
de l’affiche;
2. Inscrire votre nom et le titre de votre présentation, atelier
ou affiche en haut de la page. Le premier auteur inscrit
devrait être la personne fera la présentation, l’atelier, ou
l’affiche. Également, veuillez envoyer une deuxième copie
de ce résumé avec le titre seulement. N’inscrivez aucun
nom sur ce deuxième exemplaire. Le Comité scientifique
utilise un processus préconisant un choix à l’aveugle pour
la sélection des résumés;
3. Indiquez les éléments suivants suite au texte du résumé :
• L’auditoire visé par l’activité (novice, avancé ou général);
• Sous-groupe (pédiatrie, neurologie, neurochirurgie,
soins critiques, etc.);
• Format préféré (session plénière, simultanée, atelier ou
affiche);
4. Envoyez le document par courriel seulement.
• Fichiers sous le format de Microsoft Word :
i. Un fichier comprenant le résumé proposé avec le titre
et les auteurs participants;
ii. Un fichier comprenant le résumé proposé avec le titre
seulement;
iii. Un fichier comprenant le curriculum vitae de chaque
présentateur;
iv. Un fichier décrivant le besoin d’équipement audiovisuel ou électronique;
v. Votre adresse courriel.
5. Si vous désirez que votre résumé soit considéré pour un
prix, veuillez l’indiquer lors de votre soumission initiale.
Les détails des prix sont disponibles au site : www.cann.ca,
ou veuillez communiquer avec la conseillère du chapitre de
votre région.
Faites parvenir votre demande à :
Sue Kadyschuk, courriel : [email protected]
Un accusé réception des documents reçus vous sera envoyé
par courriel. Si vous n’avez pas reçu de réponse après une
semaine, ou si vous avez besoin de communiquer avec Sue,
veuillez la contacter à :
Présidente scientifique-Vancouver 2011
Sue Kadyschuk
12122 220th Street, Maple Ridge, BC V2X 5R5
(H) 604-466-0677; (W) 604-777-8345
Courriel maison : [email protected]
Courriel travail : [email protected]
Dates importantes à retenir
• 15 janvier, 2011—Tous les résumés de présentations ou
ateliers doivent être reçus. Si vous désirez faire une demande pour le prix Codman, le prix de la Fondation des
tumeurs cérébrales ou le prix Medtronic, veuillez le mentionner dans vote envoi.
• 1er février, 2011—Tous les résumés pour présentations
d’affiche doivent être reçus.
• 15 février, 2011—Tous les articles scientifiques complétés
soumis pour le prix Codman, le prix de la Fondation des
tumeurs cérébrales ou le prix Medtronic doivent être reçus.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
33
Les articles doivent être prêts à être publiés avant que le prix
puisse être accordé. La rédactrice en chef du JCIISN peut
aider avec ce processus si nécessaire.
dans le Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en
sciences neurologiques.
2. L’article ne doit pas excéder 20 pages écrites à double espaces.
Le Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en
sciences neurologiques a le droit de refuser de publier les
articles ayant reçu les prix Mary Glover, Codman ou le prix de
la Fondation des tumeurs cérébrales ou le prix Medtronic.
Choix des gagnants
1. Le travail est choisi par le comité du programme scientifique;
en collaboration avec la rédactrice en chef du Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques.
2. Le Comité du programme scientifique se réserve le droit
de ne pas accorder de prix, si aucun article ou document
soumis ne rencontre les critères de sélection;
2. Les articles doivent être reçus par le Comité du programme scientifique au plus tard, le 15 février 2011.
Tous les présentateurs doivent s’inscrire à la conférence,
au moins pour le jour de leur présentation et payer les
frais d’inscriptions applicables.
Règlements pour le prix de la
Fondation des tumeurs cérébrales
Le prix de la Fondation des tumeurs cérébrales existe en
l’honneur de Pamela Del Maestro, IA, BScN., membre de
l’ACIISN et co-fondatrice de la Fondation canadienne des
tumeurs cérébrales. Il sera présenté à l’auteur ou aux auteurs d’un
travail écrit qui démontre l’atteinte de l’excellence dans le domaine des soins infirmiers en neuro-oncologie. Il est entendu que
l’argent sera utilisé à des fins de développement professionnel.
Admissibilité
1. Au moins un des auteurs est membre de l’Association
canadienne des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN) et était membre l’année précédente;
2. Le ou les auteurs stipulent par écrit leur intention d’appliquer
pour le prix, au plus tard, le 15 janvier, 2011.
3. Le ou les auteurs sont prêts à présenter le travail au
congrès annuel de l’ACIISN;
4. Le travail est un ouvrage original des auteurs;
5. Le travail peut être l’adaptation d’un ouvrage précédent des
auteurs : ceci doit être mentionné;
6. Le prix ne sera pas présenté aux mêmes auteurs deux
années consécutives;
7. Les auteurs ne peuvent pas être récipiendaires d’un autre
prix de l’ACIISN durant la même année.
8. Les auteurs doivent indiquer si des prix ont été reçus de
l’ACIISN depuis les deux dernières années. Le type de prix
et la date auquel il a été reçu seront divulgués au Comité
scientifique.
Contenu
1. Le sujet du travail est traité utilisant une perspective de
soins infirmiers;
2. Le sujet se rapporte aux soins infirmiers divulgués aux
patients avec tumeur cérébrale;
3. Le ou les auteurs présentent un développement d’idées
logiques basé sur des connaissances scientifiques;
4. Le ou les auteurs démontrent de l’originalité et créativité;
5. Le travail a des implications au niveau de la pratique des
soins infirmiers en sciences neurologiques, éducation,
administration ou recherche;
6. Le travail reflète les pratiques courantes en soins infirmiers;
7. Le ou les auteurs démontrent une grande connaissance du
sujet.
Format
1. Le travail est écrit en accord avec les directives établies
pour la rédaction d’un article pour fins de publications
34
Présentation
1. Le travail sous forme écrite et sur disque doit être apporté
au congrès annuel du mois de juin;
2. Le travail sera publié dans le Journal canadien des infirmières
et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques de septembre 2011.
Publication
1. L’article complété doit être remis à la rédactrice en chef du
JCIISN ou à la personne désignée (réviseur), lors de la
réunion annuelle;
2. La portion monétaire du prix sera gardée jusqu’à la publication dans le JCIISN;
Règlements du concours du
prix de la Compagnie Codman
Le prix de la compagnie Codman sera présenté à l’auteur ou
aux auteurs d’un travail écrit qui démontre l’atteinte de
l’excellence dans le domaine des soins infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques. Il est entendu que l’argent sera utilisé à des fins
de développement professionnel.
Admissibilité
1. Au moins un des auteurs est membre de l’Association
canadienne des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN) et était membre l’année précédente;
2. Le ou les auteurs stipulent par écrit, avant le 15 janvier,
2011, leur intention de participer au concours du prix
Codman;
3. Le ou les auteurs sont prêts à présenter le travail lors du
congrès annuel de l’ACIISN;
4. Le travail est un ouvrage original des auteurs;
5. Le travail peut être l’adaptation d’un ouvrage précédent des
auteurs : ceci doit être mentionné;
6. Le prix ne sera pas présenté aux mêmes auteurs deux
années consécutives;
7. Les auteurs ne peuvent pas être récipiendaires d’un autre
prix de l’ACIISN durant la même année.
8. Les auteurs doivent indiquer s’ils ont déjà reçu des prix de
l’ACIISN au cours des deux dernières années. Le type de
prix et la date auquel il a été reçu doivent être divulgués au
comité scientifique.
Contenu
1. Le sujet du travail est traité utilisant une perspective de
soins infirmiers;
2. Le sujet se rapporte aux soins infirmiers courants en
sciences neurologiques;
Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010 • Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing
3. Le ou les auteurs présentent un développement d’idées
logiques basé sur des connaissances scientifiques et une
recension des écrits sur le sujet;
4. Le ou les auteurs démontrent de l’originalité et de la
créativité;
5. Le travail a des implications au niveau de la pratique des
soins infirmiers en sciences neurologiques, en éducation,
en administration ou en recherche;
6. Le travail reflète les pratiques courantes en soins infirmiers;
7. Le ou les auteurs démontrent une grande connaissance du
sujet.
4. Le travail est un ouvrage original des auteurs;
5. Le travail peut être l’adaptation d’un ouvrage précédent des
auteurs; ceci doit être mentionné;
6. Le prix ne sera pas présenté aux mêmes auteurs deux
années consécutives.
7. Les auteurs ne peuvent pas être récipiendaires d’un autre
prix de l’ACIISN durant la même année;
8. Les auteurs doivent indiquer s’ils ont déjà reçu des prix de
l’ACIISN au cours des deux dernières années. Le type de
prix et la date auquel il a été reçu doivent être divulgués au
comité scientifique.
Format
Le travail est écrit en accord avec les directives établies pour
la rédaction d’un article pour fins de publication dans le
Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques.
Contenu
1. Le sujet du travail est traité utilisant une perspective de
soins infirmiers;
2. Le sujet se rapporte aux soins infirmiers en sciences neurologiques;
3. Le ou les auteurs présentent un développement d’idées
logiques basé sur des connaissances scientifiques et sur la
littérature sur le sujet;
4. Le ou les auteurs démontrent de l’originalité et de la
créativité;
5. Le travail a des implications au niveau de la pratique des
soins infirmiers en sciences neurologiques, de l’éducation,
de l’administration et de la recherche;
6. Le travail reflète les pratiques courantes en soins infirmiers;
7. Le ou les auteurs démontrent une grande connaissance du
sujet.
Choix des gagnants
1. Le document est sélectionné par le Comité du programme
scientifique; en collaboration avec la rédactrice en chef du
Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques;
2. Le Comité du programme scientifique se réserve le droit
de ne pas accorder de prix, si aucun article ou document
soumis ne rencontre les critères de sélection;
3. Les articles doivent être reçus par le Comité du programme scientifique au plus tard, le 15 février 2011.
Présentation
1. Le travail sous forme écrite et sur disque doit être apporté
au congrès annuel du mois de juin;
2. Le prix sera présenté aux auteurs par un représentant de la
compagnie Codman;
3. Si un non membre est co-auteur de l’article, la décision du
partage du prix est laissée à la discrétion de l’auteur qui est
membre.
Publication
1. L’article complété doit être soumis à l’éditrice du JCIISN ou
à la personne désignée (réviseur), lors de la réunion
annuelle.
2. La portion monétaire du prix sera gardée jusqu’à la publication dans le JCIISN.
Règlements du concours de
la compagnie Medtronic
Le prix Medtronic sera présenté à l’auteur ou aux auteurs d’un
article qui démontre l’atteinte de l’excellence dans le domaine
des soins infirmiers en sciences neurologiques. L’argent sera
utilisé à des fins de développement professionnel.
Admissibilité
1. Au moins un des auteurs est membre de l’Association
canadienne des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences neurologiques (ACIISN) et était membre l’année précédente;
2. Le ou les auteurs stipulent par écrit leur intention d’appliquer
pour le prix, au plus tard, le 15 janvier, 2011.
3. Le ou les auteurs sont prêts à présenter le travail lors du
congrès annuel de l’ACIISN;
Format
Le travail est écrit en accord avec les directives établies pour
la rédaction d’un article pour fins de publication dans Le
journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques.
Choix des gagnants
1. Le travail est sélectionné par le Comité du programme
scientifique en collaboration avec la rédactrice en chef du
Journal canadien des infirmières et infirmiers en sciences
neurologiques;
2. Le comité du programme scientifique se réserve le droit de
ne pas attribuer le prix si aucun des travaux ne rencontre
les attentes du comité;
3. Tous les participants au concours du prix Medtronic doivent faire parvenir leur travail au Comité du programme
scientifique au plus tard, le 15 février 2011.
Présentation
1. L’auteur doit apporter l’article sous forme de texte et sur
disque au congrès annuel;
2. Le prix est remis aux membres de l’ACIISN par un représentant de la compagnie Medtronic;
3. Si un non membre est co-auteur de l’article, la décision du
partage du prix est laissée à la discrétion de l’auteur qui est
membre.
Publication
1. Le travail sera publié dans: le Journal canadien des infirmiers
et infirmières en sciences neurologiques en septembre 2011.
2. La portion monétaire du prix sera gardée jusqu’à la publication dans le JCIISN.
Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing • Volume 32, Issue 4, 2010
35
Canadian Journal of
Neuroscience Nursing
Le journal canadien des
infirmiers et infirmières en
sciences neurologiques
Manuscript Guidelines
for Publication
Réglements de
publication dans le JCIISN
1. The Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing is a peerreviewed journal.
1. Le Journal canadien des infirmiers et infirmières en
sciences neurologiques est une publication révisée par
ses propres membres.
2. APA is used for both the body of the paper
and the references.
3. Papers must be word processed and submitted in Word
6.0 or WordPerfect format. A hard copy and disk may be
sent by mail or the paper may be submitted by email
attachment to Theresa Green, Editor, 1468 Northmount
Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2L 0G6 or [email protected]
4. All papers received are reviewed for content by peer
reviewers and for format by the editor. This process
usually takes five to eight weeks. Papers may be accepted
as submitted, returned for revisions, or returned with
feedback.
5. Manuscript guidelines
• Maximum length is 6,000 words or 20 pages
• Margins 1”, double-spaced, Times New Roman, 12 pt
font size
• Title page with full title, name, and institutional
affiliation
• Abstract of fewer than 200 words
• Left justified, paragraphs indented 5 spaces
• Headings often include: Introduction, review of the literature (conceptual and data based), research question/
objectives/hypotheses/or clinical concern, methodology and method, analysis/findings, discussion including
specific clinical implications/recommendations, summary/conclusions, and references. (Please note, not all
these headings are needed or may apply to all papers)
• Abbreviations should always be preceded by the full
term. An example would be traumatic brain injury
(TBI)
• Drugs are cited using the generic name in lowercase
letters and brand names in parentheses.
6. For further information, please refer to the American
Psychological Association. (2009). Publication manual
of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.).
Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
2. APA est utilisé pour la rédaction du journal et pour les
références.
3. Les manuscrits doivent être transcrits par traitement de
texte utilisant Word 6.0 ou Word Perfect. Une copie, sur
papier et disquette, peut être envoyée par la poste ou le
manuscrit peut être envoyé par courriel à Theresa Green,
rédactrice en chef, 1468 Northmount Dr. N.W., Calgary,
Alberta T2L 0G6 ou [email protected]
4. Le contenu de tous les manuscrits reçus est révisé par
réviseurs puis adapté pour fins de publication par la
rédactrice en chef. Ce processus nécessite environ 5 à 8
semaines. Les articles pourraient être acceptés tels quels,
retournés pour révision ou retournés accompagnés de
commentaires.
5. Spécifications se rapportant à la rédaction du manuscrit :
• Longueur maximale du manuscrit : 6000 mots ou 20
pages.
• Marges de 1 pouce, double interligne, « Times New
Roman », 12 lettres au pouce
• Page titre avec titre complet, le nom et le lieu d’emploi
de l’auteur
• Un résumé de moins de 200 mots doit être inclu.
• Marge de gauche, laisser 5 espaces pour les nouveaux
paragraphes
• Les entêtes peuvent inclure : introduction, revue de la
litérature, (concept et données), but de la recherche,
objectifs, hypothèses, aspect clinique, méthodologie et
méthodes, analyses et résultats, discussions avec
implications d’ordre clinique, recommendations, résumé
et conclusion, références. Veuillez prendre note que
toutes ces entêtes ne s’appliquent pas nécessairement à
tous les manuscrits présentés au comité
• Les abréviations doivent toujours être précédées du
terme complet, par exemple : Accident cérébrovasculaire
(ACV)
• Les médicaments sont nommés utilisant le terme
générique écrit en lettres minuscules et le nom
commercial écrit entre parenthèses.
6. Pour de plus amples informations, veuillez consulter la
publication suivante : The American Psychological
Association. (2009) Publication Manual of the American
Psychological Association (6e éd.) Washington, DC.

Documents pareils

Volume 35, Issue 1, 2013 In This Issue

Volume 35, Issue 1, 2013 In This Issue journal providing insight and advancement of knowledge in the field of neuroscience nursing. Manuscripts submitted to CJNN can relate to all aspects of neurological nursing care: acute and chronic ...

Plus en détail

Volume 37, Issue 1, 2015 In This Issue

Volume 37, Issue 1, 2015 In This Issue Mission statement The Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses (CANN) sets standards of practice and promotes continuing professional education and research. Members collaborate with individuals...

Plus en détail